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UBC Publications

The Ubyssey Feb 9, 1979

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Array Ken ny knocks non - su
Quality education at UBC is
threatened by a lack of financial
support from the provincial government, administration president
Doug Kenny said in a major speech
Thursday.
Kenny told a meeting of the Vancouver Kiwanis Club that the
government's decreasing aid will
deprive Canadians of the opportunity to get a good education.
"Over the past four years, government grants to your universities
have not kept pace with inflation.
As a result, while the dollar increase
of these grants looks favorable, in
real terms, we are faced each year
with an erosion of purchasing
power because of inflation," Kenny
said.
"As a consequence, the widening
gap between the inflation rate and
government support at less than the
inflation rate, is threatening qualtiy
education."
Kenny said Canadians expect a
high quality education from the
universities.
"We have been given a mandate
to graduate individuals having the
best qualities possible. And it is the
university and the nation which are
hurt    when   students   are   not
THE UBYSSEY
Vo. LXI, No. 50
VANCOUVER, B.C., FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 1979
228-2301
educated to the full extent of their
abilities."
He said Canada could not compete in the international
marketplace if the provincial
government decreases funds
available to the universities for
education and research.
It is "pure nonsense" that
universities are wasting money
because graduates are unable to
find work, Kenny said.
"It goes against my grain to suggest that people should be going to
university just for job security. But
it bothers me even more when I read
or hear reports which suggest that
we are throwing our money away,
educating young people today
because they won't be able to get a
job when they finish school.
SOCCER FANATICS RELIEVE World Cup fantasies in quagmire behind
SUB. Players put boot to notions of wet, permafrost field prohibiting contest and demostrate g>entle technique of dribbling mud-caked ball through
haphazard   puddles.   Action   continues   today   as   UBC   diving   team
—ross burnatt photo
demonstrates skills in same field, while other teams contemplate moving to
temperate zone to escape Vancouver's monsoon season which devastates
field hockey, soccer and rugby fields.
Board ignores calls for Davis' removal
By VICKI BOOTH
The board of governors decided
Tuesday to dismiss charges made by
the student representative assembly
in January against housing director
Mike Davis.
Student board member Glenn
Wong said Thursday the board
decided that the unanimous motion
passed by SRA demanding Davis'
resignation for his handling of the
Dec. 5 Gage Towers incident was
unsubstantiated.
"The board could find no proof
of problems except the Dec. 5
incident and Davis' subsequent
attitude, and they felt the charges
(against Davis) were unsubstantiated," Wong said.
Wong added that the board
decided any individual complaints
about residence would be presented
to the president's office.
Wong said he and student board
member Bruce Armstrong have
received complaints from students
regarding poor conditions and unfair practices in residence.
"Some of the stories I've heard
are just nuts," Wong said.
But Armstrong and Wong said
they are willing to listen to student
complaints and take them to the
president's office.
"Glenn and I heard some things
that were disturbing and we are
going to look into them to see if
they are legitimate complaints or
Dean demands admin investigation
WINNIPEG (CUP) — The dean of engineering at
the University of Manitoba, Martin Wedepohl, is
calling for an investigation into the budgetary process
at the U of M.
Wedepohl becomes UBC's new engineering dean in
July.
Wedepohl ridiculed the university's senate
budgeting committee report, saying it didn't seem to
be dealing with real money. The engineering faculty is
being given a real increase of three per cent in its
budget, while most others are standing pat or taking
cuts.
Speaking on a CBC radio program Wednesday, he
said the three per cent is insufficient to overcome a
long-term underfunding problem.
Engineering funds were cut 15 per cent in 1972
during a temporary decline in enrolment. The
Canadian accreditation board cited underfunding of
the engineering faculty as one of the reasons it was
only extending its accreditation by three years instead
of five.
Wedepohl wants an independent inquiry of
business, government and other academic institutions
to investigate the senate budgeting procedure.
See page 3: DEAN
just isolated incidents," Armstrong
said Thursday.
Wong said he could understand
that a first-year student living in
residence would be afraid to go to a
university president's office and
complain.
Erich Vogt, vice-president of
faculty and student affairs, said
Thursday the decision to review
students' complaints about
residence was not a result of
demands  for  Davis'   resignation.
"Students have always been
strongly encouraged to come to me
with any of their problems," Vogt
said. "I'm not planning on looking
into the question of Davis'
directorship at all."
But Armstrong said that any
complaints about residence would
reflect on Davis.
"We're looking at housing in
general and any question about it is
a question about Davis and his
ability to do his job," he said.
"Maybe Davis is OK and the
system's crummy, but then again
maybe the system's OK and Davis ir
crummy."
•    t It
It
"This is pure nonsense and it is a
myth which we should lay to rest
here and now."
Kenny said he was glad to note
tha a national poll showed that an
equal number of Canadians want a
university education for a more
satisfying life, as those who used
education only as an "economic
stepping stone."
"In B.C., and I hope our
minister of education will take note,
fully 61 per cent listed 'more satisfying life' as the main reason for wanting a good education, with only 24
per cent opting for economic advancement."
Kenny said university graduates
are having little difficulty in finding
jobs, as Statistics Canada says the
unemployment rate for university
graduates is only 3.4 per cent.
There is a myth that there are
Ph.D. graduates in Canada who are
forced to drive taxis after leaving
university, Kenny said.
"Now gentlemen, I do a fair
amount of travelling across this
country, and thus take a fair
number of taxis. Once we have
struck up a conversation 1 always
make it my business to delicately
probe the background of my driver.
But I have yet to find this mythical
cabbie with the Ph.D."
Studenfs
face caf
hike
By CHRIS BOCKING
Students will be paying higher
food prices to finance extensive
renovations to the student union
building cafeteria, student board
of governors member Glenn
Wong charged Thursday.
"These renovations will benefit summer conventioneers more
than the students of UBC. Students don't need this. Look at
how many times they close half
of the cafeteria."
Wong said students should
not have to pay for any aesthetic
changes in the cafeteria with
higher food prices. He added
that the food services committee
is complacent about improving
the quality of the food offered.
"They don't think about improving the quality of the food
because they think they have already improved it."
But food services director
Christine Samson said the
money will be used to modernize
equipment.
"We have to do some asset replacement and we want to
modernize some of our equipment to make it a more enjoyable dining room. I'm proposing
a price increase of about five per
cent," she said Thursday.
Samson said there has not
been an increase in food prices
in two years.
The food services committee
wanted to decide on an increase
at the last meeting, but there was
not enough information available at the time for an accurate
assessment of food service's financial needs, said Wong.
"They wanted to decide on
the (price) increase at the last
meeting, but I wanted to hold
off for more information on labor costs and so on."
The price increase will be decided at a food services committee meeting at noon today.
Two students interviewed in
SUB agreed with Wong about
the quality of food and service,
offered by food service. Paga 2
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday,  February 9,  1979
APPEARING
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Music
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THE      UBYSSEY
Pag* 3
VOC legal threat 'no problem'
By GEOF WHEELWRIGHT
The UBC varsity outdoors club is
threatening legal action against the
Alma Mater Society in order to get
compensation for the work and
money the club used to build the
Whistler ski cabin, but some AMS
politicos say they aren't concerned.
"I'm not certain they (the VOC)
can take legal action," student
senator Arnold Hedstrom said
Thursday.
Hedstrom said the AMS has
already obtained legal opinion on
the possibility of VOC court action.
The only legal course open to the
VOC is a charge under the provincial societies act that the AMS is not
serving the interests of its members,
he said.
"Our   lawyers   say   without   a
doubt we can't just go paying compensation in this case."
But according to VOC president
Julian Dunster the VOC can still
take many courses of action to gain
compensation for the loss of the
cabin.
"Lots of action's being considered. It's rather like getting a
bunch of slaves to build a palace
and telling them to fuck off and live
in the mud," he said Thursday.
He said the VOC might not
necessarily take legal action if they
can settle the issue out of court. The
club will attend another student
representative assembly meeting to
try and again settle the matter at
UBC.
"We'll try to go and educate the
SRA again," said Dunster.
At a meeting Wednesday night
the SRA defeated a motion proposed by Glenn Wong calling for the
SRA to "recognize a moral obligation to compensate the VOC for the
Whistler cabin and that obligation
is equivalent in a dollar value
amounting to $25,000."
Dunster said the $25,000 covers
the cost of materials during 1965-67
when the cabin was built, and does
not include labor costs, which were
minimal as the cabin was built by
club members.
VOC proposed at the Wednesday
night SRA meeting that the first
$10,000 of the $25,000 could be
paid in the form of free use of the
ski cabin two weekends a year for
the next 12 years.
"We haven't had one night's use
out of the cabin since 1976," VOC
club spokesman Ross Beaty said
Wednesday.
The second part of the proposed
settlement asked that the remaining
$15,000 be paid to the VOC in
$5,000 instalments over three years
to help them improve existing VOC
cabins and trails.
But Whistler cabin management
committee chairman John Shaw
said Thursday the cabin was in such
poor shape when the ski club took
over in 1977 that it was condemned,
until the ski club spent over $90,000
repairing it.
Dunster said when the cabin was
built, its site was entirely
undeveloped and different standards existed. The cabin was
originally intended as a "mountain
Premiers contemplate differential fees
HALIFAX (CUP) — Differential fees for foreign students
studying in the Maritimes might
become a reality.
The Nova Scotia provincial
cabinet is currently studying the
possibility and will make their
decision public along with other
funding announcements later this
month.
Other Maritime provinces are
also considering differential fees.
Francis McGuire of the Council of
Maritime Premiers said that
although the decision is up to the
individual provinces, there is
always a concerted attempt to have
identical policies. "The Council of
Maritime Premiers has discussed it,
although they haven't made the
issue public yet," said McGuire.
Terry Donahue, N.S. minister of
education, said it is hard to predict
when the decision will be made.
"Questions of benefits of the
presence of foreign students must
be examined," he said. "Differential fees aren't an attempt to
discriminate."
Donahue said if cabinet approves
of the concept it will be worked into
the Maritime Provinces Higher
Education Commission funding
arrangements and monitored
through them.
Donahue said he feels public
reaction would be mixed in this
area. "I don't perceive any great
support or opposition to the idea,"
he said.
Differential fees are presently in
effect at institutions in Alberta,
Ontario and Quebec.
Mike MacDonald, Nova Scotia
representative on the National
Union of Students central committee said differential fees are
nothing less than discrimination
against foreign students. Accessibility to education is important
to everyone, not just local students,
MacDonald said.
In 1977, there were 1,463 foreign
students in Nova Scotia, 454 in New
Brunswick, and 62 in Prince Edward Island. Of the total foreign
student population in Canada 6.9
per cent are in the Maritimes.
retreat" and not a ski lodge, he added.
"We're mountaineers, we didn't
want to wander round from Hilton
to Hilton," said Dunster.
Dean criticizes
budget report
From page 1
Administration president Ralph
Campbell said he did not think an
inquiry was needed. Campbell said
Wedepohl's criticisms were being
blown all out of proportion. Campbell said "we have a pretty well-run
university." He pointed out that
engineering had received better
treatment than almost any other
faculty at the university.
Campbell also rejected Wedepohl's call for the establishment of
a polytechnical institute. "That
would fragment the university into
an independent engineering faculty
separate from all the other
students." He said it would also
duplicate services provided by arts
and science.
Other senators at the university
felt that while the plight of the
engineering faculty was serious it
could only be solved by plunging
other faculties into difficulty. Dean
of arts Fred Stambrooke said it
would be destructive to arts to take
any more out of it than was already
being chopped. Arts received a two
per cent cut in its budget.
'Cultists deserve religious rights'
By PETER MENYASZ
All cult groups should be guaranteed
religious freedom, even if they have the
potential to result in a Jamestown-like incident, Toronto psychiatrist Andrew-
Malcolm said Wednesday.
"I'm absolutely opposed to passing any
laws that remove religious freedom," he said
and added that he also disapproves of
kidnapping people who have been brainwashed by religious or other cults. "It might
be different if the person were 14 years old.
"There is a certain kind of cult that could
result in the death of people," said Malcolm,
referring in particular to the People's Temple
cult of Rev. Jim Jones.
"The problem represented by Jonestown
was that there were too many people involved. The group itself was mad and not
just the individuals," he said.
Another disturbing facet of the Jonestown
mass suicide was that the doctor who
prepared the cyanide for the suiciding cultists
was trained in an American medical school,
said Malcolm.
"His training was probably very similar to
mine."
The doctor was obviously not completely
demented, Malcolm added, as "he was
shooting information on sick patients to
Massachusetts State General Hospital via
satellite."
Malcolm describes the ideal cult leader as
"passionate, righteous and trust-inspiring."
"He has usually suffered himself, and
identifies with the common folk."
Malcolm added that the leader could be
the founder of a religious system, a political
demagogue, or a secular self-help leader. The
one thing he absolutely needs is a chosen
peple, he said.
"The ideal cult follower is often much
younger than the great man (leader), is
culturally impoverished and comes to be
aware of his dissatisfaction with his life."
Malcolm said the ideal follower usually
lives in an extraordinarily free society but is
inclined to deplore the freedom it provides.
The one thing he or she absolutely needs is to
become a chosen person, to be needed by a
great leader, said Malcolm.
The last step in the formation of the tragic
cult is the molding of the followers, he
added.
"The subject's ability to think rationally
must be reduced. He must be made
vulnerable, suggestible. He must be caused to
become more primitive."
Malcolm said followers must somehow be
isolated from their previous environment and
placed in an unfamiliar environment where
all their needs are taken care of and where
daily functions can be controlled.
Malcolm said the primary intent of
controlling the follower's environment is to
lead to a psychological disintegration which
makes the person susceptible to suggestion.
"Whether they're interrogators,
evangelists or demagogues, irrationality is
the road to the New Jerusalem."
Enemies are another important aspect of
the cult leader's control over his subjects, he
added, as oppression is one of the greatest
cohesive forces.
"If there are no enemies, they must be
invented, as in George Orwell's 1984. Jones
knew all these things, and had plenty of
enemies on the outside," Malcolm said.
"Suicide is a logical extension and a leader
could say 'it's time and we'll all go on to
another place.'
"Even if people emerge from these cults,
this disentangled person is not safe from
other cults," said Malcolm.
Tragic cults can be distinguished from
political parties or government bureaucracies, as these groups never defend their
cause to the death and rarely offer any hope
of salvation, he said.
"The department of supply and services
never makes such a claim (to salvation)."
The origin of Christianity is a perfect
example of a cult, said Malcolm, but "when
the emperor joins the cult and forces pagans
to join at the point of a sword, it's a
respectable cult and could then be called a
state religion."
Established religions can become cults
once more if conditions call for it, he added.
"Within the Roman Catholic church there
is discontent, and a charismatic movement
emerges — people start talking in tongues,
and doing irrational things."
Malcolm said that Alcoholics Anonymous
and Weight-Watchers are probably not cults
as they are not particularly passionate and
violate every principle of the cult except
brotherhood.
"There is something dangerous about
Quakerism," he said. "They were passivists
to the point of being killed. That's
dangerous."
JONESTOWN HORROR . . . Toronto psychiatrist says cult groups deserve freedom of worship even to commit mass suicide. Page 4
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday,  February 9,  1979
Ten years after
It's ten years past all that shouting
about sexual revolution. But there's a
legacy from these social and sexual experiments. They gave us more freedom
in choosing a sexual identity. They
focused our awareness on the specific
issues of gay rights, rape, male domination of women and contraception. They
also attacked the traditional institutions
like marriage and virginity.
It wasn't that there was anything inherently wrong with either institution if
they were clearly a matter of choice. But
they were also social controls to confine
and contain sexual passions.
At their worst they were sexual
imperialism which only reinforced male
domination over women. A virgin was
sexually licensed by her husband and he
had the monopoly over her sensual experiences.
Many have married for the wrong
reasons, just as an escape from responsibility for their own lives, to make sexual intercourse easily available, to find a
housekeeper, to be supported and/or to
avoid loneliness.
At the same time we run in great
danger of degrading sexual activity by
placing little value on it beyond pleasure.
And it's the one way we have to express
the largely mental activity of love. Convenience sex where neither sexual partner has emotional commitment is
almost prostitution. No one is involved
and activity can be completely discreet.
If anything, the purpose for a sexuality issue is to re-examine these roles, to
provide information and to promote
discussion, if we have one hope it's that
there is a new sexual being emerging
who will combine the best features of
the male and female identity.
\B^K^P
.... and this lot is a McDonald from
his Onanist period, "Duck in a Tuxedo as
Marc Antony." Though lacking the
elegant simplicity of his later works, this
feltpen on cigarette package composition shows a steadily growing
Bokononist influence. Originally commissioned for a feature on domestic
farm animal perversions, it has been
been contributed by a private collector in
honor of the sexuality issue. Reserve
bids start at $800 . . .
Letters
UBC risks accidental domination
I am disgusted to read that the
UBC English department has
created a new teaching job and is
thinking of going to the United
States to fill it. The head of the
English department says the selection committee has had good intentions and worked hard. We are glad
that they have and of course we
really had expected no less. As he
surely knows, that is not the point.
No closer to the point is his
remark that no one "has the
authority to displace qualifications
by nationality as the primary
criterion for appointment." Even if
made in good faith, this statement
is a complete distortion of the issue.
It has never been suggested that nationality be the primary criterion
for selection.
What people at UBC want is for
the university to be serious about
the tremendous impact it has on the
culture of the community and face
up to the debt it has to the community   which   supports   it.   UBC
Weak government needed
Underlying the entire Feb. 6
editorial in The Ubyssey (Oh,
Canada) is the assumption that a
powerful central government with
its hands on the "levers of
economic control" is a desirable
thing. The last sentence states that
". . .Canada . . . must have a
single government which can speak
and act for it." Who does "it"
refer to? Do you feel that prime
minister Trudeau and the members
of parliament are acting for you?
Do you think that most of them
give a damn about what you think,
except two months before an
election?
The disturbing fact about this
editorial is that it didn't seriously
raise the question of whether or not
greater centralization and concentration of power is preferred to less.
The article treats it as an obvious
fact that greater centralization is
more desirable. The 'logic' used to
support this contention consists of
statements such as the following:
"this  goes  against  the trend   of
many other countries" (so?), that
"such a course of action could be
disastrous" (how?), and that
Canadians would be "incapable of
resisting the . . . American
economy" (why?). There are no
hard facts here, no supporting line
of logic — only scare tactics.
Given common historical
knowledge it is time that we at least
begin to question the supposed
merits of strong central government. The more centralized the
power the harder it is to reach, the
easier it is for power to be abused.
It is hard enough to be heard when
you are one among the 2.5 million
or so in B.C., let alone among the
more than 20 million in Canada.
The existence of strong central
authority is often one of the
contributing factors enabling those
in power to "justify" violent action
to suppress minority groups that
may be peaceful in intent i.e. "this
is one country and it must remain
that way regardless of cost." At the
other extreme political power can
THE UBYSSEY
FEBRUARY 9, 1979
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the
university year by the Alma Mater Society of the University of
B.C. Editorial opinions are those of the staff and not of the
AMS or the university administration. Member, Canadian
University Press. The Ubyssey publishes Page Friday, a weekly commentary and review. The Ubyssey's editorial office is in
room 241K of the Student Union Building. Editorial departments, 228-2301; Advertising, 228-3977.
Editor: Mike Bocking
Greg Strong gently beat his rod on the desk. "It's sexuality issue time," he ejaculated. "No way, we
can't take any more of that sex stuff," said Tom Hawthorn and Julie Wheelwright, their eyes rounding
in innocence. The staff agreed. "We're tired of being frustrated, it's time to become celibate," said Bill
Tieleman the dry and Chris Bocking the sly. Wendy Hunt, disgusted by the phallic violence of Mike
Bocking and his telephone book, vowed to join a nunnery. Geof Wheelwright tried to interest Jeff
Rankin and Doug Todd in his problems and dysfunctions but they weren't having any of it. "I don't
know," said Heather Conn, "There are times when I could use a peter." "Especially that Menyasz,"
said Vicki Booth. "For shame!" cried Verne McDonald. "Can't you women think of anything else?"
David Williams burned his collection of glossy magazines featuring virile dimensions of Mark Rogers
and Ingrid Matson scattered her pills before the hormone-depleted staff. "We haven't had a pregnant
thought in months anyway," she said.
be used to maintain special status
for favored groups.
Hopefully the doomsday
scenarios of a Canadian civil war
will remain only nightmares and
not be turned into reality by any
moves to strengthen the federal
government.
Now, what about the statement
that decentralization, at least of
economic powers, will render
"Canadians incapable of resisting
the enormous pressures of the
American economy?" First — it is
unclear just what is meant by
resisting the American economy.
Does it mean stopping U.S. investment? Decreasing U.S. imports?
Decreasing Canadian exports to the
U.S.? Increasing the Canadian
content on radio and television (and
it is irrelevant, of course, that many
people may prefer American
programming)?
Second — greater decentralization usually leads to greater
flexibility. Regions are not prevented from acting in concert but
decentralization does make it more
difficult for one group to force the
actions of any minority for the first
group's benefit.
Finally, the farther away the
source of power from the area of
interest the slower the decisionmaking process and the greater the
likelihood of error.
The points above are only a few
of the many possible advantages of
decentralized power. Most important is that it makes it more
difficult for someone in Ottawa to
decide how you will run your life.
Strong central governments gave us
the massacre of the Jews and
Stalin's purges.
Fortunately in Canada we are
certainly in no immediate danger of
this kind of abuse of power. But
these extreme examples should at
least make us think before plunging
ahead with statements like
". . .Canada . . . must have a
single government which can speak
and act for it."
Brian Bolton
commerce 3
must foster the culture of the people
in its community, not dismantle it
or smother it with any other.
We disagree with anyone who
would like to see UBC turned into
some kind of intellectual country
club serving an international elite.
UBC should present the Canadian
point of view to our students,
tempered with input from all over
the world. This will not happen
unless we are openly committed to
developing our teachers as well as
our students.
Most aspects of our Canadian
culture are still young and delicate.
But while we owe much to other
cultures, the days are gone when
anyone could get away with advocating that we import our education and our world view wholesale
from the outside. Let's encourage
each other in our attempts to
understand and express ourselves as
a society and not permit accidental
domination of our culture through
short sightedness or lack of effort.
Bill Deacon
Bog plot denied
I would like to take issue with the
interpretation of your Feb. 6 story
alleging that the board of governors
was attempting to intimidate the
two new student board members by
delivering their board dockets to
them on Monday, rather than the
previous Friday.
It was the desire of board
chairman Ian Greenwood that he
have a personal opportunity to
spend some time with Messrs. Armstrong and Wong before the board
meeting to explain board
procedures and to discuss the
material with them in detail.
Because he is from Kelowna and
could not be here Friday, it was
arranged that he would meet with
the two student members on
Monday, Feb. 5, when he was to be
in Vancouver. This meeting took
place as arranged, with president
Kenny in attendance and the two
members received a full briefing
which they seemed to appreciate.
The tone of your article suggests
a plot to withhold information
which can hardly be reconciled with
the extensive personal briefing the
two student Members received prior
to their first board meeting.
Nor is there any reason to
suggest, as you have, that student
board members will receive their
material later than other members
for future meetings. wh't
secretary to the board
To the contrary, we clearly stated
in our article that "there has been
no indication that the student
members will receive their packets
later than other members for future
meetings" [Ubyssey, Feb. 6] —
Staff.
Quisling speaks
Some comments are in order
regarding Tuesday's Ubyssey
editorial. The editorial seemed to be
concerned about Canada's likely
path toward decentralization of
government powers and the
'disastrous' effects that would
result. It appears that 'levers of
economic control' and 'national
decision-making ability' would be
lost due to decentralization. Also,
the trend elsewhere in the world is
toward further centralization of
political and economic power and
the author thinks that we should
follow suit.
A state apparatus which controls
most or all economic activity and
makes social and political decisions
that affect all our lives would be
disastrous. Granting far reaching
powers to the state and its arrogant
bureaucracy is not the answer to
our problems, it is the problem. The
main functions of government are
to provide protection for individual
rights and property and a coherent
judicial order and not to control the
economic environment. State interventions in the market economy
are perverse in nature as they inhibit
incentive, reduce enterprise opportunities and choices and distort the
'real' economic conditions by currency debasement, taxation and excessive regulation.
But the editorial advocates further advancement down the road to
serfdom for the sake of vain
economic nationalism and the illusive public conducive to the hope
of making existing governments
more accountable for their misguided actions and maybe the first step
along the path to direct democracy
by the people and ultimately to a
free social economy.
Michael Jones  ASK ABOUT
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Page Friday, 2
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday,  February 9,  1979 Contents
Cover photo of Tasman van Rassel
and Kirsten Lester by Peter Menyasz.
Changing Face of Love
Homosexuality . . . . . .
Sex Problems v . . . .
Androgyny .... .... .
Pornography  »v   . .
Woman Battering
Sexual Assault .
Film Violence
Prophetess of Contraception
Contraception ..... .
......   8
. . ...    9
    10
... .   11
., . .'.' 11
Open House '79
The Open House Newspaper Committee advises that the last possible date
for submissions is
MONDAY, FEB. 12th
APPLICATION FOR GRADUATION
REMINDER
All students who expect to graduate this Spring are requested to submit "Application for Graduation" cards
(two) to the Registrar's Office (Mrs. Kent.) by Thursday,
February 15, 1979. This includes students who are
registered in a year not normally considered to be a
graduating year (e.g. combined B.Com/LLB.) but who
are expecting to complete a degree programme this
Spring.
PLEASE NOTE: It is the responsibility of the student
to make application for his/her
degree. The list of candidates for
graduation to be presented to the
Faculty and to the Senate for ap
proval is compiled from these ap'
plication cards.
NO APPLICATION — NO DEGREE
NORTHERN TEACHING
OPPORTUNITIES
Challenging northern teaching positions will be open effective September,
1979. Teachers with a solid academic background and an excellent practise
teaching record are sought.
SCHOOL DISTRICT 81 (FORT NELSON)
This dynamic and developing school system will have openings in various
grade levels and curriculum areas. An incentive package of substantial salary
scale, moving allowance, and teacher travel benefit is in effect.
SCHOOL DISTRICT 87 (STIKINE)
Positions in Cassiar and in very small, isolated communities will be open.
Teachers having strong personal characteristics are invited to consider making a significant educational contribution to the Stikine. An incentive
package of high salary, two paid flights to Vancouver per teacher and family,
modern low-rent furnished housing, and moving assistance is in effect.
Applicants must be:
(a) Canadian citizens or landed immigrants;
(b) Eligible for B.C. certification.
Applications with full resume and supporting documents should be sent to:
Paul McMuldroch
Director of Instruction
School District No. 81 and No. 87
Box 87
Fort Nelson, B.C.
VOC 1R0
Friday, February 9,  1979
THE      UBYSSEY
Page Friday, 3 Were Adam and Eve in love?
There is no evidence of it. Theirs
was an arranged marriage decreed
by their common Parent and their
story is one of innocence followed
by the enmity created between
them by God as part of their
punishment. Love is nowhere
mentioned.
Somewhere in the time since,
however, the concept of love has
By VERNE
Mcdonald
been created by man to describe
those emotions which draw people
together, emotions so strong they
seem to spring from some source
above and beyond human experience or comprehension.
The face of love has been an
ever-changing one through the
ages. The Greeks of classical times
perceived it as an ideal which had
little to do with direct heterosexual relationships. These were
reasonably seen as lust and were
exemplified in the droll myth of
the primeval creature with two
backs and four legs that was split
apart and ever attempts to rejoin
itself.
Love to them was man's search
for beauty and for the ideal, and
could take place between two
men, two women, or in one charming legend, between an artist
and his statue. Love was not expressed in sex but in friendship
such as that of Damon and
Pythias.
The roots of our own vision of
td^-d
ULdJJ
love began with the courtly traditions of the Middle Ages. Courtly
love was a far cry from the unbridled passion of our own day.
Though centred on relationships
between men and women, it evolved as a code as elaborate and strict
as the hierarchal system of fealty
which was the basis of society.
The knight who rode forth to
slay the dragon and save the fair
maiden was not acting out of love
but out of a sense of propriety and
duty. Marriages may have been
made in heaven but they were arranged by parents and the feelings
of those about to be married were
insignificant.
It is perhaps as a reaction to
such strict governing of relationships that love became romantic, a
renegade emotion that refused to
be held within the bounds of
reason and what was then natural
law.
By the time of the Elizabethans,
love was definitely a force to be
reckoned with. The sighs of
melancholy lovers were considered to draw blood away from
their hearts to cause anemia and
the inevitable wasting away of
their vitality. It struck suddenly
and hard, and was seen as a lesser
form of madness that preyed
mainly on the young but could
make a fool of the oldest and
wisest head.
It had also become entirely
heterosexual. Romeo and Juliet
replaced Damon and Pythias as
the ultimate lovers.
Love    as    a    heterosexual
ng fact irf Imre
i* "^
phenonemon soon found itself
tangled up with that original
heterosexual phenonemon, lust.
This confusion has sadly persisted
to the present day. We are sure it
exists   separately,   but   exactly
where the division between the
two lies is a difficult question.
Yet we can't resist tinkering
with it. We divide it into levels and
degrees: lust, infatuation, friendship, eternal devotion. We call it
'chemistry' and search for the
philosopher's stone that
transmutes attraction into passion. And we come up with
nothing.
Our main task is still that of
separating the primal desires of
our bodies from the supposedly
higher and purer desire for a loved
one.
The old rule that love is
necessarily lasting is no longer
good enough. If love is defined as
an emotion that lasts forever between two people then there is
damned little of it around.
Too many marriages beginning
in love have foundered; too many
marriages that continue, continue
without love and too many people
in our society reject the concept of
eternal love entirely.
The ideals of our society have
become those of individuals and
their continual personal growth
rather than the union of two persons in a lifelong relationship
meant to be the ultimate culmination of their growth. We seek not
a partner, but self-actualization
and self-fulfilment. Being tied to a
romantic ideal only interferes with
personal freedom.
In adopting such an attitude we
risk losing the truth of love along
with the false notions that have
surrounded it.
All of us are incomplete and
must communicate with each
other to find completion. Love is
the ultimate form of communication. Without it, our completion
as individuals can never take
place.
Before the sexist nature of
society was questioned, the communication of love followed role
patterns. A man must have a
woman to teach him gentleness
and care for his children; a
woman must have a man to give
her strength and provide for her.
When the inherent tyranny of
such a system was realized, love
itself became a suspect quantity.
Marxists have attacked love as a
decadent affectation of the
bourgeoisie and feminists have
contended that it has been used as
a weapon to subjugate women and
trap people in an illusion. But the
illusion is not love but a creation
of the society that we live in.
Love is an expression of appreciation for what is good and
admirable in all of us. Like lust, it
satisfies a real desire but the desire
is not physical. It is the spiritual
and intellectual desire to be
acknowledged as human and worthy of the deepest friendship.
Men and women have traditionally been seen as embodying
separate parts of human nobility:
strength and capability to survive
are male; gentleness and nurturing
are female. The canon of
heterosexuality was that only a
man-woman relationship could
lead to a combination of all that is
good, and result in love.
It is hoped that we are coming
to a time when such qualities will
be seen as the property of all
human beings, regardless of sex or
sexual attraction, and there will be
no restriction on where one seeks
love. Then, perhaps, we will no
longer confuse it with lust.
To love is to express the belief
that we are capable of communicating with each other fully,
that we can find in each other
qualities we admire, that we are
capable of love itself, capable of
nobility. Only in love do the sexes
understand each other and teach
each other to be whole and complete.
Without love we are divided, we
are incomplete and alone.
Love is our assurance to each
other that we are good and can
become better, that ideals exist
and we can reach them no matter
how elusive they may seem.
Without it, we shall surely fail.
Page Friday, 4
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday,  February 9,  1979 HOMOSEXUALITY
Those who live it say that it is
simply a matter of choice, a preference, no more, no less. But to
most people it's a subject
shrouded in myths, misunderstanding and the subject of lots of
bad jokes.
Homosexuality. It affects four
per cent of the Canadian adult
population, who are only recently
beginning to find a voice. They
are no longer the invisible people
who must spend their lives
suppressing their sexuality, and
their lifestyle.
By JULIE
WHEELWRIGHT
The president of the Gay
People of UBC talked about the
changing attitudes towards gay
people in our society.
"To a certain extent people's
attitudes have changed towards
gays. Especially here at UBC
people are pro-gay or are open to
thinking about it," said Richard
Summerbell.
Summerbell also said that there
is disagreement within the gay
community about the question of
civil rights.
"Some gays argue that they
have the same civil rights as everybody else and don't need special
protection. Others say we're a
group of people who are being
visibly discriminated against, like
the blacks in the United States.
A member of the lesbian drop-
in group at UBC suggested that
attitudes change through exposure
and communication.
"The majority of people will
change their attitudes when they
get to know someone who's gay
and is an alright person. So often
people who say that they don't
like gays are people who don't
know someone who is gay," she
said.
someone of their own sex. If
you're friends with someone,
sexual relations can be nice."
She also said the image of the
unhappy, socially shunned homosexual is presented to us at an
early stage.
"We probably have all been
brought up to believe that being
heterosexual is better. I think the
reason that the myths are there is
because people have to believe
that there is a rule that doesn't
apply to them. 'I didn't have a
E
i specially here
at UBC people
are pro-gay
or are open to
thinking about it'
One of the ways that the shroud
of mystery and bigotry is being
unravelled is through the visibility
of gay people, their "coming out
of the closet."
"People don't have actively
hostile attitudes, but they don't
understand homosexuals. There
are a lot of myths, like lesbians
are interested in castrating men
and look like truck drivers. These
fantasies exist until people get to
know lesbians," she said.
"The main problem about false
impressions is that people have
such a horrendous idea about
homosexual affairs. They imagine
horrible gay bars where women
look like truck drivers or they
think that they'll become a
deviant if they do something with
dominant mother so I'm safe,'
some people say."
"I think the majority of gay
people are pleased with their
choice. I don't think there are
many people who feel trapped in
the wrong body. Sexuality should
be a preference, like whether you
like apples or oranges."
Another one of the common
myths that surrounds homosexuality is the stereotype of the
"butch" lesbian and the "effeminate" gay. Both of these are
fallacies that are beginning to
flounder with the gay movement's
new exposure.
"There is a segment of the gay
population that is effeminate.
You can see why that stereotype
came about. In order to let some
straight people off the hook, there
are cases of effeminate straights,
too," said Summerbell.
In the case of stereotypes many
people may know people that are
homosexuals but never realize it.
The only people that they identify
as gay are those who are visibly
different and fulfill the stereotyped image.
"If someone is visibly effeminate they have a more difficult  time,"   said  Summerbell.
Another group that has recently
begun to change its attitudes
towards homosexuals is the
medical profession.
According to Boris Gorzalka, a
UBC psychologist doing sex
research, there is no single acceptable definition of homosexuality in the Canadian Psychologists Association.
Gorzalka said that psychiatrists
are evenly divided on the question
of whether or not homosexuality
is abnormal behavior. The
American Medical Association no
longer considers homosexuality
abnormal but this decision was
arrived at by a vote and not
research.
"But both psychiatrists and
psychologists don't agree on what
criteria constitutes abnormal,"
said Gorzalka.
Summerbell feels that the
medical profession is changing its
attitude towards gays as needing
to be "cured."
"The medical profession is
realizing that they can no longer
keep up the farcical show that
homosexuality is sick any longer.
They have to come to terms with
the atrocities that have been committed in the past to cure homosexuality," said Summerbell.
The "cures" in the past have
included lobotomy and
castration. The medical
profession says another problem
they have is that no one knows
what homosexuality is.
"Nobody knows anything
about it. It's nothing prenatal or
hormonal and there's no reason
for believing that it develops after
the age of six," said Summerbell.
Gorzalka feels that there is
evidence indicating that homosexuality may be linked to
genetics. There is a greater
possibility that if one identical
twin is a homosexual, the other
twin will be. But this is not the
case in fraternal twins, even
though they have both grown up
in the same environment.
Though society on the whole is
changing its attitudes towards
homosexuals, the idea that
education would teach people
tolerance seems to have been over-
optimistic.
"The faith that education
would destroy intolerance is false.
It may be partly true, but people
find that intolerance is fun," said
Summerbell.
No one needs to be reminded of
the fight that is constantly taking
place between evangelical groups
and Anita Bryant and those who
prefer to love someone of their
from person to person, the anti-
gay religious groups will always be
able to prey on parents' fears
about their children," said
Summerbell.
It seems that religious groups
have chosen gays as the first
problem to solve in a series.
Summerbell feels that the eventual
goal of anti-gay groups is to
eliminate minority groups from
society.
"Members think that teachers
may influence children to lead a
life of sin and destroy their
chances for entering the kingdom
of heaven."
"Anita Bryant has even said
that the Jews will go to hell. I
really see these people as unwittingly insinuating totalitarianism," said Summerbell.
The subject that has been
behind closed doors and tight lips
for so long is now being discussed
and gays are now being accepted
in our society.
I
he "cures for
homosexuality
in the past have
included lobotomy
and castration'
own sex. These groups have not
changed their attitudes towards
homosexuals and they remain a
threat to a tolerant society.
"As  long  as  the belief  that
being gay is spread like a disease
But there are still many unanswered questions and closed intolerant minds. Hopefully there
will be long-term changes so that
homosexuals can have the same
freedom to love.
Friday, February 9, 1979
THE      UBYSSEY
Page Friday, 5 Sex Problems
Everybody has problems with
sex. Whether it's saying the word
or mastering position 52 in the
Whole Earth sex catalog, we all
experience  sexual  difficulties  at
By GEOF
WHEELWRIGHT
one time or another in our lives.
The big question is: are there
any sex problems that are common to most people and how do
they solve them?
Well, according to local doctors
and sex experts everyone has problems with sex and solving them is
usually just a case of mind over
matter.
The two problems most often
encountered in sexual intercourse
are premature ejaculation in men
and the inability of women to
reach orgasm, UBC physician
Robin Percival-Smith said Tuesday.
Because many men ejaculate
prematurely, intercourse finishes
just as a woman is becoming sex-
pain, ejaculation, or erection
would all fall into this category,
he added.
De Martino said these types of
sexual dysfunctions are caused by
fear, anxiety, guilt and shame and
can interfere with anybody's ability to perform sexually.
Parental over-repression of sex,
peer pressure, enforced guilt
about masturbation, incest, rape,
sex education, and heavy religious
sexual taboos are all experiences
which would contribute to a person's sexual attitude, he said.
De Martino disagreed with
Percival-Smith on the value of
sexual experience. He said it is the
quality of a person's sexual experience rather than the quantity
which will determine how healthy
their sex life will be.
A large part of that quality is
based on the amount a couple
communicates in bed, said de
Martino.
"You've got to be able to communicate   about   the   problem
ually aroused, and therefore lack
of sexual fulfillment or orgasm
becomes a problem for her.
"It takes a long time for them
(women) to become aroused," he
said.
Percival-Smith said most
women don't realize that it may
take up to six months of
"regular" sexual activity before
they reach their first orgasm,
while men need "practise" to
develop control in dealing with
premature ejaculation.
However, Percival-Smith said
masturbation is one of the biggest
secondary sex problems people
have difficulty dealing with.
He said in males particularly
there is a lot of guilt surrounding
masturbation.
"I think all men have to come
to terms with it," he added.
But Vancouver Sexual and
Marital Development Centre
director Claude de Martino said
most sex problems are usually
centered around the body's inability to become aroused.
Problems with sexual interest,
arousal,    enjoyment,    orgasm,
(whatever sexual problem a person faces)," he said.
De Martino said many people
are still afraid to tell their partners
what they would like to have done
to them in bed.
"People still don't know much
more about what to do (in bed)."
But Percival-Smith said young
people are more content to discuss
sexual matters with one another
than they used to be.
"The majority of students tell
me they have a very satisfying
time," said Percival-Smith.
De Martino also disagreed with
Percival-Smith on the causes of
the female inability to obtain
orgasm.
According to de Martino
premature ejaculation is one of
the few sexual disorders that can
sometimes be cured by physical
control and "practise", while
most problems such as female
"frigidity" are psychologically
caused.
He said there are three steps involved in solving sexual problems
of this type.
The first step is to isolate the
"negative elements" in a person's
sexual attitude: what are the
elements that impair sexual
response?
These elements usually include
some combination of fear, shame,
guilt, and anxiety, said de Martino.
The second step is to remove
the negative attitudes by asking
clients to attempt certain sexual
"homework", followed by learning skills and enhancing positive
aspects of the home sex life.
"I help them to discover as they
have never before all that is potentially sexually exciting to them
physically and psychologically,"
said de Martino.
De Martino said costs for this
service are based on a sliding scale
according to patient income.
He said he also conducts
seminars for people who have
"normal, but not trouble-free sex
lives".
De Martino also commented on
some recent literature on sexual
problems and sexual enhancement.
"The Joy Of Sex is a good sex
manual, but it's not for people
with sex problems," de Martino
said of the best selling book by
Alex Comfort.
Although the book does touch
on the problems of premature
ejaculation, frigidity, impotence,
venereal disease, and rape, de
Martino said there are better basic
information books available.
' 'The Joy Of Sex is more a book
for gourmets," he added.
One of the books de Martino
recommended as a good basic information source was 'A Doctor
Speaks Out on Sexual Expression
in Marriage' by Donald Hastings.
He said this book contains a lot of
studies and in-depth analysis of
human sexuality.
"People don't know anything
about human sexuality," he added.
De Martino said a very readable
book on female sexuality is 'The
Hite Report' by Shere Hite, while
men and sex is discussed in 'Male
Sexuality' by Bernie Zilbergeld.
He said The Hite Report is particularly significant because it is
the first "accurate information"
on how women feel about sex
since the Kinsey surveys of the
1950's, and because it is written by
a woman.
De Martino said accurate information on sex is a relatively recent
development.
Until five years ago, there were
no particularly good resource
books on sex, he added.
Books such as David Ruben's
'Everything You Always Wanted
to Know About Sex, But Were
Afraid to Ask' were mostly inaccurate and misleading, said de
Martino.
But Percival-Smith said sexual
education has greatly increased
recently, with magazines such as
Penthouse, Playboy, and Oui as
the educators.
De Martino said in addition to
problems of sexual ignorance
there are also problems in what
causes sexual response in some
people.
He said there are problems
related to "a difference in the activity chosen or the object
chosen" to cause sexual arouse-
ment and these are considered sexual abnormalities or
"deviations".
Men and women are searching
for a key to equality of the sexes
and liberation from sex role
stereotyping.
Androgyny is such a key.
The androgynous individual, or
androgyne, will still be a
"masculine" male, but without
the inhibitions of the "macho"
image that society forces on him,
and the addition of the traditionally feminine characteristics
By PETER
MENYASZ
of caring, emotion and the expression of feelings.
The female androgyne will still
be a "feminine" woman, if die so
wishes, but no longer restricted by
the chains of submissiveness, and
complemented by the traditionally
masculine characteristics of
ambition and assertiveness.
"I can't see anything less than
that (androgyny) as being
liberated," says UBC Women
Students' Office director Lorette
Woolsey.
TTie feeling that androgyny is
the only solution to society's
limitations on freedom of personal expression is becoming
more and more widespread as
exposure to the idea increases.
June Singer's book Androgyny:
Toward a New Theory of Sexuality, explores the historical background from which the theory has
grown, but is difficult reading at
best. TTie book is heavily laden
with psychological jargon and
mythological references.
But it is the only definitive piece
available on the subject of androgyny and is considered by
some to be the "bible" of human
liberation.
Singer's work provided the
basis for Tamahnous Theatre
Company, a Vancouver actors'
collective, to write and perform
Vertical Dreams.
A,
kndr«
only solutic
limitations
of person<
Andr
VD, as it is affectionately
called, was collectively written by
Tamahnous, and its members
learned a great deal about the
practical applications of androgyny.
"We did a lot of reading,
especially June Singer's book on
androgyny," says Suzie Payne,
one member of the Tamahnous
cooperative.
The intention of the group was
to craft a play examining the
androgyne as the archetypal
liberated individual, as a "balance
of opposing principles."
"We discovered that ali of us
were connected to sexual patterns,
to role identifications," says
Payne.
"We had illusions of being
somehow liberated from that
sexual role discrimination.
"But we discovered how deep
our patterning does go," she
added.
VENERE/
Venereal disease is something
that makes sex decidedly
unhealthy. Unfortunately even
today it is less openly discussed
and publicized than it should be.
The following is a description
of the symptoms and treatment
for various types of venereal
diseases. If you have any of the
symptoms consult a physician or
UBC's health service immediately.
GONORRHEA
TRANSMISSION: by vaginal,
anal or oral-genital sexual intercourse.
SYMPTOMS IN MEN: after 3
to 5 days there is a white or
yellow, creamy, thick discharge
from the penis. There is pain and
burning during urination.
SYMPTOMS IN WOMEN: 80
per cent of infected women do not
have symptoms. Some women
have a green or yellow-green vaginal discharge.
TREATMENT OF FIRST
CHOICE: an injection of
penicillin.
SYPHILIS
TRANSMISSION: By vaginal,
anal or oral-genital intercourse.
SYMPTOMS: as early as 10
days or as long as three months
after intercourse, a sore (chancre)
appears. In men this is usually on
the glans or shaft of the penis; in
women this is usually on the cervix or inner vaginal walls.
COMPLICATIONS: if left untreated, the disease progresses to a
rash and sores in the groin area.
After the secondary stage the disease becomes latent. In two-
thirds of cases involving latent
syphilis there is no further dis-
Page Friday, 6
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, February 9,  1979 iy is the
) society's
freedom
cpression.
gyny
Society's reinforcement of
stereotyped totes begins at birth
and by the time adulthood is
achieved, the rotes are so deeply
ingrained that the individual can
rarely be liberated.
There is little resistance in principle to the integration of male
and female personality traits. As a
matter of fact, it is obvious that
the concept of androgyny is a preferred one.
It women displayed more
masLuline characteristics and men
more feminine ones, there would
be a new common ground through
which the sexes could communicate. Any such furthering of
relationships between individuals
can be nothing but an advantage
in a society which is plagued by
lack of communication.
Problems arise with the application of the androgynous ideal
when it extends beyond the individual's personal consciousness
and into his rale in society.
"There win be more resistance
to androgynous roles," says
Woolsey.
"We don't know what the
social consequences are."
Our society's concepts of social
roles, especially in terms of the in*
dividual's role as a worker in the
society, are still completely based
on male attitudes.
Companies that are liberated
enough to accept the hiring of
women employees and executives
are still rarely willing to change
their work structures to fully accommodate women in promotion
structures.
Some companies that have
hired women executives have been
shocked when those women have
asked for up to two years off for
pregnancy leave. The male
executives still mistakenly feel
that women are a poor investment
for this reason, and are still likely
to resist these entries, particularly
the re-entry of women into the
corporate structure.
"Role exchange and role
reversal are impractical," says
Woolsey. There is little that can
be done about them until there is a
greater acceptance of androgyny
by individuals, she added.
"Androgyny is an appealing
kind of ideal, but it's going to
take generations to change."
As with all other proposed
social changes, the liberation of
each individual from his/her sex
role stereotype must still remain a
personal prerogative. And as
more individuals move closer to
the androgynous ideal, its obvious
advantages such as the widening
of comfortable social contacts will
be impressed upon society in
general.
And, of course, androgynous
parents will raise children steeped
in the ideal — male children
unafraid to cry, female children
unafraid to compete and win.
It seems like an unpretentious
ideal to work toward. But a
worthwhile one.
Pornography
^\
. DISEASE
^V
turbance to the body. One-third
of latent syphilis cases are often
fatal, attacking the brain or
cardiovascular system.
TREATMENT OF FIRST
CHOICE: an injection of
penicillin.
VAGINITIS
TRANSMISSION: by intercourse with a male carrying
trichomonads under an uncircum-
cized foreskin or in his urethra.
Also by contact with a toilet seat,
towel, wash cloth or other moist
object that has recently been in
contact with the vagina of an infected woman.
SYMPTOMS: a frothy, white
or yellow discharge with an unpleasant smell, which irritates the
vagina and vulva causing them to
become red,  itchy  and painful.
COMPLICATIONS:  can per
manently damage the cells of the
cervix and make them more susceptible to cancer.
TREATMENT: a single 2,000
mg. dose of metronidazole.
PUBIC LICE ["crabs"]
TRANSMISSION: by close
physical contact with an infested
person. Intercourse is not necessary. You can also catch them by
sleeping in a bed used by a person
who has crabs.
SYMPTOMS: usually, but
not always, they itch like hell.
Scratching doesn't help but can
carry the lice on your fingers to
other parts of your body to start
new colonies.
TREATMENT: Crabs are
killed by local application of
"Kwellada" and no prescription
is necessary.
Throughout history in pictures
and in words, man has recorded
his preoccupation with the sexual
side of his nature. From carvings
in the ancient temples of Kahjurah
By DAVID
WILLIAMS
to the murals uncovered in the
ruins of Pompeii; from bawdy
Boccaccio to erotic violence in de
Sade, man's sexuality continually
asserts itself. Confronted with this
vivid evidence of irrepressible sexual energy, almost every age and
every culture has chosen to impose
its own regulations on human sexual behavior and its visual portrayal through ritual, religion, or
law.
Artists have used every artistic
medium to portray human sexual
activity. As several current "art"
books amply demonstrate, artistic
depiction of sexual activity is a
universal phenomenon. The portrayal of sex in all media continues
to increase exponentially. Books
that had to be smuggled into the
country ten years ago are now
available in most public libraries
and films that were formerly seen
only at stag shows now play in the
neighbourhood movie theatre.
The history of pornographic
pictures goes back to around 1850
shortly after the camera was invented. The earliest Surviving
erotic photograph in the Institute
of Sex Research collection in
Bloomington, Indiana dates from
about that time.
Shortly after Edison developed
his motion picture camera in 1890,
the process was put to erotic use.
By the turn of the century, many
film catalogues listed such "entertainment" as girls disrobing from
bed, girls exercising or dancing
about in a sultan's harem.
tegral part of pseudo-nudist
magazines.
By 1967 or 1968, publication of
authentic nudist magazines was
virtually dead. In their place was a
whole collection of magazines
featuring female nudity. The
magazines soon evolved into
"crotch shot magazines,"
popularly known in the trade as
"split beaver" or spread beaver.
Most contained little text and
featured pictures of individual
females posed in a manner which
revealed their genitalia in detail.
Homosexual magazines have
also become "stronger" in sexual
content. The prime feature of
such magazines continues to be
the depiction of male nudes,
primarily individuals. The
camera's focus on the genitals is
much more direct although very
few contain photographs of erections. In addition, there is considerably more emphasis on
photographs of two or more
models.
This  leads  to  a  considerable
but through mastery. Sexual fantasies are a logical byproduct of
this mental experimentation.
Modern-day commercial pornography depends increasingly on
the fantasy context. In the best-
selling book The Sensuous
Woman (by the anonymous "J"),
the female author describes recurring sexual fantasies reported to
her by her lovers. Fantasy: a
gorgeous unknown female is
chained to the wall. He (the man
being the fantasy) begins to do
very erotic things to her while she
writhes in helpless resistance.
Slowly, thanks to his superb
technique . . . she begins to respond to him and then goes crazy
with passion. Slowly he unchains
her and she turns herself upon him
and makes love to him. While J's
fantasy is hardly the result of
systematic research, it does coincide closely with those that oecur
in written and filmed pornography.
In a 1973 survey, sex fantasies
were found to be similar in con-
It was not long before the
potential of the motion picture
camera began to present the most
graphic and explicit depiction of
human sexual activity was realized. By the early 1900s the first
"stag films" reached the market
and have been with us ever since.
The earliest stag film in the Institute for Sex Research collection
was produced around 1915. It is
likely, however, that experiments
with "hard-core" motion pictures
had been initiated some years
previously. To be classified as
"hard-core", a photograph must
leave nothing to the imagination
of the viewer.
Throughout the early 1960s,
photographs in nudist magazines
contained little, if any, erotic content other than complete nudity.
Early nudist publications practiced a complete segregation of the
sexes. Males and females were
never shown in the same
photograph and often not even in
the same magazine.
Girlie magazines developed
along another line. By the late
1950s they presented partially
nude females (breast and buttocks
exposure) in innumerable issues.
By the- mid 1960s, secondary
publications had become much
bolder. Paid models and staged
situations were presented and implied erotic activity became an in-
amount of implied sexual activity,
some of which is relatively candid,
both anal and oral-genital acts are
sometimes strongly implied. There
is one additional feature in
homosexual magazines which is
almost wholly lacking in those
directed to heterosexual males.
Very young males, both prepubes-
cent and pubescent, are often used
as models; some magazines are
wholly devoted to such
photographs.
Part of the social concern regarding pornography is the fear that
young children may be adversely
affected by early contact with pornographic materials. However, it
is just as plausible that a sex
education manual might serve
pornographic purpose as that pornography might assist in the sex
education process.
Assessing pornographic
material as "forbidden fruit" undoubtedly plays a significant role
in its arousal value. There is no
evidence to suggest that erotica
triggers antisocial behavior.
And fantasy plays an important
role in releasing us from the conforming structures of everyday life
and enabling us to experiment
with new roles, relationships,
ideas and situations. Fantasy,
then, can be valuable in helping us
to cope with the problems of
everyday life not through escape
text to the basic themes of erotica.
They are the variety of sexual activities portrayed, the activity or
passivity of the central character
or hero, the reality or fantasy
nature of the hero's sex partner
and the erotic or conventional
nature of the sexual activities
described.
One type of fantasy usage involves a parallel relationship between choice of erotic depictions in
media, conscious daydreams and
sexual behavior.
Erotic pictures, stories and
movies simply serve as a substitute
for the self-generating daydreams
of the pornography user although
it is impossible to determine
whether pornography is good or
bad. There is no evidence to suggest that pornography creates
"perverts" or whether it actually
helps to prevent violent and
unusual acts through the release
of tension. The erotic appeal of
pornographic materials stems
from their connection with the
user's inner fantasies. But the
daydream and erotic pictures are
really two different types of fantasy activity.
The daydream comes apparently from some inner stimulation to
one's imagination and can be
thought of as separate from one's
wishes and motivations. The difference can be quite important
psychologically.
Friday, February 9,  1979
THE      UBYSSEY
Page Friday, 7 BATTERED WOMEN
Beyond the whispered words
"to love, honor and obey,"
marriage vows ignore one glaring
factor in current male-female
relationships. Violence.
Violence is a blatant fact of life
for many women in Vancouver.
Between 4,000 and 5,000 Lower
Mainland women are beaten to
the point of serious injury every
year, according to a 1977 study by
United Way. And the promise
"Til death do us part" could
easily become reality if battered
women remain with their
husbands.
By HEATHER
CONN
But if women can't find safety
and security in their own home,
they don't need to go it alone.
Countless organizations in the city
provide counselling and services
to keep women from the role of
silent sufferer.
One such place is Transition
House.
Six women are sitting at a
kitchen table, sipping coffee and
exchanging stories. Each one is
smiling, laughing or keeping a
watchful eye over children in the
living room. It is their last evening
together and they have a cake with
the frosted words: "Good luck
everyone."
The following day they will
return to society with their
children and begin life anew. One
woman plans to leave the city to
prevent her husband from
locating her, three others hope to
share an apartment together.
Each one has been physically
assaulted or beaten by a man.
Transition House is a cooperative home where battered
women and their children can stay
for up to a month, sharing
cooking and cleaning. The house
is funded by the provincial human
resources ministry.
Transition House staff worker
Valerie MacDermot says the
residents are usually quite supportive of one another and gain
confidence readily. "It doesn't
take long before they're pouring it
all out. It's been bottled up in
them for so long."
MacDermot says about half the
residents decide to return to their
homes after their stay at Transition House. "They go back
stronger, with a hope. Normally
the husband is pleading with them
to come back, saying it won't
happen again. A lot come back a
second time."
She says she would like to see a
Transition House in every district,
with at least three or four in Vancouver. There are currently only
six transition houses in B.C.,
located in Vancouver, Victoria,
Fraser Valley, Port Coquitlam,
Prince George and Vernon.
Transition houses help women
in crisis by allowing them to share
their experiences. Staff try to ease
the transition process and ensure
that women are aware of all resources available to them. The
houses provide an atmosphere in
which feelings of low self-esteem,
victimization and guilt can be
dealt with, and be replaced with
self-confidence and the ability to
make decisions.
And there are plans within
Vancouver to take this process
one step further.
The Young Women's Christian
Association on Burrard is
currently negotiating to set up a
Second Stage Housing program to
provide battered women with a
home for a period of three to six
months. At present, the YWCA
provides only short-term
emergency services and counselling for battered women.
The proposed location for the
house, with a paid staff person
and volunteers, is Kitsilano. Seven
families will tentatively be able to
live in separate suites, says Vancouver YWCA executive director
Clete Herman. The program must
be first accepted by the human resources ministry and the housing
department.
"We're very hopeful that the
project will go ahead in the near
future. We'll try to allow women
to rebuild as much of a normal
life with their children as they
can."
Herman says that in the past
available for women and an
ensuing court case.
Peg Campbell, the task force's
media producer, says the drama
will be translated into six
languages to help battered immigrant women combat their crises.
In the past, Campbell produced
Rule of Thumb, a 30-minute
video-taped conversation between
a transition house worker and a
battered wife. Later, she made a
film called A Sign of Affection
with interviews of battered
women and those who deal with
the victims: doctor, lawyer, priest,
police, social worker.
"Most of them didn't have a
clue as to the reality of the
women's situation," says Campbell. "Most of them were
ridiculous. It was really sad. It's
really frustrating what innocence
there is in society.  People  say,
family together.' They don't want
women to be independent. They
want to keep us economically
where we belong.' "
Ridington, who is also co-
chairwoman for the B.C.
Federation of Women's Women
Against Violence subcommittee,
says wife battering is treated as a
social problem, not a crime. "It's
seen as an individual problem
within a particular family."
Wife beating should be of
collective concern and so the Vancouver police are key figures in
the physical battle between the
sexes. The Vancouver police department received about 40 telephone calls concerning "domestic
disputes" in 1977 that had
reached violent or near-violent
stages.
In the same year during a six-
month   period,   a  social  agency
\
Si*     ?*<*,       lf
^vJsSki^v
'•jl^/'fifs-
year the YWCA has provided
stress support services for 30
women who were fleeing from
violence in the home, six who
were separated from a drinking
spouse and 52 who were separated
from their male companion.
Although the YWCA handles a
"sizeable number" of battered
women, she says the Burrard
centre only represents a small
percentage of the real need for accommodation for women.
United Way is making women
more aware of what channels are
available to them when leaving the
danger zone, the home. The UW's
task force on family violence is
currently producing a "very
concisely packaged drama" which
presents through slides and
narration a wife battering incident. The presentation includes
the initial fighting of a husband
and wife, the channels of help
"oh,    women    must    like    it
(violence), they deserve it."
Society sees the family home as
happy and contented, but it's the
most violent place there is, says
Jillian Ridington, vice-president
of the Vancouver Status of
Women. In 1974, 40 per cent of
all murders in Vancouver resulted
from assaults in the home. During
an 18-month period in 1976-77,
800 physically battered women
sought help from the Vancouver
Status of Women Council.
"A crime is a crime is a crime.
The only person you can beat up
and get away with is your wife. If
a man hits his foreman at work,
he'd be charged with assault,"
says Ridington.
She says that wife battering is
definitely not a priority of the
provincial government. "The
B.C. philosophy is 'keeping the
monitored 550 calls which came
into one Vancouver police station
under the "family trouble" category. According to Vancouver
Status of Women statistics, police
only recorded 98 of the calls, or 17
per cent.
Because "domestic disputes"
are considered disruptions of
order rather than infractions of
the law, men who beat their wives
are rarely arrested.
Arrests are made in only seven
per cent of the cases where police
intervene in a husband-wife
family fight, according to Don
Dutton, who developed the new
human relations curriculum for
the B.C. Police College.
Similarly, since police only
intervene in 53 per cent of the
husband-wife "disputes" where a
request for intervention is made,
only about three and one-half per
cent of men who assault their
wives are arrested. Thus, the onus
lies on the victim to lay charges.
Wife battering cases tend to be
treated not in criminal court, but
in family court, where reconciliation is encouraged, says Transition House worker MacDermott.
The B.C. Police College
currently includes training for
domestic crisis intervention. The
program "compacts skills in
safety management, defusing or
('cooling') violent people, communications and interviewing,
mediation techniques and referral
techniques." Most women interviewed all agreed that police
showed a healthy attitude in
handling family violence and were
extremely helpful to victims.
The Vancouver organization
Emergency Services offers a
unique service, "Car 86," to
handle domestic assaults and
family violence. A team consisting
of a social worker and police
officers answer calls concerning
domestic problems. But according
to Ridington, the service is not
always enough.
"They can usually only do
about six calls a night. We could
have 40 calls on a bad night in
Vancouver. That's not enough."
In wife battering incidents,
women are the obvious focal
points since they're the bruised
victims and bear the brunt of
physical attack. But what of the
aggressors? What help is available
for men?
In 1977, UBC social work
professor Larry Shulman trained
workers to lead two self-help
group sessions for men who beat
their wives or companions. The
mutual-aid groups were funded by
United Way's task force on family
violence.
Shulman said the sessions
proved highly successful.
"They (the men) often went
back to their marital relations.
They helped each other to sort out
their tempers and why they did it.
The important thing is they knew
they weren't going to be lectured
or forced to be changed."
Shulman says all the men in the
group came from a cross-section
of society and attend the groups
themselves. Some were permanently separated or divorced
from their spouse but wanted to
prevent the use of violence in their
future relationships with women.
For many men, violence is the
only way to relate to women, says
Shulman. Some of the men in the
groups found they had really
cared about their wives, but had
problems in communicating with
women. They tried to understand
their own feelings towards women
and recognize their pent-up anger
and frustrations.
Flora Hogarth, coordinator for
United Way's task force on family
violence, says society holds a lot
of excuses that men can fall back
on to justify their violent
behavior. "It's hard for him (a
wife-beater) to admit it. There's a
lot of excuse phrases he can call
on. Like 'Well, I didn't mean to
hurt her,' or 'I was drunk.' "
Hogarth says some women
assume that if their boy friend hits
them, he'll immediately stop his
violence upon marriage. But, she
adds, in the U.S., a marriage
license is often called a "hitting
licence."
So, when a husband and wife
are walking down the aisle
awaiting years of marital bliss,
they should remember the phrase:
"As long as you both shall live."
Wife battering, if severe enough,
can lead to death.
Page Friday, 8
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, February 9,  1979 SEXUAL ASSAULT
You probably won't be grabbed
by someone hiding behind a bush
at night.
Nor will you be bothered by an
old man in a dirty trenchcoat.
But if you are sexually assaulted
at UBC, it will probably happen
in residence and will be a result of
unwilling participation in sexual
intercourse with someone you've
just met socially.
By TOM
HAWTHORN
And whether it happens in
residence or you are bothered by a
flasher on campus, which the
university RCMP detachment
says is a major problem, women
students will still have to deal with
the trauma of not feeling safe at
UBC.
UBC is a major target for those
who sexually assault. The large
female population, many of
whom are forced to be on campus
at night, and those who are away
from home for the first time, are
prime victims.
Residences are particularly
notorious places where unwanted
sexual intercourse takes place,
according to Sally Thorne of the
Alma Mater Society women's
committee.
"A lot of women students are
not conscious of the dangers.
There are peer pressures in
residence which might put you in
a serious situation."
She says this problem is even
worse for first-year women
students living in residence who
might not have the courage or
strength to ensure that they do not
participate in intercourse unwillingly.
Residence advisors say they feel
the problem is serious enough to
warrant showing films on sexual
assault and harassment. They
have also initiated a number of
programs to convince women
residents that they should in no
way feel obligated to go to bed
with someone simply because of
social pressures.
Thorne says the advisors sense
the urgency women students feel
when they participate in undesired
intercourse. The possible feelings
of guilt or anxiety exist even
though the person was not a total
stranger.
And the law considers this rape.
But Erich Vogt, vice-president
of student and faculty affairs,
says he does not believe that such
covert sexual harassment and
intimidation occurs at UBC.
"I have no evidence that that is
taking place in the residences."
That's one problem.
There are other incidents which
leave women students in a very
vulnerable position. One problem
situation is the professor who
threatens and intimidates his
women students to satisfy his own
perverted   notions   of   sexuality.
"A lot of students are really
embarrassed that it (intercourse)
happened, and won't report it
until the course is over for fear of
losing marks, but by then they are
no longer emotionally in crisis and
might not report the incident,"
Thorne says.
Foreign women students are
particularly vulnerable. If one
reports any coercion or sexual
harassment, and the instructor
finds out and fails her, then she
may well be deported.
That's another problem.
But, once again, Vogt and the
administration can find no
evidence of this problem even
though those who deal with it on^a
day-to-day basis feel it is a very
real problem and concern of some
students.
"There are laws about that. We
haven't perceived that that is a
very general problem," he said.
UBC is particularly plagued by
the presence of flashers and other
sexual deviants. They frequent the
campus both day and night. They
are unexpected. They can
traumatize and frighten a woman
as much as any assault.
Here is one incident as described by a woman student:
"I was coming home from the
library one night when a man
stepped in front of me and exposed himself. It happened very
quickly and nothing happened
(she was not assaulted). But being
by myself really upset me and I
realized how vulnerable I was.
"You don't feel that you have
the same kind of freedom you had
before because it's an alarming
experience," she said.
The woman and others say that
this cannot be regarded as a joke
no matter how harmless the intention (for example, a prank).
The trauma and insecurity caused
by such an experience can
seriously disturb a student.
Poor lighting, the wooded
University Endowment Lands
which act as excellent cover for
sexual deviants, the number of
women on campus at night attending classes and the long
distances between campus centres
all contribute to the increasing
incidences of sexual assault and
harassment at UBC.
But if you are assaulted, it is
imperative for your own physical
and mental health to report the
incident and receive treatment if
necessary.
Krin Zook, a coordinator for
Rape Relief, offered a scenario of
events   a   sexual   assault   victim
RAPE CENTRE
In view of the evidence showing that sexual
harassment of women students on campus is
alarmingly prevalent, women's groups and concerned students met on Monday to organize a
centre to deal with the victims.
"Rape is not the epidemic problem," said Kate
Andrew, external affairs officer of the Alma Mater
Society. She added that indecent exposure and
sexual harassment were the main concerns.
By PETER MENYASZ
Andrew related an experience she had last year in
which a man exposed himself to her near the main
library. When she reported the matter to the
RCMP, all that they could say was: "Why didn't
you jump the guy and catch the kink?"
"We are worried about the sexual harassment of
students by faculty members," said Jean Elder, a
representative of the Academic Women's
Association.
She added that faculty members are often not
aware of what they are getting into with the
students and neither are the students. "The way to
get an A in this class is. ..." is what constitutes
sexual harassment, added Elder.
The campus patrol's involvement in campus
security was mentioned, to which Elder said, "the
campus patrol's main occupation is preservation of
property — mainly traffic spaces."
"The function of the campus patrol is the
security of the campus, to provide a measure of
security for the buildings and people on the
campus," said administrative services vice-
president Chuck Connaghan Thursday. "I would
probably say that they are effective in controlling
the rape problem."
Connaghan said that when an incident gets to the
point where the law is broken, the campus patrol
has to turn it over to the RCMP.
"You have to keep in mind that the campus
patrol has a limited mandate and limited resources," he said.
"I have been fully briefed on it (the problem of
sexual harassment, by the Women's Students' Office," said faculty and student affairs vice-
president Erich Vogt.
"Our only question will be how that (a rape
information centre) fits into the priorities of
student services. It's a delicate problem."
The Monday meeting in the women's
Office reached some conclusions about the status
of a rape information centre on campus.
"The initial problem is what kind of
organization we want," said Katrina Denis, a
concerned student.
"It's probably impractical to consider a 24-hour
counselling service," said Sally Thorne of the
Women's Committee, but added that a simple
information service would not be enough.
A representative of the Women Students' Office
said that her office had plans to set up a rape information service, and added that there are women
counsellors on staff that could deal with assault
victims.
"Theoretically, we have a direct line to the
president," she said.
It was agreed by all present, including
representatives from Rape Relief and the sororities,
that the Women Students' Office be approached
about the feasibility of establishing the rape information centre in their office, at least partly
operated by student volunteers.
The proposed centre would accumulate and
process reports by assault victims, provide them
with information on what to do, and either provide
counselling or refer them to Rape Relief. If the
statistics accumulated show as high an incidence of
harassment as is feared, the centre would be expanded to meet the need.
140 SMOKIkkS,
ExpecToasriMG.
fOPPIMS.BHINS,
SHOOTING,
PRopptna,
MJWTIN&,
^NMPIM&   OR
RJCKING-.
should follow after an attack:
Find a friend or relative: It is
important that a close friend or
relative be with the victim to
eliminate some of the fear,
anxiety and guilt about the incident.
If you need information, call
Rape Relief [732-1613]: They will
offer information about your
physical and mental health. Some
women feel better if they can talk
to someone who is anonymous
immediately after the assault.
Rape Relief handled more than
393 such calls last year.
Contact the police department:
This is absolutely necessary if you
want to press charges. The sooner
you contact them, the better the
chances of conviction.
All precautions should be taken
against venereal disease or
pregnancy, she added.
Insp. Ward Rowan of the Vancouver police department says the
department encourages all victims
to report attacks as soon as
possible.
"The number one thing a police
officer should have is compassion
for the victim. The person who
has been attacked is going
through a traumatic experience."
The attackers should be charged,
no matter how difficult the experience may be for the victim,
because otherwise he will be back
on the streets assaulting other
people shortly afterwards, he
said.
Someone assaulted at UBC
faces a similar situation, although
they will have to deal with the
I university RCMP detachment,
which is now only slowly reacting
to the demands of campus
women's groups for greater protection against assault.
Victims at UBC could also
contact the AMS women's committee or the Women Students'
Office for counselling.
At one university in Texas,
plainclothes policemen distribute
cards at night to unaccompanied
women on campus read: "If I was
a rapist, you would be in very
serious danger." The approach
might decrease the incidence of
rape, but it does so at the expense
of the woman's freedom.
So, at UBC, until a rape crisis
centre is established or the lighting
becomes adequate or an efficient
intracampus transportation
system is developed or police
patrols become more regular, rearrange your timetable and travel
in pairs and groups whenever
possible.
For the other more covert
threats of sexual harassment, the
best thing to do is to assert yourself and report all harassment.
You can only really lose if you
don't.
Friday, February 9,  1979
THE      UBYSSEY
Page Friday, 9 SEX VIOLENCE IN FILM
Women want to be subjugated.
This conclusion is inescapable if
you believe many of the movies
being shown today. Violence
coupled with sex is the drawing
card which attracts audiences and
wins the big buck in a competitive
business. ^^
By WENDY
HUNT
Violence against women in film
is based on outmoded sexual
stereotypes. Men control women
and are the embodiment of sexual
power. Sex becomes something
men do to women. Violence is the
key to not only controlling
women's behavior but to awakening their sexual desires as well.
Sadomasochism plays a large
role in sexual violence. Often the
woman provokes violence against
herself. Any sympathy for her
plight is diminished since it is her
fault.
Women are often portrayed as
sex objects devoid of personality
or worth outside the sexual
sphere. This attitude also
legitimizes violence used against
them because the audience does
not identify or emphathize with an
object.
Degradation of women used to
be confined to pornographic
films. Even soft porn films such as
Emmanuelle and The Naughty
Victorians which are billed as
erotic rather than obscene portray
women as malleable objects. Their
personalities are shaped by sexual
desire and experience.
Emmanuelle is a young woman
who is sexually awakened through
several adventures. She is
presented as the ultimate sexual
partner: passive and willing to be
used.
The Naughty Victorians show
how a man unleashes a woman's
sexual desire through bondage.
She is eventually grateful for this
and later she helps him repeat the
experience with other women.
When the women of The Naughty
Victorians finally rebel it is not so
much inspired by the violation of
their bodies but by the man's feeling of natural superiority over
them. But instead of rising to his
level the women must degrade him
to theirs by having him gang raped
by a group of men. Only men are
capable of punishing other men.
This leaves the women impotent
as  people controlling their  lives
and demonstrates that their sexuality depends on men for its
shape and physical expression.
Woman as sadomasochist and
sex object has left the back alleys
and arcades and is surfacing in
'legitimate' film. Sexism hides
behind the facade of entertainment or art. A Boy and His Dog
and The Nine Lives of Fritz the
Cat use sexual violence to get a
laugh. The Silent Partner and
Looking For Mr. Goodbar try to
tion as if the girl's life was his to
dispose of.
The Nine Lives of Fritz the Cat
culminates in a scene of sexual
violence after having portrayed
woman as sex objects
throughout the film. A female
horse provokes her rabbit lover into whipping her with a chain
because she repeatedly says she
wants to leave his creepy friends.
While he beats her his friends egg
him on excitedly.
legitimize sexual violence by calling it an integral part of
characterization.
A speaking dog adds novelty to
the sci-fi film, A Boy and His
Dog. The new approach obscures
the fact that the film is based on
the old myth of male bonding.
Man is man's best friend and no
women can possibly measure up.
Women are only useful for intercourse. As the boy says after coming upon a mutilated woman who
has been gang raped "Ah, why'd
they cut her? She could've been
used another two or three times."
Guffaws from the audience.
The true test comes when the
boy must choose between the girl
or the dog who is dying of hunger.
The woman becomes literally dog
meat. As they trot off into the
sunset after a hearty meal, the dog
says he appreciates the boy's
"sacrifice". The boy has sacrificed his object of sexual gratifica-
Fritz being the most sensitive of
the lot asks later why Rabbit hit
her so hard. Hurting her a little
bit seems perfectly acceptable in
the context of this film. After all
Horse suffers no permanent
damage and it is all done in fun.
The Silent Partner currently
playing in Vancouver gets off to a
fast start. A central character
beats up a female prostitute beginning with twisting her nipple and
ending by crushing her face
against the sauna wall with his
foot. He apparently rapes her too
but the audience only hears about
that later.
The director Daryl Duke could
say that this scene sets the
character up as psychotic but that
explanation is thrown into doubt
by the unnecessarily graphic detail
and highly sexual context which
moves the emphasis from elucidation to titillation.
When the psychotic finally kills
*
M
H
W
W
his girlfriend by sawing her head
off the audience has little sympathy for her.
This couple has a
sadomasochistic relationship
which is reasonable as some
mutual need must draw them
together. But because the woman
provokes her lover by taunting
him with her other sexual exploits,
she gets what she seems to be asking for. The audience finds it even
easier to rationalize her death
because they know she has
doublecrossed him in business as
well as sexually betrayed him.
When the woman begins to provoke her lover she is in a submissive sexual position crouching
on the floor. He beats her with her
belt and it is obvious that this is a
game which they have played
before. They get carried away and
he kills her. Unfortunately, the
director also gets carried away.
Excessive violence does not
develop character. It only excites
and in this case reinforces the idea
that women love abuse.
It is interesting to note that this
psycho practises his form of sexual intimidation only on women
and they succumb. He gets rather
chummy with the man who stole
his money and who stands up to
him. When the killer finally dies
he is dressed like a woman. Is the
moral of this story men kill,
women die? Men are powerful,
women weak?
Looking for Mr. Goodbar
began as a telling novel by Judith
Rossner about the sixties and the
sexual revolution. A young
woman who is filled with self-hate
and feelings of sexual inadequacy
searches for death by picking up
men in bars. One evening after a
brief encounter she panics when
the man is reluctant to leave her
apartment. When she begins to
scream he panics and hits her over
the head with a lamp, killing her.
The movie version however
concerns itself less with exploring
character than taking full advantage of sexual scenes. It exploits
sadomasochism   to   the   utmost.
Many people are not upset by
sexual abuse and dismiss its importance in shaping our attitudes
towards each other. The treatment
accorded women in film would
provoke outrage if aimed at ethnic
or religious groups. Yet women
are reluctant to speak out on their
own behalf fearing the label
prudish, humourless or overly
sensitive.
Sexual violence debases women
and men by categorizing their
emotions and actions. Women
must demand the respect awarded
human beings. To do less is to demean ourselves.
CANADIAN ODEON Theatres
FOR THEATRE INFORMATION PHONE 681-7836
Show Times: Vogue 1:00 3:05 5:15 7:30 9:40
Sunday 3:05 5:15 7:30 9:40
Dunbar 7:30 9:30
introducing
LYNN-HOLLY
JOHNSON
as -LEXIE-
VOGUE       I     dlJNbAlt
Warning: some swearing
& coarse language B.C.DIR.
918  GRANVILLE
685-5434
DUNBAR at 30th
224-7252
■J -^ INt^
Show Times:   12:55 2:40 4:30
6:15 8:05 10:00
Sunday   2:40   4:30   6:15   8:05
10:00
jtiire.
OClEON
881  GRANVILLE
^HALLOWEEN"
STARRING
DONALD
PLEASENCE j
Show Times: 12:40 2:20 4:10 5:50 7:45 9:45
Sunday: 2:20 4:10 5:50 7:45 9:45
Warning: Some frightening scenes -
B.C. DIRECTOR
CORONET 1
851   GRANVILLE
685-6828
NATIONAL
LAMPttN.
I ANIMAL
Show Times: 2:05, 4:05, 6:05, 8:05, 10:15 daily
Warning: Occasional nudity, suggestive scenes,
coarse language throughout. B.C. DIRECTOR.
CORONET 2
851   GRANVILLE
685-6828
I VALENTINE'S DAY
*^£» <^>aL/  arjafifxy   (l/aLzntcnz ±   -^°-y  ujitk
$ 228-3977
uoux fxzii.on.ai mzi.i.aaz
in out xfxzcial  (1/aLzntinz
^fxzztinqi. xzction of
tnz   ^Juzi.aau  CLaiiifizas
FOR MORE INFORMATION CALL
UBYSSEY CLASSIFIED
H
WINNER OF 6 GOLDEN GLOVE AWARDS INCLUDING 8EST
DRAMATIC PICTURE!
r£#>*m
DROAdwAV 1
Show times: 7:10 9:15. Warning: Frequent violence, coarse language  BC     7°7   W. BROADWAY]
DIRECTOR 874-1927
., Ellen   AlanL
kniTM'Tim^ Burstyn Aldal
>*»■■■*'   «.■!■■*'•, Show Times: |
Warning: Some
DARK
BEST FOREIGN FILM GOLDEN GLOVE      ivAuiD
AWARDS! a fi|m INllitlAK
AUTUMN SONATA    *    BERGMAN
Liv Ullmann and Ingrid Bergman
Enc iish sub-titles
Show Times: 7:30 9:30
VARSITy
224-3730
4375  W. 10th
228-3977 *¥"
M€ »HC»Nt»HC»H
%/^
Ht»HCfr
(GREGORY.   ^lAURENCETuri»f"|yC'"i
■   PECK •■'"' *""•"■'■ OLIVIER     HllUUij
llpffykMEs n^mf ROM BRAZI!
^0^^^-fS^^*heJ^#>*^^H'^i   MANd
Show Times
7:30 9:40
Warning: Some gory scenes.'
B.C. DIRECTOR
KINGSY at KNIGHT
876-3045
Page Friday, 10
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday,  February 9,  1979 H. G. Wells foretold that in one
hundred years the movement
Margaret Sanger started would be
the most influential of all time in
controlling humanity's destiny.
But Wells' prophecy was too
conservative. In only 60 years
Margaret Sanger's dramatic
one woman battle for the right to
contraception was virtually complete. By the time of her death in
1966 the woman who first coined
the term "birth control" had successfully headed one of the major
social revolutions in history.
itarphftfess of Crnitracepffimt
By DOUG TODD
Many of us do not realize how
vast a social change it was or how
painfully it was brought about.
Free access to contraception has
made sweeping changes in the
lifestyles of women and men
throughout the world.
Now the lives of women who
are not capable of giving birth can
be saved, and families are able to
plan only for the number of
children they can financially and
emotionally support. Now women
have a new freedom to enjoy sexuality and a new equality in
following careers.
It is unlikely that the woman's
liberation movement — the only
cause to have survived the seventies — would have even started
without Margaret Sanger's
crusade for birth control.
Sanger's dedication to the battle
for the right to contraception
began in 1914 when she was an
obstetrics nurse attending
deliveries in a New York slum.
By the time of her death
Margaret Sanger's biography had
become the biography of the cause
of birth control.
Sanger writes that her life
changed in 1914. As a nurse she
saw a woman named Mrs. Sachs
die after trying to terminate
another of her own unwanted
pregnancies. The only birth con
trol advice her doctor had given
the frightened Mrs. Sachs before
her death was "make sure your
husband sleeps on the^roof".
Margaret was overcome. Her
own frail mother had died at 48
after.giving birth to 11 children.
Through her own work she had
become aware that there was a
vast inarticulate hunger for information about contraception.
At that time the only methods
of birth control the tenement
mothers were aware of was drinking turpentine, rolling down a
flight of stairs or poking and
scraping themselves with knitting
needles.
Sanger quit her job as a nurse
because she saw the inadequacy of
trying to heal without changing
the cause of the problem. Within
a year she started a publication
called Women Rebel. Its express
aim was to advocate the prevention of conception.
"No Gods, No Masters" its
masthead proclaimed. The
woman who believed that emotions should dominate reason was
putting forward a new. way for
women to act: "To look the whole
world in the face with a go-to-hell
look in the eyes; to have an ideal;
to speak and act in defiance of
convention."
Soon however Women Rebel
was indicted by a federal grand
jury and was refused passage
through the mail because of a law
prohibiting material that makes
reference  to   the  prevention -of
conception.
In order to escape imprisonment Sanger left New York for
Montreal and then went on to
Europe, leaving her husband and
children behind.
In Europe she began to meet
noted Anarchists and Socialists
and found fuel for her broad
criticisms of capitalism, religion,
and marriage.
However her cause was
sharpened when she met Havelock
Ellis, the famous British
psychologist of sexuality. It is said
that Ellis came to adore her like
no other woman and that he encouraged her to focus energy on
her birth control movement rather
than all the other issues so as to
gain it more credibility.
In France she learned of the
diaphragm method of contraception and was soon headed back to
the U.S. to face the legal system
and spread the word about
diaphragms.
When she opened the first birth
control clinic in North America,
she had long lineups of Brooklyn
women stretching outside the
door. But within a week her clinic
was raided by [he police.
In the court case that followed
she received 30 days in jail and
almost died from a protest fast.
But in later court cases the charges
were dropped and this tacit approval made the giving of information on contraception possible.
In 1920 Margaret Sanger imported the first diaphragms into
North America.
Her fight for the right to contraception continued through the
twenties and thirties taking her
throughout the world to places
like India and China. It included
confrontations with the law, the
Church and the U.S. federal
government.
In 1937 the American Medical
Association finally gave approval
for the dissemination of information on birth control and soon
Sanger began the now wolrldwide
Planned Parenthood Association.
She acted as its president for six
years.
In later years Sanger has
sometimes been criticized for wanting complete and exclusive control of the birth control movement.
Such criticisms can and should
be made of Margaret Sanger
because the power of the movement she started warrants careful
examination.
At a time when some have the
tendency to canonize her, it is
preferable to see the total picture
of the woman. Her mistakes do
not cancel out her greatness.
DANGEROUS PILL
Less than a decade ago the birth
control pill for women was hailed
as the ultimate solution to the
problem of world population
control. Now doctors aren't so
sure.
Since the early '60s the pill has
gained widespread popularity.
And millions of Canadian women
use it regularly. It is one of the
lowest-risk forms of contraception known, yet physicians are
warning women about the
dangerous side effects the birth
control pill can have.
By INGRID
MATSON
Recently the Food and Drug
Administration put out this word
to the wise: "If you take the pill,
don't smoke." If you do smoke
and take the pill you run a
dramatically high risk of heart,
attack or stroke.
According to the FDA, women
who take the pill double their
chances of suffering a heart attack. If a woman smokes and
takes the pill she is three times
more likely to die of a heart attack
than non-smokers on the pill, and
ten times more likely than non-
smokers who do not use the pill.
"This risk increases with age and
with heavy smoking (15 or more
cigarettes a day) and is quite
marked in women over 35 years of
age," says the FDA.    «
In their new brochure the FDA
also admonishes women against
using the pill if they have had
blood clotting disorders, unexplained vaginal bleeding,
cancer of the breast or sex organs,
a stroke, a heart attack or if they
suspect they are pregnant. An
increased risk of circulatory problems which can lead to potentially
fatal blood clotting or stroke is
mentioned as well.
A recently completed   10-year
study conducted in California
shows that women who use birth
control pills for more than four
years run an almost doubled risk
of developing malignant
melanoma, an often fatal skin
cancer.
While results of the California
study are n6t definitive, they do
indicate a trend. The birth control
pill is more dangerous to women's
health than we once believed it to
be. Doctors and medical researchers cannot give women
realistic answers about how the
pill affects their health until
studies have been carried out on a
number of women who have
taken the pill for their reproductive lifetimes. Only then can
women take the pill without being
Ltsed as guinea pigs.
There is perhaps one small
consolation. The pill, while still 97
per cent effective, is less potent
now than it was 15 years ago, and
so its side effects are milder.
One alternative currently being
researched is a male contraceptive
injection or pill. The studies look
promising.
Early attempts to develop a
male contraceptive failed because
most drugs which stopped sperm
production tended to decrease the
sex drive and produce feminizing
effects. The early contraceptives
were made using only the female
hormone, progesterone.
But during the last few years
scientists have combined testosterone (the male hormone) with
provera (the female hormone,
progesterone) and come up with a
seemingly effective male contraceptive.
Currently 200 volunteers from
around the world are trying out
the new male contraceptive. The
volunteer testing is one phase of
research into male contraception
sponsored by the World Health
Organization (WHO).
Dr. Robin Percival-Smith of
UBC's student health centre was
scheduled to conduct experiments
funded by WHO until the
Canadian government halted his
research for what appear to be
political reasons.
About two years ago WHO
contacted Percival-Smith and
asked him to do Canadian
research on male contraception.
Percival-Smith accepted the offer
and received funding for his
project. About a year later he
advertised for 15 volunteers to test
the male contraceptive and 30
men came forward within 48
hours. Then suddenly the project
came to a standstill.
"For some reason, best known
to them, it appears the Canadian
government is not interested in
promoting research into the discovery of an effective male contraceptive," says Percival-Smith.
So the Canadian government,
which pays lip service to equal
rights issues, has halted Canadian
research into male contraception.
In doing this the government has
touched on a political and social
issue, the issue of equal opportunity for men and women.
Friday, February 9,  1979
THE       UBYSSEY
Page Friday. II rjumra a	
850 GRANVILLE MALL 669 6000
" A marvel of stupendous film-making...
a movie extravaganza."
REX REED-N. Y DAILY NEWS
"SUPERMAN is a hit"
RONA BARRETT-ABC TV
Cap.: 1:30, 4:15, 7:05, 10:00
Richmond Sq.: 7:00, 9:30. Mats. Sat., Sun. 2:00
Guildford:    7:00,
9:40.    Mats.    Sat.,
Sun., 2:00
 GUILDFORD	
GUILFORD TOWN CENTRE 5811716
-RICHMOND SQUARE,
NUMBER THREE ROAD 273
0LEHDA JACKSON «d OLIVER REED m
mm— FINE ARTS	
1117 WEST GEORGIA 685 7821
LOUGHEED MALL
Arts:    7:30,    9:30.
Mat. Sat., Sun. 2:15
Lougheed Mall: 7:55 9:45
Mats. Sat., Sun. 2:15
Warning:   frequent   coarse
language;  suggestive scenes
and dialogue—B.C. Director.
Warning:   occasional nudi-
Evenings 7:30, 9:30   English subtitles   ty;       some      coarse
language—B.C. Director.
DENMAN PLACE
1:45, 3:45, 5:45, 7:45, 9:50
Warning:    some   frightening
scenes—B.C. Director.
Invasion
Snatchers
The seed is planted...
terror grows.
, CAPITOL 6 ——
820 GRANVILLE MALL 669 6000
mm;immm\P
Warning:    may   frighten   some I
children—B.C. Director.
Van. Centre 2:10, 4:40, 7:10, 9:40
Lougheed   Mall   6:60,   9:20.   Mats:
Sat., Sun. 2:00
tht6ISRo
Based on the novels
"The Fellowship of the Ring "and"The Two Towers"
-VANCOUVER CENTRE-
GRANVILLE&GEORGIA 6694442
LOUGHEED MALL
SYLVIA KRISTEL
Goodbye
lmn\aquelk
1:45, 3:45, 5:40, 7:40, 9:40
 CAPITOL 6 _-
820 GRANVILLE MALL 669 6000
Warning:    frequent   sex   and
nudity—B.C. Director.
/KMTttflCflRISTO
DEflTtTOHLF:
ADMISSION: $3.00
Free parking for Bay Theatre patrons
at the Community Centre Lot,  1700
block Haro.
South 7:30 Nile 9:25
 THE BAY ,
□ENMANalBARCLAY 6859822
Warning:       some      coarse
language—B.C. Director.
'Z^PZ&,
FAMOUS ,
PLAYERS,
theatres
MOVIE   LISTINGS   ON   THIS
PAGE     ARE     EFFECTIVE
FEBRUARY 9-15
Page Friday. 12
WALT
DISNEY
Productions
presents
1^
1*^1
PARIS ROYAL _-
WEST VANCOUVER 922 9174
 PARAMOUNT.
NEW WESTMINSTER
RICHMOND SQUARE
!ER THREE ROAD 273
Park   Royal,   Paramount:   7:00,
9:00. Mats. Sat., Sun. 2:00
Richmond    Sq.:    7:10,    9:00.
Mats. Sat., Sun. 2:00.
Cunt Every
Eastwood Which
Downtown:    1:35,    3:35,
5:35, 7:40, 9:45
Lougheed Mall: 7:15, 9:30.
Mats. Sat., Sun. 2:00.
Loose'
(23S2EI!
DOWNTOWN
LOUGHEED MALL
Warning:    frequent    coarse
language; occasional
nudity—B.C. Director.
WAIT
DISNEYSj
OWalt Disney Productions
NOW in STEREOPHONIC SOUND
7:00, 9:15. Mats. Sat., Sun. 2:00
 STANLEY	
GRANVILLE al 12th 733 2622
starring
ROBERT SHAW WRRtSON FORD
FORCE TEN
7:30, 9:30. Mat. Sat. only 2:15      Warning:   some   violence
and coarse language—B.C.
Director.
PARh ROYAL
'Oneof the years 10 best films:
MflMIE IMMVlliE
:W.lri:WJWIir
CAPITOL 6
3:00, 5:00, 7:00, 9:00
Warning: some gory
violence and nudity—B.C.
Director.
3:15, 5:15, 7:15, 9:30
Pwtmr
— CAPITOL 6,
820 GRANVILLE MALL
7:00, 9:00. Mats. Sat., Sun. 2:00
COLUMBIA
Warning:    some    gory    violence,
coarse language
throughout-B.C. Director.
/ MUMM^
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, February 9,  1979 Friday, February 9,  1979
THE       UBYSSEY
Pag* 17
1MM
This weekend there are some exciting events at UBC and the
outlook at the city art galleries is
also exceptionally good.
Mussoc's smash hit Anything
Goes has its final performances
tonight and tomorrow night at the
old Auditorium at 8:30. The tickets
are $3 and $4 to hear this lively and
talented cast perform a delightful
Cole Porter score under director
Grace Macdonald.
The gallery has a fine collection of
Photoworks by Share Corsault and
Ken Straiton. Corsault uses
photographs, prints, paper and
sculpture to make a uniquely
personal statement. On the other
hand, Straiton uses a slightly
different 3-D effect where the
viewer gets a first hand experience
with the image.
It's the last weekend for two well-
produced plays at Spratt's Ark and
VICTOR COLEMAN .  . . sound poets at the Italian Folk Centre
The Lesson by Eugene Ionesco
and Party by Slawowir Mrozek are
two one act plays at the Dorothy
Somerset Studio tonight at 8.
Admission is free and both shows
are the work of talented theatre
students.
Terminal City Dance begins a
new season at the Studio Theatre in
North Vancouver's Presentation
House on Saturday at 8:30. The
program is Three Years Collected
Works, group pieces redeveloped
by the company last fall.
Also at Presentation House are
the Anna Wyman Dancers in a rare
hometown appearance. This
critically acclaimed group has a
single performance Friday night at
8:00. Tickets are $4 for students.
And check out the Presentation
House Gallery while you're there.
the Vancouver Playhouse, Alexksei
Arbuzov's The Promise and Arthur
Miller's The Crucible. Both plays
being at 8:00 Friday and 7:00
Saturday. Tickets are $6.
Company of Wayward Saints by
the Vancouver Little Theatre
Association continues this weekend
at the Metro Theatre, 13750 W.
Marine Drive. The show starts at
OPTIC
ZONE
Student Discounts
ARBUTUS VILLAGE
733-1722
FUNDING for UNIVERSITY
SERVICE GROUPS:
Written Applications are now being accepted for:
Grad Class Gifts and Projects: The proposed
Gifts and/or Projects should provide a service to
the University Community and/or the Community
at large. The applications must include:
(a) The name of the group requesting funds;
(b) The nature of the gift or project;
(c) If it is a gift OR a project;
(d) The amount sought;
(e) A one-hundred (100) word description of the gift OR project and of the planned allocation of any funds granted.
Deadline for applications
is February 12, 1979
Send applications (and questions) to SUB Box 118. No applications will be accepted after the deadlines indicated.
LANCE READ, P.R. Officer
8:30 every night except Sunday and
admission is $2.50 for students.
Les Grands Ballets Canadiens
will present three different
programs on Feb. 22-24 at the Q.E.
Theatre at 8:30 p.m. Each night
they will present OrfFs Carmina
Burana plus other works, with
choreography by Fernand Nault
and others.
The Vancouver Chamber Choir
will perform Ralph Vaughan-Williams' G Minor Mass and works by
various west coast composers. The
concert will be at the Ryerson
Church, Feb. 9 at 8:30 p.m.
A Festival of Cuban Cinema at
Pacific Cinemateque now relocated
at the 300-seat Robson Square
Cinema in the courthouse complex
ends this weekend. El Rancheador,
placed in colonial Latin America
and based on the actual diary of a
slave hunter is to be shown tonight
at 7:00 and 9:00. Rio Negro by
Manuel Perez, winner of the
Moscow International Film
Festival's jury prize, is about the
feud between two men set on
different sides in the Cuban
Revolution. This film will be shown
Saturday at 7:00 and 9:00. Admission to each of the films is $3.
The Surrey Art Gallery presents
the first major exhibition of B.C.
artist Amy Mukai, who works
primarily in the mode of expressionism with no attempt to
depict figures or natural objects —
only the raw emotions of sadness,
anger and joy.
At the SFU gallery is a display of
19th Century English Watercolors
and Drawings, a thematic
presentation of the techniques and
style of painting in that period.
Pumps Art Gallery on 40 E.
Cordova has 20 still life
photographs by David Ostrem from
Feb. 6 to 28.
The Centennial Art Museum has
an exhibition of stained glass
windows and a 17-foot-wide dome,
all of which were made in Vancouver from 1890-1940. There will
also be slides and an audio-visual
show. The museum is open from 10
a.m. to 9 p.m. and the display continues until the end of March.
The big upcoming news is that
the Vancouver Poetry Centre will
MUSSOC . . . Sandra Pirotti and Ian Forsyth in the last two nights
be presenting the first of its major
fund-raising performances at the
Italian Cultural Centre, E. 12th and
Slocan on Feb. 23. It's going to be
an entire evening of "sound
poetry" with bill bisset, Victor
Coleman, Steve McCafferty and bp
Nichol. Afterwards there's a part
and a chance to meet with these
writers.
The night before at Scandia
Auditorium, 828 E. Hastings is the
first of the series on writing in our
time, Best of Times, Worst of
Times.
Both evenings are only open to
series ticket holders who are part of
the drive to save Vancouver's Talon
Books. Tickets for the series of six
readings by 24 world-renowned
Canadian and American poets are
available for $36 for the entire
series, or a student mini-ticket of
$18 for half the readings.
These tickets can be interchanged
among friends and you can bring a
guest. They are also available on
the easy-pay installment plan, so
every effort is being made to make
the readings accessible to everyone.
lie foot ftu*A event at T4S& w&6, t&e CH$ci*H6*t& "DOA,
S«66cuko*4> eutd ZtiaAnaqt- oh. Satundaq *pe&. 24
Looking for a professional career in
ARCHITECTURE
ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE
URBANISM
The Faculty of Environmental Design of The University of
Calgary  invites you  to  meet  members  of the faculty to
discuss our Interdisciplinary Master's Degree.
Programme:
TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 20th
2:30 p.m. to 4:30 p.m.
CECIL GREEN PARK, U.B.C. Page  18
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday,  February 9,   1979
Row*
SOPEN!
I
2523 ALMA ST. at Broadway
Phone: 733-1225
I fnone: /jj- izzd a
Hong Kong
Chinese Food
(Self Serve
Restaurant)
.<£ UNIVERSITY BLVD^
^       Eat in and Take Out      i$-
j-ta OPEN EVERY DAY       *
4:30 p.m. TO 9:30 p.m.      V&-.
Phone: 224-6121A
f
KITS ■ DUNBAR • PT. GREVj
Open For Lunch
Open Till 2:30 Weekdays
3:30 Weekends
12:30 Sundays
7389520 i   DOWNTOWN
or 738-1113       I   13S9Roblon
361« W. Broadway |        688-5491
Dining Lounge - Full Facilities -
Take Out or Home Delivery
Late delivery call '/? hour before closing.
M04 W. t«TAVE.    733-37J3
An eating experience not to be under
estimated as one of the best mexican restaurants north of California.' Thats what
it is all about!
OPEN TUES.-SUN.
TAKE OUT ORDERS WELCOME!
LICENSED
DINNER
FOR TWO
UNDER
$10.00
ELEPHANT & CASTLE
PACIFIC CENTRE	
<!!TTMT!!TlllllTTff
fcjxttid
This Week
Mr.
Natural
FRASER ARMS
1450 S.W. Marine Dr.
ttTriTITXIIIIIXIIJ
RENOS
Pancake House & Restaurant
FULLY LICENSED
Breakfast Special
2 eggs, pancakes
with bacon or sausage
$1.90
Chargex Accepted
VISA
Hours: Mon.-Fri. 9:00-11:00
Sun. & Holidays 9:00-8:00
2741 West 4th Avenue
 738-3814
MUSSOC PRESENTS
IIMYTHIN&
JAN. 31-FEB. 10
8:30 p.m.
OLD AUDITORIUM
TICKETS: Concert Box Offices,
Outlets & AMS Business Otlice
STUDENTS: $2.00 Tues.Thurs.
RED LEAF
RESTAURANT
_' Luncheon Smorgasbord
Authentic Chinese Cuisine
K       in the I/Vest at a
~     Reasonable Price
r FREE DELIVERY
from 4:30 p.m.
J. 10% Discount on alt
[ cash pick-up orders
4 00 p n   9 0U c
m^m   2142 Western Parkway
wi*    U.E.L. Vancouver. B.C.
Salad Bar * Caesar Salad
Charbroiled Steaks * Seafood
Licensed Lounge
PIZZA
Free Delivery
Open Daily from 11 a.m.
SUNDAY from 4 p.m.
4450 W. 10th Ave.
224-3434 224-6336
In SUB
Basement
Sausage Rolls
Meat & Vegetable Samosas
Potato Chops
Italiano & other Submarines
Ice Cream
Also Special Sandwich
Counter Open 11 a.m.-4 p.m.
6iA>Heteo   d)<w
■CAFFE ESPRESSO*
LA BOCA BAR
OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK
ALL DAY TILL MIDNIGHT
3525 W 4th at Collingwood
RIGHT ON
FOR
GOOD
TIMES!
THE
GRANVILLE ISLAND
KEG
Granville Island
685-4735
{puekTbort
\JUGMW KITflRM
LUNCH
11:30- 3:00 Mon. - Sat.
DINNER
5:00- 1:00 Mon.- Sat
5:00 - 11:00 Sunday
WJw.IOth.Av*.
mm*
gi^f^r=-ir^r^n=Jr^f=Jf^f^^f=ilriJcJr^r^r^i^r^^r=I
SPECIALIZING IN
GREEK CUISINE
& PIZZA
FREE  FAST DELIVERY
228-9513
4510 W. 10th Ave. „,
ALEXFS
GREEK RESTAURANT
Welcome to
my house!
GREEK FOOD AT
REASONABLE J
PRICES.
OPEN EVERY DAY
11:30 a.m.-1 a.m.
SUNDAY 12-10 p.m.
FULLY LICENSED t\
2291B W. BROADWAY 734-4424 Friday, February 9,  1979
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 19
'Tween classes
NOW PLAYING AT SUB THEATRE:
DELICIOUSLY DAFFY!
TODAY
AQUASOC
Accepting   students   for   Feb.,   March   scuba
course,   noon,   SUB  basement cages.   Limited
enrolment.
CHINESE VARSITY CLUB
Girts' floor hockey practice, 6 p.m., Thunderbird
Winter Sports Complex gym E.
Deadline for ski trip registration, noon, SUB 216.
YOUNG ALUMNI CLUB
Happy hour, 4 p.m., Cecil Green Park.
LE CLUB FRANCAIS
Reunion, midi, La Maison Internationale.
INTERNATIONAL HOUSE
Latin   America   evening,   7   p.m., International
House.
ATA
General meeting, noon. Graduate Centre committee room.
GAY PEOPLE OF UBC
Gay hearts celebration, 8:30 p.m., Grad Centre
ballroom
jF^hv* ^
DEBATING SOCIETY
Impromptu debate, noon, SUB 211.
AMS TASK FORCE
Informal meeting with AMS part-time staff,
noon, SUB 125.
SATURDAY
INTERNATIONAL HOUSE
International valentine party, 7:30 p.m., International House. Music, speakers, positively no
tickets sold at door.
MONDAY
CHINESE VARSITY CLUB
Disco dance practice, noon, SUB 125.
WOMEN'S COMMITTEE
Rape information centre discussion, noon, SUB
130
TUESDAY
LUTHERAN STUDENT MOVEMENT
Supper    discussion   on   Revelation,   6pm
Hot flashes
Let's de the
time warp
The Ubyssey will be taking that
leap to the left next Thursday and
Friday while the whole university
does the Time Warp again and
takes a couple of days off. Since
we're publishing only on Tuesday
next week, those of you wishing to
put in Hots and 'Tweens for
publication must have them in by
noon Monday.
PutiLIC
228-6121
FRI. 8. SAT.
7:30 p.m. - 9:45   p.m.
SUNDAY
1 :00 — 3:00 p.m.
STUDENTS
& CHILDREN    .75
ADULTS $,  2S
THUNDERBIRD
WINTER
SPORTS CENTRE
TOUCH-DISCO
10    WEEKS    GROUP
LESSONS $35
Contact:
DANCE CITY
927 Granville St.,
Vancouver, B.C.
Phone: 685-4383
Classes start Feb. 26
WEDNESDAY -
FEBRUARY 14
Special Party
Valentine's Night
FUN STARTS AT 7 p.m.
COME AS YOU ARE OR
DRESS THE PART!
Door and Costume Prizes
(Cash and Surprises)
MAKE A DATE
Meet Them There
364 Water St.,
Gastown
So if you want to let your fellow
Transylvanian tranvestites know
about that wild and beautiful hunk
you're going to create in your basement during the mid-term break,
get the necessary info (times,
dates, places, et cetera) up to our
decadent office in SUB 241K Monday. And watch out for that balding
fellow with the long blonde hair.
He's weird.
BLACK & LEE
TUX SHOP
NOW AT
1110 Seymour St.
688-2481
16th & Arbutus
<PNcirr$iK)E$
6ARY CUTHMAN
19PCE    ORCHESTRA
THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 15
•PM $5.50
7:30PM MARCH I    $4.30
Tickets  at   •   Woodward's  Box  Offices
687-2801 • The Ridge • A & B Records &
Tapes •  Black Swan Records •  Ernie's
Hot Wax • Friends Records
• Quintessence Records
DAT
MCAT
LSAT      .   .,..,...
GMAT   / ECFMG
PCAT   /   FLEX
OCAT /   VQE
GRE  / NOB
SAT /   I, II
VAT/NLE
r
I      SF
TEST PREPARATION
SPECIALISTS SINCE 1938
I
KflPMN
Educational Center
Call Dap Evcnhif 11 Weekend!
University Village Bldg.
4900 25th Avenue N.E.
Seattle, Washington 98105
(206) 523-7617
For Information About Other Centers
In Major US Cities & Abroad
Outside NY State
CALL TOLL FREE: S00-223-17I2
Lutheran Campus Centre.
SCIENCE FICTION CLUB
Film on Artificial Intelligence, noon, IRC room 80.
BAHA'I CLUB
Informal discussion on the Baha'i faith,   noon,
SUB 113.
PRE-MED SOCIETY
Dr. Gordon Robinson presents case histories on
neurology, noon, IRC 4.
WEDNESDAY
CHINESE VARSITY CLUB
Deadline for square dance tickets, noon, SUB
216. 	
_^   MOVING AHDTs:
PO TRANSFER LTD. '
■STORAGE
Big or
Small Jobs*
Reasonable
^Rates
2060 W. 10th
Vancouver
732-9898
ALSO GARAGES,
BASEMENTS & YARDS
^CLgANj^PS^
Part V in Captain
Marvel series
Fri. and Sat.
7:00 show ONLY
Extra show
Sun. 9:30
. MOVIE IS
TOTALLY OUT
OF CONTROL
Thurs., Sun.
9:30
$1.00
THE CLASSIFIEDS
RATES: Student - 3 lines, 1 day $1.50; additional lines 35c.
Commercial - 3 lines, 1 day $275; additional lines 50c Additional days $2.50 and 45c
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone and are payable in advance.
Deadline is 11:30 a.m.. the day before publication.
Publications Office. Room 241. S U.S., UBC. Van., B.C. V6T 1W5
5 — Coming Events
GAY Valentine Disco is coming! Grad
Centre Ballroom, 8:30 p.m.-1:00 a.m.,
Friday, February 9. $2.00 students,
$2.50 visitors.  Full facilities.
20 — Housing
International House
presents
LATIN AMERICAN EVENING
Fri. Feb 9th 7—9 p.m.
in our COFFEE PLACE
Come Et speak or learn with native speakers
Bagels Et Coffee & Spanish music
EVERYONE WELCOME
INTERNATIONAL VALENTINE
PARTY
SAT FEB 10 - 7:30 sharp doors close
PROGRAM:
7:30-8:15 Police Padre Dr. Wotherspoon talks on
"A Time to Remember International Unity &
Love"
8:30 - 9:00 Gord Hayman on piano
9:30 - 1:00 Dancing to Popular Music
Tickets— JOO complimentary to I.H. members
25 to AMS members
$2.00 to NON-MEMBERS
IN ADVANCE FROM I.H.
no tickets at door — info-228-5021
Subfilms outrageously
presents
KENTUCKY FRIED
MOVIE
Bored Sundays?
Extra Show Sun. at 9:30 p.m.
Commedia dell'Arte anyone?
Vancouver Little Theatre Association
presents the comedy
A COMPANY OF WAYWARD SAINTS
By George Herman
Feb. 7-24, Wed.-Sat., 8:30
METRO THEATRE. 1370 S.W. Marine Drive
Students $2.50. Info: 266-7191. 731-1516
THE VANCOUVER INSTITUTE
Free Public Lecture
DR.  ANDREW  I.
MALCOLM
Psychiatrist, Toronto
Dr. Malcolm, who has appeared as
an expert witness in more than 40
murder trials, speaks on . . .
THE USE AND ABUSE OF
PSYCHIATRISTS IN COURTS
Lecture Hall 2,
Woodward Building,
Saturday.Feb. 10,
at 8:15 p.m.
lO-
- For Sale —
Commercial
ll -
- For Sale -
■ Private
STEREO, Sanyo receiver, EPl 1000
speakers, EP 2000 turntable. Must
sell, $250 o.b.o. Phone 224-6883.
COMMUNITY SPORTS — Excellent
prices for ice skates, hockey, soccer,
jogging and racquet sports equipment. 733-1612. 3615 West Broadway,
Vancouver, B.C.
15 —Found
SINGLE grad student room available in
large mixed house, Kits Point. $170
per mcnth. 731-7097.
WOMEN'S singles available in W. H.
Gage, Totem Park and Place Vanier
residences. Please contact the Stu-
dent Housing Office, Monday through
Friday, 8:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m. or phone
228-2811.
25 — Instruction
30-Jobs
SUMMER     EMPLOYMENT:     How     to
secure summer jobs in B.C. Labour
jobs, clearical, local and Northern
employment, etc. Best to apply
early! Send $2 for student Summer
Employment Guide. Satisfaction or
refund. Labour Market Info Service,
Box 7810 Sta-A (Dept UB), Edmonton,
Alta.  T5J 3G6.
WANT A SHARE of the good life? Will-
ing to spend a little time? Our opportunity could make you wealthy. We
are an international organization looking for management and marketing
people who will become our associates. Initially they may participate
without jeopardy to their present
careers. Interested, call for an appointment, 887-7711, Pager No. 3781.
35 — Lost
40 — Messages
*
1
A
70 — Services (Continued)
RESUME Service. Expertly prepared—
excellent rates. Yvonne Patrick
Steno  Service   Ltd.  594r7722.
ART&
ICALLIGRAPHYI
SUPPLIES
NOW AVAILABLE.
For lower prices and a wide
range of office and school
supplies, try
MOLLIES
QUALITY STATIONERS
4479 W. 10th AVE.
85 —Typing
TYPIST. Reports, essays, term papers,
etc. Also transcribes standard cassette tapes. Reasonable. June
682-4870   after 6:00 p.m.
PROFESSIONAL Typing. IBM Selectric.
Essays, thesis, etc. Kits area. Phone
Lynda 732-0617.
THIS
SECTION
RESERVED
for
VALENTINE'S
K        MESSAGES        2
Tuesday, Feb.13th W
-£.J SPECIAL RATES "V^
JZL, 3 lines for $1.00 «^,
^^ Deadline ^^
2^ 11:30 a.m. Monday ^J
W Feb. 12th W
_«*&»
50 — Rentals
60 — Rides
65 — Scandals
TONIGHT bring your sweetheart to
Gay Valentine Disco! 8:30 p.m.-l:00
a.m. Grad Centre Ballroom. $2.00,
Students; $2.50 visitors. Full facilities.
70 — Services
WEDDING Photography Specialist.
Complete professional coverage at
very reasonable rates. Call for consultation at your convenience.
732-9651  eves.
M.A. Grad will proof read theses and
papers. Can also check bibs. 684.7940.
Tony.
TYPING — 75c per page. Fast and accurate by experienced typist. Gordon,
685-4863.	
TYPING: Essays, theses, manuscripts,
reports, etc. Fast and accurate ser-
viae. Bilingual. CJemy ^24-9414.	
FAST efficient typing. Reasonable
rates.  266-5053.
99 — Miscellaneous
SKI  WHISTLER
Rent   cabin   day/week   732-0174   eres.
AFRICA  — Overland  expeditions London/Nairobi     13     weeks.     London/
Johannesburg 18 weeks.
KENYA SAFARIS—2 and 3 weeks.
EUROPE — Camping and hotel tours
from 4 days to 9 weeks.
For     brochures     contact     TRACKS
TRAVEL, Suite 300, 562 EgHnton Ave.
East,  Toronto,  Ont. M4P  1B9.
INSTANT
PASSPOR1
PHOTOS
kgtf^MAJiRASLTD.i
,r^    4538 W 10th
,224-9112 or 224-5858J
=ir=ir=ir=Jr=Jr=Jr=ir=Jr=ir=iT3i
USE
UBYSSEY
CLASSIFIED
=ii=ir=Jr=ii=lr=Ji=]i=Ji=lr=liarJB Pago 20
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday,  February 9,  1979
Professional
Installation
Inducted)
A new offering at A Er B Sound's Car Store
—the Rally model CXA-2374 is a dash cassette auto stereo with AM/FM Stereo Radio
in a size to fit all cars. With fast-forward and
rewind, tape eject, tape, stereo and AM/FM
indicator lights, local/distance switch and full
two year warranty — this is a fully featured
model. kWe have matched the Rally
CXA-2374 with the Marantz SS-625 dual
cone speaker system designed for installation
in tight places. The SS625 by Marantz uses a
10-oz High Flux density magnet complete
with wire mesh grilles for accoustical
transparency.
NOW
$249'
As you would expect from a top of the line
$589.95 mobile system, the T633 is a full
featured Road Rated Receiver with all the recent improvements in mobile performance
through the research of Craig Engineers. The
V505 is a 24 watts/channel amplifier with low
distortion DC coupled circuitry and 4 band
graphic equalifier. The R731's are full range
braced construction speakers with a massive
41 -oz magnetic system. All in all a powerful,
precise and reliable top of the line mobile
system.
NOW
«58995
czreAJG,
Your $389.95 Craig system includes the T605
in-dash (stereo-matrix) Cassette player with
AM/FM/MPX radio plus the V502 Powerplay
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the POWERPLAY flush mounted speakers.
This is a highly efficient, reliable and balanced system. Featuring locking fast forward
and rewind, tone controls, auto repeat, lots
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now 389
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95
SUPERSCOPE
STEREO CASSETTE DECK
Features: • Dolby Noise Reduction System • Bias &
Equalizer Switches for Low Noise, CR02 and FeC r Tapes
• Locking   Pause   Control   •   3-Digit   Tape   Counter
• Super Hard Permalloy Head • Peak Li miter • Separate Right and Left Record Level Controls • Calibrated
VU Meters.
MODEL CD 310
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95
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We've provided all the features you demand. Including a
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MODEL 1810
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1197 DIRE STRAITS - DIRE STRAITS
3034 SHADOW DANCING - ANDY GIBB
3030 SLOWHAND - ERIC CLAPTON
6134 CHAMPAGNE JAM -
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7064 "SAN FRANCISCO" - THE VILLAGE PEOPLE
7096 MACHO MAN - THE VILLAGE PEOPLE
7118 CRUISIN' - THE VILLAGE PEOPLE
6161 BLOODY TOURISTS - 10 CC.
0214 GREATEST HITS -
MARSHALL TUCKER BAND
3737 BOOK EARLY - CITY BOY
6158 ALICIA BRIDGES - ALICIA BRIDGES
170 THE POET AND I - FRANK MILLS
RECORDS
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2740.172 BEETHOVEN: 9 SYMPHONIES -
BERLIN PHILHARMONIC, KARAJAN (8-LP-SET) Records 33.99 Cassettes 34.99
198.318 VIVALDI CONCERTOS - KAMMER ORCH.. SEILER Record 5.29
2530.070 C0RELLI, MANFREDINI, T0RELLI, L0CATELLI:
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6500.413 CONCERTOS FOR OBOE - HOLLIGER Record 5 29
2530.247 ALBIN0NI, PACHELBEL, B0CCHERINI, RESPIGHI:
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2721.083 FESTIVAL OF HITS (2-LP-SET) - VARIOUS ARTISTS Record 4.99
2721.117 KARAJAN SUPER CONCERT (2-LP-SET) - KARAJAN Record 5.29
RESONANCE
2535.143 BACH: BRANDENBURG CONC. 2, 3, 5 - FESTIVAL STRINGS
2535.142 BACH: BRANDENBURG CONC. 1, 4, 6 - FESTIVAL STRINGS
2535.249 VIRTUOSO MANDOLINS -- SAARLAND MANDOLIN ORCH.
2535.110 LISZT: HUNGARIAN RHAPSODIES - KARAJAN
2535.105 VIVALDI: FOUR SEASONS - FESTIVAL STRINGS
2535.203 BEETHOVEN: SYMPH. NO. 9 - BERLIN PHILHARM.
2535.126 HELMUT WALCHA PLAYS BACH
2535.134 EMPEROR WALTZ - FRIGSAY, BERLIN RADIO SYMPH.
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THE ENTIRE SELECTION OF CBS RECORDS AND
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• CLASSICS • POP-ROCK • JAZZ #C&W #DISCO •
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LOOK FOR THE   RED   PRICE STICKER!
THE HOME OF HIGH FIDELITY
THiT
OPEN UNTIL 9
556 SEYMOUR ST., DOWNTOWN       THURSDAY & FRIDAY    682-6144

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