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The Ubyssey Mar 7, 1967

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THE UBYSSEY
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Vol.  XLVII,  No.  54
VANCOUVER,   B.C.,   TUESDAY,   MARCH   7,   1967
-.esss*-18
224-391 i
— powell hargrave photo
PAINTED FLOWERS of the Open House generation, these artistes happened onto something beautifully colorful Saturday.  It was also sticky.
Students form  co-op,
plan campus housing
By NORMAN GIDNEY
A UBC student housing co-op association was formed Thursday with
the idea of obtaining student control
in all aspects of residence living.
The co-op, temporarily chaired by
Norman Dolsen, a pre-architecture
student, was formed at a housing
seminar Thursday in Buchanan.
Thirteen students each paid $1 to
belong to the association. This entitles them to one vote in any decisions
made by the co-op.
The next meeting will organize
more fully the UBC co-op and try to
attract more students interested in
forming a residence co-op.
Robb Watt, president of the Simon
Fraser housing co-op, and Dave Berg,
philosophy professor at SFA and a
memiber of the co-op, spoke about the
practicalities and psychological effects
of co-op living.
"The co-op is not simply to provide
housing," said Berg. "The co-op is
predicated upon the fact that students
are citizens now and have a fundamental role. The university shouldn't
be the parent of the students."
Berg felt co-op living could enable
students to run their own lives.
The campus residence co-operative
association at SFA presently has an
option to buy a mansion in Shaugh-
nessy.
"We could run it economically with
25 students," said Watt.
Watt suggested the residence would
be better for UBC students.
The SFA co-op also plans to buy
two houses in New Westminster for
40 students.
Both Berg and Watt felt it unfair
that the students end up paying for
university residences yet do not own
them.
Their solution was to press for
establishment of a president's committe on housing at SFA consisting
of students and housing consultants.
They now have concrete plans for
a student co-op residence which will
start building in July. The 21 story
high-rise near the base of Burnaby
mountain will accommodate 1,100 students, staff, and faculty of SFA.
Their long-term project is a mountain village built on 24 square blocks
in Burnaby. Designed by Erickson and
Massey, the village will have single
family dwellings, small apartments,
row housing and town houses.
Both Berg and Watt emphasized
the great amount of organization
necessary before results are evident.
Berg said Watt had been "working
15 hours a day" on arrangements to
buy the New Westminster houses.
Mac predicts
student quota
UBC will have to limit enrolment
and planners will have to stop at
working drawings for new buildings
unless new funds are found, warns
UBC   president   John  Macdonald.
Macdonald made the comments
concerning the plight of UBC finances Saturday at a private UBC
Open House luncheon.
"UBC will have to limit enrolment
of graduate, undergraduate, and professional students unless new building funds are found,"  he  said.
"We cannot go beyond working
drawings of new j
buildings because of lack of
funds. No proposed buildings
will be constructed under pre-
s e n t financial
conditions.
''We  already
have reached the
point where ten-       MACDONALD
ders can't be called for an urgently-
needed   biological   sciences   building
Decause we have run out of funds.
"It would be tragic for the university and the province if we had to
limit enrolment, but physical accommodation is the limiting factor and
we are approaching the saturation
point."
Macdonald said the case of undergraduate students was not as serious
because there are outlets in other
universities for them.
He said many departments have
applications from more than 200 students but can only accept 20 to 25
of them.
"The university's five-year development program, ending in 1969, is
also falling behind because of lack
of funds.
"One reason for this is the steep
increase in construction costs and
another is the fact that the three universities' capital fund is $7 million
short of its $28 million objective,"
Macdonald said.
He said this was the first time
since he has been at UBC that the
building program has come to a complete halt.
"UBC is more crowded than when
I came here in 1962 despite considerable construction since then. Also the
number of graduate students has
risen from 750 to 2,000.
"The shortage of funds will not affect graduate enrolment this fall but
UBC is now examining each program
to see if enrolment will have to limited  after that."
BENNETT INFORMED
Macdonald said Monday UBC informed the provincial government
before last Christmas of the funds it
would need to complete the five-year
program.
"We have had no decision from the
government yet. I understand, it is
under study."
Asked if the university planned to
make further appeals to the government for funds, Macdonald said.
"This is a matter of continuing
concern for the board of governors.
Our problem is to find additional
;apital and you can see where the
possible  sources  are."
Meanwhile it has been estimated
in a newspaper report that the provincial government will give UBC
$24.2 million in operating grants this
year.
MACDONALD PUZZLED
Macdonald admitted Monday he
did not understand the method of arriving at the figures that the news
story carried.
The story claims the university got
$12.8 million last year or half this
year's estimated amount for operating grants.
The estimates were calculated in
comparing the financial department's
figures released by the premier's office earlier in the legislature.
The education minister said in
February that Victoria would give
$193 million to Vancouver this year.
Premier Cece Bennett has shown the
money going to Vancouver to be
$164.7 million which includes the
estimated provincial revenue for
UBC.
Since the university is to receive
$4 million as a capital grant, the operating figure would be $24.2 million.
AMS  presses for  yes
AMS council Monday urged
students to vote yes on Wednesday's
referendum proposing an action
program to fight a possible fee increase next term.
The referendum is worded:
"If inadequate provincial operating grants to B.C.'s universities
result in a fee increase for 1967-
68, do you authorize and support
a co-ordinated program by the
universities of B.C., Victoria and
Simon Fraser to take steps to
insure withdrawal of that fee
increase?"
"The board of governors is „con-
sidering the alternative of restricting enrolment rather than raising
fees" said AMS president Peter
Braund.
"I feel that either alternative is
just as bad."
Braund said the purpose of the
referendum is to focus on the issue
of fee increases.
"We want full disclosure of all
the alternatives."
Braund said there must be full
consultation with the board of governors on any decision to either
raise fees or restrict enrolment.
"The important point is to get
as many students as possible to
support the three student councils."
University of Victoria students
voted March 1 on a similar referendum. Of a 40 per cent turnout 75
per cent voted yes.
QUEBEC'S REPLY
See pages 6 & 7 Page 2
THE       UBYSSEY
Tuesday,  March   7,   1967
Tuition fees   punishment
assembly speaker charges
SACRAMENTO (UNS) — California
governor Ronald Reagan "is attempting to
justify tuition as a punishment for student
activities," says California state assembly
speaker Jesse Unruh.
Speaking to the 22nd Annual National
Conference for Higher Education, Unruh
said: "I am implacably opposed to this administration's attempt to impose tuition
through the device of a budget cut and I
resent its efforts to sell this proposal through
an incipiant distrust of higher learning."
Unruh quoted statements by governor
Reagan and lieutenant governor Finch des-
scribing tuition as a disciplinary measure
aimed at "maturing" students involved in
campus demonstrations.
"There are other, thoroughly studied
revenue sources available in California," said
Unruh.
"The withholding of income taxes, for
example, would produce more new revenue
each year than the governor's proposed tuition would produce for many year to come.
"The logic of tuition as a device for weeding out undesirables is contradicted by the
facts. The students who demonstrated recently at Stanford in opposition to vice-president
Humphrey's appearance there, pay a tuition
of $800 per year.
"It is difficult to see just whom tuition
is going to 'discipline', but experience has
shown us who is not likely to be affected —
the determined student agitator," Unruh said.
Commenting on the firing of U of C
president Clark Kerr, Unruh said, "The
suspicion that the university is regarded as
no more than another weapon in the political
arsenal has undermined the prestige of all
California's public education system.
"Other   universities  throughout  the  na-
tion — indeed throughout the world — have
interpreted the dismissal as an intellectually
insensitive threat to academic freedom."
Students  suffer
Edmonton  squeeze
EDMONTON (CUP) — Qualifying stu
dents may be turned away from the University of Alberta in the 1968-69 school year
when an anticipated "space squeeze" will be
felt.
A brief released by U of A last week
said it is impossible to have alternate facilities ready in time to house the several
thousand students who may be involved.
"We expect to feel the squeeze in the
1967-68 academic year when we'll be short
of staff office space and research facilities,"
the brief said.
The brief attributed the squeeze to an
unexpectedly large annual growth rate and
the provincial government's decision to limit
the university to 18,000 students.
Outlined in the brief is a long-range plan
for future enrolment and facilities, and
quotas for each faculty's share of the 18,000.
When the long-range plan was introduced
in 1965, it was expected to meet the university's needs until about 1975, but "it has
now become clear that this will not be so,
and an immediate plan for additional facilities must be made," the brief stated.
But University of Calgary president Dr.
H. S. Armstrong said U of C should be able
to accommodate the overflow students from
Edmonton if the campus' building program
goes ahead on schedule.
~" ..'•■'•^v^uessK'
MOUSER WEEK PROBES CHANGE
*
*
This week is Education
Week.
William Piatt, director of
manpower and educational
research and industrial
development economics at
the Stanford Research Institute will speak on Chance
and Change: learning in
and out of School.
Plat t's lecture is in
Buchanan 106, noon Friday.
He will also participate in
a seminar on decision
theory: a new understanding of the statistical nature
of chance, risk and uncertainty.
It   involves   new   philoso
phical insights into the
means and methods of managements, new concepts for
analysis of systems, and
better planning and scheduling of men, equipment and
materials.
The seminar will be held
at St. Marks college Friday
from 8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Two evening programs
will also be presented today
at 8 p.m. in Totem Park
Russian Night where UBC
professors will show slides
and discuss their recent experiences in Russia.
Freedom in Education will
be  discussed in the Lower
Mall residences Thursday at
8 p.m. with more UBC
professors involved.
PLATT
Fee referendum again
As a last chance to bail out the AMS
financial ship, student council Monday moved to reput a referendum asking for a $3
fee hike.
Treasurer-elect Dave Hoye said the referendum, to be put March 22, must pass or
the AMS will be $13,000 in the hole.
Hoye said that to cut the amount from
the existing program could be distastrous,
but if the referendum failed council will
ask the March 23 general meeting to approve huge slashes in non-discretionary
grants.
The major cut would be from extramural athletics.
If the referendum goes down, council
will ask the meeting to reduce the present
allocation for men's athletics from $4.20
per student to $3.20.
Women's athletics would be cut from 80
cents to 50 cents per student.
This amounts to a reduction in non-discretionary allocations of roughly $20,000
which would be rechannelled to other campus   events.
Both cuts must be approved by the general meeting.
The move to reput the fee vote came
after a long and heated discussion on the
proposal to cut athletics which was originally advanced by a budget-cuts committee
looking for ways to find the missing $13,000.
President Peter Braund expressed disappointment at such a step.
Among other suggestions from the-budget
committee: university clubs committee cut
by $1,000; $1,000 for special events; $1,000
from undergraduate society grants and conference budgets; $3,000 from publications;
$10,00 from quitting the Canadian Union of
Students.
Also Monday, council received a letter
from UBC president John Macdonald refusing students' permission to see a consultant's
report on new residences before it goes to
the board of governors.
Council also appointed committee heads:
high school conference, Susan Berg; world
university service, Dave Zirnheld; CUS,
Stephen Beckow; special events, Gerry
Cannon.
Council deferred appointment of a frosh
orientation committee chairman and academic activities chairman.
— powell hargrave photo
ONE OF THE BETTER displays to be seen at Open  House,
arts 3 guide Linda Campbell caresses tootsies tired from
showing tepid tourists UBC's talents
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Opp. the Army & Navy
LA 1-0751 Tuesday,  March 7,   1967
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 3"
ARTS US...
... FLOORED
Stan chucks formality
The first meeting of the new arts council
was held Thursday — in the middle of the
second floor hall in Buchanan.
Parliamentary procedure was thrown out
and any arts undergraduate in the vicinity
had a chance to speak.
"The idea behind the new method is to
end the secrecy and meetings no one hears
about," explained arts president Stan Persky.
"We want to end the arts exile in Brock,"
he said.
The arts council has asked Dean Healy
for their former office in Buchanan basement.
Persky said if their request is refused
Arts will build a paper mache office under
the stairs in Buchanan basement.
Arts council also is preparing an arts
anti-calendar to be published soon this term.
Questionnaires are being distributed today
among students in 1,100 arts classes.
Persky  stresses  the anti-calendar  is  "a
Draft dodging?
SUPA tells how
TORONTO (CUP) — A handbook for
American draft dodgers, prepared toy a group
of Toronto tmiversity students, is gaining
wide circulation in the United States.
The 12-page pamphlet, published by the
Student Union for Peace Action, details
Canadian immigration procedures and describes life in draft-free Canada for the U.S.
pacifist.
About 5,000 copies of the booklet, Escape
From Freedom, have been distributed, and
one SUPA official estimates nearly 15,000
U.S. students have read it.
An estimated 3,000 Americans have already come to Canada to beat the draft.
There is no extradition treaty between the
two countries covering draft dodgers.
The SUPA pamphlet tells the prospective
draft dodger how to apply for residence in
Canada, the needed documents and what he
will find when he gets here.
It quotes one U.S. draft dodger who has
spent some time in Canada as saying: "It's a
fantastic relief. It's just like having a holiday."
serious thing" and it will be a digest of arts
courses and professors.
"The anti-calendar will probably be given
free to all arts students," said Persky.
Other arts projects planned include a
free book review by arts students and an
arts newspaper.
The paper would have "more depth"
than The Ubyssey said Persky.
CIA financed
under orders'
WASHINGTON, D.C. (CUP) — Senator
Robert F. Kennedy said Tuesday the Central
Intelligence Agency operated under presidential orders when it financed student
trips to foreign conferences.
If it was a mistake, it was one of policy
made in the executive branch and it should
not be blamed on the CIA," he said.
Meanwhile, CIA director Richard Helms
told a secret session of a Senate armed
services subcommittee which supervises the
CIA that the agency is withdrawing financial support from some private organizations it has subsidized.
But subcommittee chairman Richard
Russell refused to identify any of the organizations affected when he made the director's statement public.
Russell said it was impossible to subsidize these groups openly as this would have
cast doubt on the status of any Americans
attending  international  meetings.
"So far as the talk that there's been anything done that impinges on academic freedom or subverts youth — that's hogwash,"
he said.
Helping young Americans attend world
youth meetings thwarted Communist efforts
to take over the forums, he contended.
But because of the uproar over the CIA's
financial connections associations, "it might
be well for the CIA to sever financial connections with a great number of organizations," he said.
STOFF NEW UBYSSEY CHIEF
By DANNY STOFFMAN
Ubyssey Appointments Editor
AMS council Monday ratified the appointment of
fourth year arts student
Danny Stoffman as editor-
in-chief of The Ubyssey for
the year 1967-68.
Stoffman was elected by
the paper's editorial board
in a meeting Friday.
Currently city editor,
Stoffman has been at The
Ubyssey almost four years.
He has spent two summers
as a reporter at the Vancouver Sun.
"The   Ubyssey   will   con-
'.4    t~j    i""'
HELMSMAN STOFFMAN
tinue to serve the best interests of the students —
future students as well as
present," Stoffman said in an
interview.
"Our basic function is to
tell students and the world
what's happening at UBC —
they can' find out anywhere
else,"  he said.
"If a radical student paper
is one that analyzes the educational process and the
structure and operation of
the university — and proposes alternatives — then
The Ubyssey will be radical."
— al harvey photo
"THAT GOLLDURNED APPARITION is back but this time
the face has a body attached," remarks Elsnerd Plaidshurt
to friend Mervin Sigersmoakur. Longbrush activities are
part of physical plant's post-Open House dirty-up
campaign.
Be an IH buddy' recruit;
foreign students need YOU
It's buddy time again at UBC's International House.
The buddy program recruits volunteers to take part in the
annual September reception program for foreign students.
In an interview with The Ubyssey, Mrs. Kay Edwards,
International House program assistant, explained the system.
"When the new student arrives he finds himself placed in
an environment which is totally new to him. The buddy system
helps him get acquainted with the campus," she said.
"Through a series of social outings the new student becomes acquainted with Canadian customs and family life.
"Before the new student leaves his own country, if possible,
he is contacted by a UBC graduate student who is a fellow
countryman returned home," said Mrs. Edwards.
"He is also contacted by mail by his proposed buddy and a
fellow countryman who is at that time studying at UBC."
International House wants as many volunteers as possible
from UBC. More than 300 overseas students are expected to
arrive this fall.
Anyone interested should contact Mrs. Edwards at International House between 9:30 a.m. and 5:30 p.m. or phone
224-4535.
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1 ** u THE UBYSSEY      Progressive hell...   LETTERS
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the university year
by the Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C. Editorial opinions are
the editor's and not of the AMS or the university. Member, Canadian
University Press. Founding member. Pacific Student Press. Authorized
second class mail by Post Office Department, Ottawa, and for payment of
postage in cash.
The Ubyssey publishes Page Friday, a weekly commentary and review.
City editor, 224-3916. Other calls, 224-3242: editor, local 25; photo. Page
Friday, loc. 24; features, sports, loc. 23; advertising, loc. 26. Telex 04-5224.
Winner Canadian  University  Press trophies
for general excellence and editorial cartoons.
MARCH, 7,  1967
Following orders..
American scientists who worked on the first atomic
bomb in the early 40's transmuted an old problem from
an academic sleeper to a contemporary horror by asking, afterwards: "Were we morally correct in using our
skills and knowledge to create an instrument of such
enormous destruction ?"
The problem exists today, and is farther from solution than in 1945. The rigors of acquiring a vast amount
of scientific knowledge is increasingly used to limit the
time a scientist spends in other areas of study, and
today's scientist emerges from university wholly ignorant
of the humanities — but for what he has absorbed
outside the classroom.
Scientist and engineers today are doing themselves
and their fields of study a great disservice by actively
avoiding studying man. The same criticism reversed
applies to the humanities, and the whole problem is
one Canadian educators occasionally talk about but
never do anything.
The question the bomb-makers asked could fairly
be posed to any biologist working with virulent diseases
that might be used militarily, to a physicist studying
lethal radiations, to a scientist finding ways to speed
mutations, or to a chemist studying fuels. And it could
be asked of any number of other scientists working on
a host of purely academic problems — today's theory
must yield tomorrow's applications.
The standard answer, of course, is: "I'm not interested in how the knowledge I uncover is used; the
pursuit of truth is my only concern."
That answer is not good enough any more. It's
not good enough when another man says, "I am part of
the society you are giving this knowledge to, and I am
concerned."
The same killpr faces all the engineers and technicians whose work affects those around them; whether
it be building a dam that will flood a river valley or
constructing a freeway through the centre of a. city
or designing a nuclear warhead delivery system.
The Nuremburg trials and the insane American
position in Vietnam show that the world does not
consider "I was only following orders" an adequate
defense.
The argument that a scientist must study human
affairs to know the ramifications does not imply a
research freeze in any area that might be lethal, but it
does imply an engineering freeze.
That is, when man has the knowledge, and has done
the research necessary to complete a particular project,
a moral judgment must be made, and this moral judgment is not now being considered. It is: "Shall we carry
out this project, knowing the damage that might be
done, or shall we refuse to work on it, remaining sure
that we could do it without actually needing to prove
it."
The same judgment applies to mundane engineering
works — and the engineer must ask: "Can I in good
conscience write a report for my employers claiming
pollution in Buttle Lake is not really so bad, even though
T know the fish are dying, by the millions ?"
Before the humanist caji criticize the engineer for
his work, he must have some understanding of the alternatives open to him, and before the engineer can
continue his project, he must consider the moral
objections.
Today, the university trains neither to do either,
and man suffers for it.
The problem is rooted in a definition of progress.
The engineer says his freeway must be built through the
park in the name of progress. He labels the people
who protest anti-progress and dismisses them.
We submit he must have an understanding of their
objection, gained through studies of man, and must
consider their view. The engineer cannot judge progress
in human terms if all he knows are his own life and his
engineering studies. But he has a moral responsibility
to discern whether his employer's project really is
progress, whatever the hell progress is, which is the
field of the philosopher, whom the engineer all too early
dismisses as irrelevant.
To restate the original problem. Today, society is
increasingly affected by the works of engineers, technicians and scientists responsible only to their employers
and to the foundations which give them grants. They
are not competent to do such work without an understanding of man: his literature, his philosophy, his art
his history.
This university does not provide the necessary interdisciplinary understanding, does not offer programs
including it.
The calendar says one lab science for artsmen, one
English course and one other arts course for sciencemen.
Neither is nearly adequate, but then the present courses
offered are not adequate for the needs of people in the
opposite faculty.
The English scholar doesn't need to know about
cylinders rolling down planes, but a broad course in
communication from the scientific viewpoint would be
tremendous. Similarly, the physicist who cares about
Greek grammar is rare. For him, a reading course in
English literature, or a historical view of political
philosophy.
At no other time in history has the need for communication among disciplines been greater — and never
before has the gap been wider.
Classical ethics
Editor, The Ubyssey:
The article of S. Arthur
Dolsen criticizing the teaching of the classical languages
at this University calls for
come comment.
I am disturbed by the
tone of Dolsen* s article
which seems to raise a
matter of ethics. To illustrate
his opinions he chose to make
scathing remarks about the
content of certain courses in
Latin and Greek and he calibre of student taking them.
Because he found the method
of teaching unpalatable, he
sought to impugn the intellectual capacity of he in-
sructors concerned.
In some circumstances such
criticism of a course might
be offered confidently without reference to any particular person.
In a small department, however, which frequently
assigns the names of particular professsors to specific
courses in the university calendar, this guarantee of anonymity is lost. As a result,
when Dolsen refers to "first
year Greek" or a "senior
Latin course where Roman
satiric poets are read" and
ridicules the quality of the
teaching he has in effect
slandered particular persons
who can easily be identified.
JAMES RUSSELL.
EDITOR: John Kelsey
City      Danny Stoffman
Newt  „ _. Al Birnie
Photo  Powell Hargrave
Page Friday  Claudia Gwinn
Sports   Sue Gransby
Managing  Murray McMillan
Focus  Kris Emmott
Ass't News   Al Donald
Ass't City   Tom Morris
CUP Bert Hill
Clamorously, with objective
verve, these wrote: Dave Cursons,
Val Thom, Norman Gidney, Boni
Lee, Jane Laidlaw, Wes Johnstone, Charlotte Haire, John
Rogers.
Sports scene was seen by Mike
Jessen, Tony Hodge, Pio Uran,
and  Ross Evans.
Pix by Kurt Hilger and Chris
Blake. Tuesday, March 7,   1967
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 5
I should like to take this
opportunity to thank those
who worked so very hard in
making Open House 1967
the success that it was. Behind the activities of Friday
and Saturday lay hours,
days, weeks, and months of
effort — effort that involved
a great part of this campus
— and anyone who attended
Open House can surely attest to the impact of the program   upon  the   visitor.
To try to communicate
what it's like to be here at
UBC is a very difficult task
indeed. Undoubtedly we imperfectly did so toy attempting to relate the intangible
the   learning  experience
— by tangible, audio-visual
methods. But there can be no
doubt but that the community, and we ourselves, are
better for our  attempt.
I'm sure I speak for the
entire organizing committee
when I say that the prodigious effort of those involved
in the many facets of the
program made us immensely proud to be a part of it.
JIM TAYLOR. Chairman
OPEN HOUSE
PICTORIAL
The weekend as scenes through the cameras
of Hargrave and Hilger, Ubyssey photo editors Page  6
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday,  March   7,   1967
JOHN FORD'S
BLOODY INCESTUOUS ELIZABETHAN   REVENGE TRAGEDY
'TIS PITY SHE'S A WHORE
An   M.A.   Thesis   Production
FREDERIC WOOD STUDIO,
March 8-11, 8:30 p.m.
Matinee — March 9 at 12:30 p.m.
Adults $1.00 — Students 75c
Tickets at door or call 288-3880
OfUUfL KoULbSL 1%7SaifA.
THANKS
Jo ^oshifons, (i)ho~ disdpsucL
SPECIAL       EVENTS
presents
March 10-Dr. Jules Henry
March 17-Joan Baez
March 24-Country Joe & The Fish
Alma Mater Society
OFFICIAL NOTICES
POSITIONS AVAILABLE
Applications are now being received for Chairmen of
the following Committees:
Homecoming Committee
Intramurals Committee
Applications are also 'being received for:
College Shop Manager
Student Union Building Chairman
COMMITTEE MEMBERS
Applications are now being received for Committee
members for the following Joint A.M.S.-Administration
Committees:
Academic Symposium Committee
Brock Art Committee
Student Union Building Clients Committee
Winter Sports Centre Management Committee
Food Services Committee
Book Store Committee
Library Committee
Parking and Traffic Committee
Applications for the above positions must include a
letter outlining qualifications, reason for applying,
and, where applicable, a proposed program. Eligibility
forms are available from the A.M.S. Office (S. Brock)
and must be completed by the Registrar's Office before making application.
LETTERS OF APPLICATION AND ELIGIBILITY
FORMS MUST BE RECEIVED BY THE SECRETARY, BOX 54, BROCK HALL BY MARCH 10, 1967.
A.M.S. GENERA! MEETING:
1. No A.M.S. Subsidiary organizations may hold any
function between the hours of 12:00 noon and 3:00
p.m. on March 23, 1967.
2. No A.M.S. Subsidiary organization may advertise in
the form of posters or banners, etc. during the three
(3) days (March 21-23) preceding the General Meet
ing. CO-ORDINATOR OF ACTIVITIES
ASSISTANT CO-ORDINATOR
Applications are now being accepted for the position
of Assistant Co-ordinator for the 1967-68 school term.
A.M.S. eligibility is desirable tout not essential. The
successful candidate must have completed one year
at U.B.C. and must have an uncanny desire for bureaucratic red tape.
Applications should be addressed to: Co-ordinator of
Activities, Brock Hall, U.B.C.
SECOND  CENTURY  WEEK:
How Calgary's rednecks
killed Confederation
and Que., at one blow
By  DANIEL  LaTOUCHE
This week, students from all across Canada are participating in the $250,000 project labelled Second Century Week. It is
now certain that very few Quebec students
will be in attendance and so far no Quebec
student organization has given its support
to the Alberta project.
David Estrin, director and chairman of
the planning committee, in a secret and confidential document entitled Quebec, its students and Second Century Week, tried to
explain, in ten long pages, this unfortunate
situation.
His explanations constitute the greatest
collections of lies and distorted facts I have
ever seen in the Canadian student world.
Consequently I feel obligated to present the
other side of the medal and this publicly
since I do not believe — like Estrin says in
the foreword of his document — that "these
issues . . . are better kept secret until the
conclusion of  the project."
Originally bi-national
The project originated during the summer of 1965 at the University of Alberta.
From the start, the Centennial Commission
insisted on the "Approval and authorization
from the national student bodies — Canadian Union of Students and Union Gen-
erale des Etudiants du Quebec."
It is only eight months later that they
approached the representatives of UGEQ
while CUS officers were informed as early
as September, 1965. It is clear that Estrin
is simply lying when he says it was his
committee's intention to involve "French
Canadian students from Quebec in the planning and executing stages. It had always
been the intention of lo have a Quebec
student as one of the key planning persons."
Instead of contacting the officers of the
national union of students as they should
have done, they chose to visit the local
member unions of UGEQ. Even more, Estrin claims that they received "a favorable
and enthusiastic reaction." On the contrary,
the Quebec reaction was quite cold and it is
only to be able to receive the Centennial
Commission grant that Estrin distorted the
facts in such a way.
Mr. Estrin continues then to say that in
May, 1966: "Two Alberta students flew to
Quebec and New Brunswick for a week of
discussion in French and properly armed
with briefs on the project written in French
. . . the monetary expense to the project
was about   $500."
Translation needed
Let me laugh Their French brief is
nothing else but a two page resume of the
official 21 page brief presented to the English unions. I prefer not to comment on
the quality of the translation, suffice it to
say that we needed the English original to
decipher the French translation.
I am also profoundly disturbed by the
fact that in their great Anglo-Saxon generosity they agreed to have discussions in
French. Three rahs for them — if they
spoke as good French as Estrin did it must
have been quite interesting. As for the $500;
I propose a national subscription to help
pay them back.
On May 9, 1966, they are supposed to
have met with the president of UGEQ and
with   "Mr.   Jean   Archambault,   secretary.
Our talks were very indecisive. There was
never any spoken criticism of the project
as such."
It is incredible First of all, there never
was a secretary-general of UGEQ named
Jean Archambault (I believe I should know,
since I should have sat with him on the same
executive for 12 months). As to the" absence
of criticism he is totally right, but the thing
he forgets to mention is that the project
was so weakly received that nobody bothered to go into detailed criticisms. This reception is quite understandable if you consider that they were asking the French
Canadian students to join in "the celebration of Canada's centennial",, and these celebrations "imply a looking to the future basing perceptions on the gains of the first
century."
Majority English
But what if you believe that this first
century was not so great after all for French
Canadians? Also, Estrin does not mention
the generous offer they were presenting us:
Out of 100 students participating in the
literary seminar, eight would have been
French speaking students from Quebec. The
situation was so ridiculous that there would
have been more English speaking Quebec
delegates than French speaking ones. A
very generous offer indeed.
On the next page the secret report goes
on to say: "Our best hope is that another
attempt would bring different results
if undertaken perhaps in the fall. A change
of personnel will have taken place on the
UGEQ executive and perhaps a change of
heart." A very revealing comment indeed.
Then we come to the really funny part
of the report. Allow me to quote in full.
"For the next occasion at which this
topic arose saw a UGEQ representative Mr.
Daniel Latouche, vice president for international affairs, criticize several aspects of
the program . . . the occasion was the meeting of the Western Regional conference of
CUS in Saskatoon.
Mr. Latouche apparently sort of fell into
Writer Daniel LaTouche this year is a
grad student in political
science at UBC. Three
years ago, while editor
of Universite de Montreal's student newspaper
Le Quartier Latin, LaTouche helped form
L'Union Generate des
Etudiantes de Quebec.
He served the past two
years as international
vice-president of UGEQ.
the conference, in that he had attended the
SIS A seminar just previously in Winnipeg,
and it is certain that UGEQ would not have
paid so as to have representation at the
western regional .... to give M. Latouche
and UGEQ the benefit of the doubt, however, SCW determined to carry negotiations further."
Poor Mr. Estrin, you certainly have a
productive imagination. Allow me to bring
some facts to your memory. Since, if I am
not mistaken, you were not present at this
meeting.
1. My presence, in Saskatoon was to ask Tuesday,  March  7,   1967
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 7
for CUS solidarity in our fight to keep
UGEQ's president out of the hands of the
RCAF.
2. Alberta was one of the only delegations (and certainly the most verbal and
vehement one) to oppose the expression of
their solidarity. While the entire Canadian
student community was joining us in our
fight against the defense department, Alberta stood alone and refused to join the
movement.
We will remember this for a long tiirie.
Labelled 'traitor'
3. You are right when you say that
UGEQ would not have sent an observer if
it had not 'been for the SISA conference in
Winnipeg. In fact, I had to pay for my trip
from Winnipeg to Saskatoon, since the
UGEQ executive was so displeased with
both the project and the Albertan diplomacy that they did not want to have anything to do with it. It is only because I
thought the project could be saved that I
went to Saskatoon. This gave me the privilege of being labelled 'traitor', and 'vendu'
when I came back. If I had just known. But
now I have learned my lesson.
4. A final point: if I remembered well
the Conference did not object, but on the
contrary  supported my criticisms.
Following this, I had two days of conversation in Montreal with Mr. Estrin. There
a compromise was reached:
• The theme of the academic seminar
would be slightly modified to make it more
relevant to the Canadian and Quebec student.
• The athletic section of the program
would remain untouched.
• For the academic and literary seminar
(approximately 150 participants out of
1,100). Quebec would have half the representation (including both English and French
speaking Quebec students), but at the same
time would be responsible for half the expenses. It seemed fair to us that if we had
half the representation we should also pay
half the costs.
It  is  only with these  conditions  that I
could convince UGEQ's executive and board
of directors to  participate  in  a  centennial
v activity.   Mr. Estrin  was supposed  to  give
me an answer the following week.
We waited five weeks for the answer.
Then it came. A 24 page telegram.
Allow me once more to quote from this
UBC, the English, 1
and that week
Second Century Week, which started
Monday is hailed as "The major centennial program for the students of
Canada's universities, colleges and technical institutes".
The project will bring 1,100 students
from across Canada to the University
of Alberta and the University of Calgary "to participate in academic, cultural, and athletic activities."
The $250,000 event is being paid
for by the Centennial commission and
the province of Alberta, as well as CUS,
private industry, the host cities, and
participating universities.
UBC is sending delegates to a
literary seminar, an academic seminar
titled "Canada: 2?" and a drama festival.
UBC athletes will take part in
Olympiac '67, a series of Canadian
Intercollegiate Athletic Union championship events in twelve sports.
There will be a fine arts festival, ".
a student composers competition, debate 5
ing finals, a photography salon, and §j
numerous other events. £|
Organizers state the goals of the £■
week as establishing the necessary dia- ^
logue among the future leaders of J
Canada, and picturing for the rest of j
Canada the activities, thoughts, aspira- -g
tions and potential of her youth. &
No French-Canadian universities S
will take part in the celebration. 1
0UTC   V**
J as 3*o<i
i3S us
telegram that in my eyes is a "chef d'oevre"
of English Canadian arrogance.
"Sympathize with the Quebec organization but . . . are not prepared lo reduce
other representation lo accomplish this. A
commilmenl has been " made lo serve 40
universities oulside Quebec."
No reduction asked
Before continuing let me express my
gratitude for their sympathy. We never asked a reduction of the Canadian representa-
•tion, only an increase in the Quebec one.
As to their commitment, had Mr. Estrin
consulted us as he was supposed to do, before committing himself to the whole world,
this would not have happened.
But let us continue. The rest of the telegram is even more interesting.
"UGEQ first secure and send directly lo
SCW the $3,100 requested from but refused
by the former LeSage government ....
UGEQ is then encouraged lo sponsor any
number of additional delegates by raising
funds (about $250 per additional delegate.)"
"The important points lo make are thai
(a) no olher province or group is being allowed lo send more than three students
and thus puis Quebec into a special category, (b) we are really proposing a very
good financial bargain lo you."
I am beginning to realize that Anglo-
Saxons are really obsessed with money. Mr.
Estrin was proposing that we give him the
money he could not raise (if he had consulted us beforehand he would perhaps have
had better chances) and then as a bonus, we
would be allowed to pay a ransom of $250
for every delegate -we would like to send in
addition.
'Chance of importance
This, in the words of Mr. Estrin was
"A way lo give you whal you wanl. i.e.
give lo UGEQ a chance to be important in
(a) dealing with the government of Quebec;
and   (b)   choosing  the   36   extra   delegates."
Dear Mr. Estrini we really appreciate
this concern of yours to make us feel important.
In the two years during which I was responsible for the international affairs of
UGEQ this episode was probably the saddest and the most revealing one. It shows
beyond any doubt what English speaking
students mean by "a frank co-operation"
with their Quebec "friends". I have personally learned my lesson; UGEQ also, and a
lot of water will flow under the Jacques
Cartier bridge before this is forgotten. You
will have to change this paternalistic attitude if any Canada-Quebec co-operation is
to be expected, but from what we have
learned you are far from  being ready.
Anglo-Saxons are indeed all the same.
A less polite observer would not hesitate to
qualify certain of Estrin's comments as racist; I limit myself to qualify them as childish.
Mr. Bourgault and the separatists are
perhaps correct: a "maudit anglais" will
always stay a "maudit anglais."
I will say no more.
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566 SEYMOUR - 685-2271 Page 8
THE      UBYSSEY
ADVERTISEMENT
Tuesday, March  7,  1967
BREATH OF FRESH AIR
"THIRD REFORMATION"
"We are now in the third tremendous move of the
Holy Spirit during the history of the church", says Ed
Gregory, who speaks this week Tuesday through Thursday
at noon in Bu 202. The Rev. Ed Gregory who spends
most of his time conducting student and clergy seminars
across America and in Britain is in a good position to
give a nearly complete picture of a movement in the
church that he thinks may be as important as the Protestant Reformation four centuries ago.
The Associated Full Gospel
REV. £  GREGORY SAYS:
Students who are sponsoring
Gregory's noon hour series on
"Charismatic Living in the
Twentieth Century" are themselves local representatives of
the larger movement of which
Gregory speaks. He will speak
of the work of the Holy Spirit
among the Episcopalians in
California, the Mennonites in
the Midwest, the Lutherans in
Minnesota and Montana; the
Catholics in Latin America,
the Anglicans in Great Britain and the Commonwealth
countries, the Pentecostals in
East Africa, the Reformed
Church in Holland, and the
Baptists behind the Iron Curtain.
CHARISMATIC RENEWAL
RELEVANT
Says Gregory, "There has
never been a generation of
students as knowledgeable
and concerned with relevance
as the present one, but one of
the major dilemmas of today's
college student is that he does
not know who he is or the
significance of his existence.
... In the midst of this apparent vacuum in the universities,
God is at work revealing to
students   their   place   in   the
scheme of things".
PRAYER MEETINGS
In addition to the noon hour
sessions Tuesday through
Thursday in Bu 202, Ed Gregory will participate in informal prayer meetings at St. Andrew's Chapel each afternoon.
The Full Gospel Students
have also scheduled two off-
campus meetings for students
and clergy in the Board Room
of the Hotel Vancouver, Tuesday and Thursday at 7:30 p.m.
More Ecumenical
More Pentecostal
Something is clearly happening at what have been traditionally regarded as two
polar extremes, the Roman
Catholic Church and the Pentecostal movement. Today the
Roman church is becoming
more evangelical and the Pentecostal movement more ecumenical.
—Dr. John Mackay in
Christianity Today
"Experience Liberating
n
"A new breath of fresh air
is blowing across the world
today. Reports are continually coming in from Europe;
Scandinavia, Germany, Africa,
South America, England, Canada, Australia, the Philippines, China, and Japan." Ed
Gregory comes with news of
this Charasmatic Renewal
throughout the world. He has
travelled extensively as a staff
associate for Inter Varsity
Christian Fellowship, an organizer for the Billy Graham
crusades, and as a member of
a group called African Enterprises. Currently, he is serving with Inter-Church Team
Ministries, a group that directs
its attention to honoring the
ministry of the Holy Spirit
today.
Ed Gregory had his own
dramatic experience with the
Holy Spirit in 1963. At that
time he was ministering to
Faculty and Students at Purdue University. He was convinced through his experience
that only the Holy Spirit
could energize the church, and   Spirit.
give it the power that it lacks.
He found that the new ex-
Ed Gregory of Inter-Church
Team Ministries will be on
campus during the week of
March 7-10 lo discuss the increased interest in the Holy
PAPERBACKS AVAILABLE
Want to be up-to-date on church history? Raise your
Christian education literacy level?
The Full Gospel Students are making available two paperbacks listed below, free of charge to students, and at a nominal
charge to others:
They Speak With Other Tongues by John Sherrill — an
account of the author's scholarly attempt to see what
the tongues movement is all about.
The Cross and the Switchblade by David Wilkerson—this
books deals  with the miraculous cure of drug addiction.
These books may be obtained at the Gregory lecture series
this week in Bu 202 at noon, or through Box 12 in Brock Hall.
perience liberated him so that
he was able to minister, without prejudice, or reservation
to people of all walks of life.
His own life has been touched
by the deepening revelation
of the love of God. Finding
God, he believes, is finding
love.
Rev. Gregory's encounter
with Love, has given him a
definite, compassion which is
directed toward everyone. He
believes that the Holy Spirit
is the instrument that God is
using today to quicken the
church, and to make each
member a truly Christ-centred
person.
The Rev. Ed. Gregory will
be speaking on the "Charasmatic Renewal" in Buchanon
202. Tuesday, Wednesday, and
Thursday.
What If Takes
Christ urged His disciples
to think and witness internationally. 'He had permitted
persecution to disperse them,
but for Peter it still took
hunger, a trance, a voice from
Heaven, a journey and a miraculous movement of the Holy
Spirit to overcome his prejudice and to convince him that
God wanted him to be interested in Gentiles as well as
Jews.
Two feet may ibe adequate
to cross geographic boundaries, but it takes humility,
love . . . and imagination to
cross boundaries of prejudice.
National and racial prejudice
is usually the last citadel to
be surrendered to Christ.
—Editorial in
Missionary Mandate
WHO THE HEAVEN ARE WE?
Coir constitution says we are people interested in presenting
the claims of Christ to the university community.
Our membership list reveals that we, students at U.B.C,
represent a wide range of academic levels in many different
faculties.
Our church attendance shows that we represent more than
five different denominations, and can be properly classed as
a cross-denominational  club.
Our history says that we have sponsored student get-togethers, special speakers, films, etc., for the past four years
at U.B.C.
No matter who the heaven you are, if you want more
information about the Associated Full Gospel Students please
contact us through Box 12, Brock Hall or phone:
President—Rick Bowering (224-9065)
Vice-president—Ken Gaglardi (228-8615)
Chaplain—Bernice Gerard (266-9275)
Rev. ED GREGORY
METHODIST MINISTER
speaks on
CHARISMATIC LIVING
IN THE
TWENTIETH CENTURY
Tues.
- HISTORY
Wed.
- THEOLOGY
Thur.
- PERSONAL EXPERIENCE
Bu 202         Noon
-.'
r -   „;^-", ™'r "t^ r-iVT,iaBPTP7iE!f*iw Tuesday, March 7,   1967
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 9
EVERYTHING?
NOTHING?
Munton fingers AMS
MUNTON
By TOM MORRIS
Ubyssey Ass't. City Editor
Newly-elected AMS first vice-president
Don Munton decided to run for his position
because the AMS constitution allows the
first vice-president to have his fingers in
everything and nothing at the same time.
The role of AMS first vice-president is
not defined and consequently he is the only
central member on the council who has the
potential to be involved in everything.
And Munton, if he works as well as he
talks, will be involved
in everything.
"*I suppose I mainly
act as a liaison between
various committees, the
students and the AMS,"
he says.
"My job is not only
what I make it, but also
what special issues come
up next year."
And what special issues does he think will
come up?
"It will probably be fee increases. We
should have a public supported campaign
ot get British Columbians concerned."
Strikes and marches are somewhat negative. The progressive campaign is seen in
the Back Mac effort."
"No matter what some may think it did
get a little more money for higher education and some public support.
"The idea of an external affairs officer
is also good. I agree with a person being
elected to pressure the government full-
time.
"He could also contact other universities
and see what they are doing to aid university finance and education.
"The government has a choice of changing its policy towards education or suffering
the consequences. At present the B.C. government is not resnonsive to our demands.
"Take Leslie Peterson at the Victoria
march for example. All he said was 'you
think this and I think that and the hell with
you all'.
He splits the role of the AMS into two
parts: the service station role and the outside, public role.
And there is a definite choice between
the two for Munton.
"The service station role includes clubs
and special events. The public role includes
making people conscious of higher education, getting more housing and better financing of expanding facilities.
"Things like open house and homecoming will have to be self-sustaining in the future. An evaluation of all existing programs
will have to take place every year.
"For example if the arts undergraduate
society can't get more people involved who
can participate and pay for their programs,
they should not get an AMS grant.
"I don't think clubs take much from AMS
resources so they aren't a problem when it
comes to financing.
"But the service station aspect of the
AMS takes too much time and money. The
emphasis will have to be put on higher education and housing.
But what is the value of an organization
that involves the participation of less than
300 students?
"The small group that is involved in
AMS council and committees certainly affect many more students than is usually
understood."
"But the real effect comes when the
AMS definitely takes the active, outside,
public role. Higher education and housing
are only two examples of programs pertinent to all students."
What can the AMS do that ad hoc committees cannot do?
"Committees cannot do a job in housing
marches like the AMS does. You have always to start with the essentials of organization and carry the project out with organization in mind."
"The AMS is also more representative
of student opinion than a small group of
activists. They only have one point of view.
In the AMS there are multi-points of view
at work."
But isn't the AMS also slower to take
action and plodding in the action it does
take?
In this way, isn't the AMS safer to have
around so everything is under control rather
the action of activist groups?
"In the sense that the AMS gathers more
points of view and properly considers everything it does, it is safer for it to organize
protests and active campaigns than the activist groups."
IRON CURTAIN?
New York College rebels,
tries course experiment
NEW YORK (UNS) — An experimental
student-run "college within a college" has
started for 75 City College of New York
students here.
The new "seminars for equals" program
will offer such courses as America—What is
it and How to Change it, The History of
String Instruments, Revolutionary Movements in Latin America, The Role of the
American University, New Approaches to
Campus Organization, and The Works of J.
R. Tolkien.
Michael Friedman, one of the student
organizers, said the courses would be free
wheeling discussions, the scope and subject
of which would be determined* by the students.
In most cases, he said, graduate students
or professors will join the classes "after
they have decided which direction they want
to take and then learn together".
"The students will take courses which
will not count toward degrees at the experimental college in addition to their regular
class work, and will meet two or three times
a week at hours arranged at their convenience," said Friedman.
"No teachers will direct the seminars of
equals, but rather as the group moves along,
different people with different knowledge
in those areas will take over."
"No tuition will be charged," said Clifford
Tisser, student government vice-president.
The classes, limited to 15 students, are
a reaction to what many students consider
conservative course offerings, large class
sizes that inhibit discussion, and the formal
student-teacher relationship.
Sheldon Sacks, student government president, said the program tells the College,
"We didn't come here for your stupid
degree — we came here to learn."
Culture cheap
for students
Special events master Brian Plummer has announced a special deal for
UBC students who want to see Italian
piano team Mario and Lydia Confer.
A special student price of 35 cents will
be in effect at their Saturday concert
at the Queen Elizabeth at 2:30 p.m.
Special student rates of $1.50 have
also been announced for jazz singer
Jon Hendricks.
Hendricks, frequent jazz poll winner, is playing at the Shanghai Junk,
442 Main. The club has scheduled a
special student concert for 3 p.m. Saturday.
Pretty flimsy nowadays. However, travel
to the U.S.S.R. and E. Europe is a little
different and we have more experience
than most. Come and see us at least
two months before travelling. New low
21-day fares apply to these destinations.
t HAGEN S
736-5651
Hagaa's Travel Service Ltd. 2996 W. Broadway
BOOK STORE
ANNUAL SALE of
Discontinued Texts
Paperbacks
Stationery
Miscellaneous Items
BEGINS
Tuesday, March 7, 1967
Your car is waiting
in Europe
Lease or purchase
a Renault: either way
you're money in pocket
Step off the boat or plane into a sporty Renault and
drive in Europe like a European. Leasing prices start
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NAME_
ADDRESS-
_TEL:_
CITY_
.PROVINCE,
I . 1 Page 10
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday,  March  7,   1967
CAREER OPPORTUNITIES FOR
1967 Graduates In Mathematics
with  the
Department of Insurance
OTTAWA, TORONTO and MONTREAL
as
ACTUARIAL ASSISTANTS
$6130 - $7725
and
ACTUARIAL SUPERVISORS
$5850 - $7310
Details and application forms available at your University Placement Office
Competition Numbers 67-6400 and 67-6401  refer.
__8^___H^
About Town Hair Stylists
1      4603 W. lOfh Ave.        Call 224-4384
I     Presents             •  SCIENTIFIC BEAUTY METHODS
S                               • EXPERIENCED  STYLISTS
'                                • PROFESSIONAL PRODUCTS
•  REFRESHING  ATMOSPHERE
YEAR ROUND STUDENT RATES
INTER-CITY   TITLE
JV hoopsters triumph
Graduating Students -
A Career In
Elementary School Teaching
There is a great need today for young people with a good education
and professional training to serve as teachers in the elementary schools
of this province and of Canada' generally. Particularly is there a need
for young men who may eventually take administrative positions. Many
students in the non-professional faculties of Arts and Science arrive at
the point of graduation with no definite idea of a future career in mind.
Elementary school teaching may interest you. Currently over 90 graduates
of Arts, Science and other faculties are completing a one-year professional
training course (Programme A3) to prepare themselves for teaching in
elementary schools. The professional Basic Certificate which they will
receive will entitle them to beginning salaries of about $6,000, increasing
annually to a maximum of about $10,000. Opportunities for promotion
and administrative position's are very good for young men. Admission
requirements: a 65 % average in the B.A. or B.Sc. or other Bachelor's
degree or in lieu of this a 65% average in a suitable major. Applicants
for admission to this programme should arrange personal interviews
before September through the office of the Director of the Elementary
Division, Faculty of Education, Room 2515, fifth floor, south wing, Education Building (Phone 228-2141).
F.  HENRY JOHNSON,
Director, Elementary Division,
Faculty of Education.
For the second year in a row the UBC
JV's are the ibest Junior Men's basketball
team in B.C.
They accomplished this toy beating Kerrisdale on Friday night 110-73 to take the
best of five semi-finals in three straight
games.
The JV's will now travel to Saint John,
New Brunswick for the Canadian Jr. Men's
final, March 27-29. Indications are that they
will meet teams from Alberta, Ont. and N.B.
With only one loss this year in 23 league
games, the JV's have continued the winning
habit they acquired last year. It was then
that they won the B.C. championship for
the first time and went on to become the
best junior varsity team in Canada.
This year's squad appears more power
ful and should make an excellent showing.
In last Friday's clincher, the leading man
was Sam Vandermeulen. He was playing a
role to which he is both suited and accustomed. His 32 points in this game gave him an
average of 21.4 per game in this year's playoffs, consisting of six games. He has scored
464 total points this season (a JV record)
and recently was chosen the most valuable
player in the league. Certainly he helped the
JV's to a 27 win and four loss season, including exhibition games.
Other scorers in Friday's game and their
points were: Ed Richmond—16, Bill Ruby—
15, Gordy Hogg—10, Terry MacKay—9,
Derek Sankey—8, Rick Inrig, Dave Marshall,
and Larry Donaldson—6, and Keith Marget-
son—2.
SAM VANDERMEULEN
. . . JV victor
North-Rite "195" passes 23 strict quality and endurance tests before it is finally
packaged and shipped to your dealer.. .that is why we have no hesitation in giving
you a written guarantee for life. Even the ink cartridge is guaranteed to write for
one full year or we send you a replacement free. The new stainless steel ball and
socket eliminate ink leaks on hands, clothing and paper.
Nanth-TiitE
.THE COMPANY THAT MAKES A POINT OF QUALITY.
Washington rugby team
given   a   trying   time
The UBC Thunderbirds lengthened their unbeaten streak
in the Northwest Intercollegiate Rubgy League to seven games
Friday.
They overran a weak side of U of Washington 16-3.
Bill Black led the UBC scoring with two tries and a drop-
kicked convert. The convert fulfilled a "Cassius Clay" like
prediction that Black made before the game: "I'm dangerous
around the sticks — I think I'll try a few 50 yard drops."
Chuck Plester, himself a star of the game was quick to
point out his amazement after the game. "Their average weight
is 16 stone 8, and average height is 12 hands to the withers."
Plester managed to manoeuvre around such a tough opposition as Ernie Koo and Conrad Hitchler (all-north-west coast
American tackles) to score on a spectacular 80 yard run. He
later added another try.
Keith Watson rounded out the scoring with a convert.
In other rugby play last weekend, the Braves lost 18-10
to Rowing Club 1st team. The Braves are representing UBC in
the Lower Mainland 1st Division League.
Also last weekend Tomahawks lost 11-0 to Trojans 1st.
Totems won a crucial victory over Vancouver City College 8-0.
The win leaves Totem solidly ahead in the new inter-collegiate
league.
Swimmers to splash
in championships
The UBC swim team leaves today for Edmonton to compete in the CIAU Championships.
The Birds will be taking back a very powerful quintet
composed of Bill Gillespie, Bob Walker, George Fudge, Phil
Winch and Jim Maddin.
These five, while competing in the qualifying trials held in
Winnipeg, won at least one event each, with their full results
as follows:
200 yd. freestyle — WC record
500 yd. freestyle — WC record
400 yd. IM — WC record
Gillespie
1st
1st
1st
2nd 100 yd. backstroke
200 yd. freestyle
200 yd. ibreaststroke
2nd 500 yd. freestyle
2nd 400 yd. IM
200 yd. butterfly
400 yd. IM
1 metre diving
3 metre diving
The Birds will be swimming against teams from all over
Canada, with their major competition coming from the University of Toronto and McGill University.
Competitors will be trying for best ever performances due
to the fact a team of eight swimmers and divers is toeing chosen
to represent Canada in the World Student Games which are
being held in Tokyo later this year.
Maddin
Winch
Walker
Fudge
4th
1st
1st
3rd
1st
3rd Tuesday, March 7,  1967
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 11
s*f*$®vr
— derrek webb photo
RELAXING GOALIE, Calgary's Don Vosburgh, gets up a little too lat? to stop a UBC shot
which   evades  the   three   Dinosaurs   protecting  the   net.   Glen  Richards   scored.   The
Thunderbirds won 11-2 Saturday.
Hockey Birds wrap up play;
McLean steals scoring lead
By ROSS EVANS
The UBC ice hockey Thunderbirds capped what coach Bob Hindmarch thought
was one of the squad's best seasons, with a
resounding 14-4 victory over the University of Calgary Dinosaurs in the two game,
total goal series last weekend.
The win cinched the John Owen Memorial Trophy for the Birds, for the second
consecutive year since its inception in 1965.
Friday night's win marked the second
time that the Dinos had forced the Birds
into overtime. After one period of play, the
Birds held a 2-1 edge on goals by Al McLean and Miles Desharnais, Roger Smith
replying for Calgary. Play bogged down in
the second, as the Birds were content to
check their opposition into the ice, but
couldn't put the puck behind U of C goalie
Don Vosburgh, who turned in the most outstanding goaltending performance seen at
Thunderbird Arena this season. In the third
stantza, Calgary caught some lift and the
game developed into a wide open, end to
end affair for which college hockey is noted.
At the 16 minute mark, Doug Dayman scored unassisted to knot the score at 2-2.
The action picked up where it had left
off when the overtime period commenced.
The Albertans missed two clear opportunities, in the first minute, but the Birds soon
regained their mastery over the Dinos, and
at the five minute mark, Mickey McDowell
took passes from Jack Moores and Al Mc-
— derrek webb photo
A GLOWING Al McLean receives the John
Owen    Memorial    trophy,    presented    by
Anthony Galloway, marking the clpse of
the ice hockey season at UBC.
Lean   and   drilled  the   winning   goal  past
Vosburgh.
Saturday, the Thunderbirds pasted the
hapless Dinosaurs 11-2, whose goalie finally
gave up the ghost and seemed to evaporate.
Al McLean again paced the squad scoring
three, followed closely by Ron Morris and
Glen Richards with two each. Singles went
to Jack Moores, Mickey McDowell, Kevin
McGladery, and Tom Koretchuk. Fred
Sloan and Ron Dowart potted the lone Calgary goals.
For McLean, his six point weekend secured the WCIAA scoring championship
The stocky, uncannily deceptive and hard-
shooting centre finished the season with 33
points, (22 goals, 11 assists), four more than
Brian Harper of the Alberta Golden Bears.
UBC ended the season in fourth place
in the Western Intercollegiate League, winning six and losing nine. The turning point
in the season came at the Canada Winter
Games, where the Thunderbirds won a silver medal against the toughest competition
in the country.
The Birds did not lose a game for the remainder of the season.
Intramurals
Managers meeting will be held noon
today, rm. 213 of the Memorial gym.
Tennis doubles begin today, noon, in the
Field Houses. Manson — Wightman (Psi U)
vs. Hall — Wilson (Eng). Yacub —Valdai
(phys. ed.) vs Barnhill — Kennedy (Zeta
Psi).
Wrestling weigh-in Friday noon under
the Stadium. Tournament begins March 13
in the Memorial gym.
Standings: Rugby — Fiji (1), Delta Upsilon (2), Phi Delts (3). Soccer — Delta Upsilon <1), Phys. ed. (2), Engineering (3). Curling — Psi Upsilon (1), St. Marks (2), Aln ia
Tau Omega (3).
Basketball tourney
The 22nd Annual B.C. High School
Boys' Basketball Tournament tak<s
place all day and evening March 8-11
in the Memorial gym.
:on   gymnasts
display  winning   style
Like good hosts the UBC gymnasts let the visiting teams
win last weekend.
The event was the Pacific Northwest Collegiate Gymnastic
Championships held at Memorial gym. UBC finished fourth of
the five teams in the finals.
Team point totals of the meet were: U of Washington—
179.80; Eastern Washington U—167.00; Washington State U—
152.75; U of Oregon—141.45; UBC—131.75; and U of Alberta
(Edmonton)—111.50.
Bill Mackie was the only bright light for the UBC squad.
He was fourth all around with a total of 46.40. In his best showing he was second in the floor exercise.
Mike Flansaas of U of Washington took the title with
52.30 points.
Field hockey Jokers stop
laughing; UBC stays first
The UBC field hockey Thunderbirds put the Jokers in
their place, second, in weekend play.
The Birds remained in first place after the 5-2 victory.
Coach Ernie Broome termed it "a tremendous performance".
In other action on the field, the Braves lost 1-0 to Jokers
1.
Track runs South
The UBC track and field team leaves for San Francisco
Wednesday for three days of meets there and in Seattle.
Almost as soon as they arrive the men's team takes on
California State College. At the same time the women's team
goes against Millbrae Lionettes, rated one of the top teams on the
west coast.
Thursday the men meet San Francisco State College and
then leave for Seattle to meet Seattle Pacific College Friday.
Also on Friday, the women will go against the Seattle Falcons.
The three day, three met trip will be hard on UBC as, due
to a small team, many UBC contestants will be forced to go
in unfamiliar events.
Track and field coach, Lionel Pugh said, "We should do
well in the running events on this trip, although we are weak
in the throwing events."
The UBC team relies heavily on runners Don Scott, Dave
Aune and Ron Haddad, high jumper Sam Vandermeulen, and
decathlon star Ron Parker.
Judo men belt in wins
UBC recorded two firsts and three seconds at the judo
tournament hosted by North Van Community Centre Saturday.
In the white to orange belt heavyweight division, UBC's
Al Nazaruk, a white belt, took the top spot, followed by Pete
Brockway who took second in the 176 lb. and under class.
Mike Bennett placed second in the green to blue belt
section.
In the heavyweight class, Paul Musgrove was number one,
followed by Mike Marshall. Musgrove, a brown belt, has had
his nomination for black belt accepted by the B.C. Black Belt
Association.
Doug Maclean reached the semi-finals of the middle-weights.
Although losing, John Micholski, Dan Barbour, and Neil Crouch
also fought well.
The next big meet takes place at Steveston Secondary
school, Saturday.
Soccer game scoreless
All the stars were on defense last Saturday when the UBC
soccer Thunderbirds played North Shore to a 0-0 tie.
Soccer coach, Joe Johnson said, "It was a bad game as far
as the Birds' offensive playing was concerned — that's why we
didn't win."
The tie gave one point to each team and therefore still
has them in a third place deadlock although UBC has a game
in hand.
In their next game, the Birds meet fourth-place Fire Fighters
2 p.m. Saturday at Callister Park.
Better news comes from the Inter-city Junior Soccer League
where the UBC Tomahawks came from behind to beat league
leading Westminster Royals 2-1. Bruce Ballam tied the game
early in the second half with a penalty kick and Myron Rozu-
miak scored the winner with 15 minutes to go.
Edmonton end Calgary - March 6-11 - UK
basketball - swimming - wrestling
batt - gymnastics - skimg (Banff) Page 12
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, March 7,  1967
7WEEN CLASSES
Bonner economizes
ECONOMICS  SOC
Attorney general Robert
Bonner discusses economic
continentalism and its implications to B.C., tonight, 8
p.m., Ang. 104.
FRONTIER   COLLEGE
Film  on Frontier  college,
today, noon, Bu. 106.
SCM
Luther  Crockett  discusses
trinity,  doctrine  vs. dogma,
today, noon, Bu. 102.
SUS
All candidates meeting today, noon, Henn.  201.
DEBATING UNION
Meeting to discuss elections and constitutional revisions, today, noon, Bu. 222.
PSYCH  CLUB
Dr. Albert speaks on brain
mechanisms    and    chemical
factors,    Wednesday,    noon,
Ang. 207.
ALLIANCE   FRANCAISE
Election meeting, Wednesday, noon, Bu. 1221.
CHORAL SOC
Practice,    Wednesday,     6
p.m., Bu. 104.
PRE DENTAL SOC
Elections and speaker,
Wednesday, noon, Bu. 204.
VIETNAM COMMITTEE
Prof. Willmott discusses
the politics of escalation,
Wednesday, noon, Bu. 102.
PRE MED
Elections   Wednesday,
noon,  Wes.   201.   Tickets   to
Slipped   Discotheque   available.
ONTOLOGY
Discussion of expanding
consciousness,      Wednesday,
noon, Bu. 223.
PHRATERES
Fashion show of new and
original styling from Pepy's
boutiques, Wednesday, noon,
Bu.  ground floor.
PRE LIBRAIANSHIP
Election   meeting Wednesday, noon, Bu. 225.
GAMMA DELTA
Discussion of a search for
BLUE GARDNERS PICK POLITICOS
Elected 1968-68 agriculture president is Gene Zabawa, ag.
2. Alan Watson is treasurer; Merrilee Fahrni, secretary; Roma
Rees, first vice-president, and Dave Parsons, second vice-
president.
The remainder of the council will be chosen at a general
meeting to be held this week.
STUDENTS SIGN TO SWEAT SUMMERLY
AU students who want summer employment through the
UBC placement office can present their eager little grimy hands
at the auditorium this week.
Group registration will start at noon. All men and women,
from all years and faculties will be registered.
If you don't sign-up now, the next date for the first step to
your summer fortune will be April 1.
S
You can't
beat
the taste
of Player's
filters.
meaning in a lost society,
Wednesday, noon, Ang. 204.
ACE
First  year  teacher  panel,
Wednesday,   noon,   ed.   204.
Non-members  of ten cents.
CAMPUS LIFE
Josh McDowell speaks on
signs of the times, Thursday,
9:01 p.m., education auditorium.
SPORTS CAR CLUB
Tinsnip    rally,   Thursday,
Thursday,   noon,   top   of   C-
lot. City map advisable.
GUEST LECTURER
Prof. Christain Bay discusses civil disobenience and
democratic theory, Thursday, noon, Ang.  110.
"THE"   PLACE
to meet
your friends
is at the
The Diner
4556 W. 10th Ave.
Try  our  delicious  T-bone
Steak $1.35
Ifs Really Good!
Full course meals
within your income
Student Meal Tickets
Available
THE ORIGINAL
A£S£AT9AOAT
Born on the South African
Veldt, now worn around the
world . . . unique construction
.. extreme flexibility and lightness ... . rugged, smart.
Come in for a fitting.
You'll "swear by" them.
$16.95
Made in England,
brushed leather,
land color.
(genuine plant*,
tion crepe soles)
OF ENGLAND
Kerrisdale
Bootery
2182 W. 41 St.      261-7137
Rear Entrance from
New Parking lot.
HAS BEEN HARANGUES
METROPOLIS (UNS) — A
crusty, bearded newspaper editor today called for increased
investigation into reports of
numerous red and blue flying
objects in this eastern city. "It's
anti-dialectic," he cried.
CLASSIFIED
Rates: 3 lines, 1 day, $.75—3 days, $2.00. Larger Ads on request
Non-Commercial Classified Ads are payable in Advance
Classified Ads not accepted by telephone
Publications Office: Brock Hall.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Lost 8c Found
11
LOST       BROWN WALLET       IN
vicnlty   of   War Memorial   Gym.
valuable     papers contact     John
224-3488. 	
LOST — PAIR MEN'S GLASSES
heavy brown W[Ood-like frames
(Roberto) Please contact Dept.
of  Metallurgy.
BRIEFCASE LOST IN BI BUILD-
ing Thursday, call 596-6826 or
return  to   Zoology   Office.
LOST at PAINT-IN SAT. SMALL
clutch purse containing red wallet & keycase, & AMS card.
Please return to AMS office, reward. 	
LOST FEB. 24—LADIES' BLACK
framed glasses. Urgently needed,
228-8763.
LOST—BROWN LEATHER CASE
outside Microb. 104. Please return
case or at least notes to Gopaul,
6560   N.W.   Marine  Drive.
WOULD THE PERSON WHO
took the brown tote bag from
lower mall please return the
music books, they have little
value but are hard to  replace.
WOULD THE PERSON WHO
took John Grant's briefcase please
at least return glasses to lost
and   found.
Coming Dances
12A
PRE MED "THE SLIPPED-DISC-
o-Theque" with the "Organization"—March 11 at the Canyon
Gardens — Tickets AMS. Non-
members   welcome.
WIRED  FOR   SOUND?
If so, plug In and get turned on
to the electrifying sound of the
Shockers this Sat. nite in Brock
Hall,    9:30-12:00,    $l,25/person.
WHAT   !
THREE  BANDS   ?   !
TUP.
1. THE    SHANTELLES
2. THE   STAGS
3. THE   PAINTED   SHIP
ARMOURIES,   MARCH   10th,   9-1.
I'm  going!  Me too!  So  are  Mary,
Jean,   Linda,   Nancy,   Joyce,   Sue,
Bill, John, Jerry, Bob and George.
Hey,  why don't you come too?
Special Notices
13
WHY PAY HIGH AUTO INSUR-
ance rates? If you are over 20 and
have a good driving history you
qualify for our good driving rates.
Phone Ted Elliott 224-6707.	
THE CAMPUS SHOPPE (in the
Village) 5732 University Blvd.
228-8110 announces new store
hours. Tues. to Sat. 9 a.m. - 5:30
p.m., closing Mondays, commencing March 6th. Sale continues on
dresses, skirts, sweaters, etc. We
carry top brand names, "Dalkeith", "Panther Pants", "Shirt
Tales", "Shamrock", "Kayser",
etc.
ESCORTS UNLIMITED: OUR
unique service can provide a perfectly trained gentleman for any
and all social functions. Further
information,   1157   Steveston   Hwy.
GEM-ROCK CRAFTS — 3121 WEST
Broadway, 731-1721. Stop here for
your gifts! Jade and other Jewelry.   $1   up.
REWARD FOR INFORMATION ON
who the idot was that struck a
black '64 Sprite in B-Lot Feb. 28,
Phone   433-1896.
Transportation
14
RIDE WANTED 16th CAMBIE
area. Mon.-Fri., 8:30 classes,
phone   Liz,   TR  6-5681.
Travel Opportunities
16
EXPO CHARTER MAY 6-14; FOR
information ph. 224-6734; Information booth outside Bookstore,
noons,   Mondays   and   Fridays.
AUTOMOTIVE   fc  MARINE
Automobiles For Sale
21
1962    SPRITE    MARK    II,    $995.00.
261-6042.
TR3  '62.   HARD AND  SOFT TOPS.
731-0161,   evenings.
MUST SELL 1957 MORRIS GOOD
cond. Phone Rick 684-6830, evenings;	
1957 PLYMOUTH, 2 - TONE, 4
door, automatic, R. and H. good
running condition. Must sell. Can
be seen on campus. Ph. 876-6963
btwn. 5:30-7:00 p.m. or see Danny
in  Radsoc  at  noon.
V.W. NEW TIRES & BATTERY,
radio, good upholst., mech. excel.,
$250.    CA.   4-0196.	
1931 DESOTO 3 WINDOW COUPE
6 cylinder stock running condition,
phone   261-8656,   after   5   p.m.	
CONVERTIBLE — 58 HILLMAN,
new clutch, tires, radio, good
transportation, $150, phone Rob
AM.   6-8018.
Accessories
22
WILL      PAY      CASH     FOR CAR
radios,    tachs.,    accessories, etct
Phone    Jim    988-4564    after 3:00
p.m.
Automobiles Wanted
25
WANTED — LATE-MODEL M.G.
T.R. A.H. etc. Call Peter, CA. 4-
9020.
BUSINESS SERVICES
Miscellaneous
34
GETTING ENGAGED: SAVE AT
least 50 percent on finest quality
diamond rings. Satisfaction guaranteed.  Call 261-6671 any time.
Photography
36
PHOTOS OF HOMECOMING &
Mardi Gras, Pep Meets, see Mike
Sochowski   in  Photosoc   any noon.
Scandals
39A
WANT    BALL   AND    CHAIN   FOR
stag,    must   be   heavy,   call   Rick,
738-7975. 	
DONALD R. IS TAKING BARBA-
ra M. to the dance in the Armouries on March 10th because It's
the   "IN  THING"   to   do.
FIGHT THE RISING TIDE OF
plastic conformity, Leathersmithe
2057 W.   4th Ave.,   736-6177.
If your life is to dull.
And   no   fun   atol,
A   haircut   will   probably  right   It.
Then   go   out   prepared   to   fight   it.
CAMPUS   BARBER   SHOP
Typing 43
Professional Typing
ARDALE   GRIFFITHS   LTD.
8584   Granville   St.
70th  &  Granville  St. 263-4530
GOOD    EXPERIENCED    TYPIST
available   for home  typing.   Please
_call_ 277:5640.	
ESSAYS,   THESES   EXPERTLY
typed.   Phone   733-7819.
EXPERIENCED TYPIST WILL
type essays, theses etc. at home.
581-8660.
FAST,      ACCURATE     TYPIST     —
Electric.    224-6129.    	
MANUSCRIPTS, ESSAYS, THESES
accurately typed on I.B.M. Selectric. Phone 325-0368 after 5:30
p.m.	
YOUR MANUSCRIPTS, ESSAYS
theses, what - have - you, type
neatly and reliably at reasonable
cost.   244-4561._	
EXPERIENCED TYPIST—ESSAYS,
theses, regular rates. 41st Ave.,
Dunbar,   Marine area.   261-9027.	
TYPING DONE MY HOME, EX-
'perlenced.   Phone   255-9483.	
EXPERIENCED TYPIST FOR
home typing, essays, theses, etc.
Phone   263-7120.
THESES, ESSAYS, REPORTS OF
all kinds. Correspondence (shorthand or dictaphone). Many years
experience. Mrs. A. Brownick.
Phone:   224-4257   or   228-2245.
EXPERT   TYPING,   PROMPT,   Accurate    service    on     essays,     term
papers,   theses,   731-7496.
INSTRUCTION—SCHOOLS
Music
63
INSTRUCTOR WANTED IN POPU-
lar piano—two hrs. a week In my
home,   call   263-3466.
BASS   FIDDLE —  GOOD  TONE -
needs   finish.   224-1631   —   Marve.
SILVER PEARLED DRUM SET
minus floor torn—$90.00. Phone
Steve  C,  224-9726 after 6 p.m.
Instruction-Tutoring
64
ALL FIRST AND SECOND YEAR
subjects by excellent tutors: Scl-
ences and arts. 736-6923.	
ENGLISH, HISTORY, FRENCH
tutoring by B.A., M.A., B.L.S.
No   contracts.     Phone   736-6923.
March   Registration
TUTORIAL   COLLEGE
Experienced    tutoring    in
University
Secondary
Elementary   courses
Educational   Consultation
in Industry
THE HUBERMAN  EDUCATIONAL
INSTITUTE
B.C.  Owned  & Licensed
263-4808        2158   W.   12th        732-5535
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
COMPLETE LINE OF UNPAINT-
ed furniture. Klassen's Used
Furniture Mart, 3207 W. Broadway.   RE   6-0712.
Beer  Bottle  Drive-ln
at Rear of Store
"BE IN SHAPE FOREVER" A
lifetime pass to Surfside Health
Club is yours for $70.00, phone
Steve   C.   at   224-9726   after   6.
SONY TC-102M TAPERECORDER
& 5000 ft. tape. 2 yrs. old. $125.
phone 224-9029,   Dick,   Room   9.
RENTALS  & REAL ESTATE
Room & Board
82
ROOM AND BOARD FOR QUIET
male student. 4595 W. 6th. Phone
224-4866.	
EXCELLENT ACCOMMODATION
summer also, lowest rates on
campus, congenial atmosphere,
Phi-Delt. house, Jim, CA. 4-9073,
6-7.

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