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The Ubyssey Feb 24, 1967

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Array THE UBYSSEY
Vol. XLVIII, No. 51
VANCOUVER, B.C., FRIDAY,  FEBRUARY, 24, 1967
«m«is' x^>
Shaun?
FEB 24 1967
*
©r
224-39\$*>
Sullivan
plots CUS
pull-out
By TOM MORRIS. Ubyssey Ass't City Editor
UBC students could leave the Canadian Union of
Students next year if present AMS financial difficulties
are not overcome.
The possible breakaway was announced Thursday
when The Ubyssey questioned AMS president-elect
Shaun Sullivan.
"If we are to cal-ry on our present ^activities — and
those include membership in CUS — we will either have
to generate new revenue or cut athletic, special events,
clubs, or CUS costs," Sullivan said.
"We are now in financial
—kurt hilger photo
RUMBLE, SPLASH, AND KER-LEAVE goes Canada's second-largest campus, as AMS president-elect Shaun Sullivan predicts UBC may have to leave CUS next year for financial
reasons. Once in Fraser, island floats to oblivion  as councillors count pennies.
sy?'
AMS HOLDS TENDER PARTY
Everyone is invited to a tender party
today at 4:45 p.m. in AMS council chambers in Brock Hall.
Tenders will be called for construction of UBC's mammoth white elephant
Student Union Building.
AMS treasurer Lome Hudson expects
the white elephant to cost $4.6 million.
The party will last until all the sealed
bids from contractors have been opened.
Lowest bid will be accepted unless it's
too high.
The foolish project is scheduled for
completion by fall, 1968.
difficulties and if they are
the same next year, CUS
may have to go.
"But we do have alternatives before taking the final
step of leaving  CUS.
"We could have another
fee referendum to boost the
student contribution up to
$3. This would give us
another $50,000."
The last fee referendum
was soundly defeated on
Feb. 15.
"The cut I would like to
see would be in men's- athletics.  At present all athle
tics spend about $78,000. We
are already committed to
this expenditure next year.
'If we can't make some
arrangement with athletics,
we will still be committed
to  that amount.
"We could also cut special
events and club's budgets
but that is unlikely as they
are   small   enough   already."
The executive of university clubs committee voted
Wednesday to advise the
AMS to withdraw from CUS.
UCC   represents   5,000   stu-
To   Page 2
See: CLUBS APPLY
FIGHTS IRRELEVANCES ...
...DESPITE  WITHDRAWALS
Activist Ward revitalizes CUS
By DON SELLAR
OTTAWA (CUP) — Winter is beckoning to
spring and students across Canada are preparing
for the final onset of term papers and exams.
Their leaders are now looking back over an
unusual year — rife with new talk about student
activism, student involvement in university government and developments in education.
It began with the usual Canadian Union of
S t udents declarations
about busting the social
fabric of this country by
pressing for free education, student salaries,
better teaching in universities and open decision making by the crusty
legions of university
government.
For 28-year-old John
Douglas Ward, president
of CUS, it began with
the certain knowledge
that if Canada's largest
student organization was
going to rise beyond mealy declarations, it was
going to have to lose some members.
Lose them it did. Eight universities have
withdrawn from CUS since Ward faced the annual
congress last fall.
The withdrawals, centred on the activism issue,
cost CUS all its Quebec membership and shaved
its rolls to 40 universities and 150,000 students.
Out of Doug Ward has come massive office
reorganization, new concentration on implementing CUS legislation, a research centre and a start
on field work.
A communications secretariat last fall published program outlines to help localv c£jxy^usegv in
WARD
their drive for seats on university governing
bodies, for the evasive thing called "universal
accessibility" and for other direct action at the
local level.
But today, it isn't easy to say Ward has been
able to mainton the congress orientation.
CUS has failed (on more campuses than Ward's
army could visit in six months) to activate the
bureaucratic, administrative monstrosities that are
local student government.
Ward has fearlessly blasted students' councils
for dealing in the "irrelevant" things like winter
carnivals, yearbooks and campus dances.
Local CUS chairmen have failed to take CUS
ideas and policy to their campuses, and programs
CUS withdrawals
a   healthy sign'
REGINA (CUP) — A CUS official has termed
the recent withdrawal of eight universities a
"healthy sign" that students are trying to relate
to their academic communities.
Students are beginning to think realistically
about what the academic community is and how
they can best relate to it, field secretary Rolli
Cacchioni said in an interview.
SOme universities feel they can't relate through
CUS, Cacchioni added, and this is why they have
withdrawn.
The field secretary said CUS will only become
relevant to Canadian students if local student
councils relate its programs to their electorates.
"Until they realize the difference' between a
legislative and an administrative body, they can't
be active on $e ca^i^ T v v t v „,, ^,   ,..__„	
like UNI VAC have died on many of their desks.
But more and more, there is a feeling in CUS
headquarters that student government will have to
be by-passed and better communication methods
found if Doug Ward's successor, Hugh Armstrong,
is to reach students effectively.
There is a new reliance on the new provincial
structure which CUS has assumed this year.
Ward, whose administrative knowhow may
have saved the national office budget $15,000
this year, believes provincial associations must
develop if CUS is to go ahead.
Indicators of success achieved by CUS lobbies
aren't many, but they repesent some solid gains.
■ For example, the free education lobby is now
gaining support from many politicians in the so-
called old line parties. Students on half a dozen
campuses have gained representation on senior
university governing bodies.
There is no indication that tuition fee hikes
will be general across the country this year.
Ward's long-awaited report on CUS structures
will be considered by a CUS directors' meeting
next month — if he can get it finished.
When spring truly comes, the CUS secretariat
will be gearing for closer contact with students
interested in going activist.
The next approach will be direct, warns Ward.
This year about 3,000 students have written for
information about CUS. Next year, with an expanded communications section, Ward is hoping
to boost that figure to 15,000.
DIALOGUE   67
See pf 3 Page 2
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, February 24, 1967
Canadian careers attract
emigrant grads in U.S.
Canadian graduate students at west coast
American universities show "tremendous
interest" in returning to Canada, Dr. Robert
F. Seagal said Thursday.
Seagal, assistant science dean at UBC,
returned recently from visiting six west
coast universities — Washington, Oregon,
California at Berkeley and Los Angeles,
Stanford and California Institute of Technology.
His tour was among six included in the
1967 program of visits organized by the
Association of Canadian Universities and
Colleges annually since 1965.
"We met 40 to 60 students on each campus," he said. "There is no doubt in our
minds that there are a lot of Canadian students who are really keenly interested in
coming back to Canada but they are completely out of touch with what is going on."
University salaries in Canada and the
U.S. are similar and many American graduate students showed interest in Canadian
career opportunities.
On a four-man AUCC tour to six leading
United Kingdom universities is applied
science dean William Armstrong.
Included in the groups this year are
federal  department of manopwer  and  im
migration and the civil service commission.
Information on interested students will thus
be more widely distributed in Canada.
In all, six tours will cover 27 American
universities, eight universities in the U.K.
and Western Europe, and meetings with
Canadian graduate students in Geneva, Paris
and Brussels.
Space  explored
Is there really any fact in reports about
flying saucers or little green men who walk
only to the sound of breaking glass?
Scientific fact will be seperated from
scientific fiction in a seven-lecture series
offered by the UBC extension department
called Space Research and Exploration.
Two of UBC's leading scientists in astronomy and geophysics, Michael Overden and
J. A. Jacobs will present the lecture series.
Topics will include life on other planets,
rockets, spacecraft and future prospects in
space research.
The series begins Tuesday, Feb. 28 at 8
p.m. in the auditorium of the Vancouver
Public Library. Complete information can
ibe obtained at UBC's extension department.
TUSSMAN DISCUSSES DISSENT
Students can hear about being loyal and dissenting in a
democracy at half price from
famous Berkeley philosopher,
Dr. Joseph Tussman.
Tussman will speak on Individualism in Jeopardy in a
lecture today in Buchanan 106
at 8 p.m. Student admission
is $1.
He is a noted author, speaker, political philosopher and
director of the experimental
arts program at the University of California.
The program is sponsored
by the UBC extension department and includes an all-day
seminar on the same theme
Saturday.
Saturday's program includes
professor Noel Lyon, UBC faculty of law, and Dr. Alan
Aberbach, Simon Fraser Academy department of history.
It begins at 9:30 a.m. in Henry
Angus 415.
Student rate for the total
seminar is $5 and registration
is through the extension dept.
or at the door.
TUSSMAN
College is tools/ texts
A summer of helping others and $1,000
in your pocket is what the Frontier College
of Canada offers male university students
of all years and levels of learning.
The college has for sixty years organized
a summer program sending students into
mining, logging, and railway camps.
The students, called laborer-teachers,
work a summer of hard labor at long hours
and relatively low pay.
The labor-teacher works alongside the
men in the day and in the evening counsels,
teaches, or offers recreation.
Applicants must be in top physical condition and toe relatively intelligent.
Any interested student can attend an
organizational meeting March 7 in Bu. 106
at noon.
A film concerning a laborer-teacher's
experiences will be shown, and job interviews will be arranged.
FROM PAGE  1
Clubs apply pressure
dents in  campus  clubs.
"It is nearly impossible
to make cuts in the undergraduate societies' and clubs'
budgets,"   Sullivan   said.
"They don't understand
the importance of CUS to
UBC, and they can apply a
lot of political pressure
around here.
"CUS correlates what is
happening on other campuses. It gives us background material from other
universities about student affairs, and student movements for better deals from
local governments.
"As university finance is
being  taken   over  more  by
the local governments it is
even more important today
that we have information
from other groups concerning their fights with local
government.
"If we cannot make cuts
in local activities, then our
CUS committment will have
to toe partially or completely
cut."
At present the AMS pays
$10,205 for a full membership in CUS.
"We may have to arrange
associate status with CUS
or pull out. At present there
are no provisions for associate status in its constitution
and this could prove impos
sible to implement.
"One of the largest parts
of the AMS budget next
year will be the financing of
a program to promote higher
education in B.C.
"If we are going to finance this we need both the
knowledge that CUS provides and the money that
CUS takes.
"The fact is that some organization or a number of
groups will get their budgets cut next year if our
financial difficulties are not
overcome. CUS is among our
biggest expe|»ditures and
it is naturally considered
when budget cuts are discussed."
PRINCE GEORGE
SCHOOL DISTRICT
Written enquiries are invited from qualified teachers and
those who expect to obtain their qualifications during the
present academic year.
If you are interested in teaching in this dynamic and rapidly growing centre of British Columbia write for full details
concerning available positions, working conditions, salary
and fringe benefits.
Interview appointments will be arranged on March 13th
and 14th in Vancouver.
Write to: District Superintendent, School District No. 57
1891  Sixth Avenue
Prince George, B.C.
Alma Mater Society
OFFICIAL NOTICES
HONORARY ACTIVITY AWARDS:
Each year the Alma Mater Society awards a number
of Honorary Activity Awards to recognize outstanding
contributions to the A.M.S. in the form of leadership
and/or service.. The award recognizes outstanding
contribution in any one year or cumulative contributions over a number of years. The award will not,
however, be granted in recognition of athletic ability
or accomplishments.
Applications will be received up to 4:00 p.m., February 28th, and should be submitted to the Chairman,
Honorary Activities Awards Committee, Box 53,
Brock Hall.
Further information is available from Club Chairmen,
A.M.S. Councillors, or Mr. Lome Hudson, Treasurer,
A.M.S. Office (S. Brock).
COMMITTEE CHAIRMANSHIPS
Applications are now being received for Chairmen of
the following Committees:
Canadian Union of Students Committee
Canadian University Service Overseas Committee
Frosh Orientation Committee
High School Conference Committee
Homecoming Committee
Intramurals Committee
Special Events -Committee
World University Service Committee
Academic Activities Committee (applicants for this
Chairmanship must submit a proposed program
for 1967-68 with approximate costs)
COMMITTEE MEMBERS
Applications   are  now  toeing  received   for Committee
members for the following Joint A.M.S.-Administration
Committees:
Academic Symposium Committee
Brock Art Committee
Student Union Building Clients Committee
Winter Sports Centre Management Committee
Food Services Committee
Book Store Committee
Library Committee
Parking and Traffic Committee
Applications for the above positions must include a
letter outlining qualifications, reason for applying,
and, where applicable, a proposed program. Eligibility
forms are available from the A.M.S. Office (S. Brock)
and must be completed by the Registrar's Office before making application.
LETTERS OF APPLICATION AND ELIGIBILITY
FORMS MUST BE RECEIVED BY THE SECRETARY, BOX 54, BROCK HALL BY MARCH 3rd. 1967.
AMS-FACULTY STUDY GROUP
CO-ORDINATOR
Applications are invited for co-ordinator of a joint
A-M.S.-Faculty study group investigating the financial
and sociological barriers to higher education. Experience in survey analysis, sociology, and/or economics helpful, but not mandatory. Applications to
Assistant-Treasurer, Box 53, Brock Hall.
OTHER POSITIONS AVAILABLE
Applications are now being received for:
College Shop Manager
Ubyssey Editor
Student Union Building Chairman Friday, February 24, 1967
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 3
U.S. CONTRACTS
UBC RESEARCH
McKIM FACES PERSKY .
— powell hargrave photo
. resoundingly dialectic
-  ARTS  EXECUTIVE
CLEARS  CANDIDATES
By NORMAN GIDNEY
A special executive meeting Thursday of the arts
undergraduate society cleared up the "whole election
schmozzle."
A motion passed by the executive upheld AUS
president George Roberts' interpretation of the arts constitution that presidential candidates Stan Persky and
Linda McKim are eligible.
The constitution states
candidates must be in third
year. Both Persky, arts 1,
and McKim, arts 2, will be
in third year arts next term.
A second argument arose
over alleged attempts by
Blue Guard members and
returning officer Brian Min-
ter to postpone the nomination and election by four
days because of ineligibility
of some candidates.
Blue Guard spoksman Don
Emanuel, arts 3, denied the
neo-fascist group was involved in any such attempt.
"Some people are blaming it on the Blue Guard;
but this is untrue," he said.
Roberts said the returning
officer is responsible to the
executive. '1 checked that,"
he assured.
"He  has no official  duty
beyond    looking   after    the
polls."
Roberts emphasized the
vagueness of the constitution.
"The constitution is ambiguous and foolhardy," he
said.
Only two candidates are
running for AMS vice president: Harley Rothstein, arts
3, and Clay Larson, arts 1,
after the withdrawal of Fern
Miller and Bart Call in favor
of Rothstein.
Russell Precious, arts 3,
was acclaimed treasurer and
Nancy Gilbert, arts 1, became secretary with no opposition.
The elections for the remaining positions will be
held Feb. 27. Polls are in
North and South Brock, the
auditorium caf, and Buchanan.
Politicians carry yoke onto cross
POINT GREY (UNS) — Four Laputians and a Lilliputian Wednesday successfully withstood the dialectic oppression of an aged Brobdigragian who refused to break his eggs
at the proper; i.e. neither; end.
The combatants, breaking hot buns of peace beforehand, discovered power politics upon the manifestations of
aforesaid aged one's namesake appetite for then-broken
pieces.
Brains worth $131000
By PETER SHAPIRO
United States army, navy, and atomic
energy commission this year have poured
into UBC more than $131,000 in research
grants, a Ubyssey survey showed Thursday.
Contracts have been signed between
UBC scientists and the American air force
($34,781), navy ($63,296), and atomic energy
commission ($63,296).
None of the work being done, according
to   administration   sources,   seems   directly
related to the war in Vietnam. Also according to university accountant P. D. Bullen,
the    contracts    do
not bind the professors to secrecy.
Bullen   said  the
professors are able
to    publish    their
findings after they
deliver    a    report
on  their  research
to the contractor.
Chemistry    professor   Dr.   R.   E.
Pincock,  who  has
about $20,000 from
the U.S. air force
for   research   into
"reactions   in   frozen   solutions,"   said   his
work has been published around the world.
Fisheries professor Dr. N. J. Wilimov-
sky, who has several thousand dollars from
the U.S. navy for research into the state
of the fishing economy in China, said that
although the professors are technically under contract, they are actually recipients of
grants.
"U.S. government bodies can only give
money under contract, but they exert no
real control," Wilimovsky said.
"Thus the money is really a research
grant."
Professor Wilimovsky was not aware of
any projects in his department, financed by
U.S. government contract, where publishing
rights are restricted.
Bullen said the only sort of secret contracts he was aware of were those involv-
BULLEN
ing pharmacy research. Private drug companies sometimes demand custody of research findings, he said.
Besides the government contracts from
the U.S. and contracts and grants from private sources, there is almost $130,000 in
grants from the United States National Institute of Health, and the National Science
Foundation.
Bullen said the National Science Foundation grants were only aavilable to U.S.
citizens working here.
"Citizenship is not a factor in the National Institute of Health grants," he said.
The U.S. government contracts went to
professors in the departments of chemistry,
mathematics, zoology, fisheries, oceanography, and geophysics.
African activist
to speak Tues.
Rhodesia's first negro lawyer and
active African nationalist is coming to
UBC Feb. 28.
Herbert Chitepo in being brought
by the U.N. club and CUS.
He is one of a few highly-educated
Africans who broke the color barrier
in law being permitted to open a law
office in Salisbury.
The Rhodesian Bar Association rallied to his support when land segregation laws prohibited him from opening an office in central Salisbury.
He is now president of the Zimbabwe African National Union while
its national leader, the Rev. Sithole, is
held in preventive detention in Rhodesia.
He has recently devoted himself
fully to nationalist activity in Africa.
He speaks in Buchanan 106 on Tues-
Posh centre overcrowded
private club proposed
Grad students may build their own private club on campus.
This was one of the suggestions put
forth Thursday by grad student Lome Hudson, law 3. The grad students were trying
at their annual meeting to decide whether
or not to withold the $15 of the AMS fee
which is used for building development on
campus.
The withheld money might be used to
"promote an exclusive club somewhat apart
from the majority," according to Hudson,
who is outgoing AMS treasurer.
However, if the grad students paid the
money, Hudson said they would be "actively joining with the students in achieving
many common purposes."
The meeting was held at the plush Grad
Centre, which GSA president Peter Robinson claims is too small.
AMS first vice-president Charlie Boylan told the meeting the GSA is not working properly in the interests of grads.
"It should organize and work actively in
the vital interests of grad students," he said.
Boylan gave an example of the kind of
problem GSA should work on:
"Teaching assistants at UBC get about
$1,800 a year for teaching English. At most
Canadian campuses they get $3,000 — this
is the kind of problem GSA is doing nothing about — it's just a social club," Boylan
said.
_. cj-AT THE BORDER:^
°|g ^S^HAT'5 THE TROUBLE..
JH\myMOHAL^pAhl6ER0US IN-tf>t>tfARE IMVAO/N^ US!
MAN?3 ^ FILTRATION!      "*
h
Z
o THE UBYSSEY
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the university year
by the Alma Mater Society of. the University of B.C. Editorial opinions are
the editor's and not of the AMS or the university. Member, Canadian
University Press. Founding member, Pacific Student Press. Authorized
second class mail by Post Office Department, Ottawa, and for payment of
postage in cash.
The Ubyssey publishes Page Friday, a weekly commentary and review.
City editor, 224-3916. Other calls, 224-3242: editor, local 25; photo. Page
Friday, loc. 24; features, sports, loc. 23; advertising, loc. 26. Telex 04-5224.
Winner Canadian   University  Press trophies
for general excellence and editorial cartoons.
FEBRUARY 24, 1967
Kangaroo court
To protect the public image of the university, justice
for campus offenders is meted in secret by the mysterious faculty council.
Sometime this month, the council met to fine two
anonymous students a total $150 for some unnamed
traffic violation.
If the offenses were minor, the council has committed a grave injustice which students will never learn
about.
If they were major — which seems to be the case —
the council is affording students privileges which other
members of society not enjoy simply because they are
students. One one side, uncalled for severity. On the
other, surrogate parents protecting would-be adults for
the sake of image.
And it's all in secret, contrary to every established
precedent of British and Canadian justice — trial by a
jury of one's peers or by impartial magistrate; in public;
under one law for all.
A student who commits an offence against the laws
<4nf Canada should be tried in a court exactly like any
other citizen.
The faculty council is supported by undergraduate
societies with disciplinary problems too great to be
handled through student court. It could be broken
by passing such major offenses to the police and refusing
to deal in any way with the council. Individuals brought
before council for traffic offenses should refuse to participate in the secrecy arrangement, and insist on their
right to legal counsel and open trial.
Cut the jocks
While treasurer-elect Dave Hoye casts about for
places to skin cash for next year, he might try athletics.
Now, extra-mural sports get a total of $78,000 a year
from the AMS—almost as much as council's total
discretionary spending and more than twice as much as
all other  campus events.
And on campus, the society gives $2,500 to intramural sports.
Extra-murals are designed to achieve physical excellence among Canadian universities. UBC teams play
across Western Canada — half the budget is far travel
alone. Excellence on this scale amounts to publicity for
the university, and little else. If the university needs
such publicity, the responsibility to bear the cost lies
with the administration.
Intramurals, however, involve roughly five times as
many students and cost three per cent as much — $2,500.
Here, the object is the fun of playing physical games —
recreation for the mass of students.
That 1,000 students participate in extramurals is
sufficient reason for retaining them, if the society as a
whole can afford such disproportionate expenditure.
Present financial straits mean something must go.
Extramurals are our most superflous activity.
Maple Leaves
I know it's art, but is it realty sex ?
LEjTERS-fiQsTilE  EDITOR
v^-^C-s^ v^~W~/,*«*
TheqVe also handU)
if gou run out of teilef paper.
'NDP' is socialist
Editor, The Ubyssey:
Thursday's "Think and do"
editorial hit a few nails on
the head. That a few thumbs
were also hit does not detract
from its accuracy re campus
politics.
First, the NDP did not support Shaun Sullivan. The fact
that it supported no one else,
however, is a devastating criticism of the campus club.
The open house forum has,
apparently, become the focus
around which campus political clubs operate. This, by itself, is sufficient damnation
of all present party political
activity on campus.
Your criticisms of the campus political clubs, especially
the NDP, are accurate; so accurate it hurts to be reminded
of them.
Where you go wrong is in
your blanket accusation that
the NDP has sold out to me-
tooism and non-ideological
liberalism. What is true on
campus is not necessarily true
provincially  or federally.
The socialism of the NDP
may not sound the same today as it did in 1933 or even
1953. But it is still socialism.
We may not call for the revolution, but few of us believe
in the market economy or in
welfare capitalism. I, for one,
do not believe in welfare. I
think the world is rich enough
to provide everyone with a
proper living standard. This
standard will never be attained, however, under any form
of capitalism including social
welfare   capitalism.
The campus NDP may not
like it, the NDP leadership
is fully aware of the hollow-
ness of proposing alleviating
welfare  assistance.  But what
can it do? Call for the overthrow of capital immediately
and lose any chance to make
some sort of progress, however limited that progress
may be?
It is a tough practical problem. We do not have the advantage of just having to
write editorials. The NDP
is going to have to govern
this country and that calls
for methods different from
those of editorial writers.
COLIN   GABLEMANN
arts 4
Vietnam  petition
Editor, The Ubyssey:
R. V. Best of the dept. of
Geology, who wrote The
Ubyssey on 10 February
about the Vietnam petition,
should have looked before he
leaped. His criticisms will
not survive close scrutiny.
First, a great mass of mail
soliciting faculty and staff attention for a great variety of
activities is circulated
through the cmapus mail system and is thus dependent to
some small degree on the university system.
A board of censors would
perhaps be competent to cut
out all mail which is offensive to Best, or even to me,
but probably not, and many
of our colleagues would quite
legitimately protest. Therefore it is best to permit the
circulation of whatever enters the channels by legitimate routes.
Second, the petition did enter the mails by one of these
legitimate routes. It was only
necessary to pay for the use
of the addressograph machine
in the administration building. The committee did pay
so its action does not in the
« -L'-* *'*;i-;4m'<-__L!*''*_fc-_i_..-*. _.m*-%1«:_---N-X2--fc_t--_E--
least affect UBC's requests
for bigger provincial grants.
In fact we suspect that the
machine makes profit for its
owners.
Third, it is clear that use
of the machine does not automatically imply participation
of the addressee as a professional, because there was
nothing quasi - official about
the action. The means did not
not, then, smack of either
"irresponsiblity" or "intellectual dishonesty," and we're
not "wrong." Since the means
were perfectly proper the
ends do not suffer from them.
Fourth, when faculty and
staff join for a cause such as
the Vietnam petition they do
so as a pressure group which
in the abstract is neither no
more nor no less worthy than
any other pressure group. We
believe that our cause, which
supports U Thant, among
others, is worthy. Some
people may not and they may
disagree. But we hope they
will direct their attention to
the issues and not to other,
less relevant matters.
LEONIDAS   HILL
History
EDITOR:  John  Kelsey
City _-          Danny Stoffman
News -_  Al Birnie
Photo ..      Powell Hargrave
Page Friday .   __      Claudia Gwinn
Sports _ _    - Sue Gransby
Managing  .. Murray McMillan
Focus . .     Kris Emmott
Ass't News    Al Donald
Ass't City . . .      Tom Morris
CUP    Bert Hill
"W rite a nasty masthead,"
shrieked Lee Tse-boni, who went
home early, leaving the desperate
rim in the proverbial lurch. These
things also happened: Dave Cur-
sons walked off for news and
didn't come back, leaving the
desperate desk in the proverbial
lurch. Others wrote: David Hastings, Val Thom, Norman Gidney,
Wes Johnstone, Robert White, Val
Zuker, Peter Shapiro. Charlotte
Haire,   and  Margaret Ladbury.
Sports news was spread by Tony
Hodge, Mike .lessen and Wasser-
man of The Gauntlet, who came
with giant lizards, according: to
the once sane Great G.
Fotos by Chris Blake, Kurt Hilger,  and  Don Kydd.
^___9-_-_-----_----_--------------________________- it  -.  *  »  *   *  ■»  jf    ,.   * '* ■_•   J   y «   _    #   _    . K^VT^?^' V?   ,Jr<8««
» ^™wN.v,, <, r^^-j vj~*£~$*r*» -,    *Vt->\"
'. ""■>< . «
Pro(f)s and cons
on Vietnam issue
By W.  E.  WILLMOTT
Professor of Anthropology
During the past weeks the
teaching staff at UBC (part-
time and full-time) have
been invited to sign a statement asking Canadians to
urge their government to
two immediate actions toward peace in Vietnam: 1)
Give strong and official support to U Thant's plea that
the Americans stop bombing
North Vietnam and de-escalate in South Vietnam, and
2) ban the export of all arms
to belligerents in Vietnam
(as Sweden has done). 349
teachers have signed to date.
This    means   some    1200
teachers   at   UBC   did   not
sign. Why not?
In the original mailing,
.we asked those disagreeing
with the statement for their
comments and criticisms. We
got sixteen replies.
This discussion on the
reasons presented is my own
and could not represent the
other 348 supporters of the
statement. (The numbers
after each reason represents
the number of responses giving that reason.)
We should call on both
sides lo stop military activities  (5)
The Viet Cong are the aggressors, so ask them to
stop (2)
1. Our statement asks
Canada to endorse U Thant's
suggestion that the first
move toward peace must
come from our side right
now, in the form of ending
the bombing of North Vietnam.
Chester Ronning gave the
American government the
same message. McNamarra
has since stated that the
bombing of North Vietnam
serves no military purpose.
Then why not stop it and
try the results?
2. While "it takes two to
tango," the American position in Vietnam is prima
facie morally weaker. They
are 10,000 miles from home.
In a strategic sense, they
are engaged in the dangerous policy of rolling back
communism, not containing
communism as they claim,
for Vietnam has been under
the control of a communist-
led government at least
twice in recent history (1946,
1954).
All the powers at Geneva
in 1954, with the sole exception of the United States,
saw the settlement as producing- a united Vietnam
under the communist-led
Viet Minh.
3. The historical evidence
suggests to me that the simplistic view that North Vietnam has invaded South Vietnam seriously distorts the
complicated truth.
At the time the American
pf 2wo
military presence switched
from an advisory to a com-
battant role (1964-5), they
were faced with a guerrilla
force indigenous to South
Vietnam, aided from the
North to be sure, but based
on legitimate and widespread dissatisfaction with
the Saigon governments
which the United States intervened to maintain.
North Vietnamese actions
have been responses to
American intervention, not
the   reverse.
The situation would be
worse if the Americans withdrew now (1)
This is a simple statement
of the domino theory, which
war
seriously underestimates the
strength of nationalist movements  in   Southeast Asia.
1. The longer the United
States remains embroiled in
Vietnam in support of an unpopular   regime,   the   more
who see the world in red
and white can equate the
two.
The statement is anti-
American and anti - Americanism moves people to sign
it  (1)
1. While I cannot speak
for all 349, I am not moved
by anti-Amteiricanism. The
statement aims at serving
the best interests of the
United States. It -is in her
interests to bring about
peace in Vietnam, in a war
which she cannot win but
which might expand to include millions more Asians
and  Americans.
2. The view that the
United States should de-escalate has been spoken ever
more loudly within the
United States itself: Mansfield, Fullbright, George F.
Kennan, Morse, thousands of
university teachers, and millions of other citizens.
We add our voice to American voices against the war.
3. The suggestion that opposition to American foreign
policy is anti-Americanism
results, I believe, from the
friends it loses elsewhere in
Southeast Asia.
Even among its closest supporters (Thailand, Malaysia,
Philippines) there is a growing belief that the prolonged
war is a more serious threat
to their stability than is the
menace of communist aggression.
2. To the argument that
democrats elsewhere would
lose heart were the United
States to abandon an ally
after giving her (presidential) word, one can reply that
the only governments who
might worry are those which
resemble the succession of
oppressive regime in Saigon.
By remaining in Vietnam,
the United States is proving,
its intransigent opposition to
communism, not its support
of   democracy.   Only   those
%XK,".
v<t§/r 'V   f
Page 6
fact that American foreign
policy since Truman has
been bi-partisan, making criticism by Americans unpatriotic and by others, anti-
American.
This is a dangerous curtailing of the necessary
political debate.
This is inappropriate action for university teachers
(3)
1. The basic concept of a
university is a community of
scholars who together advance knowledge and train
minds, including their own,
through research and discussion.
To refuse to speak is to
create an ivory-tower separation from the community.
2. One of the problems of
contemporary democratic so-
THE       UBYSSEY
Y 3 •! J Y  8  U   ,    _!  H   f
ciety is that no group is functionally appropriate to comment on the fundamental
political issues confronting
us. If the university teachers
should not comment, then
who should?
The danger of such an approach is that no one has the
right to speak but the expert.
That is the end of democracy.
Since I am a university
teacher, it is university
teachers in the first case
that I seek to move into political action.
3. There is a difference between expertise and concern.
To give an analogy that
is far from exact, but will,
I hope, make the point: I
would never agree to lecture
to students or the public on
trilobites, for I know little
about them; but were a political issue to arise affecting
trilobites (for instance, the
destruction by a mining company of deposites containing
crucial fossil remains), I
would consider it my duty
as a university teacher (after
carefully studying the issues)
to support any statement circulated by the geologists (or
anyone else) asking for political support to oppose the
move.
As citizens, trained to
think through issues, we
should certainly indicate our
views at times when we consider very serious mistakes
are being made by those in
authority.
4. It is not inappropriate
to point out that the five
people on campus who have
made the deepest study pf
Vietnam all signed the statement, and four of them sponsored it.
Were one to follow the
argument for expertise, this
should provide ample reason
for anyone to support it! No
one would argue such nonsense.
We do not know enough
about Vietnam to take a
stand (3)
One could argue equally
forcefully taht we do not
know enough not to act. Does
anyone at UBC know enough
about the war to be satisfied
that if we fail to do everything in our power to stop
it now it may not embroil us
all  in  a. futile holocaust?
Other reasons (4)
One teacher said that in
mentioning a "rain of chemicals and bombs" in Vietnam
the statement "exudes a
puerile emotionalism." Two
others did not favor publicising it is an advertisement.
Yet another was concerned
that action on partial issues
would subvert good people
from the central concern of
advancing the revolution in
North America.
You are aiding the forces
of darkness
The following statement
by Associate Professor W.
R. Danner, although addressed to me, was obviously
intended for all the 349
signers and those who agree
with them:
"I pity you in your beliefs
as the communists would be
the first to eliminate you if
they took over Canada. How
can you promote a cause that
denies all the freedoms of
Western  Civilization?"
He further accuses us of
prolonging the war by giving "hope and comfort to an
enemy to keep on with their
terror and assassination."
This can only mean that Professor Danner sees a total
American victory as the only
solution.
Anyone -who knows anything about the war in Vietnam realizes that is impossible.
It is my hope that the war
will be ended before Vietnamese and American casualties rise any higher. Al-
readv 9,000 Americans and
250.000 Vietnamese have
died in this futile conflict.
Surely the time when anyone calling for peace can
be accused of aiding the
communists is not still with
us at UBC!
Is Pope Paul destroying
Western Civilization?
P»
... a weekly magazine of
comment and reviews.
FEB. 24, 1967
*&' * *£«. i&w ~-rf>!.<_?«r«
Friday, February 24, 1967
~<.<>r ,kfc   rnu:dtH ,\'obhi Grads probe process of change
AMS vice-president Charlie Boylan reports
on Dialogue '67, a program to emulate.
By most standards the University 01 Western Ontario is
a dead campus. A $27,000
year book is the largest item
of their budget and the
annual Purple Spur frosh orientation is complete with
beanies and the rest of that
American hoopla crap.
•      •      •
Academically, the campus
is still very much business
oriented, London being the
Insurance Capital of Canada
and all.
Yet the seminar "Dialogue
67 — Processes of Social
Changes,"  presented by the
change
Society of Graduate Students on Feb. 16-18, was the
best academic program I've
seen.
The program opened with
Marxist - Christian Dialogue,
a discussion between Stanley Ryerson, greatgrandson
of Egetton, editor of "Horizons: A Marxist Quarterly"
and head of the Marxist
Study Centre, and Dr. Ed-
uardo C a s a s, an eminent
Catholic philosopher and
professor of psychology at
L' Universite d'Ottawa.
"At the heart of the Christian-Marxist dialogue," Ryerson said, "is the problem
of relations between people,
of the ordering of society in
time   of   tremendous   crisis
for mankind."
"Certainly, a radical disagreement prevails between
us," he continued, "But I
suspect that this disagreement would remain the concern of theologians and philosophers were it not for the
state of human emergency
on the planet—the unending
massacre of the innocents in
Vietnam, the crying needs
of hundreds of millions over
the face of the earth, the
threat of thermonuclear extinction • of the species—and
the counter-challenge of new
answers, new patterns of
social order."
•       •      •
"Is Christian love strong
enough to transcend the dimension of concern for the
salvation of the individual
soul (and first of all, one's
own!)—so as to embrace the
community? For it to do so
would mean to do what the
churches in the main have
done—that is not only look
class society and class power
in the face, but break with
it, and cease using the name
of love to stay the revolt
of the exploited and
oppressed."
"For Marxists," he concluded, "the Christian protest and concern hold
promise, not only of a pos-
s i b 1 e intercommunication,
but of common action in the
cause of peace and ultimately in the_ building of that
new "city of the sun" that
was the  dream   of  Thomas
WE SHALL FIGHT on the beaches . . . says George Hees,
PC leadership candidate to Communist chairman Tim
Buck at Dialogne '67 session.
rsvra.^„rv,-:r*r,„-''/'r^
Friday, February 24, 1967
More and Campanella, of
Marx and Owen and William
Morris: the society founded
on common ownership of the
creation of the material conditions for the flowering of
the spirit of man—no longer darkened with hate, or
shadowed by any fear."
Dr. Casas responded by
drawing heavily on his experiences in his native Cuba
where he had continued to
teach seven years after the
revolution. He pointed out
that the hierarchy of the
Church had supported the
Batista regime even though
the majority of Catholics opposed it.
• •       •
After Castro proclaimed
Cuba socialist, Dr. Cassas
said, many Catholics in. the
middleVd lass placed anti-
communism ahead of any
concern for building a new
society.
He pointed out that the
Church and Marxists have
been enemies for a hundred
years and he personally welcomed the beginning of exchanges of views. However,
this has "not progressed to
the point of intellectual cooperation."
Each should remain faithful to his position, he said,
and dialogue "should produce a receptive enrichment,
making Christians better
Christians and Marxists better Marxists."
• •       •
He concluded: "Questions
of peace and war, economic
development, social injustice
claim our attention and
Christians and Marxists can
find identity in the present
suffering in the universe."
The second dialogue "Capitalist-Communist" was more
of a debate—between Dr.
G. Warren Nutter, economic
adviser to Barry Goldwater,
and Dr. Herbert Aptheker,
historian and head of the
American Institute for Marxist Studies.
Unfortunately, Nutter did
not really represent the
mainstream liberal capitalist
point of view. For him the
greatest freedom is freedom
from government. The Russian Revolution, he said, was
the most reactionary event
in history and he saw the
minimum wage law as the
main obstacle to emancipation for the American Negro.
He did feel, however, that
capitalism could learn from
the Soviet educational system, but only to stop the
international communist
conspiracy.
• •       •
Aptheker    documented    a
strong argument that the
United States is really dominated by a few large trusts.
"Structurally the U.S. are intensely monopoly capitalists," he said, "therefore
dominant political priorities
in that country are generally
anti-human and outside the
country are regressive, aggressive and violent with
each reinforcing the other."
He claimed the U. S. has
been and still is deeply inflicted with race hatred, and
THE       UBYSSEY
added "no meaningful social
advance can be possible in
the United States without
resolving the so-called
'Negro problem'. No social
advance can even be begun
which does not base itself
on Negro-White unity and
does not comprehend that
the single most urgent
domestic question in the
U. S. is the termination of
the crucification of 20 million black Americans."
• • •
The rest of the conference
was divided into four panels.
Panel 2, "The Politics of
Social Change." was highlighted by the participation
of Paul Martin, T. C. Douglas, George Hees and Tim
Buck.   The   premier  of   On
tario, John Robarts, was
scheduled to participate but
had to sit it out in a London
hospital.
•       •      •
Martin placed the main
government with hypocrisy
for selling arms, some $300
emphasis in his speech on
the need for world peace.
He spoke of the world as
"a global village" and lauded
the proposed treaty to stop
the proliferation of nuclear
arms as a landmark in world
diplomacy. But some smart-
aleck student asked him, "If
we live in a global village,
why does Canada play silent
diplomacy games while our
neighbor burns down the
hut across the village pond."
This  touched   off   an   ani-
SPEAKERS   AT  DIALOGUE  '67  were  Dr.  Eduardo  Casas,
Dr. W.  S. Turner, and Stanley  B.  Ryerson.
mated debate about Vietnam
with Douglas charging the
million worth, to the U. S-
Martin claimed it would be
irresponsible to divulge sec^
ret negotiations and said
even Kosigan engaged in
them, at which point Tim
Buck said, "Yes, but nobody
is unclear where Kosigan
stands and Canada too
should speak out against the
bombing."
•      •      •
All the politicians spoke
about the need for revolutionary change in the age
of automation. And that
w ier d y-b e a r d y radical,
George Hees, even demanded
th elimination of university
fees. A pretty safe platform
for a federal politican.
The final panel, "Students
and Social Change," saw
President-elect of the Canadian Union of Students,
Hugh Armstrong, sound off
with Dr. Wright from Ontario Committee on University Affairs, John Patrick,
President of U.W.O. and myself.
•      •      •
The students argued for
elimination of social and financial barriers to higher
education and for students
participation in university
government. Dr. Wright
made the telling point that
these policies were accepted
actively by just a small minority  of   the   student   body
and that most students were
quite content to be "processed through the knowledge factory" because it
would ensure them a privileged place in our society.
I replied his analysis was
generally correct but that
"student leaders" should not
aquiesce and instead should
fight like hell to move students from their Babbit
middle-class   complacency.
A student from the audience said the whole effort
was futile because "universities in Canada are the last
stronghold of an:ti-intellec-
tualism in the country." No
one disagreed.
•      •      •
But "Dialogue 67" was intellectual, in the finest sense
of the word. There was free
and open debate, well
studied argument and a general progression of ideas. So
maybe there is hope in our
universities yet. Then I
think of UBC's Graduate
Association organizing beer
nights and soft-ball games
and I despair.
Anyhow, thanks students,
for flying me back to London. It was worth it. Maybe
next year we can organize
one of our own.
pf 3hree
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Only teaching dead, not languages
Br ARTHUR DOLSEN
Consider a theoretical situation in
which modern languages would be
taught as Greek and Latin are today.
A modern language, for example
Spanish, would be in effect killed and
served up to the beginning students in
the following way. In the classroom,
the Spanish vocabulary to be learned
would rarely, if ever be pronounced by
the teacher. Certainly the teacher
would never ask the class questions in
Spanish. Language laboratory work
would be abolished. The student, completely lacking sensitivity to sound
and oral cognizance of language, and
depending entirely on visual recognition would treat each sentence as a
problem to be solved by translating
into English.
Yet, if he continued in Spanish, the
student would be expected to read
Spanish literature well and appreciate
it.
Obviously the learning situation outlined above would not be likely to
produce very apt students and would
hardly he an encouragement to those
wishing Hispanic studies to flourish.
It is a sorry fact that Greek and
Latin are taught today in such a "killed" language situation.
For example, in first year Greek,
students are made to learn a great
deal of military vocabulary with the
air of later decifering Zenophon.
Also, the words are not taught as
effectively as they could be. It is only
good reasoning to say that vocabulary
and grammar can be best taught if the
teacher makes use of as many sense
associations as possible. At all levels of
language learning, the students must
experience a continual bath of sense
associations — he must hear the language as often as possible and he must
see the language as often, as possible.
There is no other way to make language
enter sufficiently deeply into the
thought processes.
At present in Greek and Latin
courses where the oral faculty, that is,
50 per cent of the human language
learning tool is almost entirely neglected,  most   students   actually   do   treat
sentences as problems whose solutions
is a rendering in English.
The student learns a set of grammatical names and applies them to the
components of the sentence; this done,
he translates into English. And he lives
under the illusion that he is reading
Greek or Latin. Actually, he is goinig
through a decifering or decoding process.
Some of the products of the present
system of teaching Greek and Latin are
not very pleasant to see. There are
students in the upper and graduate
years who would not even think of
reading Greek and Latin literature for
pleasure, who read aloud so badly that
they cannot be understood, who seem to
have very little sense of the beauty and
richness of the idioms they are working
with.
There are four natural steps in
learning a language — hearing, speaking, reading, and writing. It is hardly
t" be hoped for, but maybe some day
teachers of Greek and Latin will start
to respect these facts. Then Greek and
Latin would be taught according to
oral methods, senior courses would be
taught predominantly in the two languages, essays (and more essays than
assigned now) would be written in
Greek and Latin and oral exams would
be re-instituted. If someone were concerned enough to try to revitalize
Greek and Latin in universities, It
would be very wonderful.
Objections will 'be raised to the
criticisms and ideas given above. The
most common one will be, I believe,
"You don't study a language in a university to learn to speak it, you study
it to read its literature."
It is a simple fact that a person who
has a speaking knowledge of a language reads it more easily than a person who does not have a speaking knowledge. It follows, therefore, that more
literature could be read by students
who have a speaking knowledge.
Besides, it is obvious that the students produced by the present system
of teaching Greek and Latin are not
learning these languages as quickly and
as well as possible.
In senior Greek and Latin courses
the literature is almost always laboriously translated into English. This is
thought to be necessary. Unfortunately,
it is also thought to be enough. And
therefore, the more important aspects
of literature, such as what it means,
are often quite neglected.
The use of intellect is not
stressed in senior Greek and Latin
courses. Recently I wrote an exam in a
senior Latin course where Roman satiric poets were read. The exam consisted
of translating fifty lines, naming authors and supplying the correct Latin
word— in other words, nothing but a
glorified Latin 100 exam. This course
purports to be a course in literature
and not one question pertaining to the
literary and satric content of these
satires was raised on the exam. Such a
situation is disappointing.
Another objection will be that Greek
and Latin are so difficult that they
must be translated to be understood.
This is pure conceit on the part of
the classicists. Greek and Latin are
difficult languages, but they are no
more difficult than Russian, which
thousands of people all through the Iron
Curtain countries learn to read and
speak well. I feel confident in saying
that they would not learn to read and
speak Russian very well if subjected
to the methods of UBC's Classics Department.
Again, one can hardly hope, but
perhaps some day the teaching of
Greek and Latin will be free from its
present backward concepts.
Then, Greek and Latin will be given
the reverence and deference that their
greatness deserves, and the study of
Greek and Latin literature will become
a more pleasureable and thought-provoking experience than it is now.
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Page  8
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, February 24, 1967 rsrti
"What beautiful hubcaps
Farce for fun and sanity
By JUDY BING
There is a story, probably
apocryphal, that a burly
cop from the morality squad
went backstage after a performance of Lysistrata by
the San Francisco Mime
Troupe and demanded to
speak to "this here feller
Aristophanes".
This incident serves to illustrate how far the mores
of our civilization have come
from the eminent sexual
sanity of the Greeks.
Aristophanes treats sex as
he treats war — as an ab
surdity. In -war as in sex
by vanity, by exhibitionism,
vanity, by exhibitionism.
The swords and arrows of
combat are actually phallic
extensions. It is this sexual
pride which is progressively
deflated, as in the scene
where the indignant Commissioner of Public Safety,
pompously played by Ellis
Pryce-Jones, quotes Homer:
"War is manly business,"
but the women retort: "War
is monkey business."
The plot  of  this  delightful   farce   revolves   around
■'IV"*'-*    '
"Why  don't you  get out of your built in wheelchair?"
Friday, February 24, 1967
Lysistrata, the original exponent of the make-love-not-
war philosophy, who persuades the Athenian and
Spartan women to abstain
from sex until their men
should end the Pelopennes-
ian War, which was in its
twentieth year when the
play was written.
There is no situation more
central to comedy than the
conflict of the sexes, and
Lysistrata is the purest expression of this conflict. No
opportunity for double entendre jokes is missed as the
frustration increases on both
sides.
Donna White in the title
role was both feminine and
commanding. Her foil, Marian Penner was wry and
wonderful.
Judi Freiman, lusty as
Lampito, and Robert Graham as the envoy with an
"epithle from Thparta" drew
the heartiest laughter of the
evening.
Though ably led by Gayle
Pelman and Darrell Evans,
the old women's and the old
men's choruses had little relation to the other characters. One could have wished
they didn't dominate the
play to such an extent.
But the best part of Don-
lad Soule exuberant adaptation was his use of film
clips, in which Dr. Soule
himself, speaking as a TV
newscaster, read the latest
releases on the Pelopennes-
ian War — in unmistakable
U.S. State Departmentalese:
"Athens will defend the
right to self-determination of
the countries under her control." And "Athens will
never sacrifice principle
merely for the sake of stopping the bloodshed." The
women's uprising of course,
is termed the work of unwashed beatnik agitators.
Where have we heard that
before?
|f Sive
THE      UBYSSEY
CRUD CLASS
GENERAL MEETING
THURSDAY, MARCH 2
ANGUS 110 - 12:30 P.M.
J
CANADIAN STUDENTS . . .
HOPING TO TRAVEL?
Like to have a personal escort
in 75 Countries
Come to INTERNATIONAL HOUSE and
arrange to help meet 300 new foreign
students coming to UBC this fall
224-4535
PAPERBACK
NEW ARRIVALS
List No. 85 - February 15, 1967
The Adventurer*. Robbins. Pocket Pooks                    1.25
Anatomy of A   Phenomenon—Latest  Findings  on  UFO's.  Vallee.
Ace paperbacks — -*0
Animal Treasure. Sanderson. Pyramid            -       .75
Approach to  Archaeology.   Piggott.   Pelican               1.25
Art of Administration. Tead. McGraw-Hill               2.65
Black Metropolis—Vol. 1 and Vol 2. Drake & Cayton. Harper Torch.
each       3.20
Bratsk Station. Yevtushenko. Anchor  1.45
Caribbean Treasure. Sanderson. Pyramid      -  .75
Children and the  Death  of a  President.  Wolfenstein  &  Kliman.
Anchor    ...          1.65
Cloud Forest. Matthiessen. Pyramid               __  .75
Communities  in   Britain.   Frankenberg.  Pelican   ..     1.35
Education for Tomorrow. Vaizey.  Pelican       _              .85
Expo 67 Official Guide. Mclean Hunter Pub.    1.00
Fahrenheit 451. Bradbury. Ballantine  .60
Flame Trees of Thika.  Huxley.  Pyramid                                             .75
French Canadians and the Birth of Confederation. Bonenfant.
Can.   Hist.   Assoc.                                     . _.  .50
Gambling:   Nevada  Style.   Lemmel.   Dolphin                                1.10
Great Chain of Life. Krutch. Pyramid  .75
Great Coalition. Cornell. Can. Hist. Assoc.                   .      .50
Great Documents of Western  Civilization.  Viorst.  Bantam      .95
Icebound  Summer.  Carrighar.   Pyramid                              .75
The   Idiot.   Dostoyevsky.   Dell                       ___          ,_-     .95
Iliad the Odyssey and the  Epic Tradition           1.45
Industrial British Columbia. Westpac Pub.         2.95
Inside Flying Saucers. Adamski. Paperback Lib.  .60
Kwakiutl Art. Speck. Canadian Native Prints Ltd.    _    1.50
Late  Mattia  Pascal.   Pirandello.  Anchor     1.45
Logarithms  Self-Taught.   Selby.  McGraw-Hill                  2.90
MacKenzie Poems. MacKenzie & Colombo. Swan Pub.   . .75
Meaning &  End  of  Religion.  Smith  Mentor         _            .95
Modern Poetics. Yeats, Pound,  Frost, Eliot et al. McGraw-Hill  __ 2.95
Molds and Man. Christensen. McGraw-Hill           .       3.50
Nabokov's Dozen.  Nabokov.  Popular Lib.      -    _      .50
Narrow Road to the Deep North & Other Travel Sketches. Basho
Penguin   _   _    1.35
Natural. Malamud. Dell    -,  .85
"Near  Horizons.  Teale.  Pyramid                _         .75
New  Frontiers  in Medicine.  Englebardt.  Pyramid  .75
New Worlds of Oceanography. Long. Pyramid  -  .75
No Other God. Vahanian. Braziller Pub.  1.95
Partial   Differential   Equations  of  Mathematical  Physics.   Webster.
Dover                                                    .                       2.65
PaPth to Dictatorship 1918-1933. Conway. Anchor  1.45
PaPth  to  Modern  Mathematics.  Sawyer.  Pelican            _     1.25
People of the Reeds. Maxwell. Pyramid           .75
Place D'Armes.  Symons. McClelland & Stewart      _   .          2.50
Political Power:  USA/USSR. Brzezinski. Compass    2.50
Pop Art. Lippard. Praeger                           _         4.75
Preliminary  Report of the  Royal Commission  on  Bilingualism &
Biculturalism.  Canadian Government Printing  Bureau-  1.50
Protestant Mystics.  Fremantle.  Mentor                                        .95
Psychology:  Science  of Mental  Life.  Miller.  Pelican       -   _     1.65
Psychology of Learning. Borger & Seaborne. Pelican  1.25
Quebec Conference. Whitelaw.  Can.  Hist. Assoc.                .50
Realm of the Green Buddha.  Koch-lsenburg. Pyramid             .. _ .75
Religions and The  Promise of the Twentieth  Century. Metraux &
Crouzet.   Mentor                .   .    _   _                  ...._._  .95
Seal's World.  Stuart.   Pyramid       -   _               .75
Selected  Poetry and Prose of Byron.  Byron. Signet       _  .95
Selected Poetry of Donne. Signet          .     _.  .95
Senses.   Lowenstein.   Pelican  ~ 1.25
Sizing  Up  People. Laird &  Laird.  McGraw-Hill                     . ...   _   ..   - 3.15
Survival of God in the Scientific Age.  I_aacs.  Pelican             1.25
Teaching Comtempt Christian Roots of Anti-Semitism. Isaac.
McGraw-Hill                                                  2.55
Techniques of Leadership. Uris. McGraw-Hill            2.90
Thirty Days to Better English. Lewis. Dolphin       __.        1.10
Trigonometry Self-Taught. Selby.  McGraw-Hill                     2.90
Unlerstanding the New Mathematics. Rosenthal. Crest   .60
Varieties  of Mystic Experience. O'Brien.  Mentor                      . _       __ .95
UBC BOOKSTORE
Page 9 Fine cast wasted on 'Seasons'
By KEN LIVINGSTONE
It is certainly not the actors who
are at fault: Orson Welles, gargantuan in his scarlet robes; Robert
Shaw, a bellowing Henry; Leo Mc-
Kern and John Hurt, a fine pair
of traitors, the one cunning the other
merely greedy; even Vanessa Redgrave in a tiny cameo as Ann
Bolelyn, and of course Paul Scofield
as Sir Thomas More, all are excellent. Few recent films can boast a
cast of such magnitude, why then is
Fred Zinnemann's film of Robert
Bolt's A Man For All Seasons so
disappointing?
Utlimately   the   fault   is in   the
script. As a play A Man For All
Seasons was over-long and took itself far too seriously, the film has
cut away a large tangle of plot but
in the process most of the drama
seems to have gone too, and Bolt is
still terribly aware of the importance
of what he is saying.
It seems almost inevitable to compare the film with Anouilh's Becket
where the struggle was also between
the power of a King and the will
of God, as understod by one man.
Whatever one might think of Anouilh's sense of history, there is no
denying the wit and eloquence of his
dialogue (even when adapted for the
screen)  and  yet the essential issue
was never obscured by the ironic
manner in which it was treated.
There is nothing more fatal than
to take a serious subject too seriously, as does Bolt.
For the most part, his language
suffers from a pretentiousness which
seems common to all aspects of the
film. (For instance, the overly significant shots of grotesque gargoyles
silhoueted against a darkening sky.)
All too often the muted colors and
magnificent Tudor halls suggest nothing more than a historical tour
through ye stately homes of England.
Zinnemann repeatedly robs the
film of its dramatic impact by not
coming to grips with the essential
struggle which is that of More himself, particularly in the court scene
where the repeated long shots deny
Scofield what should 'be his finest
triumph.
Still, the film has its moments.
Welles, pudgy hand coming out of
a scarlet sleeve to crush his seal in
the red, steaming wax; the black
hood of the executioner suddenly filling the screen in the final scene and
his hurried fumbling for the axe
which has been mericfully hidden
beneath some straw; and all those
times when the camera rests on Scofield long enough to let him do his
job.
JOSH WHITE
Josh White, one of the greatest folk singers of all times
now telling his stories at the
BUNKHOUSE  until March  4
THE
TOM JONES
Shop
OFFICIAL OPENING
March 1 to March 11
Expended Premises
New   Spring   Fashions
Opening Specials
4511   West  10th  Ave.
224-7217
Film blows mind
Travelling
Individually
Or In Groups
contact
JOHN SIMSON
CPA^
CAMPUS REPRESENTATIVE
ON CAMPUS OR
RES. 266-6188
BUS. MU 2-2383
A  Man   for All   Seasons
Non-existent tennis
ball hits audience in
collective face
By  STEPHEN  SCOBIE
Michelangelo Antonioni's
latest, and best, film, Blow-
Up, is about many things—
all one review can do is to
suggest a few (a very few)
of them.
Ultimately, it is "about"
itself—which is just another
way of saying that it is a
perfectly realized work of
art. Or again, it is "about"
the way some trees look on
a grey morning, and the
sound they make.
Like all Antonioni films,
Blow-Up is "about" alienation—a concept too familiar,
perhaps, to be all that useful, but it seems unavoidable. All his characters are,
to a greater or lesser extent, alienated (and by extension we, the audience,
are also).
The "hero" of Blow-Up is
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more so than most: man, he's
so alienated he just doesn't
exist any more: at the end of
the film he vanishes, poof!,
into nothing.
But, taking all this for
granted, Antonioni moves
further out. To a person for
whom no meaningful human
relationship is possible, can
there be any such concept
as morality, social responsibility?
He has witnessed a murder
—what is he to do about it?
Must he accept responsibility—or can it be shrugged
off as easily as a ban-the-
bomb poster falls from his
plush car? For the issue is
the same—that one lonely
little murder in the park
equals Hiroshima, equals
Vietnam.
One way out is abdication
from what is normally called
Page 10
THE      UBYSSEY
reality, via marijuana or
whatever else happens to be
fashionable. And this is one
interpretation of the ending
(and the title) — the hero
literally blows his mind —
and there's nothing left. Or,
alternatively, there is everything left.
Everything in the film has
a dual perspective. The same
act is approved and condemned; it indicates both rejection and acceptance. For
the man who is entirely
alone, what can other people
matter? What does external
reality matter? What IS external "reality?
The film ends with a truly
Berkleian game of tennis,
without a ball. But it's not
just the players who are
creating their own reality,
nor just the hero, nor even
just Antonioni. It's you.
The whole film is throwing a non-existent tennis
ball right in your face. What
are you going to do—catch
it, or duck?
pf 6ix
Friday, february 24, 1967 Mod
world
mocked
By NELSON MILLER
Antonioni's Blow-Up wanders through a color bright
and neat world of mod fashion and cultivated scenery
and the mind of a nameless
observer who photographs
all he sees.
Mock games of life are
played with an attempt to
explore all the possible angles and simulations of human beauty and feelings; in
a world of manipulators and
mannequins, of exaggeration
and indifference.
The nameless observer,
however, has the seeds of
involvement within him,
and the blowing up of some
photographs of a frolicking
couple involves him step
by step in a murder
over which he feels excitement and fear. He desires to
communicate his discovery
of this awful reality; here
is an event that he doesn't
have to blow up to infuse it
with significance.
However when he attempts to tell someone else,
he finds all avenues of communication closed. All external evidence of the event
is removed. Only his mind's
perception of death makes it
real.
King and Country, preaching to the converted.
King and Country simple, powerful;
anti-war message familiar, relevent
While watching an invisible tennis game being played, he quietly accepts and
involves himself in the game
and therefore in the reality of intangible events
(thoughts and feelings).
He then blows his mind
by evoking the soundless
sound of an invisible tennis
ball and disappears into total acceptance and involvement.
He becomes everything and
nothing.
By STEPHEN SCOBIE
The trouble with most anti-war
films is that they preach to the converted. Any of the heathen who stray
in unware have a large arsenal of
defence mechanisms to turn to.
King and Country is a more restrained statement than most. The message is simple and familiar — that war
is hell, and that justice and law are
two separate things.
The characters are moderately interesting — especially Hargreaves the
Defending Officer, who makes a most
eloquent statement of a position he
does not believe. The central character
is Hamp — a simple, confused, unheroic
hero who one day just got up and
walked away, and was shot one rainy
morning to keep up the troops'
"morale".
Upon this basically uncomplex subject matter, director Joe Losey has
imposed a highly stylized form. He uses
a sort of Greek Chorus of common
soldiers, who enact a parody trial on
one of the plentiful rats gorging the
body of a dead horse.
The trench-mud glistens in chiacras-
cure lighting; looming faces fit into
impeccable compositions. Losey works
primarily in close-up and long shot; he
dislikes a medium view.
The effect is claustrophobic: we
never see beyond the borders of this
one small patch of mud. It is as confined as one of the Circles of Dante's
Inferno. Beyond it there is only the
constant falling of the rain and the
noise of the guns, from which poor
Hamp walks away.
King and Country is a good rather
than a great film. If has nothing of
the complexity of Joseph Losey's previous work, The Servant, though it
shares its artistry; Losey is an undoubted master of cinema. And perhaps it
is too easy to dismiss its message as
obvious: that's easy enough to do in a
theatre seat. King and Country is a
careful and precise sculpture of a Hell
with which we are all too glibly
familiar.
•Joseph LOSEY'S
NTR¥
Dirk BOGARDE Tom COURTENAY.
PLACE WITH THE BEST of the anti-
war movies like 'All Quiet on the Western Front' and 'Paths of Glory'!" -.*■.*.<..*
NEXT  ATTRACTION
7"
224-3730
4175 W. 10th.
PERSPECTIVES
The Thea Koerner Memorial Lectures
PROFESSOR J. MAX PATRICK
Graduate  School,  New York  University
HER INFINITE VARIETY: CLEOPATRA
THROUGH THE AGES
Friday, February 24, 1967       12:30 p.m. — Education 100
11
Europe with Expo"
AMS 2nd Charter Flight- now goes to
Expo & to Europe
Leave Vancouver June   1st; Leave Montreal June 7th;
Leave London Sept. 4th
All this for only $375 return
Call CA. 4-4232 or drop in to the A.M.S. office
7^
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Friday, February 24, 1967
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T H E       UBYSSEY
V 2 2 3 v 3  U       3 M  T
Page  1 I
01   -j-r-'i sx;;,^srs;„ w«r--»r *,?
Apathy
appalls
musician
Editor, Page Friday:
On Thursday, Feb. 9 at
12:45 p.m., the Vancouver
Symphony Orchestra p r e-
sented the second of this season's two programmes in the
UBC armoury. Since not
more than 200 people attended this concert, the above
information cannot be even
of passing interest to the vast
number of faculty and students who were not there,
and who have stayed away
in equal numbers over the
past few years.
And yet, fifteen years ago,
when UBC enrollment was
less than half what it is today, concerts by the VSO at
the university consistently
drew more than 3000 people.
There is general agreement
• from everyone who attends
VSO concerts regularly that,
the playing standard of the
orchestra is now higher than
it has ever been; deteriorating performance cannot be
blamed for decreasing campus interest.
Recent concerts have included standard works by
Brahms, Beethoven, and
Richard Strauss, as well as
lesser known but equally
important works by Ravel,
Kodaly, and Webern; lack of
pf 8ight
Fast, accurate typing
of essays and theses on IBM Electric
typewriter. Reasonable Terms. Call
Mrs. Mugridge, 684-4145 day or
263-4023 evenings.
interesting programmes cannot be the reason.
Prior to this week's concert, the university refused
to supply chairs for the audience. Those who attended
were forced to sit on the
cement floor throughout the
one and one-half hour concert, undoubtedly a deterrent to esthusiastic audience
response.
Furthermore, can it really
be so surprising that there
is such a galloping apathy
on the part of the general
student body and faculty,
when the faculty and students of the school of music
have been consistently conspicuous by their lack of interest in these concerts?
For instance, at Thursday's
concert, not more than half a
dozen music students were
seen, and the only faculty
members present were in the
orchestra.
Surely at a time when interest in music performance
WE HDNDAY
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RGTHSmtt
aats vp
Do re To Be . . .
Drink Teo at
The Frior
4423 West 10th
We deliver tea, coffee, pizza, chicken, hamburgers and more until almost 2  a.m.   knightly.
is increasing all over the
world, and when greatly increased funds from cultural
grants are creating exciting
new opportunities everywhere in North America for
young performers, it would
seem logical that a university music school, engaged in
training young musicans,
would encourage maximum
interest in our major professional musical organizations.
The poor attendance at the
recent Stravinsky programme by the CBC Chamber Orchestra at the University was discouraging to the
musicians involved, and
seems to further indicate a
regrettably conditioned disinterest at UBC in Vancouver's major cultural institutions.
ROBERT E. CREECH
Vancouver Symphony Orchestra
CBC    Vancouver    Chamber
Orchestra
-•vwaws™
WVC.   -wfr.wy.   *«£
UNIVERSITY CHURCH
ON THE BOULEVARD
UNIVERSITY HILL
ST. ANSELM'S (Anglican)
(United)
8:00 & 9:30 a.m.
11:00 a.m.  Church   Parade
Holy Communion
Community Cubs, Scouts,
11:00 a.m. Matins
Guides   &   Brownies
"Virgin  Birth -
"UPON  MY  HONOUR"
Must 1  Believe   It"
7:30 p.m.-THE NEW MORALITY and THE USE OF DRUGS
at University Hill United — Rev. Ted  Kropp
HAROLD MacKAY                                           JIM McKIBBON
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Delightful food —
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MODERN    CAFE
Bavarian Room    —    3005 W. Broadway    —    RE 6-9012
PURE VIRGIN WOOL
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Woalmark on the label
when you shop
Page  12
it is not u genuine K_TTK.\i. $8
THE      UBYSSEY
in the "Now" Place at Eaton's Downtown
Tee Kays black vinyl hipsters, 19.98
Lancer shirt, button-down collar, 7.95
Corduroy three-button jacket, 19.95
EATON'S
Friday, February 24, 1967 Friday, February 24, 1967
THE       UBYSSEY
Page   13
THE ROUND  WORLD...
... TURNS
Cambridge dons downed by exams
CAMBRIDGE, Eng. (CUP) — Fifteen per
cent of the science instructors at Cambridge
University are not bright enough to pass the
intelligence tests given to 11-year-old British
school children, a recent survey said.
The survey of 148 science dons revealed
that 15 per cent of them had an intelligence
quotient below 118, the score needed to
pass the  11-plus examinations.
Under Britain's educational system, the
11-plus exams segregate students according
to intelligence. A child failing the 11-plus
is generally sent to trade school and has
little chance of entering a first-rate university.
The survey, conducted toy two members
of the university's genetics department,
showed that some teachers with so-called
first-class degrees had IQs as low as 110. In
one department, the man rated as the best
scientist proved to have the lowest IQ.
The majority of teachers failed to reach
the 130 needed to be classed brilliant. "This
shows that IQ tests are an extremely unreliable guide to a person's ability," said Dr.
John Gibson, one of the surveyors.
The survey was conducted as part of a
study of the origins and abilities of science
teachers.
Board off limits
WOLFVILLE (CUP) — The president of
Acadia University last week came out in
favor of student participation in university
government — but placed the board of governors off limits.
Dr. J. M. R. Beveridge said he saw "a
number of areas where student participation would be desirable, essential" — but
not on the board of governors.
Beveridge said he opposed student board
members because the student would be
transient and bear no responsibility for his
decisions, and increased board membership
would tie up decision making.
In lieu of direct student participation,
Beveridge suggested students adopt a system
similar to the one at Queen's University
where students appoint an alumnus or faculty member to represent them on the
board.
Youth fight medieval voting age
By Canadian University Press
This month the Canadian Union of Students and youth wings from all major political parties are trying to dispel a medieval
superstition about the number 7.
They're acting in unprecedented concert
to have federal and provincial voting ages
reduced to 18 by persuading political parties
at both government levels to approve private members' bills on the long-standing
question.
In federal and in most provincial elections, voting age is set at 21, which just
happens to be a neat multiple of 7. Members
of the new "ecumenical" movement against
the dominant voting age explain the superstition this way:
Back in the Middle Ages, males were
cared for by their mothers from birth to
age 7. From 7 to 14, they were made pages.
During the next 7 years, they came of age.
At 21, formally binding themselves to
chivalrous conduct, they were knighted and
welcomed to majority age.
A member of each party represented in
the House of Commons will be coaxed to
introduce appropriate legislation at the federal level. The same program will be applied  in provincial  legislatures.
The drive will also seek support from
Quebec and Saskatchewan governments,
which support voting at 18, from the Canadian Political Youth Council and from
other interest groups such as local student
governments.
Provincial lobbies are expected to be
difficult in British Columbia, Alberta and
Newfoundland, where the minimum voting
age is already set at 19. (All other provinces
—including Prince Edward Island where
there is now considerable controversy over
a government hill to lower the age to 18 —
allow voting at 21).
Dialectic denied
KITSILANO (Staff) — Informed sources today denied
that banana skins, if baked
for 20 minutes at 350-400
degrees, can have their in-
sides scraped and resulting
flakes rolled into joints. "It's
a phony hoax — it blows
my cool," said T. S. Tripper.
NEW YORK
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Rebellion plans fizzle
TORONTO (CUP) — Plans for a student rebellion over
academic freedom and free speech rose to a climax only to
fizzle to nothing at a University of Toronto students' council
meeting.
The proposal would have challenged University College
principal D. V. LePan's decision to deny UC facilities to LSD
users and advocates at the college's psychedelic arts festival at
the weekend.
But Joey Stciner, president of the UC literary and athletic
society which sponsored Perception '67, refused to go along
with the plan to play a tape made by Dr. Timothy Leary in
UC's west hall on Friday. Stciner called the would-be violation
of LePan's decision "a cheap parlor trick."
Council president Tom Faulkner said council instead will
invite U of T president Claude Bissell, LePan and Steiner to
a public meeting Wednesday to explain "a violation of free"
speech at this university".
SPECIAL       EVENTS
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FEB. 28
12:30
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VI     St Page 14
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday,  February 24,  1967
SCIENCE UNDERGRADUATE SOCIETY
Announces nominations  open for positions on council
President
1st Vice-President
2nd Vice-President —
AMS representative
Treasurer
Secretary
Public   Relations  Officer
Sports Rep.
Women's. Rep.
3   Executive  Members
Nominations are open and can be turned in to Science Secretary Claire
Lapham or Box 73 in Brock.   Nominations close March 1  at 4 p.m.
Pick up eligibility forms from AMS office
^______K_____'^_______-_
■NT-ntNAT-ONAI.
CONSULT WITH US
FOR ALL YOUR TRAVELLING NEEDS
AIR —SEA —LAND
(No booking fee)
WORLD WIDE INTERNATIONAL TRAVEL
5700  University Blvd. 224-4391
Representing American  Express
Vkt, advertising Irnnntb.
lapiavary friend was
Iniey maJctru?. a <sliort
Itop across campus
-wKen. she ©spied a
copious cjuatttifc-es ot
C&drofc oapcakes.
l>ufc such dulituaty
coa/summations dall
feir capital.
and capitals kiddies*
mean/a like Jxmks.
■PwoMyr we shottld
meatim war.
lappy Wc?s short-
Surprising* because
■we would J&h&ra .
fufc to advertiSB tins
way if She weren't?
pc  So site ronuped over
iatei»mysJgw»«»S     -to -the Campos B&xijc,
2££S3-£3£?   _*  whidh was nearty,
^ioeity «llw-It-rne-«-ty.  jyafcll, and gkriuered
a, few -pfennigs
^Herefrom/.
&nd S-t&^tillliadiia-ie
-to caifrc&, ttie cujxtake
-VBtidor and :b:low13ie
lot iefbre lie was
out o£ sigfth
lkSnBANKrt <3ow&tisw&a
but one pKc&letn-.
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WCIAA  TITLE AT STAKE
Death dive on Dinnies
By MIKE JESSEN
There comes a time when a
whole season can be condensed into one or two games —
that time has come for the
UBC basketball Thunderbirds.
The   Birds   clash  with  the
University   of  Calgary   Dino-
DANNY QUANCE
. . . 6'8" centre
saurs tonight and Saturday
night in a battle for the
WCIAA Championship. UBC
has only to win one of the
games to take the title but
the visitors must win both if
they want to represent Western Canada at the Canadian
Intercollegiate Championships to be held at Calgary
and Edmonton on March 9-11.
The Birds are in first place
in the conference on the
strength of seven wins and
three losses for 22 points.
Four of the UBC wins were
worth four points each. Calgary is just two points behind
the Birds with a record of 10
wins and four losses.
The Dinnies have the conference scoring champ, Robin
Fry, who is averaging 22
points per game. Although
Fry broke his nose last week
in Quebec, he is expected to
play this weekend.
In previous games this season, Calgary won the first 73-
72 and UBC took the other
62-58.
While the Birds were idle
last weekend the Dinosaurs
played a rugged eight-game
schedule at the Canadian
Winter Games, where they
won their way through a preliminary round which includ
ed a 95-67 win over SFA, and
advanced to the championship round. Their overall 4-4
record gave them a tie for
fourth place in the tournament.
All week the Birds have
ben practicing the offensive
and defensive tactics they
will use on the Dinnies. Coach
Peter Mullins says the practice sessions have been going
very well. Mullins thinks that
the Birds have an excellent
chance to take the title since
they only have to win one of
the two games and the Calgary team could be tired from
its  travels.
The games start in the
Memorial   gym   at  8:30   p.m.
During half time on Friday
the CKLG Radio DJ's will
try to win their first game
when they play the UBC
cheerleaders in an exhibition
of basketball.
The UBC Thunderettes will
also be out to capture the
WCIAA basketball Championship.
So far undefeated in league
play, they take on University of Manitoba. A victory
will  clinch the title.
The games are 6:30 p.m.
preliminaries to the UBC-Cal-
gary competition. Two big
wins are possible.
Triple try for WCIAA titles
HAVF. YOU TRIED A
BEAFEATER YET?
WHY NOT!
THE FRIAR ... is inn
4423 W.   10th Ave.
HOUSEBOAT
FOR SALE
Choice West End location.
4 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms,
bar, open fireplace, fully
furnished. Ideal for students
or staff.
For appointment to view call
685-2103
Made-To-Measure
PANT
SUITS
Designed by 'Michel'
SKI and
CURLING
PANTS
CASUAL  &
EVENING   SLACKS
Designed   by
'Don Manuel'
(pwrialojtM.
654 Seymour St.
Tel.: 6814621
The seven-man strong wrestling team leaves UBC today
for the WCIAA Championships in Edmonton.
Those going and the weight classes in which they will be
competing are: Chuck Tesaka—123 lbs.. Wayne Cave—130 lbs.,
Dennis Boulton—137 lbs., Ron Turner—145 lbs., Ken Kerluke—
167 lb"., Bob Scott—191 lbs., and Chris Nemeth—heavyweight.
Coach Paul Nemeth expects the toughest competition from
the Saskatoon and Edmonton entries. He has hopes of winning
two titles.
The winner of this weekend's meeting will go on to the
Canadian Intercollegiate Championships in Calgary and Edmonton March 8-9.
•        •        •
The UBC men's curling team is in Regina this weekend to
compete in the WCIAA final. Team members are: Len Mason,
Peter Munro, Dennis Perry and Richard Pughe.
•        •        •
The UBC mixed badminton squad travels to Edmonton for
the WCIAA Championships this weekend. Male team members
are: Ted Goddard, Victor Connley, and Gordon Schmidt.
UBC dares Boppers to
hockey. Brock dance
Between 200 and 300 spectators are expected to invade
our campus next Tuesday for the first annual Steel Cup Hockey
game between the SFA "hoopers" and the UBC phys.ed hockey
team.
The Jocks are hoping to get a good fan support from the
UBC contingent. The game goes at 5:45 p.m., Feb. 28. A dance
is being held after in Brock from 8-12 p.m. The Bremen Town
Musicians are providing the music.
Tickets are 75c each for both the game and dance and can
be bought early at the Memorial gym. Student cards must be
shown. Friday, February 24, 1967
THE      UBYSSEY
Page  15
Birds introduce indoor field
hockey tourney; take second
The UBC Varsity Team came out second
in the first Annual Thunderbird Indoor
Field Hockey Tournament held last Sunday.
The tournament, first of its kind in Canada, was termed "a tremendous success" by
UBC coach and organizer-Eric Broome.
Winners of the five a side tournament
were Hawks A.
They were bolstered in their ranks by
John McBride, captain of the Australian
Olympic team, winners of the Bronze Medal at the Tokyo Olympics.
Hawks won three, lost nil, and tied two,
while the Birds came out with a 3-1-1 win-
loss-tie record.
Next year the tournament will probably
expand and become the B.C. Indoor Championships.
Last weekend, the UBC Thunderbirds
stooped slightly as they continue to run
along their trail of victories.
Although the Birds had 95 per cent of
the play in their game against Pitt Meadows, they were unable to come up with
the finishing touch.
The final score was 1-1.
The tie game, combined with a win by
the Jokers, leaves the Birds ahead in league
play, but only by one point, with Jokers
close on their heels.
In other league play last Saturday,
Braves were downed 4-2 by Hawks A.
Next Saturday, its Birds vs. Grasshoppers A on Wolfson at 1:30 p.m., Braves vs.
Vancouver C on Wolfson at 3 p.m.
— j. e. langton-adamt photo
IN THE FINEST  sequence  this  season   for  UBC,   the  field
hockey Birds' centre Jamie Wright  scored   on   a   perfect
pass from right winger Dave Johnson in the first minute
of play against Pitt Meadows.
Volleyball Thunderbirds
compete in weekend Open
This weekend the Western Canadian Open volleyball
Championships are being held at the SFA gymnasium.
Games start at 6 p.m. tonight and continue all day Saturday.
The Thunderbirds will be competing with other top-rate
teams from the universities of Washington (Huskies), Alberta
(Golden Bears), Victoria (Vikings). Also participating are the
Washington Athletic Cluib and the West Vancouver Spartans.
A lot of action is promised at this major tournament,
preceding the Pan-American Games in Winnipeg.
The Birds, averaging 6'1" in height, 180 lbs. in weight, and
four years in experience, can be expected to continue on their
winning ways.
Both the UBC Thunderettes and JVs will be entered in
the Championships. This tournament is a preliminary to the
Canadian Championships to take place in Montreal in March.
Firefighters  hot
The fourth place soccer
Thunderbirds were shut out
3-0 last Saturday by the fifth
place Firefighters.
Coach Joe Johnson said:
"The main reason we lost is
that the boys ran with the ball
instead of passing it."
The Birds take on Victoria
United this Sunday at Callister
Park at 2 p.m.
Hockey moves;
rqgby stays
The UBC ice hockey Birds
travel to Calgary this weekend for the opening half of a
four game league series.
**•    *
The rugby Thunderbirds
meet Western Washington
State Saturday, 2:30 p.m. at
the UBC stadium.
Meanwhile, the Junior Varsity rugby teams play their
matches on Wolfson field,
starting   at   1:30   p.m.
RECORD SALE
25% Discount On
All L.P.'s
WARD  MUSIC
412  W.   Hastings
682-5288
Come   and   Discuss
'THE NEW
MORALITY"
in "Talk-Back"
at University Hill
United  Church
on University Boulevard
SUNDAY NIGHTS AT 7:30 P.M.
Coffee and Discussion 8:30-9:30 p.m.
Feb. 26th—The   New   Morality   and
The Use of Drugs
Rev. Ted Kropp,
Chaplain, Matsqui Centre
for Drug Addiction
Mar. 5th—The New Morality and
Marriage and Divorce
Dr. Reg Wilson,
Union College of B.C.
Mar. 12th—Tho Now Morality and
Church ft Community Uh
Rev. Tod Nichols,
Exec. Soc B.C. Conference
ecutd
RESTAURANT
and
Dining Room
4544 W. 10th Ave.
Vancouver 8, B.C.
Ph. 224-1351
• Full Dining
Facilities
• Take
Home
Service
FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE
HELD OVER
MONDAY, FEBRUARY 27th
and
TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 28th
8:30 p.m.     ^
Student* 75c
GETTING MARRIED?
PLEASE SEND YOUR LATEST INVITATION
SAMPLES AND PRICE LIST BY RETURN MAIL
TO:
NAME
I
ADDRESS
MR.  ROY YACHT,  Consultant
ran CARD SHOP
Corner Robson and Burrard
MU 4-4011
Huberman   Educational
Institute   Ltd.
TUTORIAL COLLEGE
University Subjects
Morris   Huberman,   Educational   Consultant
Knowledge  and Success through Learning  Power
2158 W.   12th  Ave.,  Vancouver
FOR APPOINTMENT,  PHONE
732-5535 263-4808
You can't
beat
the taste
of Player's
filters. Page  16
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, February 24, 1967
1
'TWEEN CLASSES
Two Tanzanians talk
INTERNATIONALISTS
Two Tanzanian grad students in political
science discuss democracy in the one-party
state,  and  neocolonialism,  tonight,  8  p.m.,
Fort Camp men's lounge.
CLASSICS CLUB
Dr. Kassis of religious studies speaks
tonight, 8 p.m., 4049 west 11th avenue.
CIRCLE K
Meetings today, noon, BE 156; Monday,
noon, Bu. 2205.
LIBERAL CLUB
MP Grant Deachman speaks on how the
committee  system  is  changing parliament,
today, noon, Bu. 214.
SOCIALIST CLUB
Gabor  Mate speaks  on  the  Hungarian
revolution of 1956, today, noon, Bu. 221.
IH
Dance in IH lower lounge tonight, 7:30.
Admission 25 cents.
GERMAN CLUB
Meeting today, noon, Bu. 203.
KOERNER LECTURE
Prof. Max Patrick of New York University speaks on Her Infinite Variety:  Cleopatra in World Literature, today ,noon, Ed.
100.
VCF
Dr. Morgan of Master's Divinity school
discusses mature Christian thinking, today,
noon, Ang. 110. Gym party with introduction
to Pioneer Pacific, Saturday, 7 p.m., women's
gym.
ARTS US
Arts all-candidates meeting today, noon,
Bu. 106.
EL CIRCULO
Gerry Aaron presents Argentina and the
modern world, today, noon, Bu. 204. Or. H.
Oostendorp presents La Estructura y el
sentido de la celestina, Tuesday, 7:30 p.m.,
Bu. penthouse.
PHYSICS SOC
Slides  of Deep Space Objects,  and organization of open house activities, 8 p.m.,
Henn. 201.
MATH COMMITTEE
Student-faculty   math   committee   would
like to hear all comments from students on
their present math courses. Exams, teaching,
etc., today, noon, Ma. 202.
SPECIAL LECTURE
Dr. Wilbur Zelinsky of Pennsylvania
State University discusses Culture Areas of
the U.S.: Some Problems of Indentification
and Interpretation, Monday, noon, FG 100.
WAA
Nominations for president, vice-president,
and secretary close March 6. Forms available
at WAD office.
GAMMA DELTA
Fireside   with   Hillel,   Sunday,   2   p.m.,
Lutheran Campus Centre.
DESERET CLUB
Would you believe Jews in America in
0 A.D.? Talk on evidences 'by an archaeologist, Monday, noon, Bu. 216.
LSM
Hon. Phil Gaglardi and Dr. Carl Barr of
political   science   discuss   Regligion  —   A
Political Crutch?, Monday, noon, Ang. 104.
PRE-MED SOC
Seminar on Women in Medicine, Monday,
7:30 p.m., IH.
UN CLUB
Dr. Chitleno, leader of Rhodesian African
Nationalists party speaks on the resistance
movement in Rhodesia, Tuesday, noon, Bu.
106.
MATH CLUB
Dr. Westwick discusses P-adic numbers,
Tuesday, noon, Ma. 204.
PE US
First annual Steel Cup hockey game —
SFA vs. UBC PE, Tuesday, 5:45, arena.
Dance with the Brementown Musicians in
Brock following (8 p.m. to 12 midnight).
Admission 75 cents with cards.
CONSERVATIVE CLUB
Debate of the year — former argriculture
minister Alvin Hamilton vs. Charlie Boylan,
Wednesday, noon, Brock hall.
UBYSSEY
Yes Virginia, you too can reap the joys
of journalism. Work for The Ubyssey. See
us anytime in North Brock ibasement.
PE US
Gymnastic display with world calibre
gymnasts .Monday, noon, Brock Hall.
White Institutes
UBC's dean of commerce, Philip White,
speaks to the Vancouver Institute Saturday
evening on Responsibility and Liability in
Urban Development.
He will speak in Buchanan 104 at 8:15
p.m. on Feb. 25.
The Institute is sponsoring a series of
lectures on varied topics to which everyone
is welcome. Further information can ibe
obtained at the lecture.
RECORD SALE
«-A
M
BUTTERFIELD  BLUES  BAND   	
THE BLUES PROJECT PROJECTIONS
$4.49
$3.19
* Dave van Ronk • David Blue • Butterfield
Blues Band * Ray Charles * Donovan * Tim
Buckley • Woody Guthrie * Phil Ochs • Tom
Rush • Abbey Tavern Singers • Judy Collins
All the Great Artists-Latest Hits-
Broadway Musicals—Rock and Roll
Popular — Folk Music, Etc.
Hurry down—pick out your favourite record
and save. Choose from Pops, Classics, Show-
tunes. All are now in stock at our Record
Department.
LOWEST PRICES IN TOWN
ABSOUND
Open Friday Until 9 p.m.
571 GRANVILLE (at Dunsmuir)
MU 2-4846
CLASSIFIED
Rates: 3 lines, 1 day, $.75—3 days, $2.00 Larger Ads on request
Non-Commercial Classified Ads are payable in Advance
Classified Ads are not accepted by telephone
Publications Office: Brock Hall.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Lost & Found
11
BROWN SUEDE COAT, FULL
length, taken from outside BiSc.
3001.   Phone  Kathy,   922-7991.	
WOULD THE CLOD WHO RE-
moved cord carcoat from LA 104
Wed. at 10:30 please return to
same place, same time. Am locked
out   'till returned.	
TAKEN "FROM THE BROCK
Proctor's office, a long blue gown
in plastic bag. Please telephone
228-8083. It was borrowed.
Coming Dances
12A
THE   DANCE   WITH   A
DIFFERENCE!
(It's not in  the  Armouries.)
Swing this Sat. nite to the "turn-
on" sound of the STAGS in Brock
Hall,   9:00-12:30.   $1.25   per  person.
Pre   Med presents  the
"SLIPPED   DISCOTHEQUE"
with "The Organization"
March  11  at  the  Canyon Gardens
Special Notices
13
WHY PAY HIGH AUTO INSUR-
ance rates? If you are over 20 and
have a good driving history you
qualify for our good driving rates.
Phone Ted Elliott 224-6707.	
BASKETBALL: ' FRIDAY, 8:30,
War Memorial Gym. U. of Alberta (Calgary) vs. UBC. See
Boss-Jock Basketball at half
time, featuring CKLG Radio Disc
Jockeys  and   UBC   Cheerleaders.	
SCIENCE ELECTIONS. ALL Positions open. Nominations close
March 1st at 4 p.m. Elections
March 8th.
WATCH THE FAST FLYING PUCK
at the Steel Cup hockey game,
SFU vs UBC-P.E. Tues., Feb. 28,
T'Bird ice arena, 5:45. Dance 8-12.
Brock to Bremen Town Musicians
all  for  75c.
THE CAMPUS SHOPPE (in the
Village) 5732 University Blvd.
228-8110 announces new store
hours. Tues. to Sat. 9 a.m. - 5:30
p.m., closing Mondays, commencing March 6th. Sale continues on
dresses, skirts, sweaters; etc. We
carry top brand names, "Dalkeith", "Panther Pants", "Shirt
Tales", "Shamrock", "Kayser",
etc.
ESCORTS UNLIMITED: OUR
unique service can provide a perfectly trained gentleman for any
and all social functions. Further
information,   1157   Steveston   Hwy.
GEM-ROCK CRAFTS — 3121 WEST
Broadway, 731-1721. Stop here for
your gifts! Jade and other jewelry,   tl   up.	
GRAD CLASS GENERAL MEET-
ing Thursday, March 2. Angus
110,  12:30 p.m.
UBC OPEN SQUASH TOURNA-
ment, March 6-12; enter at AMS
Office  by March  3.
Travel Opportunities
16
SEE B.C. INTERIOR TO KAM-
loops, 3 days, $15 (plus expenses).
Leaves March 24, returns March
26.   Contact  I.H.	
AMS CHARTER FLIGHT NOW
goes to Europe via Expo. Spend
one week at Expo on route to
Europe. Lv. Van. June 1st; Lv.
Montreal June 7th; Lv. London
Sept. 4th. Hurry, only a few seats
left. Call AMS Business Office
for details.
AUTOMOTIVE   8c  MARINE
Automobiles For Sale
21
MUST SELL 1965 AUSTIN 1100.
Excellent cond., radio, 1967 plates.
Phone   Art,   evenings,   RE   3-8672.
'49 DODGE CPE., GREAT SHAPE,
runs well. New rear seal, battery,
much more. Phone Don, Rm. 19,
224-9853.
1958 VOLKSWAGEN. NEW:
Brakes, tires, radio, battery,
plates. Excellent running gear.
Offers? John(K). Room, 207, 224-
9049.
1953 CHEV. SEDAN. CITY TEST-
ED.   Good  condition,   $100.   AM  6-
'53 CHEV. BELAIR. SOUND CON-
dition. City tested. Best offer.
987-1319.   '67   plates.	
NICE   '66   PONT.   STD.   6.   PHONE
685-1830.
1964 VOLKSWAGON — RADIO —
gas  heater. ^24-0145.	
1962 SPRITE MARK II, $995.00.
261-5042.
1953 AUSTIN, '67 PLATES, BODY—
excellent running, needs work,
offers? 1951 Austin (parts). Phone
228-8543    (Dave).	
FOR SALE — '64 MGB, EXCEL-
lent condition, low mileage, radio,
682-5786.
BUSINESS SERVICES
Miscellaneous
34
GETTING ENGAGED: SAVE AT
least 50 percent on finest quality
diamond rings. Satisfaction guaranteed.  Call 261-6671 any time.
Scandals
39A
DESIRING TO MAKE MONEY—
Musicians, singers entertainers,
groups. Phone 688-3012. Have a
resume  & photo if possible.
HI HO DOES H.A.M. WANNA
do battle? Raid Grouse Fri. night.
The   S & D   Five.	
BEWARE OF THE JABBERWOK,
Vancouver's finest newi band, tonight   at  the   Afterthought.	
DEAR JOHN: THE DARKEST
hour is just before dawn. Happy
21st.   Love   from  your  L.C.B.
Scandals
39-A
DEAR RONNIE JOHNNIE: BE
good — and if you can't be good,
then for God's sake be careful!!
from Lindy Lou and the girl in
the   dream.
LEATHERSMITHE — FINE
leather goods, sandals, 15% off
until March. 2057 W. 4th Ave.,
736-6177.
WE DO BETTER WORK FOR
less money! This may seem paradoxical but come and see us if
you don't believe it (even if you
do, come anyway). Auto Henne-
ken, 8914 Oak St. at Marine Drive.
Typing
43
TYPING—FAST,    ACCURATE    EF-
ficient,   any   time.   224-5621.
Professional Typing
ARDALE   GRIFFITHS   LTD.
8584   Granville   St.
70th  &  Granville  St. 263-4680
TYPING THESIS AT MY HOME.
Speed: 65 wpm. Contact after 5
p.m.   at   255-8853.    Call   Rosie.
WILL    TYPE    THESIS,
able   rates,   929-2757.
REASON-
TYPING — 25c Single Page; legible
handwriting. Call after 10 a.m.
738-6829. 	
MANUSCRIPTS, ESSAYS, THESES
accurately typed. Elec. machine.
Phone   224-5046   after   6   p.m.
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted
81
LIFEGUARDS — HEAD GUARD
City of Kamloops refer to placement   office.
102nd CUB PACK DESPERATELY
need an assistant cub master.
Contact Mr. Stan Stewart 224-
3782  or Mrs.   Harris   224-7555.
ELDERLY WOMAN WISHES PER-
son to prepare evening meal and
do light housekeeping several
times a week. Phone 224-7039 or
224-3070.
ENGLISH MAJORETTE WITH
artistic ambitions to design invitation for Bird Dog Gun Club
Ball.   Spruce,   224-7137.
Music
63
FENDER BASSMAN AMP. STU-
dent can't maintain payments.
Excellent condition. Only $395 owing.  Phone Pete 224-5958  (eves).
Instruction-Tutoring
64
ALL FIRST AND SECOND YEAH
subjects by excellent tutors: Scl-
ences and arts. 736-6923.	
EXPERT TUTORING IN MATH,
Science, Engineering. $3/hr. Mini-
mum 5 lessons. 876-1859.	
ENGLISH, HISTORY, FRENCH
tutoring by B.A., M.A., B.L.S.
No   contracts.     Phone   736-6923.
Instruction Wanted
66
TUTOR WANTED FOR GRADE
eleven math student. $3.00 per
hour.   Ph.  433-9485.
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
Tl
COMPLETE LINE OF UNPAINT-
ed furniture. Klassen's Used
Furniture Mart, 3207 W. Broadway.   RE   6-0712.
Beer   Bottle   Drive-in
at Rear of Store
ITS SPRING! FOR SALE: GOLF
clubs and bag. Good clubs, excellent condition. Phone 736-0669
evenings.	
METAL SKIS COMPLETE WITH
bindings; 215cm. stereo, low impedance microphone.   Ph.   685-2170.
TYPEWRITER — 21" CARRIAGE,
steel stationary cabinet, misc.,
office chairs, 30-cup percolator.
327-8527.	
LONG FORMAL SIZE TEN TO
twelve royal blue velvet top white
belled   skirt.   Phone   224-0869.
RENTALS  &  REAL ESTATE
Rooms
61
ROOM & BOARD FOR QUIET
male student. 4595 W. 6th, phone
224-4866.	
ONE SLEEPING ROOM FOR SEN-
ior male student. Private entce.
Shower. Light housekeeping facil-
ities,   $50  mth.   CA 8-8814.	
RENT ROOM OR SHARE APART -
ment, UBC vicinity, with teacher.
Phone   733-3983.
Room & Board
82
FOR CONVENIENCE, COMFORT,
and congeniality, stay at Zeta PSI
Fraternity, 2260 Wesbrook Cres.
Phone 224-9662 betweei. 5:00 p.m.
and  7:00 p.m.
Furn. Houses and Apts.
83
FOR RENT—2-B.R. HOUSE. MAR.
1 to May 15. Ideal for couple and
child.  263-8979,  evenings.	
TWO GIRLS TO SHARE FULLY
furnished and equipped modern
two bdrm. apt. Located 70th at
Oak. Available May 1st. Contact
Brenda   327-7541.   After   5:00   p.m.
STUDENT WANTED TO SHARE
West-end apt.  $42.50 mo. Ride 9:30-
5:30.   682-7604.	
MAY 1, WANTED BY TWO MALE
graduate   students.    Phone   Rene,
5 - 7   p.m.,    224-4593.
WWIWWf

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