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The Ubyssey Dec 2, 1983

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 Q
h
S
Hrcnives Serial
Vol. LXVI. No. 23
Vancouver, B.C. Friday, December 2,1983
228-2301
By SARAH COX
ON THE NORTHERN SIDE OF NICARAGUA'S
mountainous border, thousands of U.S. troops are
fighting an imaginary war on Honduran territory.
Two aircraft carriers hover off each Central American
coast, soon to be joined by an additional naval battle
group. And in the largest display of CIA overt aid in
history, American trained rebels are sabotaging vital
Nicaraguan oil lines and ports.
Father Ernesto Cardenal, Nicaragua's culture
minister, says Nicaragua will be invaded before the
next U.S. election.
"In January, Reagan starts his electoral campaign
and he wants to show the people of the United States
that he has already solved the 'crisis' in Central
America," Cardenal said at a recent public forum in
Vancouver.
"We don't know how much this is going to cost us
in blood and suffering, this craziness of Reagan trying
to overthrow the government so he can win another
election."
Four years have passed since U.S. backed dictator
Anastasio Somoza was overthrown by the Sandinistas,
but Nicaraguans stll have vivid memories of half a century of military rule and a history of U.S. intervention.
Warnings of an impending U.S. invasion have been
broadcast on Nicaraguan radio stations since
American troops landed in Grenada, and Cuban
teachers, technicians and military advisors have been
asked to leave the country.
Cardenal says the Reagan administration prefers to
use force rather than dialogue to solve its differences
with Nicaragua.
"The reason why Reagan wants to destroy the revolu
tion is because he sees it is going to be a bad example
for the rest of Central America."
AFTER THE 1979 REVOLUTION, THE
Sandinistas cut rents in half. The government made
health care and schooling free, and subsidized basic
foods. A massive literacy campaign taught thousands
of people to read and write, and unemployment was
greatly reduced through co-operatives and land reform
programs. Laws protecting women from economic
and social discrimination were quickly passed and
women assumed a more equal role in Nicaraguan
society.
Author Margaret Randall, a Nicaraguan resident,
says the country is building a "unique revolutionary
project" based on a mixed economy and a certain
amount of redistribution of wealth. Sixty per cent of
the economy is privately owned and the government
has indicated this will continue, Randall said recently.
"The Nicaraguan revolution is not a communist
revolution," she says. "It is not even a socialistic
revolution."
Both of these ideologies have been drawn upon, but
Nicaragua's politics stem from the country's own
history and deeply Christan background, says Randall, who prefers not to stereotype the revolution.
"To see the conflict in Central America as an
East/West conflict is missing the point of what the
struggle in Central America is all about."
CARDENAL SAYS NICARAGUA'S REFORM
programs are based on a desire to serve other people, a
fundamental value for Nicaragua's vast Christian majority.
"There is a total unity of views between Christians
and the revolution. We are demonstrating that we can
Revolution revives ailing culture
It is the day after a bombing attack on
Nicaragua's major port and Nicaragua's
culture minister is quickly surrounded at
a Vancouver conference on north/south
dialogue.
Wearing jeans and a scruffy brown
suede jacket, Ernesto Cardenal is barely
distinguishable from the people who
cluster around him. His rapid Spanish
and the direction of their stares —
toward a black berret, long silver hair,
and grey eyebrows poking above dark
rimmed glasses — are the only indications that this man is a reknowned politician, poet and priest.
The question on everyone's mind is
the same, the answer unexpectedly
direct.
"El CIA," Cardenal tells them. "The
CIA attacked the port." He speaks softly and without anger. Moments later the
crowd is ushered back into the conference room and Cardenal takes his
place among the row of well dressed
panelists from around the world to
discuss the possibility of culture in an
under-developed country.
When Cardenal begins speaking,
whispers rustling through the audience
die down. He avoids mentioning the
latest attack on Nicaragua's struggling
revolution and plunges into an explanation of how Nicaraguans are rediscovering their authentic culture — "a culture
against underdevelopment, a culture
against dependence, the culture of a
revolution."
Poverty and illiteracy stunt all Latin
American culture, explains Cardenal,
but Nicaraguans fought, and died to
overcome these barriers and create a different kind of society.
"After the triumph of the revolution
it was a natural phenomenon that the
spontaneous boom of culture was
started by the people."
The first victory against cultural
underdevelopment was a literacy cam
paign which reduced illiteracy from 50
per cent to 13 per cent, Cardenal says.
The five month campaign was conducted in four languages, including the
languages of the Mosqito and Suma Indians.
"Education for them is bilingual
because we want their culture to be
preserved. The ministry of culture is
promoting their crafts, their folklore
and their traditions."
Before the revolution, the introduction of beverages like coca-cola and the
substitution of plastic for Nicaraguan
textiles eroded traditional culture, says
Cardenal. Even the national palace is "a
grotesque imitation" of the Parthenon,
he says.
"We used to have a false culture as an
underdeveloped country. This is not true
just for us but for all of Latin
America."
But fundamental changes over the last
See page 2: POPULAR
have a revolution without it being an atheist revolution."
Two priests hold positions in the government and
more than half of the cabinet are practising Christians,
says Cardenal. Supporting the revolution is their duty
because it represents what the Bible teaches, he says.
"We're faithful to the Gospel. The program of the
revolution is to feed the hungry, dress the naked, teach
the one who knows nothing."
But the clergy's participation in politics has been
criticized by the Roman Catholic hierarchy. Randall
says tremendous hope was placed on the Pope's spring
visit to Nicaraua because Christians felt such a
prestigious visitor could make an influential plea for
peace in the border war with Honduras.
"But what really happened was like a slap in the
face."
The day before the Pope held mass for 80,000 people, 17 youths were killed in an ambush on the
Nicaraguan border. Their mothers held up pictures of
their dead sons for the Pope during mass, but he made
absolutely no reference to the tragedy, says Randall.
"The Pope's answer to these women was 'silence'.
Then thousands of people began to shout 'There is no
contradiction between the revolution and
Christianity'."
The Pope's refusal to acknowledge Nicaragua's
political situation made the Vatican lose a great deal of
its credibility, says Randall.
THE U.S. GOVERNMENT CRITICISES
Nicaragua for failing to hold elections. But when the
Sandinistas won the war they said elections would take
place in 1985, and preparations are underway to keep
this promise. A legislature which represents both right
and left leaning political parties tried to arrange for elec-
Sce page 2: CIA Page 2
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, December 2, 1983
CIA directs anti-Sandinista contras in Honduras
from page 1
toral commissions to visit European and socialist
countries as well as the U.S. to gather information
about different electoral processes. The findings of
these commissions were to determine how Nicaraguan
elections will be held, Randall says.
"But the entire commission was denied a visa into
the U.S. last month (September)."
In January 1983, Associated Press reported that
CIA director William Casey confirmed the U.S. backing of the Honduran based counter-revolutionaries.
Sergio Raminez, a member of the Nicaraguan government, said in a July interview with the Globe and Mail
that the contras could not survive without the help of
the U.S.
"They have rockets that are so modern they fire
without a tube, and rubber rafts that hold 40 men, and
both are manufactured in the U.S.," he said. "They
also have U.S. army rations, special paraffin for cooking, M-16s and ammunitions . . . We're dealing with
nobody but the U.S."
Led mainly by wealthy supporters of ex-president
Anastasio Somoza, the contras train in Florida and
California — a direct violation of U.S. neutrality law.
According to the Miami Herald, CIA officials told
Congress they are in full control of the day-to-day contra activities — pinpointing targets, plotting attacks
and conferring with rebel field leaders who conduct
the raids into Nicaragua.
Eight hundred Nicaraguans have been killed in the
attacks since January, says Randall, and she and
Cardenal says the contras burn villages, torture
peasants, and rape women.
As part of the Pentagon's $21 million program for
Western Caribbean airfield improvement, U.S. army
engineers are building new roads, bases, and airstrips
in Honduras along the Nicaraguan border. According
to the New York Times, the bases will be able to "handle large United States military transport planes and
jet fighters."
Sophisticated radar installments along the Honduran and Costa Rican borders also allow planes using
American intelligence equipment to photograph
Nicaraguan airfields, military encampments and
troop movements.
American aid has been defended on the grounds that
Nicaragua is supplying weapons to Salvadoran guerrillas — aid the Reagan administration wants to stop.
But evidence of the supposed flow of weapons has
never been found, says Cardenal. "The CIA would
come to Nicaragua in any case.
"Since the contras haven't made any gains, we
assume that Reagan is going to use other methods,
possibly using the armies of Honduras, Guatemala,
Chile or Argentina, or their own to intervene."
But Cardenal has a message for those trying to
destabilize Nicaragua's revolution. "The government
of Nicaragua has warned that those people who want
to cross the border with arms and without a visa are
going to be returned to the U.S. in a plastic body
bag."
Economic limitations prevent the Nicaraguan army
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from expanding, says Cardenal, but people have been
given weapons to defend themselves.
"This shows the popular support of the revolution
because if dictatorial regimes gave arms to the people
they wouldn't last one day.
"We are sure of our victory, even though our
aggressor is one of the biggest powers in the world."
)
Popular art makes comeback
from page 1
four  years  have  given  Nicaragua  an
authentic culture, says Cardenal.
What was once a luxurious theatre is
now an affordable "popular" theatre
where ballets are performed and artists
display their work. Films are being made
in Nicaragua for the first time and some
have even  won  international  awards.
Mobile cinema units are bringing film to
remote areas and theatre groups are
flourishing, he says.
Cardenal, who gave up a secluded life
writing poetry to become a minister,
stresses the important of making poetry
accessible for everyone. The Indians'
poetry is taught in schools, and poetry
workshops are held everywhere, he says.
But Cardenal modestly takes no credit
for the cultural victories of the revolution.
"I'm fulfilling my task of minister of
culture because I think it's the will of
God," he says. "This moment when
Reagan is attacking I just can't run away
and write poetry. Culture is a weapon we
have and Reagan doesn't."
MOLSON MALT
When you've got
Molson Malt
you've got it all! Friday, December 2,1983
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 3
r
UBC fee increase imminent
An administration proposal now before
the UBC board of governors recommends
that tuition fees double within three years.
The proposal, announced at Thursday's
board meeting, would also have differential
fees for foreign students introduced over
the next two years.
The administration wants tuition fees to
make up 20 per cent of the university's
operating costs by the 1986-87 winter session. Fees now account for 11 per cent of
operating costs, following a 1979 board
decision that they be not less than 10 per
cent of costs.
UBC administration president George
Pederson said he "deeply regretted" having
to recommend the massive increase, blam
ing the hike on provincial government funding policies.
"There was no other option open to us in
the light of indications from the provincial
government that there will be no increase,
and quite possibly a decrease, in operating
grants over the next three years," said
Pedersen in press statement released Thursday.
He added the wringing of student purses
will still not prevent further cutbacks and
declining quality of education at UBC.
"Even with the fee increase, one half to
two thirds of the 1984-85 anticipated shortfall with have to be met through reductions
in other areas of expenditures within the
university."
The board will discuss the administration
proposal at a special meeting Jan. 19, when
it will be setting fees for next year after also
examining briefs from International House,
the graduate student society and the Alma
Mater Society.
If the proposal is adopted, fees for first
year arts students will rise to $1,764 in
1986-87 from the current $882. At the other
end of the scale, medicine and dentistry
students will pay $3,046 compared to the
current $1,532.
The last doubling of tuition fees took a
full decade, from 1973-74 to the current session.
Even harder hit will be foreign students,
who will be paying two and a half times the
normal fee structure by 1985-86. Next year
their fees will be double those of other
students.
The 256 visa students currently enrolled
at UBC will not pay the differential fee over
the next two years, but will be charged the
higher fee along with the rest in 1986-87.
The administration says it will use some
of the revenue generated by the fee increases to increase aid to students directly
out of operating funds.
According to the proposal, financial aid
available to Canadian students would increase each year at "a percentage rate at
least equal to that of the average per annum
increase in tuition fees."
A similar kickback scheme would have 25
per cent of the new revenue from foreign
students available to them in the form of
aid.
V
Huge tuition hike
shocks students
By JOEL PECCHIOLI   & MURIEL DRAAISMA
Student leaders expressed outrage and shock at the administration's proposal Thursday to increase tuition fees dramatically and to introduce differential fees.
"I'm appalled and infuriated. The administration releasing stuff as a fait
accompli is disgusting," said student board representative Dave Frank.
The administration proposal asks for student fees to make up 20 per cent
of the university's operating costs by 1986-87, and was introduced as a
notice of motion at Thursday's board of governors meeting.
"Picking 20 per cent out of the air is the least creative and most arbitrary
way of setting fees. It means that even if the government came up with a
lump of funding (in addition to its grant), students still must pay the 20 per
cent," added Frank.
The administration introduced the proposed figures compiled by John
Chase, director of analytical studies, to board members at its closed session
after student groups made presentations about the impact of higher tuition
fees. Many board members were not expecting the notice of motion, said
Frank.
"We were led to believe that these figures were purely informational, to
be used in the reports at the closed session. As far as I'm concerned it's all
in the open now. That closed session was complete bullshit," said Frank.
Lisa Hebert, Alma Mater Society external affairs coordinator, said the
administration completely overlooked the arguments of the students who
made presentations and ignored their reasons for not setting higher fees.
"It's very disappointing that the board couldn't have waited for at least
two weeks to evaluate the presentation before discussing a proposal. It
looks as if it was decided in advance," she said.
"It's insulting that they introduced that notice of motion at the same
meeting that they heard the presentations."
Immediately preceding the administration's notice of motion, three student groups warned the board that massive fee increases will force potential
UBC students to seek an education elsewhere.
Representatives from the AMS, Graduate Student Society and International House expressed grave concern about the effects of huge fee increases on UBC's reputation, accessibility and the quality of education.
But board members responded by saying the university might be faced
with a $12 to $16 million funding decrease next year and must find ways to
come up with the money.
"With all the things that have happened, many oxes will have to be
gored. The question is which oxes will be gored the hardest," said board
chair David McClean.
See page 7: FOREIGN
Saskatchewan geers
upset with paper
SASKATOON (CUP) — The
University of Saskatchewan
engineers don't want to hear off-
campus news.
The engineers came out in full
force against the student
newspaper, the Sheaf, at the student association's annual general
meeting Nov. 17, but the fund-
cutting motion they passed is not
binding.
About 100 angry engineers attended the meeting of 120 criticizing
the Sheaf's coverage of "off-
campus stories." They were
especially upset with a recent issue
devoted to gays and lesbians.
They passed a motion to cut the
newspapers funding in January
unless it meets three conditions.
They want the paper's editorial
staff to become directly answerable
to the student union, a 40 per cent
cap put on "off-campus news" and.
a 50 per cent cap put on content
about "any significant sexual,
radical, ethnic or political group."
Motions passed at U of S general
meetings are not binding unless they
are ratified by the student council.
At its last meeting, council tabled
consideration of the motion until its
Dec. 1 meeting.
Sheaf editor Diane Reid said
council will likely reject the motion
because it has already set up a committee of its own to investigate the
paper's structure. That committee
will report at the Dec. 1 meeting
and Reid said she expects favorable
recommendations.
"I don't think (council) could accept this motion because they've
already put a lot of work into the
committee reviewing the Sheaf,"
she said.
She called the engineering motion
"an attempt at coercion."
"They have no right to tell us
what to print," she said, adding
that the only control the student
association has over the Sheaf is
financial.
The review committee includes
three student union representatives,
four students at large, and one
Sheaf member.
Reid said the committee which
has met twice, "seems to be listening to what we are saying."
THOUSANDS  OF   UBC  students  protested  _
    government.    "Government
ly, preferring to.
action
told students. Administration president
   cutbacks  in  	
must    be    reversed.
-a. r. chiva photo
by  the
AMS    president
_ did not attend ral-
Anarchists seek freedom in '80s
By DOUG SCHMIDT
Anarchists face the formidable
task of offering an alternative to the
existing political systems which
have apparently alienated young
people.
This was one observation which
came out of a free-flowing exchange of ideas at a roundtable
discussion entitled Anarchy For the
'80s — organized by the UBC Anarchist club and attended by 40 people
Thursday.
"Young people are disgusted
(with the political choices available
to them) and are looking for alteratives, which have been non-existent
so far. They feel defeated, that
there is no hope, and they have
developed a fuck-it-all attitude,"
said Ken Lester, manager of the
Vancouver-based political rock
band D.O.A.
"(Participants) were trying to
figure out if anarchy could provide
such an alternative," organizer
Jamie Baugh said later.
Anarchist ideas will be seen as a
credible alternative when people
overcome stereotypes of anarchism,
said a guest speaker from Toronto.
"People don't really understand
the meaning of anarchy, although
many are now advocating and living
by its principles," said the speaker
who wished to remain anonymous.
"People think of anarchy as
chaos, disruption. Chaos is a
human element, we must simply
learn to address it. Governments'
attempts at structure and order are
attempts at ignoring natural chaos.
It's the same as trying to make
forests manageable by dumping
chemicals on them," said Jim, an
anti-authoritarian activist who requested that his full name not be
printed.
The failure of existing political
structures to address this natural
chaos has helped create a situation
where people, particularly those
who are younger feel defeated and
hopeless, Jim said.
Both Jim and Montreal-based ac
tivist Norm agreed the anarchist
movement must try to remain open
and not be driven underground
despite harassment by authorities,
if the public is to become educated
about anarchy.
"Because police have an open
and public side and a 'real' side of
corruption and brutality, they feel
there must be a 'real' side to us,
because we are now operating so
publicly," Jim said.
Job postings come down
By NEIL LUCENTE
Students eligible for work-study
will have to scamble to apply for the
jobs available before all funds are
exhausted, a work-study administrator said Thursday.
"The job postings at Canada
Employment Centre will go down
when all work-study funds are committed, which will probably be in
one week, maybe tomorrow even,"
said work-study coordinator Sheila
Summers.
Once the postings are taken
down, even students with
authorization to work forms will
not be able to apply for a job.
The awards office is currently
giving out authorization forms but
after the funds are spent, no more
forms will be processed and
distributed.
"As it is, some students who applied late may receive authorizations after the job postings have
come down," she said.
"Applications are now being processed and authorizations sent out
on the same day. Depending on
postal service, it may arrive in two
to three days," she said.
Meanwhile, the awards office is
advising students currently applying
for work-study to have their applications and authorization forms
taken care of as soon as possible.
Students who want to use the
work-study program for the second
term only will have to get their arrangements ready and apply for a
job before all the funds are
allocated, said financial aid officer
Byron Hender.
Of the 900 available job postings,
the work-study program has only
enough money to provide jobs for
400 students, said Summers.
"It's too bad we don't have more
funding. We would need approximately $1 million more to fill the
other 500 positions."
Work-study funds were fully
committed by Nov. 17 last year,
said Summers. She estimates that
200 or more students with
authorization to work forms have
not yet applied for a job. Page 4
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, December 2, 1983
Women harassed in washrooms
MONTREAL (CUP) — Another
woman has been harassed in the
washrooms at McGill University,
the third such instance this year.
Julianne Pidduck, an employee
of the Daily Typesetting Shop, was
in a cubicle of the basement
washrooms of the student union
building, when a man's face appeared under the door. The man fled when she screamed at him.
She reported the incident to campus security staff.
"This is the third face under the
door," said Professor Sam
Noumoff, a member of the senate
sub-committee    on    safety    for
women. The sub-committee recently distributed posters to campus
washrooms warning women against
intruders and advising them to
report attacks.
Two washroom intrusions oc-
occurred in the MacDonald Harrington building, and a woman had
her purse snatched elsewhere on
campus.
At UBC, four women have been
harassed in main library and one in
Sedgewick. The incidents involve a
man who accosted students while
working alone and exposed himself.
All four main library attacks occurred during the daytime.  Head
librarian Douglas Mclnnes attributed the increase in harassment
to the building's ageing condition
and the fact that the library is a
public place.
"The library contains some
remote areas and some people
might perceive them as relatively
safe places to do something like
that," he said.
"I don't think there's been any
physical contact," he added.
Mclnnes said he was pleased he
had no new incidents to report, but
urged any student harassed to
report the incident to the librarian's
office or to campus RCMP.
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2nd Feature:
SHOW TIME WEEKDAYS
8:00 1tl FMtur«
7:45 2nd Feature
9 30 1« Featur*
SHAO LIN BROTHERS
Sat. & Sun. Mat
200 1« Faatur*
4 00 2nd Fsatur*
A great movie about an important period in modern Chinese
History. A story about Emperor Xianfeng and Empress
Dawager Cixi of Ching Dynasty. Filmed on Original location in
the reconstructed Imperial Palace named Yuan Ming Garden. Friday, December 2, 1983
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 5
Peace virgins must go all the way
By PATTI FLATHER
The peace movement must
become more political if its goals
are to be achieved, a UBC professor
said Thursday.
"We must involve ourselves in
politics or we are fallen," Mike
Wallace told 40 people in Hebb
theatre. "The peace movement
must go all the way."
In his speech, entitled the
"political   virginity  of the  peace
movement," Wallace criticized the
peace movement for "a kind of fixation with staying apolitical."
Consensus among politicians that
the policy of deterrence must give
way to disarmament has existed for
years, but policy decisions do not
reflect this, said Wallace.
The current broad-based movement has advantages because the
large conservative element has
powerful   connections,    said
Wallace. But appealing to a broad
based coalition has suffocated any
analysis and emphasis on the
physical and environmental effects
of nuclear war.
"The task of publicizing is over,
ABC finished it for us," Wallace
said, referring to ABC's showing of
The Day After, which was viewed
by an estimated 125 million people.
Wallace also attacked what he
called the myths of a free press, unbiased political decisions, and electoral competition.
"Our press is really not that
much different from that of the
Soviet Union," he said. "Our entire
By Alar Olljum
A snap election called in Jamaica
has forced the country's ex-prime
minister, Michael Manley, to cancel
a UBC speaking engagement
scheduled for this weekend.
Manley was due to speak on the
U.S. occupation of Grenada and
other Caribbean affairs Sunday.
Bruce Paisley, Alma Mater Society programs coordinator, said the
visit was cancelled for security
reasons.
"Manley is under heavy security
right now and there's a lot of
violence going on which is not being
reported," said Paisley.
Jamaican prime minister Edward
Seage called the Dec. 15 election
one day after he devalued the
Jamaican dollar by over 40 per cent
in response to the International
Monetary Fund's rejection of his
government's economic policies.
Manley and his People's National
Party refused to field candidates in
what they termed "bogus elections
for a bogus parliament". Manley
was quoted by the Toronto Globe
and Mail Tuesday as saying "We'll
hold our own parliament separately
outside."
The PNP refused to nominate
candidates because the Seaga
government broke a promise to not
hold elections before a non-partisan
electoral reform could be completed
and implemented.
political system acts as a conduit for
economic interest groups." The
West's electoral system is no longer
accountable to a majority of people, he added.
Wallace also urged the peace
movement to acknowledge the
potential force of women, blacks,
Hispanics and other visible
minorities.
"There has been a major shift in
women's political behavior to independent analysis of politics. The
peace movement has not really
come to grips with this."
Feminists are a leading force in
the movement and are not willing to
settle for small changes in the
system, said Wallace.
And blacks and Hispanics are
quickly mobilizing into "a major
political force in the U.S.," he said.
Wallace criticized student
apathy, saying students have
adopted the conformism of the McCarthy era. "I think we will get no
help from them."
In the short-term, Wallace called
for opposition to U.S. president
Ronald Reagan's re-election bid,
and for support for Prime Minister
Pierre Trudeau's peace initiative.
"It is not a matter of partisan
politics. The media have it all
wrong."
UBC faculty may be axed
The administration is thinking of increasing tuition
fees drastically and laying off faculty in an effort to
"downsize" the university, a student representative
told student council Wednesday.
Dave Frank, student board of governors representative, said the administration has recommended to
the board of governors that these measures be taken
Council Briefs
to offset budget shortfalls. UBC is being used as a
test case for North America because the policies
recommended have never been introduced at other
universities, he said.
Council decided to urge students to write letters to
the board emphasizing the effects of these moves on
the universities' credibility and quality of services.
Council members said doubling tuition fees and
laying off faculty would destroy UBC's reputation
and that some high quality students would go to
other universities instead. Some members suggested
that they too might look to other schools.
»       *       »
Council also agreed to finance SUB expansion for
up to $1.25 million. Don Holubitsky, capital projects
acquisitions committee member, said SUB expansion
as well as the construction of new day care centre
would be finished in the next two years.
Frank said council must begin the SUB expansion
now because construction costs will increase when
the city begins to prepare for Expo '86.
In another motion, council decided to pay $2,500
in partial funding for an architectural design study
for the daycare centre. The president's office and
Gage Alumni funds will supply the rest of the money
for the study.
A motion to place advertising for SUB groups on
the poles outside the building was also passed.
Rampant racism responsible
— cary rod in photo
LATEST TORY RECRUITS discuss strategy outside SUB ballroom before
attending meeting to plot downfall of new leader Brian Mullitover. Conservative party organizers denied rumour Margaret Trudeau is a member.
ician cancels show
One hundred an fifty thousand
Jamaicans have been disenfranchised by the early elections and the
possibility of voter irregularities
have been greatly increased, said a
PNP spokesperson.
Manley was a close friend of slain
Grenadian prime minister Maurice
Bishop and an outspoken critic of
both the military takeover and
resulting    U.S.    occupation.
Paisley said he spoke with
Manley's New York agent Wednesday. The agent communicated
Manley's eagerness to re-schedule
his UBC engagement for January,
said Paisley.
British Columbian schools will
continue to discriminate against
minority students until Canada accepts the responsibilities of a
multicultural society, an education
professor said Wednesday.
"Unless society as a whole is
prepared to accept
multiculturalism.the efforts of the
schools will be a drop in the
bucket," Mary Ashworth told 35
people in Buchanan A203.
While 46 per cent of students in
the Vancouver public school system
speak English as their second
language, efforts to adapt programs
for these students are still inadequate, she added.
The B.C. Teachers' Federation
has started to address the problem
of multiculturalism by hiring a
fieldworker, installing equal
employment opportunities for
minority teachers, and celebratilng
several holidays of foreign origin.
But some issues outlined in the
BCTF's 1982 race relations policy,
such as non-English language programs, are still considered "hot
issues" by the school board,
Ashworth said.
Racist policies stem from societal
attitudes which later form the basis
of actions against minorities, both
on the personal and governmental
levels, she said.
"Racism and multiculturalism
are both attitudes, and these attitudes later translate into actions."
Most people belonging to minority groups, whether they were born
in B.C. or not, have grown up in a
climate of discrimination, she said.
These pervasive attitudes of racism
have   prompted   some   minority
groups to withdraw from Canadian
society in an attempt to preserve
their traditions and integrity,
Ashworth added.
In Ontario, a recent study on the
effects of multicultural policy in
school shows that students
demonstrated more awareness of
minority groups as a result.
Solidarity struggle in B.C.
is far from victorious
Positive strike vote possible
Members of the teaching assistants union will probably vote Dec. 5
to support a strike, TAU president Horacio de la Cueva said Thursday.
"It will be a close yes vote," said de la Cueva, adding that the decision to call the strike will have to be formalized at a general meeting
held after the vote.
A successful strike vote could change the administration's hardline attitude in negotiations, he said. "They have not negotiated in
the past until right before a strike."
Negotiations between the TAU and the administration will resume
Dec. 8 with a government appointed mediator. Talks stalled in early
November after the TAU altered some of their contract demands to
show a willingness to negotiate, said de la Ceuva.
Administration negotiator Robert Grant was unavailable for comment.
De la Cueva declined comment on how the strike could affect the
university's operations until the strike vote has taken place.
Most of the 500 TAs contacted by the union said they will participate in Monday's vote, he added.
The Solidarity movement will continue despite the tenuous agreement
reached between Operation
Solidarity and the provincial
government, speakers at a forum
sponsored by students against the
budget said Thursday.
"Students must show the media
and Mr. Bennett that right in his
own backyard of this Social Credit
constituency, Solidarity is alive and
well," SAB member Kevin Annett
told 25 students in Buchanan A104.
Further strike action could come
from B.C. teachers, said Kevin
Novakowski, B.C. Federation of
Labour bargaining unit member.
"If any teacher is laid off as a
result of funds saved from the strike
not returned to school districts,
there will be a general strike in the
province,"  he  said  confirming a
motion passed at the Federation's
convention this week.
Cynthia Flood, a women against
the budget member said International Woodworker's of
America president, Jack Munro
overstepped his authority with the
agreement reached in the Nov. 13
Kelowna pact.
Munro may have made the settlement to help top layers of the trade
union movement maintain control
over their membership, said Flood.
Education still suffers badly
despite the agreement, Flood added. "It is very clear that they (the
provincial government) wants to
produce a poorly educated population that is unable to think and
question what the government is
doing."
Cruise to the border for CD action
The international border between
the U.S. and Canada will be ignored by peace activists from both
nations this weekend when they set
up a peace camp at the symbolic
Peace Arch to protest the testing
and the deployment of the cruise
missile.
The action will symbolize the
resolve of citizens of both countries
to work together to achieve disarmament, according to a press
release of the Vancouver ad hoc
group, United Against the Cruise,
one of the organizers of the event.
The Canada-United States
solidarity days being held across the
continent are focusing on civil
disobedience actions, according to
the press release. The 24 hour peace
camp will be no exception and participants risk arrest by border
guards.
Other activities have been planned for those not participating in the
peace camp itself. There will be a
slide show, movies, music, a bonfire on the beach Friday night and
a program of events on Saturday
beginning at 10 a.m. TT
Page 6
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, December 2,1983
Admission by:
DONATION
CANNED FOOD ONLY
All proceeds go to the PROVINCE
Empty Stocking Fund
Dance to the surfing sounds of
THE BEACH BOYS & JAN AND DEAN
DOOR PRIZES - LIMBO CONTEST -
HULA HOOP CONTEST
Mai- Tai Specials
TRADER VIC'S
WALDORF HOTEL
SPORTIF
WOLF TANNING SYSTEMS
CANADIAN FITNESS SYSTEMS
& THE OLYMPIC GYM
December 8th-8:30 p.m.-1:00 a.m.
We'll supply the sand & the music - You wear your Hawaii Beach A ttire
SpflF
STUDENT UNION BUILDING    P^P
University of British Columbia
6138 S U B  Boulevard
LAST DAY TO
PURCHASE YOUR
GROUSE PASS IS
SAT., DEC. 3
REMEMBER TO BRING YOUR
STUDENT CARD
STILL LOTS OF GOOD BUYS IN OUR  \
SIDEWALK SALE  I
^ —
f AMS GAMES ROOM
NEW!
REMEMBER CHRISTMAS
IS ONL Y
3V2 WEEKS AWAY
JANUARY BUS PASSES
WILL BE AVAILABLE
BEGINNING DEC. 19
I
Come On Down!
Lower Level Student Union Building Friday, December 2,1983
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 7
Women's
i •
at Concordia suffer
MONTREAL — "You can't
take money from men's varsity
sports to give to girls' things."
That's what Concordia University's athletic director Ed Enos said
last year in the documentary Why
The Difference.
This year, the athletics department is under attack from all sides
over discrimination against women
athletes.
The controversy revolves around
the huge disparity between funding
of men's and women's sports programmes at Concordia, as well as
the apparent disregard of women's
concerns by athletics officials.
And the fact that the position of
women's athletics director has
always been occupied by a man il
lustrates the insensitivity of the
department, according to those involved.
Women's soccer coach Gerard
McKee is among the many critics of
the women's program.
"Women's sports are definitely
not taken as seriously as men's"
said McKee, whose yearly salaryl is
less than a third of last year's
men's soccer assistant coach.
"Women should have their own
athletic director and there are certainly a sufficient quality of
women available at Concordia for
the job."
"Paul Arsenault (women's
athletic director and full-time men's
hockey coach) does not have much
contact with any of the women's
coaches. As for Ed Enos, he should
at least show some interest. . . once
during the season, he should make
an attempt to be there during a
game. As it is, he never shows up."
Women's players are equally
disturbed by the situation. "Last
week, we brought Arsenault
receipts from our trip to New York
and he didn't even realize that we
had been away," said soccer player
Karen Ungerson.
Arsenault consider this criticism
justified, saying, "Women have to
promote their own program. I can
not do it because I have a man's
feelings and a man's thoughts.
There should be a women's
representative."
Foreign students hurt the most
from page 3
All three students agreed that
large fee increases and differential
fees will limit UBC's accessibility to
a few wealthy students and that
those with academic mobility will
reject UBC in favor of other universities.
AMS representative Alan
Pinkney, who is also the director of
administration, said the provincial
government's restraint program has
already harmed the quality of
education at UBC. Massive fee increases will make universities east of
B.C. much more attractive, he said.
"It is ironic and regrettable that
B.C. students may be unable to participate in post-secondary education, or be forced to seek this
education east of B.C., especially
when this province already has the
lowest participation rate of any
region," Pinkney said.
GSS spokesperson Penny Jones
said increased tuition fees will also
deter graduate students from attending UBC. Graduate students will
be especially affected by increases
because the university controls their
expenditures and income as
teaching assistants.
"UBC is in danger of becoming
uncompetitive, accepting mediocre
students and lowering its present
high academic standards," she added.
International House director
Rorri McBlane said UBC will lose
its international reputation if differential fees are introduced. The
university will drive no economic
gain from differential fees,
McBlane said, citing a report commissioned by universities minister
Pat McGeer in 1980 about the
feasibility of such fees.
"I am not convinced that the
relatively small financial gain which
would accrue to the province
through the introduction of a two-
tiered fee structure, would offset
the financial loss to the private sector, and the very educational loss to
our own students who gain much
from interacting with students from
other lands, and the loss to our
universities who should not be
parochial institutions but must, in a
very real sense, belong to an international community," McGeer
wrote in January 1982.
McBlane said the board should
examine the impact of differential
fees on the university setting and
not just accede to pressure from the
provincial government.
"The situation should be reviewed in its totality. The university
should make its decisions on the
basis of hard facts, and not the
basis of political pressure."
"One of the primary purposes of
UBC should be to attract students
from the Third World. It is advantageous to UBC, the province and
Canada for foreign students to attend UBC."
According to Enos, "Arsenault
was handed the job because it was
like the changing of the guard."
"How could I be involved with
women's athletics?" he said. "I
'have a full-time job with academic
and administrative duties. I simply
do not have time for it."
In 1981, the department removed
the women's field hockey and
volleyball teams from league competition. Enos said this was done
because of the "lack of quantity
and quality of players around."
"Field hockey was a new activity
on the scene and it did not generate
interest. The athletes were just not
dedicated," he added.
"Furthermore, the field hockey
coach ran off to Yellowknife and
there was no replacement for her,"
he said.
George Short, the women's
athletic director at the time, had a
different explanation.
"Cathy Haig was the coach at the
time and she ran off with her
boyfriend to the Maritimes. Once
she left, the girls did not have any
desire to continue playing. Also we
couldn't find a replacement for
her," he said.
Actually Haig left Concordia to
take a job in Alberta. Contacted
there, she told the Concordia stu
dent newspaper she left the university for personal reasons. She said
she had suggested that Vanier College coach Wendy Stack, who expressed interest in the job, replace
,her. Stack said she was never contacted.
Julie Healy, who was assistant
coach and captain of the field
hockey team when Haig left, was
irate that the team had been scrapped.
i "We had an abundance of
players that wanted to play and he
(Enos) is trying to say that we don't
have enough. At least 26 people
would show up regularly to team
practices and games, even though
we only had enough equipment for
1-5 women," she said.
Last year, speaking in the film
Why The Difference, Enos suggested that women's teams hold
bake sales to raise money for equipment.
"They should hold bake sales
that they're so good at to raise the
money to pay for the equipment,"
he said.
This statement and others outraged women athletes.
"He's a sexist," said field hockey
player Marina Kolbe. "He only
wants recognition through male
sports and cares nothing about the
women's program."
Video attacks heart
(RNR/CUP) — There's more fuel for the controversy surrounding video
games — researchers at Britain's Birmingham university say kids who play
"Space Invaders" have exactly the same stress symptoms as a managing
director facing a difficult board meeting.
And they say video game addicts face the same risks of long-term heart
and circulatory disease.
Psychologist Douglas Carrol says some players' heartbeats increase to
the level of joggers, even though they're standing still. The games act like a
pep pill, which may explain why some players report getting a "buzz"
while destroying monsters from outer space, he says.
TA UNION STRIKE VOTE
The T.A. Union and the University have held numerous negotiation sessions over the past 2>4 months. The university has proved intransigent and has refused to compromise on any meaningful issue.
The T.A. Union requested that a mediator be appointed to assist the parties in reaching agreement on a new contract. The mediator was
unable to convince the university to modify its stand. The administration's negotiator remained adamant, uncooperative, and intent on confrontation.
WHAT IS A STRIKE VOTE?
A strike vote is a poll, undertaken by secret ballot and observed by the Labour Relations Board, of all members of a bargaining unit after
contract negotiations have broken down. A strike vote is not a decision to strike. If the vote favours a strike, the decision to strike will be
left up to a general membership meeting of the Union.
WHO CAN VOTE?
Everyone who is employed as a T.A. or Marker, that is, everyone in the bargaining unit, is eligible to vote, whether or not they are
members of the Union.
THE WORKING OF THE STRIKE BALLOT
According to B.C. Labour Law, the only question allowed on a strike vote ballot is: "Are you in favour of a strike? Yes No."
WHY THE STRIKE VOTE?
The University has said NO to Union Security for T.A.'s and Markers. The current proposal of university makes orientation
meetings non-compulsory. These meetings are the only chance the T.A. Union has to inform the T.A.'s and Markers what the Union has accomplished, and why they should join and support the work of the Union.
The University has said NO to any benefits for T.A.'s and Markers. The T.A. Union's wages and benefits package attempts to protect the accessibility of education by allowing T.A.'s and Markers to meet the rising cost of living. This package consists of:
1) a TUITION FEE WAIVER equivalent to the cost of 6 units of undergrad courses ($438 this year) for those with a full TAship.
2) a 2% wage increase, equivalent to the one proposed by the SFU administration, even though the cuts there have been greater.
3) a medical/dental plan, with a cost to the University of $7.01 per month per TA or Marker.
4) vacation pay and vacation period. At present our salary includes the vacation pay, and we are asked to compress our 16-hour vacation
(1.3 weeks) into 4 days.
The University has said NO to quality of education at UBC
1) T.A.'s receive little or no training for their work, even though such training programs are required in the current contract. This year the
T.A. Union tried to attach a deadline date as to when the training sessions are to be held. The University said NO.
2) The T.A. Union wants to insure that reasonable class sizes are established. A proposal was made for a joint committee to regularly determine what this class size should be. Again, the University said NO.
3) The T.A. Union wants to ensure T.A.'s academic freedom to examine, question, learn, and teach without interference or reprisal. Once
again the University said NO.
VOTE YES for
•Quality of education at UBC
•Academic Freedom for T.A.'s and Markers
•Benefits to equalize the increasing cost of living and getting an education
WILL A POSITIVE STRIKE VOTE MEAN A STRIKE?
Not necessarily. A positive strike vote will show the University we are serious in our demands and is meant to force the University to
bargain seriously. We would rather settle in negotiations. Strike action, if necessary, will be decided by a general meeting of the T.A. Union.
VOTE YES MONDAY DECEMBER 5, 1983
T.A. UNION OFFICE ROOM 204 ARMOURIES   10:00 A.M. to 4:00 P.M.
Horacio de la Cueve
Jeremy Mouat
Greg Schwann
(Bring an ID)
For more information call:
228-5267     Ed Wishnow
228-0164     Steve Dancho
222-0795     Mike Burke
738-0855     T.A. Union Office
736-0052
732 7571
874-0679
224-2118 Page 8
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, December 2,1983
[IkftDRftKE
& cosmes
t>vj XI dart   & Jones
Swallow hard
In the quiet evening hours yesterday, a small group of people, eight of
them appointed by the Social Credit party, sat deliberating the fate of
university students.
And what they discussed is of equal importance to all students on this
campus. The board of governors, after hearing lengthy presentations
about the impact of higher tuition fees on the university, began to examine
some figures placed before them.
These figures formed the basis of a proposal quietly submitted by the administration after student leaders had packed their knapsacks and their well
reasoned arguments against higher tuition fees and gone home.
The administration, which claims to make decisions in the university's
best interests, ironically and quite hypocritically asked the board of governors to consider doubling tuition fees over the next three years and introducing differential fees for foreign students.
The timing was ironic because students had just finished emphasizing
and explaining how increased tuitionfees will stamp out accessibility, erode
the quality of education and destroy UBC's reputation.
And their actions were hypocritical because they had specifically asked
students to make presentations on the issue. The claimed they wanted information when they only wanted to go through the pretense of listening
to students' arguments and pleas for an accessible university.
Only the privileged, not necessarily the qualified, will be able to open the
doors to a higher education. And students from lower income
backgrounds might as well give up applying for student aid, because they
will only wallow in massive debts when they graduate.
But the Socred appointees and administrators have not made the final
decision yet. There still is time to petition, protest, organize, fight, argue,
demand, demonstrate, scream for the right to an accessible education.
Don't let them shovel the financial burden onto students.
Anarchy, eh?
The UBC anarchist club finally held its forum Anarchy For The '80s
Thursday. Having survived a near general strike, picket lines and couple of
jibes from the Globe and Mail, perhaps UBC's very own nationally renowned anarchists will now send out news releases of their events so Toronto's
national newspaper can keep Canadians informed about subversion.
Or don't Globe reporters cover campus events that aren't behind picket
lines?
Letters
Pens provide the power
By ROBBY ROBERTSON
These days, no one likes to hear
about the sixties when universities
were forums for the evaluation of
contemporary society and bases for
action affecting its' directions. People don't like to talk about the
university as a place where the student, who as yet has no vested interests in society, can discuss the
world in a protected environment.
Seldom does one hear today's student talking about the repercussions
of an individual's actions in society.
It's awful quiet out there.
While in some respects the activism and social awareness of the
sixties lead to a dead end, one can
not help feel that today students are
missing out on something.
The recent debate concerning
sexism in engineering that covers
the letters page of The Ubyssey stirs
a thought: hey, those guys aren't so
different from staffers at The
Ubyssey. The engineers stick their
heads out of the crowd and dare
to say something. They are responsible for a great deal of action on
campus, and are definitely the most
The final solution?
In response to the flurry of letters
over my Perspectives article of Nov.
22 (Female engineers should stand
up to sexism), I would like to make
a few parting remarks.
I will freely admit that the article
was inflammatory and that it
painted a picture of the engineers as
being possibly worse than they are.
My intention was to provoke controversy and discussion by upsetting
and even irritating the reader. At
the time of writing I felt that the
best approach was to make a loud
noise; recognition of a problem is
the first step to the solving of it. Today I am less inclined to outrageous
and rabid criticism — what is required now is a calm appraisal of
the engineering tradition and steps
to eradicate sexism from the
engineering community.
The various letters sent in to The
Ubyssey bring to mind a couple
points of note. First, sexism is not
confined to engineering but
permeates all of society. That it
does so, however, does not justify
pretending that the engineers are innocent. They are guilty just as the
others are.
Second, some people
misunderstood me to believe that it
is up to women to stop men from
discriminating against them. Not
true. Men must stop discriminating
and women should be willing to admit that sexism exists and to raise
their voice when it happens to them.
It is up to men to listen and change.
Third, I have no objection to red
jackets per se, I only dislike the image which they project: the Lady
Godiva decal is plainly inappropriate.
If the engineers find their public
image upsetting, then they are going
to have to accept that they are the
authors of their own misfortune.
We create the image which we don't
like. 1 think that the public at large
would be greatly appeased if the
engineers did three things:
• put Lady Godiva to rest and
reject the Godiva decal ii favour of
some other figurehead.
• make a responsible and conscious effort to avoid policies and
activities which are obviously sexist.
• be willing to change in concert
with the evolving demands of social
conscience.
I would like to thank all of those
who took the time to respond to my
article. Greg Harms
bio-resource engineering 4
organized and effective faculty.
They act as a group and create
something out of nothing.
Whether it is better than nothing
is another question.
What's interesting about the
engineers is the amount of criticism
they draw. There are plenty of people ready to criticize the actions of
the geers, but how many of these
people do anything on their own initiative?
The Ubyssey also draws a lot of
criticism, most recently concerning
the coverage of the actions of the
Alma Mater Society. People have
criticized our coverage of the issue
as well as our point of view. But the
nature of the criticism is largely
limited to simple reactions against
the doings of others. The environment on campus condones the practice of breaking down the ideas of
others, but ignores the construction
of alternative ideas.
One issue where few ideas are be-
(freestyle)
ing formulated is the state of education. B.C. has the lowest per cent-
age of university students in the nation, and what students we do have
face a sharp decline in the quality of
education. Yet who does anything
about it?
I have this depressing habit of
looking at the letters page of The
Ubyssey as a reflection of the social
conscience of the student body. The
letters we receive are almost all reactions against something previously
written, and are almost always
destructive rather than constructive
in nature. Why doesn't anyone
write and tell us about what we
didn't cover? The letters you write
can affect the social awareness of
UBC and even (no!) Canada,
because the people reading your
letters will be in positions of power
and initiative 10 years down the
road.
It's your world. Is it the world
you want?
Moral confusion?
I suppose all academic pursuits are totally irrelevant on the campus of
UBC. Or such is the impression which a Ms. Muriel Draaisma gave when
she reviewed the latest edition of Arc magazine. Draaisma seemed to be
somewhat confused, so perhaps she should be enlightened.
Arc magazine was originally started as a forum for good student writing,
particularly that of the academic variety. While we have now broadened
our range of material greatly, we still value well-written, thoughtful essays.
We feel that such essays do appeal to more than "a few academics lingering
around Buchanan", and I think we have been vindicated by the sale of
most of our run of 250 copies.
There are entire departments of students on campus who write and read
essays constantly, and many of these people are interested in the ideas of
others. In fact, isn't an exchange of ideas what university is about? By
dismissing some excellent essays as "tedious" and taking another grossly
out of context, you show a basic lack of understanding of the value of an
education. I do not feel that one should automatically condemn what is
outside of one's field of interest.
What Arc prints represents the abilities of the student body, and we do
try for works from all years and points of view. Also, Arc is just what is
needed for many students struggling with English 100 and the English
Composition test. It provides examples of "A" papers to those who can
learn from them, and we like to think that we greatly benefit the first year
students and any others looking for examples of good undergraduate
essays.
Finally, we are always welcome to new editorial input and new submissions. If anyone feels that they have some constructive criticism, please
come and tell us, or leave a note in our mailbox in Buto 397. The same procedure applies to submissions, which we will accept until January 13, 1984.
We don't publish for our own sake, but look upon ourselves as a service for
anyone who is interested in having their work recognized, appreciated
and/or criticized by the university community. And we invite you, Ms.
Draaisma, or any other undergraduate to submit their work to such
exP°sure Iain Blair
associate editor
THE UBYSSEY
December 2, 1983
The Ubyssey is published Tuesday and Fridays throughout the
academic year by the Alma Mater Society of the University of British
Columbia. Editorial opinions are those of the staff and are not
necessarily those of the university administration or the AMS.
Member Canadian University Press. The Ubyssey's editorial office is
SUB 241k. Editorial department, 228-2301/2305. Advertising
228-3977/3978.
Muriel Draaisma yawned as she rose from her comfy state of serenity after 12 hours in a futon. Her
thoughts wandered to the office, where strange creatures such as Neil Lucente, official photog of the
Social Cretin party, and Bill Seymour, lay siege. And what about Brian Jones, still shaken from his
strange encounter at Trutch, but proud to wear his new Stanfields, and Doug Schmidt who had an
urge to turn gay because his love said au revoir and Gordon Clark who had apparently already made
this move after frequent trips to Benjamins. "Oh me oh me, oh my oh my, how can I face these
people," Muriel asked herself. Then came the thoughts about Sarah Cox, who was swept off her feet
by the dashing Justin Wyatt. "He's just another pretty face," thought the young revolutionary as she
lay still, with visions of Joel Pecchioli's moustache and Alan Olljum's beard suffocating Holly Nathan,
"Oh God," she yelled at even more horrible thoughts of Patti Rather and Robert Beynon. Chris Wong,
dressed totally in Mack, the epitome of hip, raced through her mind, followed by a strange visit from
Cary Rodin, on assignment from Vanderhoof with Steamer Plant chug chugging behind. Rnalry, came
grotesque images of hours trapped in a room with Peter Berlin talking to Peter Berlin, and "yuch" she
yelled, I see Robby Robertson paying $3,000 in fees. "Hopefully Charlie Fidelman is more comfortable
in her new bed in Trutch then I am," she said with pleasant memories of the past as she dozed back into a state of nirvanic tranquility. Friday, December 2,1983
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 9
Book offers healthy outlook
By GORDON CLARK
"Doctors are the most familiar
professionals. They bring us into
the world, they try to keep us there,
and at the end they help us fight the
last fight, yet they remain shrouded
in a potent mystique."
—in Martin O'Malley's Doctors
In his highly readable new book,
Martin O'Malley draws back the
curtains that surround the medical
establishment in Canada. By interviewing outstanding Canadian
physicians in many specialities, he
paints a sweeping picture of the
medical profession and gives an
understanding of the social and
professional difficulties as well as
joys in practising medicine.
Doctors
By Martin O'Malley
Macmillan of Canada
215 pgs.
Doctors is a book worth reading
because it offers many sides of a
whole variety of issues in a fair
manner, instead of a confusing
mosaic of medical images. Rather
than leaving us with one sided impressions, the book conveys the
feelings and arguments of both
sides.
One topic the book examines in
depth is the recent exodus of Canadian trained doctors to the U.S.
Many people feel a certain amount
of anger towards doctors who leave
Canada. It is argued that these people are taking advantage of Canadian tax payers since their medical
training is so heavily subsidized by
the government. And doctors who
migrate south are commonly branded as money hungry traitors.
O'Malley offers the views of
some of these doctors and their side
of the story is interesting to hear.
Another chapter in the book
deals with the work of Dr. Glen
Green, a holistic doctor who lost his
medical license because of his alternative approach to health care.
Green is an anomaly. He was
prime minister John Diefenbaker's
private physician and faithfully
practised orthodox medicine for 20
years before he turned to holistic
techniques. Green's approach to
health care is different becjfise he
believes through proper diet
everyone is capable of avoiding
disease and will not need the "crisis
medics" of traditional medicine.
He believes that most of our health
problems occur when our bodies
react chemically to some of the
common foods we eat. He,
however, does not simply rely on
controlled diets. Some of the
techniques he practises include getting people to drink their own urine
to improve their immunity to the
poisons they ingest daily.
"All this stuff sounds like horse
shit, but it works. I know it
works," he writes.
The description of his trial before
the Saskatchewan College of Physi-
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cians and Surgeons shows the rigidity of the medical establishment to
alternative health care.
The most interesting person introduced in the book is Dr. Harley
Smyth, a neurosurgeon of international acclaim. He expects to retire
from active surgery in a few years to
devote himself to his second field —
medical ethics.
He is an amazing man who has
devoted his life to perfecting new
techniques in brain surgery. Judging from passages in the book,
Smyth appears to be a highly skilled
and caring man. He has become a
spokesperson for the anti-choice
movement, although he presents a
fresh and less emotional reason for
supporting the rights of the unborn.
As the father of a Down's syndrome child, he knows the outcome of high risk pregnancies, but
maintains that abortion does not ter
minate a pregnancy, but ends a life.
As a doctor who works 80 hours a
week attempting to sustain life,
Smyth makes no distinction between the unborn and the born. People may not agree with his position
on abortion, but should respect his
intelligence and compassion. He
says he hopes he has what Albert
Schweizer called "Ehrfurcht vor
dem Leben" — Reverence for Life.
Arguably Doctor's most appealing feature is it presents a complete
view of a doctor's world without
bogging down in a marsh of
technical language. Doctors will
like the book because, while it does
expose some negative aspects of
traditional medicine, it also gives
them a chance to articulate their
arguments. And people not part of
the medical profession will simply
find the book highly interesting and
enjoyable.
r
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50c off
|  on Maxithins
i Super, Reg. 12s
NOTICE
U.B.C. ENGLISH
COMPOSITION TEST
is to be written
DECEMBER 12 at 8:30 a.m.
Please check the FINAL Examination Timetable for the location. All students writing the U.B.C. English Test must affix
a sticker to the test paper. Stickers may be obtained in one of
three ways:
1. Those students currently enrolled for English 100 and writing the test for
first time will receive a complimentary sticker.
2. Those students who have written the rest at any previous sitting must purchase a sticker from the Finance Department prior to December 9. The fee
is $10.00.
3. Those students who have not previously written the test and have not
received a complimentary sticker should contact the Registrar's Office
prior to December 9.
Students may use a dictionary.	
THE UBC BOOKSTORE
IS
PLEASED TO ANNOUNCE
THAT
ALLAN FOTHERINGHAM
will autograph
copies of his new book
Look Ma...
No Hands
ON FRIDAY. DEC. 2nd
12:30 pm to 1:30 pm.
TO RESERVE YOUR COPY
CALL 228-4741
Wt BOOKSTORE
b200 UNIVERSITY BLVD
UBC CAMPUS. VAN. B.C.  V6T  1Y5
JESUS OF
NAZARETH:
HIS VIEW OF
WOMEN!
Lecture By: Thena Ayers
SUB AUDITORIUM
Tuesday, Dec. 6 at 12:30
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Klimate is a waterproof, breathable fabric similar to Gore-Tex,
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shoulder patches. Men's and women's sizes.
So what's the problem? For complete waterproofness, deluxe
outdoor jackets like the Klimate have factory tape sealed seams, but
oops! the seam tape on these jackets has not proved durable in
washing.
What to do: Wear your jacket. The fabric is waterproof and for
most wear (skiing, windy days, light showers) seam leakage is not
a problem. If you wish you can remove the defective seam tape on
your jacket (or wait till it comes loose in the wash) and reseal the
seams yourself by hand using liquid seam sealer ($2.65/tube) or new
seam tape available at the Co-op.
PailtS TOO! Klimate pants with full side zippers. $29.00*.
Klimate pants with full side zippers and seat, knee and cuff patches to
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'Sale of all items to Co-op members only. Hurry! Quantities limited,
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Join us.
MOUNTAIN
EQUIPMENT
CO-OP
428 W. 8th Ave. — One Block East of Cambie
Open Thursdays and Fridays till 9 PM Page 10
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, December 2,1983
>B«C«™TERAA
Non-Credit Instructional Courses In Leisure Pursuits — Jan.-Apr. 1984
Our extensive Recreation U.B.C. Program is available to all students, faculty, staff, alumni and and their spouses.
PLEASE NOTE: Membership of $35.00 is required for all faculty, staff, alumni and their spouses — with the exception of
students and their spouses.
Registration for all courses will take place during regular office hours: Monday-Friday, 9:00 a.m.-3:00 p.m. at the INTRAMURAL SPORTS & RECREATION UBC Office, Room 203, War Memorial Gym. Phone 228-3996 for further information.
SECOND TERM REGISTRATION: Tuesday, January 3 - Friday, January 13, 1984
PLEASE NOTE: Classes will be cancelled for MID-TERM BREAK -
Thurs.-Fri., February 16-17. 1984 THERE WILL BE NO REFUNDS AFTER JANUARY 27th, 1984
REFUND POLICY: We cancel, you get a full refund. *   *   All classes are subject to last minute changes
You cancel after January 20th. there will be a $5.00 charge.
Please check at the REC UBC office for corrected course information.
CRS.
CODE
COURSE
DAY(S)
TIME
PLACE
FEE
DATE(S)
MAX.
NO.
100 FITNESS DIVISION
112 HATHA YOGA
122 STRENGTH TRAINING
124 STRENGTH TRAINING
132 STRENGTH TRAINING FOR WOMEN
134 STRENGTH TRAINING FOR WOMEN
136 STRENGTH TRAINING FOR WOMEN
142 RHYTHM FIT — "THE FITNESS
GROUP (Higher Intensity)
144   RHYTHM FIT — "THE FITNESS
GROUP (Lower Intensity)
152   STRENGTH, STRETCH & SWEAT
Rhythm Fit — "THE FITNESS
GROUP"
Tues/Thurs
Monday
Wednesday
Tues/Thurs
Tues/Thurs
Tues/Thurs
Mon/Tues/Thurs
Mon/Wed
Tues/Wed/Fri
Saturday
Mon/Wed
Tues/Wed/Fri
Saturday
Mon/Wed
4:30- 6:00 p.m. War Mem. Gym-Rm. 211
6:00- 7:30 p.m. War Mem. Gym-
Weight Room
6:00- 7:30 p.m. War Mem. Gym-
Weight Room
6:30- 7:30 p.m. War Mem. Gym-
Weight Room
6:30- 7:30 p.m. War Mem. Gym-
Weight Room
6:30- 7:30 p.m. War Mem. Gym-
Weight Room
7:30- 8:15 a.m. SUB Ballroom
12:30- 1:15 p.m. War Mem. Gym
4:40- 5:30 p.m. Gym B West
10:00-11:00 a.m.     Gym B-Osborne Ctre.
12:30- 1:15 p.m. War Mem. Gym
4:40- 5:30 p.m. Gym B West
10:00-11:00 a.m.     Gym B-Osborne Ctre.
3:30- 4:30 p.m.
War Mem. Gym
Mon/Wed/Thurs       12:30- 1:05 p.m.    Gym E-Osborne Ctre.
$30.00
$35.00
$35.00
$15.00
$15.00
$15.00
$40.00(1)
or
$2.00 per
class
$40.00 (1)
or
$2.00
per class
$40.00(1)
m.   or
$2.00
per class
$35.00 (2)
Jan. 17-March 8
Jan. 16-March 26
Jan. 18-March 28
Jan. 17-Feb. 2
Feb. 7-Feb. 28
March 1-March 20
Jan. 16-April 3
Jan. 16-April 4
Jan. 17-April 4
Jan. 21-March 31
Jan. 16-April 4
Jan. 17-April 4
Jan. 21-Mar. 31
Jan. 16-April 4
162   FACULTY/STAFF EXERCISE
CLASS
(1) The $40.00 fee allows participation in all three Rhythm Fit classes (Codes 142, 144, 152).
(2) Fee is the cost of membership in the Recreation UBC Program — Faculty/Staff & Spouses Only.
Jan. 16-April 4
30
20
20
20
20
20
100 +
100 +
100 +
40
200 MARTIAL DIVISION
300 OUTDOOR PURSUITS DIVISION
610 ADVANCED DANCE Tues/Thurs
612 ADVANCED MODERN DANCE Mon/Wed
622 ADVANCED JAZZ DANCE Mon/Wed
624 JAZZ DANCE (Level I) Mon/Wed
626 JAZZ DANCE (Level II) Tues/Thurs
632 JAZZ FIT Tues/Thurs
634 JAZZ FIT Tues/Thurs
12:30- 2:00 p.m. Armoury Bldg.-Rm. 208 $40.00
5:00- 6:30 p.m. Armoury Bldg.-Rm. 208 $40.00
12:30- 1:30 p.m.       Gym B West-Osborne $40.00
3:30- 4:30 p.m.        Gym E-Osborne Ctre. $40.00
12:30- 1:30 p.m. Armoury Bldg.-Rm. 203 $40.00
12:30- 1:30 p.m.       Gym B West-Osborne $40.00
4:30- 5:30 p.m. Armoury Bldg.-Rm. 208 $40.00
Jan. 17-Apr.
Jan. 16-Apr.
Jan. 16-Apr.
Jan. 16-Apr.
Jan. 17-Apr.
Jan. 17-Apr.
Jan. 17-Apr.
700 SCUBA DIVING — REGISTER AT REC. UBC OFFICE, ROOM 203, WAR MEM. GYM
710   SCUBA DIVING —
CERTIFICATION COURSE
(LEVEL I)
PLUS: 6 Open Water Dives
Tues/Thurs
3:00- 4:30 p.m.       TUES-Osborne Ctre.
Room 203 A
Saturday
Sat. & Sun
3:00- 4:30 p.m.
T.B.A.
T.B.A.
THURS-Aquatic
Centre
Open Water
Open Water
Jan. 17, Jan. 24,
Jan. 31, I-eb. 7,
Feb. 14, Feb. 21,
$150.00 Feb. 28
Jan. 19, Jan. 26,
Feb. 2, Feb. 9,
Feb. 23. Mar. 1
Februay 25, 1984
March 3-4, 1984
LEVEL III — for participants entering an instructional program for the first time to acquire basic activity skills.
LEVEL III — for participants who have learned basics of activity and wish to continue developing personal skills.
LEVEL III — for the experienced person wishing to acquire playing skills and techniques.
212
JUDO
Tues/Thurs
7:30- 9:30 p.m.
Gym G-Osborne Ctre.
$30.00
Jan. 17-March 22
30
222
TAI CHI
Tues/Thurs
7:30- 9:00 p.m.
Rm. 208-Armoury Bldg.
$25.00
Jan. 17-April 3
30
242
SHOTOKAN KARATE
Mon/Thurs
7:00- 9:00 p.m.
Gym E-Osborne Ctre.
$30.00
Jan. 16-March 22
30
252
WOMEN'S SELF DEFENSE
Mondays
7:00- 8:00 p.m.
Gym E-Osborne Ctre.
$15.00
Jan. 16-March 5
30
262
KUNG FU
Mon/Thurs
9:00-10:30 p.m.
Gym E-Osborne Ctre.
$25.00
Jan. 16-April 2
30
272
AIKIDO
Monday &
Wednesday
8:00- 9:30 p.m.
9:30-10:30 p.m.
Gym G-Osborne Ctre.
Gym G-Osborne Ctre.
$25.00
Jan. 16-April 4
30
312
LEARN TO SKATE
Tuesdays
4:15- 5:15 p.m.
Thunderbird Winter
Sports Centre
$25.00
Jan. 17-April 3
30
332
GOLF
Tues/Thurs
1:30- 2:30 p.m.
Gym E-Osborne Ctre.
$25.00
March 6-April 3
Saturday, April 7
16
342
FLAT WATER KAYAKING
Mondays
Saturday
9:00-12:00 p.m.
10:00-12:00 p.m.
10:00 a.m.-3:00 p.m.
UBC Aquatic Ctre.
$95.00
Mar. 5 & Mar. 12
Mar. 19 & Mar. 26
Saturday, Mar. 31
8
352
FLAT WATER KAYAKING
Wednesdays
Sunday
9:00-12:00 p.m.
10:00-12:00 p.m.
10:00 a.m.-3:00 p.m.
UBC Aquatic Ctre.
$95.00
Mar. 7 &Aflar. 14
Mar. 21 & Mar. 28
Sunday, April 1
500 RACQUET SPORTS DIVISION
"512
TENNIS (LEVEL I)
Mon/Wed
12:30- 1:30 p.m.
Armouries
$30.00
Jan. 16-Feb. 15
20
514
TENNIS (LEVEL I)
Monday
8:30-10:30 p.m.
Armouries
$30.00
Jan. 16-Feb. 13
20
516
TENNIS (LEVEL I)
Tues/Fri
12:30- 1:30 p.m.
Armouries
$30.00
Jan. 17-Feb. 14
20
518
TENNIS (LEVEL I)
Thursday
12:30- 2:30 p.m.
Armouries
$30.00
Jan. 19-Feb. 23
20
520
TENNIS (LEVEL I)
Saturday
8:30-10:30 a.m.
Armouries
$30.00
Jan. 21-Feb. 18
20
522
TENNIS (LEVEL II)
Tues/Fri
12:30- 1:30 p.m.
Armouries
$30.00
Feb. 21-Mar. 23
16
524
TENNIS (LEVEL II)
Saturday
8:30-10:30 a.m.
Armouries
$30.00
Feb. 25-Mar. 24
16
526
TENNIS (LEVEL II)
Mon/Wed
12:30- 1:30 p.m.
Armouries
$30.00
Feb. 20-Mar. 21
16
528
TENNIS (LEVEL II)
Thursday
12:30- 2:30 p.m.
Armouries
$30.00
Mar. 1-Mar. 29
16
530
TENNIS (LEVEL II)
Sunday
9:30-11:30 a.m.
Armouries
$30.00
Jan. 22-Feb. 19
16
532
TENNIS (LEVEL III)
Monday
8:30-10:30 p.m.
Armouries
$30.00
Feb. 20-Mar. 19
12
534
TENNIS (LEVEL III)
Monday
11:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m.
Armouries
$30.00
Jan. 16-Mar. 19
12
536
TENNIS (LEVEL III)
Sunday
9:30-11:30 a.m.
Armouries
$30.00
Feb. 26-Mar. 25
12
542
BADMINTON (All Levels)
Mon/Wed
6:30- 7:30 p.m.
Gym B-Osborne Ctre.
$25.00
Jan. 16-Feb. 15
30
552
SQUASH (Level I)
Mon/Wed
4:15- 5:45 p.m.
Winter Sports Ctre.
$55.00
Jan. 16-Feb. 15
8
554
SQUASH (Level II)
Mon/Wed
4:15- 5:45 p.m.
Winter Sports Ctre.
$55.00
Feb. 20-Mar. 21
8
562
RACQUETBALL (Level I)
Tues/Thurs
4:15- 5:45 p.m.
Winter Sports Ctre.
$55.00
Jan. 17-Feb. 14
8
564
RACQUETBALL (Level II)
Tues/Thurs
4:15- 5:45 p.m.
Winter Sports Ctre.
$55.00
Feb. 21-Mar. 22
8
600 DANCE DIVISION*
20
25
50
50
30
50
30
20 Friday, December 2,1983
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 11
Theatrespace behind Times
By HOLLY NATHAN
A small makeshift theatre in the
depths of Gastown captures almost
perfectly the subversive, revolutionary flavor of the Theatre-space
presentation of Die Mutter.
Bertolt Brecht had a specific audience of German workers in mind
when he wrote Die Mutter in the
1930s. Based on Maxim Gorky's
story about a simple peasant
woman who joins the 1905 Russian
revolution, Brecht's play is an exhortation for workers of the world
to unite. The words are simple and
the ideas simplistic. But comparing
the entire social structure of Russia
to the ownership of a table as
Brecht does would leave most people cold and would certainly not
persuade them to hurl themselves
before a rain of bullets in the name
of revolution.
Die Mutter
By Bertolt Brecht
Playing until Dec. 4
But Brecht addresses the problem
of the helplessness of the individual
in the face of an overwhelmingly
oppressive society. Brecht's symbolic mother takes up the fight,
challenging the notion of the
backward, illiterate peasant bent
eternally over a pot of soup or a
plot of land, while political wars
rage all around.
Judith Rane does a great job of
looking perpetually worried,
motherly and harassed but her conversion to politics is not convincing.
Brecht did not wish to appeal
through the emotions as much as
through the intellect, but the world
of "us" and "them" as portrayed
in the play is simply too hard to
swallow.
It is not clear what
Theatrespace's intentions were in
staging this play. As a forum for
alternative theatre, it might have
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done better to stage one of Brecht's
better works. Die Mutter has an
unsettling air of pedantic
preaching, based on Brecht's
technique of characters speaking
directly to the audience and one
leaves feeling vaguely insulted.
There was also a confused notion
of how far to trust the audience.
Some things were wisely left to the
imagination and others were
patronizingly spelled out, such as a
tiresome and frequent change of
scene which was mostly symbolic,
as well as some film footage from a
movie showing the slaughter of
workers at the Winter Palace.
If the audience was encouraged
to make comparisons between he
striking Russian workers and the
Solidarity coalition — as the appearance on stage of Solidarity
Times would seem to indicate — it
is not a very enlightening comparison. Times, after all, have
changed.
Deak - Perera
From now until the end of the year, all Deak
Perera offices in the Vancouver area will display
collection boxes for the public to donate foreign
coins and banknotes.
At the end of the year Deak - Perera will convert the money collected to Canadian funds and
forward the proceeds to the Multiple Sclerosis
Society of B.C. Donations are being accepted at
all B.C. offices:
Gilford Mall, Surrey; Stock Exchange Tower, 609
Granville, Vancouver (Pacific Centre). Other Canadian Offices: Toronto, Ont.; Mississauga, Ont.;
Montreal, P.O.
Your home
away from home.
Students, senior citizens,
military personnel, men, women
and families will find clean,
quiet rooms with a telephone at
reasonable rates (under $25).
After a busy day, relax in the
pool or enjoy some court
games. So, for more than a
good night's rest, think of the
Downtown YMCA.
The Seattle Downtown YMCA
909 Fourth Avenue
Seattle, Washington 98104
(206) 382-5000
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LOOK GREAT FOR LESS
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Top names for head to toe dressing at
prices that will strretch your shrunken
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THE MENS CONSIGNMENT BOUTIQUE
GRAY FLANNEL
1979 Lonsdale 986-1491
Daily 10-6
Sun. 12-4
Jack Daniel Distillery Named a National Historic Place by the United States Government
AT THE JACK DANIEL DISTILLERY we
have everything we need to make our whiskey
uncommonly smooth.
We have daily deliveries of the very
finest grain American farmers can
grow. A stream of pure,
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I flowing close by our
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things—and some others too—we
predict a pleasurable moment when
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Our own iron-free water
London
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1913 1954
H you'd like a booklet about Jack Daniels Whiskey, write us a tetter here in Lynchburg. Tennessee 37352. USA
BROADWAY Page 12
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, December 2, 1983
M
Vancouver
after Classes ...
THE KEG
AND
Introduces
A Dinner and Dance Special
Wednesday's
Student Night
Enjoy Caesar's for Dinner
20% OFF ALL FOOD
Afterwards visit Brandy's
Featuring:
- Great music
- Friendly Atmosphere
- ALL NIGHT STUDENT PRICES
(Bring Student I.D.)
The Keg Corner, Providing The Complete Night Out.
HORNBY and DUNSMUIR
Traditional
Greco-Roman Cuisine
7 Days a Week: 5 p.m.-l a.m.
Fri. and Sat.: 5 p.m. to 2 a.m.
FREE fast delivery/
228-9513
4510 Wast 10th Ave.
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Sat.
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LUNCH SPECIALS
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.
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Sun. 4:00pm   -    1:00am
2136 Western Parkway
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The only place you can get excellent vegetarian and non-
vegetarian food at reasonable prices.
OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK - LUNCH & DINNER
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for up to 70 people:
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(at tha back of tha rUlaga) Friday, December 2,1983
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 13
F.O.B. not stale
on touchy issue
By CHRIS WONG
The play F.O.B. (Fresh Off The
Boat) begins with a humorous and
powerful scene that touches on the
stigmatized attitudes often encountered by Chinese new to North
America. The scene features
Keeman Wong who summarizes, in
a   few   minutes,    many   of   the
stereotypes and labels cast upon
those "fresh off the boat."
Wong announces in a loud voice
that a FOB can be distinguished
from an ABC (American Born
Chinese) by some unmistakable
characteristics that include a
"loud" and "stupid" manner, and
an "ugly and greasy" appearance. He adds that a FOB can
be found in such places as Chinese
discos and Bee Gees concerts.
The attitudes presented sarcastically in these opening moments
of this Crossroads Theatre production serve as a preface to the play's
action, which focuses on the efforts
of three Chinese-Americans to find
their ethnic identity.
A theme concentrating on
characters searching for their identity is nothing new. But in adapting
this theme to the problems faced by
Chinese in a white-dominated society, American playwright David
Hwang has come up with a fresh
angle. FOB explores and analyzes
the   prejudices   new   Chinese   en
counter from their own people —
those who grew up in Western
society and have lost their traditional ways. The play avoids an examination of the conflict between
whites and Chinese — a much more
talked about subject.
But despite the play's emphasis
on a sensitive subject that has
received little attention, the production of FOB at the Firehall Theatre
suffers from uneven acting and a
haphazard construction.
The scenes take place in the back
of a small Chinese restaurant in
Torrence, California, where Grace
(Angela Sui) meets Steve (Raymond
Dang), who has an accent and manner that indicates he is fresh off the
boat.
Grace is a first generation
Chinese-American who has spent
most of her life away from Chinese
society. Her character epitomizes
the dilemma faced by many Chinese
living in Western society. She feels a
need to fit in with the American
way of life, but she also has a strong
urge to maintain cultural traditions.
This is illustrated by her interest in
Fa Mu Lan — a Chinese folk
heroine who in legend took her
father's place as a warrior.
While Grace walks the middle
line in her search for cultural identity, the characters Steve and Dale
represent the two extremes. Steve is
new tot he country and adopts a
tough exterior which he projects
through his obsession with another
legendary Chinese figure: Gwan
Gung, a God known for his skill as
a warrior. While Gwan Gung commands respect in Chinese society,
when Steve announces he is the all-
powerful Gwan Gung, he only
receives blank stares from
Westerners.
F.O.B. (Fresh Off The Boat)
By David Hwang
Directed by Kate Weiss
At the Firehall Theatre
Playing until Dec. 11
At the other extreme is Dale,
Grace's cousin played by Wong. He
knows how to command respect in
American society. He drives an
XI/9 and wears slick designer jeans.
Chinese Gods and tradition, important parts of the play, are of little
significance to him.
Dale and Steve have a verbal battle that brings in the conflicts between Chinese separated in their
cultural heritage. Dale takes the offensive by making fun of Steve's
English, and taking advantage of
his ignorance to Western ways. He
makes a dark prediction that when
Steve fulfills the American dream
of finding riches and success, he will
betray his family and leave behind
cultural traditions by taking a jump
off the boat and becoming a real
American with a confused sense of
his ethnicity.
While the two battle it out, Grace
sits back and undergoes a transformation. She recognizes Steve's
anguish after Dale's verbal attack.
Sui is successful in showing how her
character finds the proper balance
between her American environment
and her Chinese background.
Braineater horrifies
By PATTI FLATHER
Disturbing, terrifying horror
which captivates you with it's sheer
energy and imagination
characterizes the art of Jim Cummins.
Cummins, the lone musician in
the punk group I. Braineater, is a
master of a wide range of art including paintings, sculptures and
even furniture. His exhibit in the
Unit/Pitt gallery is a trip into the
depths of creativity.
The art of Jim Cummins
At The Unit/Pitt Gallery
On display until Dec. 11 ,
The focus of the exhibit is two
realistic portraits. One is a huge
closeup of a man's face, his cold
eyes staring, his fap mouth closed
and determined. The title begins
"He's going to beat you up . . ."
Alongside, an older man with
bloodshot eyes is portrayed, his
cheeks sunken and unshaved. The
title says "He is old and mean and
drunk. He don't like you and he
don't have to . . ."
These works make the viewer feel
like turning around and running
away from the rage and violence expressed.
Perhaps Cummins' most powerful work is a painting titled "Silent
night. Everyone is there but no
saviour tonight." In this large painting, masses of skeleton-like people
with no hair, greyish skulls and
bulging, painful eyes gather. Some
are screaming while one figure faces
the crowd with the words "I.
Braineater" written on his square
form.
Very different styles are used in
other paintings. Some contain simple figures with black dots for eyes
and nose and thick single lines for
their bodies. The figures are solidly
painted in grey or brown with no
shading.
The unorthodox shapes of the art
are also interesting. Some paintings
are triangular. The board for one
painting reminiscent of a Dutch
landscape — in which a tiny tank
approaches — is cut in the shape of
a tank. Other irregular shapes are
white and splattered with black.
"Table for two" is an actual
table in the shape and appearance
of an angry robot.
The two sculptures are striking
and well-done. One is of a winged
female   figure  created   from  con-
violence,   and   the   portrayal   of
women.
One example is the surrealistic
painting, "Every boy needs a girl."
The arms of the male figure appear
as fins or claws as they sweep
around the female figure, aiming
for her grossly enlarged breast.
Another painting depicts a
woman with made-up face and
black hair askew. One hand with
long, sharp blood-red nails is held
near her head, and her huge breasts
almost burst out of her dress.
These and other paintings leave
confusing and disturbing impressions of violence and sexism
towards women. Perhaps this is
Cummin's point, but it is unclear
whether these paintings are critical
or supportive of these impressions.
Sui and the other performers in
F.O.B. are convincing in their portrayals of Chinese-Americans in
transition. But their acting lacks the
polish and stage sense necessary for
such a sensitive play. Moments of
hesitation disrupt the flow of the
play.
The play's flow is also interrupted by its construction. Scenes in
the restaurant are interspliced by
scenes where the individual
characters pour out their souls.
While the playwright's intention
was to provide a greater insight into
the inner thoughts of the
characters, these scenes disrupt the
rising action of F.O.B. It would
have been more effective for the attitudes of the three to be displayed
solely by their actions during the
course of the play rather than by
these tedious breaks.
Although the writer's decision to
spell things out clearly is valid, the
effect would have been greater if
the audience had been left to
perceive the character's attitudes.
But these confusing monologues
are offset by a good balance of
serious and humourous moments
and the play managers to do justice
to an often neglected but serious
issue.
Film on good terms
By JUSTIN WYATT
James Brooks makes his debut as
a director in Terms of Endearment,
a film charting the relationship between a mother and daughter over a
15-year period. Brooks, who
created Taxi and The Mary. Tyler
Show, shows much promise in
Terms of Endearment. The film is
both moving and comic, yet certain
flaws make this film only a partial
success.
The film focuses on the relationship between Aurora Greenway
(Shirley MacLaine) and her
daughter Emma (Debra Winger)
during the young woman's turbulent marriage. Various arguments
and reconciliations occur over the
years, and the growth of both
women is seen. Emma grows from a
young carefree teenager to an il-
ndependent, confused mother
desperately trying to cope with an
unfaithful husband. Aurora's transition follows the opposite route;
she changes from a tense matron to
a   more   relaxed,   sexually  adven-
crete, steel, and wire (and weighing
75 pounds!).
Cummins' art is difficult to
classify because it is so varied and
strange. Curator Barbara Daniels
said "You could safely call it postmodern. He just takes everything
from different historical styles."
While this versatility and the skill
it is handled with make this exhibit
well worth seeing, viewers may feel
ambivalent   or   disgusted   by  the
turous person as evidenced by her
involvement with former astronaut
Garrett Breedlove (Jack
Nicholson).
Brooks shows his ability with
scenes between mother and
daughter.: His most successful
scenes coalesce from comic to tragic
within seconds. Especially
memorable is Emma's birthday
scene in which her once amusing
confusion and anger becomes
pathetic.
The film's greatest attribute is its
talented cast. Shirley MacLaine has
the toughest role, but she manages
to make Aurora's difficult transition realistic. Winger's role is better
developed; her energy and life give
humor and meaning to Emma.
Lithgow may be one of the most
underrated actors of the decade. In
the past year, he has already turned
in tremendous performances as
Roberta Muldoon in The World
According to Garp, and as the terrified passenger in Twilight Zone —
The Movie. In this film, he plays
Winger's extramaritial interest with
skill.	
Terms of Endearment
Directed by James Brooks
Playing at the Capitol Six
His deadpan delivery and quiet
humour are in direct opposition to
the slapstick fun of Nicholson's
character. Nicholson creates a
lovable character that offers the
audience relief from the tense rapport between MacLaine and
Winger. Nicholson deserves the
Oscar for best supporting actor
with this performance.
But Terms of Endearment has its
share of problems. The script jumps
years at a time in the lives of its
characters leaving the viewer in confusion about the action in the omitted time. As a result, entire
characters disappear in the shuffle.
The prime examples of forgotten
characters are MacLaine's suitor,
Vernon Dahlart (Danny DeVito)
and Winger's best friend, Patsy
(Lisa Hart Carroll). De Vito's
disappearance is especially annoying since he enters and exits the
story with no explanation. Less
troublesome are the unrealistic, offbeat situations that Brooks imposes
on his characters. Some of the
humour in these situations detracts
from the reality the director builds
so carefully in the rest of the film. Page 14
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, December 2,1983
Yiutii
NIGHTCLUBBING
Hugh Fraser: Vancouver's multi-
instrumentalist/composer fronting an original
quintet. Dec. 4, Classical Joint, 231 Carrall,
689-0667.
Blaina Dunaway: another multi-
instrumentalist who plays a curious combination: violin and trumpet with a group featuring
once again, Hugh Fraser, Dec. 6, Classical
Joint.
Gettin' Off Easy: a vocal trio with you guessed it, Hugh Fraser on piano. Classical Joint.
Big Band Bash: featuring some hot young
jazz musicians in two of Vancouver's better
community bands, Dec. 2-3, Hot Jazz Club,
36 E. Broadway, 873-4131.
CAMPUS GIGS
Vancouver Walsh Man's Choir: singing
many of the worlds' favourite choral music arrangements, Dec. 2, Old Audotorium,
324-1134.
Davinder Hundal: violinists playing classical
East Indian ragas, Dec. 4, 2:30 p.m., Museum
of Anthropology, 228-5067.
Repercussion: a percussion ensemble that
has left audiences breathless, Dec. 7-8, 8
p.m.. Recital Hall, 733-0113.
CONCERT CONNECTION
Skyline: a bluegrass group led by master
banjoist Tony Trischka, Dec. 2, Oddfellows'
Hall, 1720 Gravely.
The Combo Clash: five jazz combos vie for
top spot in this friendly jazz cutting session,
Dec. 3, 8 p.m.. Mount Pleasant Recital Hall,
225 W. 8th.
Talking Heads: Mr. Psycho Killer, Qu'est-ce
sas, fa fa fa fa fa, fa fa fa fa fa is finally in town
with his ingenious band, the question is
whether Bryne and co. creatively immersed in
funk has lost their energetic oomph, find out
Dec. 3, Pacific Coliseum.
Tha West Coast Music Fest: featuring 30 of
Vancouver's alternative bands, Dec. 5-10, The
Waterfront, 686 Powell, 253-6753.
D.O.A./Shanghai Dog/Young Rub-
bias/Actionauts: four alternative bands
which seem to be sprouting up everywhere,
see D.O.A.'s new drummer, Dec. 9, Commodore Ballroom.
•
■saia. *»
CAMPUS CINEMA
SUBfilms (SUB Auditorium, 228-3697) Dec.
1-4; 48 Hours, Thurs. and Sun., 7 p.m.; Fri.
and Sat. 7 and 9:30 p.m.
REPERTORY CINEMA
Pacific Cinematheque (1155 W.  Georgia,
732-6119) Dec. 5: The Owl and The Raven,
7:30 and 9:30 p.m.
Ridge Theatre 116th and Arbutus, 738-6311)
Alfred Hitchcock film festival continues with
some films that stay away from the intense
horror genre, but retain the suspense, Rear
Window. 7:15 and 9:30 p.m. Next showing.
Vertigo. Vancouver East Cinema (7th and
Commercial, 253-5465) Dec. 2-4: Animal
Crackers, 7:30 p.m.; Cocoanuts. 9:15 p.m.
Dec. 5-6: Odd Man Out. 7:30, p.m.; The
Third Man, 9:30 p.m. Dec. 7; Nicholas and
Alexander, 7:30 p.m. Dec. 8: Dr. Zhivago.
7:30 p.m.
Hollywood Theatre (3123 W. Broadway,
738-3211) Dec. 2-4: The Optimists. 7:30
p.m.; Missing, 9:35 p.m. Dec. 5-11: The
Seventh Seal, 7:30 p.m.; Citizen Kane. 9:30
p.m.
Savoy Cinema (Main and Kingsway,
872-2124) Dec. 2-4: Tron. 7:30 p.m.; Raiders
of the Lost Ark, 9:20 p.m. Dec. 3: Star Trek
Two — The Wrath of Khan, midnight. Dec.
5-6: Last Tango in Paris. 7:30 p.m.; The
Discreet Charm of the Bourgeoisie. 9:50
p.m. Dec. 7-8: Dr. Strangalova. 7:30 p.m.;
On the Beach, 9:30 p.m.
Craw: an alley tale in one act by Danny Vie,
experimental dance performance borrowing
from traditional narratives to tell the story of
the "new world", Dec. 10, 8 p.m., Central
Centre; Dec. 11, 8 p.m., Western Front, $3.
An Entertainment at tha Cafe Terminus:
an entertaining look at terrorism (?), Dec. 6,
8-9, Cap College Studio Theatre, $2.
Godspell: rock with J.C. to this funky beat,
opens Dec. 3, Q.E. Playhouse. 872-6622.
Gypsy: stars Roma  Hearn in this Dunbar
Musical   Theatre   production,   till   Dec.   3,
Metro Theatre. 266-7191.
Piaf, Her Songs. Her Loves: about the Parisian street singer who went on to fame and
francs. City Stage, 751 Thurlow, 688-1436.
Fresh Off Tha  Boat: the story of three
Chinese-Americans in search of their cultural
identity, till Dec. 11, Firehall Theatre, 280 E.
Cordova, 689-0926.
White Rock: portrayal of three different
characters and their opposing views and relationships, Dec. 2-4, Waterfront Theatre,
Granville Island, 685-6228.
Working: a musical by Studs Terkel (candidate for name of the year award), opens
Dec. 6, Studio 58, 100 W. 49th, 324-5227.
Reflections on Crooked Walking: Ann
Mortifee's musical fantasy, opens Dec. 2, Arts
Club Granville Island.
The Dead of Winter: a chilling Gothic
thriller. Arts Club Seymour. I Dol I Do!: a
delightful musical about love and marriage
(two very mysterious entities), opens Dec. 9,
Arts Club Granville Island.
•
I, Braineater: featuring the art work of a
very, very wierd guy, Jim Cummins who has
HA VE TROUBLE SA YING
WHA T YOU MEAN?
Carter Communications Ltd. can help. We . . .
produce   critiques   on   manuscript   content   and   presentation
help construct persuasive and coherent arguments
help produce smooth, clear, concise prose
So for assistance with . . .
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*ji»V ***hr tfA>' «»irV*»V *»»*»* <*&& ***V **hr **&& w^y *&
t \
f       mmmmmmmmm $
t I
f CHRISTMAS J
It's that time of year for parties, j^
Japanese   oranges,   mistletoe, ^
t presents, LIQUOR, and more. Like %
exams. j»
And    the    annual    Ubyssey "
t Christmas edition. J
So there will be no Ubyssey Jf
f Tuesday, you will have to wait un- J
til Thursday for our final edition of S
19183. »>
~ Deadline for letters, Tweens and J
J* the like is Tuesday at 1 p.m. S
t k
v&w **hr »** »&0 »&* ■"»V m<V »»i*V ■"'V **hr **h* *»»*
filled  a  gallery  full   of  paintings,   posters,
stickers, sculptures and furniture, till Dec. 10,
Unit/Pitt Gallery. 163 W. Pender, 681-6740.
Contemporary    Art:    featuring    some
unknowns of the art world, till Dec. 9.
AMS Gallery, SUB.
Imaginary Animals: depictions of fantastic
creatures, till Dec. 4, Artists Gallery. 565
Hamilton.
More Than Meets The Eye: a collection of
watercolours  by Joan Ward-Harris,   opens
Dec. 2, M.C. Duthie Gallery, 776 Thurlow,
689-4766.
Women Waiting: German sixteenth century
prints, opens Dec. 7.
Burnaby Art Gallery. 6344 Gilpin, 291-9441.
m
<UJ00tt
TODAY
CHINESE STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Squash nite, 9:30-11 p.m.. Winter Sports centre.
THUNDERBIRD BASKETBALL
Varsity Women vs. Belco Electric, Seattle, 6:30
p.m.. War Memorial gym.
THUNDERBIRD GYMNASTICS
Varsity Women vs. University of Calgary, 6:30
p.m., Osborne Centre II.
MEN'S BASKETBALL
High school tournament, all day. War Memorial
gym.
THE UBYSSEY
Clean-up tha office party, 4:30 p.m., ths office.
HOLLYWOOD
3123 West Broadway
738-3211
Week of Nov. 28-Dec. 4
Costa Gavras' Oscar Winner (1982-
Best Original Screenplay).
MISSING
9:35
Peter Sellers "Best Performance"
THE OPTIMISTS
7:30
CLIP THIS AD FOR
ONE FREE ADULT
ADMISSION
When accompanied by one
paid adult admission
EXPIRES DEC. I (not valid Friday or Sat.)
UNITED AGAINST THE CRUISE
Peace Camp - plus slide show of various peace
camps around tha world, beach bonfire, 5 p.m.
(6:30 p.m. slide show), 17:30 p.m. bonfire).
Peace Arch park.
DANCE CLUB
More street hustle lessons, noon, SUB partyroom.
LE CLUB FRANCAIS
General meeting, noon. International House upper lounge.
SATURDAY
UNITED AGAINST THE CRUISE
Peace camp continued, all day, Peace Arch park.
Music, jugglers street theatre, etc.
THUNDERBIRD BASKETBALL
Varsity women vs. Belco Electric, Seattle, 2
p.m.. War Memorial.
MEN'S BASKETBALL
High school tournament, all day. War Memorial
gym.
CHESS CLUB
Special chess tournament for novices, $6 entry
fee; draw for $300 chess computer; brings sets
and clocks; open to everyone, registration 9-10
a.m., Angus 421.
DANCE CLUB
Xmas party with team match and lots of dancing, 7:30 p.m.-12:30 a.m., SUB ballroom.
CHINESE VARSITY CLUB
Pub night, 7:30-12 p.m.. The Poits.
SUNDAY
MOTORCYCLE CLUB
Christmas toy run — sponsored by several lower
mainland clubs, 9:30 a.m., starts from Lougheed
mall.
ST MARK'S COLLEGE
The Dene Nation — a slide presentation with Fr.
Bruno Tesolin, Mary Anne Morris and Richard
Whiting, 8 p.m., St. Mark's College Music room.
CORKY SAYS:
Good luck on
all your exams
HAIft
CORKYS
STYLING
APPOINTMENT SERVICE
731-4191
3644 West 4th Avenue
At Alma
CHESS CLUB
'83 and '81 B.C. Junior Champions will each play
30 players at once; $2 entry fee; meant for
novices; brings sets and clocks; open to
everyone; registration 9-10 a.m., Angus 421.
UNDERWATER HOCKEY
Practise, 10 p.m.. Aquatic centre.
CYCLING CLUB
Ride, 9 a.m., meet south side of SUB.
MONDAY
UBC CYCLING CLUB
Noon hour ride, noon (when else!), north side of
SUB.
SLAVONIC CIRCLE
General meeting, guest speaker Dr. Petro on
Czechoslavakia, 4 p.m., Buch. B312.
CITR RADIO
The Hot Air show, the quarter finals, 9 p.m., The
Pit.
MONDAY
FIRST YEAR STUDENTS COMMITTEE
General meeting, all first year students welcome,
noon, Buch. B221.
OVEREATERS ANONYMOUS
General meeting,  12 noon,  Lutheran Campus
Centre conference room.
CIRCLE K
General meeting, 3:30 p.m., SUB 211.
WEDNESDAY
VARSITY OUTDOOR CLUB
General meeting, noon, Chem 150.
ANARCHIST CLUB
Literature table, 11 a.m.-2 p.m., SUB concourse.
PSI UPSILON FRATERNITY
Last I.F.C. bzzr garden of the year, 4-8 p.m.,
2260 Wesbrook mall.
HAPPY HOUR
serve
COPIES
kinkcs copies
5706 University Blvd.
Vancouver, B.C.
V6T 1K6
(604) 222-1688
THE CLASSIFIEDS
RATES: AMS Card Holders - 3 lines, 1 day $2.50; additional lines, 60c. Commercial — 3 lines,
1 day $4.20; additional lines, 65c. Additional days, $3.80 and 60c.
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Publications, Room 266, S.U.B., UBC, Van., B.C. V6T2A5
Charge Phone Orders over $5.00. Call 228-3977. >   VISA
5 - COMING EVENTS
25 - INSTRUCTION
HOW TO PASS THE
ENGLISH
COMPOSITION
EXAM
Attend an afternoon seminar
especially designed for English 100
students and learn all the skills and
techniques necessary to pass. Full
notes provided. Preregistration, by
Dec. 2 is essential due to demand
for enrollment.
1:00-5:00 p.m. Sunday. Dec. 4,1983
SUB 213. fee $35.00. Contact: L.A.
Johanson, B.A. (Hons.) Res:
732-1593. (weekends and evenings)
LSAT. GMAT, CAT preparation. Call National Testing 738-4618. Please leave message
on tape. Manager is counselling.
ENGLISH TUTORING - instruction in all
areas. Speaking & writing, essays, term
papers, reports, theses, oral presentations,
etc. Grammar, composition, spelling, punctuation. Brian, 682-1043.
30 - JOBS
10 - FOR SALE - Commercial
LIQUID    HONEY    &    HONEYCOMB    at
Farm Price. Half-way along University Blvd.
at Church. 261-9105 after 7 P.M.
11 - FOR SALE - Private
USED FENCING EQUIPMENT, one each
of the following: Foil — rt. hand St. Paul;
Mask — St. Paul; Ladies Electric Jacket
-Med; Ladies Regular Jacket - Med.; Mens
Rt. Glove - Med., hardly used. Sold as
package $135 or by the piece. Janet - Res:
683-7805, Bus 682-0811 (loc. 571)
20 - HOUSING
HOUSE FOR RENT part. furn. 4/bdrms.
Jan./84 July/84 $12007mo. near UBC.
224-7205.
ROOM & BOARD on Campus, single or
double avail, now or Jan. phone 224-9930.
Ask for John or Mark.
DOMINION AUTOMOBILE ASSOCIATION
Has p/t sales positions available to market
tried & proven necessary car-care service.
Comm. & bonus paid daily. Earn between
$40-60 per eve. Call Leo 688-4163 (24 hrs) or
683-3914 (office).
AUTOPLAN SALES REP - Everyone must
renew their auto insurance - Why not
through you? Earn 70% commission on
each renewal, working on your own hours.
Call 732-1809 or 684-3828.
40 - MESSAGES
ELLEN STRONG: Gela is in Germany. Please
write. For address call Bonnie 872-4081.
65 - SCANDALS
WHAT GOES QUACK, Quack, has a fluffy
white beard, and wears sunglasses.
Answer: A duck in a Christmas movie.
TO THE PLEDGES of Delta Gamma. You're
the greatestl Don't forget to ask Santa for
gum boots. The Actives
EXPERT TYPING. Essays, term papers,
factums, letters, manuscripts, resumes,
theses, IBM Selectric II. Reasonable rates.
Rose, 7 3 1-9857.
FAST. ACCURATE WORD PROCESSING.
10/hr. essays, term papers, letters, etc.
879-5108. Visa accepted.
WORD PROCESSING SPECIALISTS: U
write we type theses, resumes, letters,
essays, days, evenings, weekends.
736-1208.
WORD PROCESSING (Micom). Student
rates for thesis typing, $12/hr. Equation
typing available. Phone Jeeva at 876-5333.
DOTS WORD PROCESSING service
offers reasonable rates for students for term
papers, essays, & masters thesis. 273-6008
evenings.
YEAR ROUND EXPERT typing from
legible work, essays, theses. 738-6829 10
a.m. - 9 p.m. On King Edward bus route.
FAST, ACCURATE typing at reasonable
rates. 732-0834 after 6 p.m.
PROFESSIONAL TYPING, essays, thesis,
manuscripts, etc. Choice of type engineering exp. Reasonable 271-6755.
TYPING: experienced typist; reasonable
rates; all jobs, will pick up and deliver. Tel.
421-0818, Mary Lou.
70 - SERVICES
EXPERT RESEARCH help for hire. 224-5802
or 224-6518.
86 - TYPING
TYPEWRITING - ESsays, resumes, MINIMUM NOTICE REQUIRED. Tapes
transcribed. Elite, Pica or Script. UBC
Village location. 224-6518 day or night.
ABOVE AVERAGE TYPIST. For accurate
professional result call Audrey. 228-0378.
WORD PROCESSING. Essays, Theses,
Resumes, Etc. by professional typist. Ask
for our student rate. Ellen, 271-6924.
SAME DAY SERVICEI Fast accurate,
dependable low rates. 734-8451 anytime.
99 - MISCELLANEOUS	
IMAGE DESIGN. 2331 Main St., 876-5586.
15% discount for students on all reg. priced
items. Full line of drafting, engineering B
art supplies. SPECIAL Drafting Table
-$139.00 Friday, December 2,1983
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 15
Vancouver Dance Week offers wide variety
By CHARLIE FIDELMAN
Performances during the recent
Vancouver Dance week featured the
work of more than 30 Vancouver-
based choreographers, who provided a broad spectrum of performances ranging from post-mortem
cliches to post-modern innovation,
with an emphasis on dance-theater.
Much of the work was original
and experimental.
One of the highlights was Peter
Bingham's Violators Will Be Towed
Away. It started uniquely with
Bingham emerging from a seat in
the audience. He slowly emptied his
pockets, removed his shoes, socks
and shirt, and sat on a chair staring
back at the spectators. The chair
served as a centre. Bingham performed rhythmic gyrations on,
over, under, and around the chair
including a visual interpretation of
a Nat King Cole love song.
Lyne Lanthier in Good Night
Sweetheart used disconnected parts
to structure a very comical unit. She
danced energetically, like a child flinging about a room and flew to a
noisy stop on an open piano.
A dance by Savannah Walling
lacked proper lighting and the
choreography was unimpressive.
The first six minutes showed a
swaddjed figure hunched over
flashing lights. Her silence,
seriousness and dramatic taut hand
gestures provided some interesting
images of agony.
T. Schiporst gave a stunning per
formance. Using projected images
of a wedding, she danced and alternated between song and dialogue
with her partner. She re-enacted the
wedding, confetti included, giving
an intelligent and fun performance.
Ranald Rabu's On A Cold
Winter's Eve, a highly polished
traditional ballet, featured two
dancers engrossed remorsely in
emotional pursuit of their relationship. The result is a tongue in cheek
pas de deux. The dance appeals to
the sentimentality of tradition —
dance as beautiful, graceful
movements in time to the music.
Rabu's other piece, Humanic
Mechanic, was also well crafted
featuring two robots. An integral
part of the dance was two lighting
technicians who mechanically moved flood lights around the dancers.
Dance works by Karen Jamieson
Rimmer were of exceptional quality. The focus was on group interaction among six dancers trying to in-
5
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tegrate a seventh dancer into the
mainstream. Two percussionists
provided music that transformed
into an a capella at one point, the
dancers adding their panting
breath. The Outsider danced solo
and as each individual joined him
the dance altered to portray a different relationship in the group.
Up Front experimental works
gave a performance that was entirely improvisational with no polish
from rehearsal. The conception is
more important than the finished
product with this work. They showed there is an unlimited range of
response without the limits of
scripted movement. The Up Front
dancers were extremely sensitive, as
such dancers must be, to successfully create and improvise dance.
I
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2053 W. 41St Ave, (near Arbutus) 263-0878
FOR THEATRE INFORMATION CALL 687-1515. TIMES EFFECTIVE DEC. 2-8
WARNING: Some nudity and
suggestive scenes.
vogue
/        CHRIST0P
918 GRANVILLE ' CHRISTOPHER ATKINS
685-5434 AT 2:15. 4:10. 6:00. 8:00. 10:00.
Glenn Close Kevin Kline
coronet:
151  GRANVILLE
dunbar
BIG CHILL
■OaUtrmtl
DUNBAR  AT 30th
224-7252
WARNING:    Some    very
coarse  language;  occasional
nudity and suggestive scenes.
B.C. Director
CORONET: 2:30. 5:00, 7:45. 10:00:
DUNBAR: 7:30. 9:30.
CHRISTOPHER WALKEN    BRAINSTORM   \
nataue wood  The Ultimate Experience'
70IVIIVI 3IXTRACK [XIISltH!1??]
/SSia»l\   WARNING:    Occasional
r»uoii:  it i«th       \g**22mmmmf   swearing   and   suggestive
CAMBIE  AT  18th        "" scenM B c  Director
-B76274r AT 7:30. 9:30.
ICmatwe)
FRENCH WITH
ENGLISH SUB.
broadway
707 W. BROADWAY CAR( )LE LAURK ,
874-1927 AT 7:00, 9:00.
d^mmJBj*      a film by DENNIS HOPPER
odeon
881  GRANVILLE
682-7468
WARNING: Frequent very coarse language;
occasional violence, nudity and suggestive
scenes. B.C. Director
AT 2:10, 4:00, 6:00, 8:00, 10:00.
[LYNDA DAY GEORGE CHRISTOPHER GEORGE]
.WHERE NO0ODY RESTS
IN PEACE
coronet:
BSl GRANVILLE
685-6828
AT 2:00. 3:45. 5:30, 7:30. 9:30
WARNING:   Frequent
gory violence.
B.C. director
"MARY STEENBURGEN
DELIVERS A PERFORMANCE
TO REMEMBER."       i>m*«
AT 7:15. 9:30.
varsity
4375  WEST  10th
COtNBUQ
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]M\
AT 7:16. 9:15.
broadway
707  W.  BROADWAY
874 1927	
TOM CRUISE
JMom
One of the year's
best!"
Jeffrey Lyons, Sneak Previews. PBS TV
:>
WARNING. Some very
coarse language; occasional nudity and suggestive scenes.
B.C. Director Page 16
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, December 2,1983
The Film After
Thai waight <rf tha tramandmtt raaponstbittty m> kHbig K. yaawaaHhavatoMourlittlankrtiatnthiaworid. butwhyoh whydidthattfny
thing hav. tha miafortun. of bahtg bom • gray box en paga 1*7 fcrfflMngahH)lmpurpo*«vmomthfc^. but taking up room so tha whltaapac*
bauman tha ad* wouldn't gtaa out at tha roadar'a ayaa was something attogathar (Hffarent. aapaclalty whan on* m at tha bottom and tha
haavy waiflht of pllad Ubyssaya waa crushing your vary axiatanc* into floors all ovar campua. Look up, look up and find hop* in Toronto-bound
akrptenaa. Ooodby*. oh gray on*.
By BRIAN JONES
The publicity surrounding ABC's
television movie The Day After has
unfortunately forced a similar
movie into the shadows. Two weeks
after The Day After, the movie is
still in the news. The lack of a corresponding reaction to Testament is
a reflection of our society's basic
values as well as its entertainment
tastes.
Testament
Starring Jane Alexander
Directed by Lynne Littman
Playing at Vancouver Centre
Whereas The Day After followed
the formula television rule of
embellishing every story with
violence, Testament leaves out the
gore and destruction that a nuclear
war would obviously cause. There
are no clips of charred bodies sticking out of the ground. There are no
special effects turning characters into walking x-rays. All that is shown
of the actual nuclear war in Testament is a bright, three-second flash
of light.
Rather than being confronted
with The Day After's shattered city,
Testament shows the viewer a shattered family — the disrupted life of
a young mother (Jane Alexander)
of three children. Instead of making
you wince with induced horror,
Testament draws you into Alexander's family and makes you share
in their tragedy, their loss and their
love. The Day After and Testament
both deal with the same general
topic, but Testament brings out
your empathy and compassion
rather than just shocking you.
Testament is such an emotional
film that it is perhaps unfair even to
compare it to The Day After. Testament outclasses ABC in every way,
and ironically, this may be the
reason why the movie hasn't received the recognition and acclaim it
deserves.
ABC newsman Ted Koppel could
and did get away with hosting a
post-movie debate between a group
of academics and politicians, but if
he tried the same thing with Testament he and the panelists would
probably be booed off the stage.
Testament is so powerful that
viewers are not drawn into or interested in politics, petty ideological
debates and rationalizations or
military strategies in a nuclear age.
After viewing Testament, you do
not care about such discussions,
because the film reaches the intensely personal, while exposing the lies
and deceit of deterrence, defense,
security, balance of terror and all
the other catch-phrases that are used to explain and legitimize the
building of nuclear weapons.
The immense problem of the
arms race is hacked down to a size
we can understand in Testament.
5I00L.
iuodafi afpzM#*p<*> **0 Witty)
^U\mesr4mAmfUE
Ako at 7IOO Outrage *hy. fZdrmcnd.
Most of us can't really imagine an
entire city being destroyed in a few
seconds, but we can relate to a
woman losing her husband and having to comfort and support her
children while she herself is experiencing a great trauma.
Testament has scenes that will remain unrivalled for a long time by
any disaster movie, nuclear or not.
In one particularly moving scene,
the mother falls to her knees on the
ground, grabs a fistful of dirt in
each hand and asks in an angry but
pitiful voice, "Who did this?" A
few dozen yards in front of her
huge flames lap at the night sky and
three men unload sheet-wrapped
bundles from a pickup truck.
Scenes such as this reveal a much
more sophisticated understanding
of a nuclear war's aftermath. The
film's sensitivity to its characters
also reflects its sensitivity toward its
audience and the issue generally. To
its credit, Testament does not need
mushroom clouds, firestorms or
physical destruction to gain and
hold your interest.
As much as one can gain by watching Testament, another valuable
lesson can be learned from the way
it is being ignored by politicians, the
media and even peace activists. The
uproar over The Day After is
predictable and even expected
because it essentially accepts the
basic rules of the nuclear game (for
example, the Russian invasion of
West Germany, as told by
Hollywood). But Testament forces
you to question many of the very
basic assumptions of our society.
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