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The Ubyssey Oct 19, 1971

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Vol. Llll,        No. 15
VANCOUVER,  B.C.,
TUESDAY, OCTOBER 19
~4S 228-2301
rFireff warns Belshaw
) as smoke thickens
The. anthropology-sociology department
isn'ts gejfect, but over all, the recent tenure
_prpcfeftdings in the department were thorough
and fair.
And graduate students who have formed
their own tenure committee to review tenure
proceedings in the department "do not
understand the nature of the fire they are
playing with".
This is the essence of a memorandum sent
to department members Monday by anthrosoc
head Cyril Belshaw.
The four-page statement was released half
an hour after the anthrosoc grad students'
association executive met with Belshaw to
discuss the controversy surrounding tenure
proceedings in the department.
In the memo, Belshaw discusses and rejects
the subject of the Monday meeting: grad
students' views on the tenure proceedings.
However, the memo was written before the
meeting and the grad students who attended
said they were not given copies of the memo
or told of its existence or impending release to
faculty members.
They said they were called to the meeting
by Belshaw, who did not give an explanation
of what was to be discussed.
"The meeting was just a set-up. There's
really   not   much   to   talk   about   because
Belshaw already has his mind made up," said
one grad student who asked to remain
anonymous because of fear of department
reprisals.
To discuss the department situation and
the issue of tenure in general, the Union of
Radical Social Scientists - which has
members in the anthrosoc department — plans
to hold a teach-in Friday.
Meanwhile, Belshaw in his memorandum
charges that "The Ubyssey has recently been
dealing in innuendos directed against the
integrity of the department in its handling of
tenure deliberations."
See page 9: BELSHAW
OPPRESSION takes many forms . . . photographer Kelly Booth took this symbolic study of the crushing social toll of modern technology at the
University of Edmonton. This is not a member of the UBC anthropology department, it has been reliably  innuendoed.
Eleven busted at war act demo
TORONTO (CUP) - Eleven people were
arrested Saturday and fifteen plate glass
windows broken after demonstrators
commemprating the first anniversary of the
imposition of the War Measures Act in
October, 1970, clashed with police outside
Eaton's downtown department store here.
Demonstrators marched Saturday from a
vacant lot down Toronto's Yonge Street strip
chanting slogans like "free Paul Rose", with
police swarming all around the Yonge Street
area.
Uniformed police followed the 100
protestors in cars and on motorcycles as
plainclothes policemen marched
inconspicuously behind the chanting crowd.
Taking their police escort by surprise, some
of the demonstrators holding Quebec patriot
streamers broke into a run oiitside Eatons and
charges down a side street breaking 15 of the
corporation's display windows.
Even though demonstrators confined their
trashing to Eatons, police moved in and after
scuffling with demonstrators arrested eleven
people.
All those arrested after Saturday's
disturbance have been charged with mischief
to private property and conspiracy.
Four people of the eleven have also been
charged with possession of dangerous weapons
and two with common assault.
Although the demonstration has been
billed by radio and television as the work of
the Red Morning, 'a Maoist organization',
only four of the eleven arrested came from
the group's co-op residences.
Quebecois writers to recite poems of love, revolution
The following was written by a very
anonymous student in the UBC French
department.
Raoul Duguay and Paul Chamberlahd
are among the most representative poets
now writing in Quebec. Between them they
have written a good part of the best
Quebecois poetry of the 1960s.
Since 1962, Chamberland (born in
1939) has produced four books of poetry
of which the best known is undoubtedly
Terre Quebec. Also an essayist and
polemicist, he has written many articles on
the social, political and economic changes
now taking place in Quebec.
He was one of the founders and pillars
of the review Parti Pris (1963-68), which
had a great influence on the political
thought of young Quebecois.
Duguay (also born in 1939) is less
preoccupied with political and social
problems than Chamberland but is no less
active to judge by his incredibly prolific
output.
Since 1966 he has produced three books
of poems, a manifesto, an encyclopedia of
3,333 pages and a study of the music of
Quebec.
He was also a founding member of the
literary review Quoi (1967), not to
mention his activities in theatre and
cinema.
What do these poets have to say to us?
Those who come to hear a nationalist
Quebec poetry that is both radical and
violent will perhaps be disappointed.
Bergeron speaks today
Quebecois author Leandre Bergeron will
speak on Quebec history today at 12:30
p.m. in SUB ballroom.
Bergeron is the author of the Petit
Manuel d'Histoire du Quebec which has
been published in English as The History of
Quebec: Patriot's Handbook.
His speech is part of the Quebec Week
program sponsored by the Alma Mater
Society special events committee.
On pages 6 and 7 of today's Ubyssey
appears an analysis of the situation in
Quebec one year after the invocation of
the War Measures Act.
^^^\f^:^^^^^9i^&^^m^^s<^^^n''9m^y^sc^^ssm^rw^f^> <■. ^^- ?■ \-**
Duguay and Chamberland talk of
Revolution and Liberty, but also of Love
and Peace, and after their own fashion.
Everything they do is distinctively after
their own fashion.
They also speak of a return to Natural
Harmony, of a more primitive Kebek, more
tribal, more 'amerindian', but after their
fashion which is that of the poet.
What they are doing is perhaps not so
very different from what West Coast poets
are doing.
But come and listen to them and figure
it out yourself. Duguay reads at noon on
Wednesday, Chamberland at noon on
Friday. Both will read in the SUB art
gallery.
Partial translations of some of their
texts will be distributed at the readings. Page 2
THE       UBYSSEY
Tuesday, October  19,  1971
Benson's budget means
long term disadvantages
This article was written by Mark Read,
Finance minister Edgar Benson's budget means
a debt of $1.07 billion - a debt for short term gain.
$498 million represents a quick attempt to
provide employment for the country's growing
jobless with $35 million for training. The balance,
$572 million is to absorb tax reductions.
The tax reductions have as their basis an
attempt to stimulate consumption and capital
growth. A seven per cent cut goes to corporate
concerns and this will mean profit increases with the
hopes of investment and more jobs.
A three per cent income tax cut should increase
middle class take-home pay by $1-2 per week.
Thus the total budget represents an attempt to
deal with the growing unemployment crisis in
Canada today.
However, there are problems.
The government is going into debt to the tune
of $1.07 billion dollars to transfer $498 million
from unemployment insurance and welfare to this
debt.
As well the $348 million business can expect
from their tax cuts will not necessarily go into the
Canadian economy.
The tax benefit has a one and a half year time
limit. The major beneficiaries are the American
corporate giants in Canada who will be sending their
gains south of the border to cash in on the capital
tax credits and higher write-offs under the new
Nixonomics.
Benson's budget means, in real terms, marginal
short term benefits and long term disadvantages of
long term debt interest.
Canada is a country getting wealthier through a
trade surplus. The beneficiaries in this situation are
the Canadian dollar and those who control the raw
resource.
Through a system of claims and crown grants
first year UBC commerce student.
the latter are able to produce for export at a
relatively small expense with large gains as in the
case Kaiser Industries and Kootenay Coal.
Here lies the unemployment problem. Our
manufacturing jobs are being exported to the U.S.
and Japan along with the resources.
To cut the unemployment rate we must
increase the development of secondary industry
either through private or public capital and at a
higher rate than the growth of the labor force.
This increase of development has been
hampered by a lack of capital available to Canadians
for the development of secondary industry.
The Benson budget is doing this very indirectly
and what money does end up in savings he is hoping
will be turned into capital formation.
Vehicles exist in Canada which are not being
used efficiently and which could be used to
overcome the unemployment problem. The
Industrial Development Bank, the Banking Act and
other legislation can be used for private
development.
More important, we have a direct vehicle in the
Canadian Development Corporation.
The CDC is a public vehicle to create
secondary growth and industry. It would give direct
control to the people of Canada and would look to
their interest rather than a private company whose
only interest is itself.
More and more Canadian businesses owned by
Americans are closed by the parent companies
during a recession. The only permanent solution is
Canadian control of the economy.
Benson's billion should be going to the CDC
as a more direct method of creating this secondary
industry and the control of it. Instead of costing us
more than $1.07 billion; our short and long term
gains (employment) would be substantial.
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Killer weed gets researcher
OTTAWA (CUP) - The Le
Dain commission's inquiry into
the non-medical use of drugs has
converted at least one researcher
to the pleasures of smoking dope.
Dr. Charles Farmilo, 53, was
fined $100 Friday by an Ottawa
court after pleading guilty to
illegal possession of hashish.
Farmilo is a former research
scientist for the Le Dain
commission.
He was suspended from
commission   work   by   chairman
Gerald Le Dain in August,
immediately after the possession
charge was laid.
His lawyer told Ontario
provincial court that Farmilo was
preparing a text on drug abuse
and that his use of hashish was
for research purposes.
The court argued this was not
an excuse for illegal possession of
the drug and rejected Farmilo's
declaration that his drug usage
was directly related to the Le
Dain commission's research.
done
"Not only have you done a
great disservice to yourself,"
Farmilo was told by provincial
court judge Thomas Swabey, "but
you have done a great disservice
also to every scientific project you
have been involved in."
The Rock Opera by THE WHO
sound by Kelly-Deyong
OCT. 27th to NOV. 6th
8:30 p.m. - UBC Old Auditorium
TICKETS: $2.50 & $3.00 at Vancouver Ticket Centre 683-3255
and outlets; Pants Plus in the Village.
Notice to Graduating Students in
SCIENCE
A meeting will be held in Chem. 250
Wednesday, October 20 at 12:30 p.m.
to hear a representative from the Placement Office
(Office of Student Services)
on the subject
GRADUATE EMPLOYMENT
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your daily needs. Tuesday, October 19, 1971
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 3
-kelly booth photo
FLEA MARKET on the main floor of SUB provides relief both for students escaping from dull classes and
for the penniless entrepreneurs. The people behind the tables are selling everything from cowturd cookies
to commie literature, so drop around sometime for a looksee.
'Nothing wrong
with war money'
say UBC biggies
By SANDY KASS and SANDI SHREVE
Money is money — even when it's dipped in blood.
That was the reaction Monday to The Ubyssey's description of
the funding of a visiting professorship scheme at UBC.
The $600,000 which UBC benefactor Cecil H. Green has donated
to the university to establish a series of visiting professorships is based
largely on the supply of strategic equipment to the U.S. military.
A Ubyssey story Friday detailed how, as founder of Texas
Instruments Ltd.., Green has been instrumental in the manufacture of
products such as air-to-ground missiles and armaments, radar systems,
military data systems, target detection and acquisition programs, and
undersea warfare signal studies.
It is money from the sales of such items which is financing the
visiting professorships.
Physics department head George Volkoff, chairman of the
committee to administer the fund, said Monday that doesn't matter.
"I've been given $600,000 to establish the professorships, and as
long as I can get qualified people, I do not care where the money
comes from," Volkoff said.
Linus Pauling, a chemist, leader of the American pacifist
movement and former Nobel Peace Prize winner, is-one of the people
Volkoff is considering for a professorship.
In a telephone interview Monday with The Ubyssey, Pauling said
he has not been approached officially by Volkoff, even though the
two are personal friends.
"I do not take a firm attitude to funds coming from military
sources if they are being used for non-military matters," he said.
"In fact, I think its a good thing UBC managed to get some
money away from that war profiteer," Pauling added.
Pauling said he did not know to what extent a decision on
accepting a visiting professorship would be influenced by the source
of the funds.
"Time is a major factor in my decision to do anything," he said.
Pauling is a chemistry professor at Stanford University in Los
Angeles and director of a mental disease research project.
UBC administration president Walter Gage said Monday he "likes
Green very much as a person."
When asked how he feels about the source of the money Green
has donated to the university, Gage said: "Well, I imagine he made it
in business."
Chemistry department head Charles McDowell said Monday UBC
accepts money without question from corporations and the university
See page 8: GAGE
English dept. publishing machine, say radical humanists
English department head Robert Jordan is turning
the department into a faculty publishing machine
instead of an educational instituteion, says a bulletin
issued by a group of arts students.
The bulletin is the first action taken by a
newly-formed group called the Union of Radicals in the
Humanities and is an attempt to break the silence that
has fallen over the department since last year.
Already a number of junior faculty members in the
department who are concerned mainly with teaching
rather than publishing have been refused contract
renewals, the URH claims.
URH spokesman Stan Persky said Monday that
there is something radically wrong with education in the
humanities which must be changed.
The union plans to hold a series of open discussions
on various arts departments as well as publish a journal
containing information on the university administration
and the education system.
Information about the URH can be obtained from
Colin Portnuff at 224-4140 or Sue Kennedy at
732-0340.
a consumer column.
By ART SMOLENSKY
Despite a Ubyssey story last week
something fishy is definitely going on in
the UBC bookstore.
A copy of one of the bookstore's
invoices fell into our hands recently
detailing in black and white what the
bookstore really pays for its books. The
invoice was found in a book purchased
this fall in the annual Armory book
buying festival.
Of Time, Work, and Leisure is a
sociology 353 text which has a $2.95
bookstore label on it.
The invoice from Doubleday
publishers states that the list price is
$2.25 and that the bookstore received a
41 per cent discount on it.
In effect, this makes their cost $1.33 a
copy, a handy profit of 123 per cent on
what they paid.
The bookstore claims that they get a
33 per cent discount off of a $2.95 list
and that this price has been in effect for
two years. Incidentally, underneath the
bookstore's sticker is a $2.45 publisher's
imprint.
Further intrigue is added by the fact
that the July, 1971 Paperbound Books in
Print gives the book a $ 1.95 brice.
Three things seem to be evident.
l.The UBC bookstore had some old
stock from last year which they
over-priced both last year and this year.
Thus they obtained a 123 per cent profit
on a number of texts sold this year.
2. The Canadian importer-distributor
(Doubleday) has slapped on a 20 per cent
charge ($2.45 to $2.95) as its right for
having a monopoly in obtaining these
books. Doubleday is a U.S. company.
3. The American publisher is raising
his prices so fast that even the most
recent book catalogues can't keep up
with the spiralling increases. In this case
the publisher has increased his price 20
per cent in the last six months ($1.95 to
$2.45).
For those interested in a distinct case
of the bookstore pushing things above list
price the accompanying photo virtually
speaks for itself.
An Oxford book stated to have a
$"2.95 price (in the U.S. ?) and a $3.25
Modern Essays
in Criticism
fedrad by
^i'.hurE.Barkor
"in Canada" price is proudly sold by the
bookstore for $4.35.
This 34 per cent difference is even
proudly displayed. The bookstore didn't
bother to cover the $3.25 price with one
of its own new non-remove able tags.
If the reader detects much venom on
the part of this columnist towards fat-cat
publishers, monopolistic book importing
agencies and the chronic inefficiencies in
the bookstore, I hope that he or she will
find justification in the above.
The end result of all of this is that
students are being screwed but good. The
major portion of the blame lies on the
importer agents who contribute little to
the state of Canadian publishing. Bursar
Bill White and his bookstore overseers are
not without blame.
The tragedy is that the government
through consumer affairs minister Ron
Basford seems sympathetic but unwilling
to do anything about it. Basford's
department has been grossly underfunded
by a Liberal cabinet whose links to large
corporations have been proved time and
time again. Page 4
THE       UBYSSEY
Tuesday, October 19, 1971
Jungle generalities
Anthrosoc department head Cyril
(Bwana) Belshaw, in a frenetic 72 hours, has
cranked out enough letters and
mimeographed explanations of what's going
on in his small empire to fill an issue of
American Anthropologist.
The only thing he doesn't explain is why
he's in favor of firing Matthew Speier and
Ron Silvers — two teachers who have a good
publications record (by normal
publish-or-perish standards) and who are
widely respected as teachers by students.
And neither does he deal with the general
issue of a democractic alternative to tenure,
as raised in The Ubyssey on Friday.
Really, Cyril, we aren't attacking your
war record. We don't even want to make fun
of it. We're sure it's distinguished.
As for reporting, we have our ups and
downs no doubt. Generally, we try to get
the facts straight. If department procedures
weren't cloaked in secrecy, there wouldn't
be any danger of innuendoes (to use Cyril's
word of the week.)
But let's focus on the first area Cyril isn't
dealing with, and in his words, come clean.
We'd like answers to some serious
questions about the Speier-Silvers case:
What criteria were used to decide whether
or not to grant tenure?
Were the criteria publishing and teaching
(in that order)?
If those were the criteria, then how were
they applied to the cases of Speier and
Silvers?
Isn't it true that Speier and Silvers both
have better publishing and teaching records
than at least two of the people
recommended for tenure?
Instead of jungle camouflage answers to
questions that are easy to rage about — like
the ones on political tenure considerations —
for which it would be impossible to produce
concrete evidence — how about the above
ones?
It seems to us that the anthrosoc promo
and tenure committee is making the claim
that it has rationally applied criteria to the
cases of all persons involved.
Yet, on the face of it, it's completely
unclear (to put it mildly) where the
rationality is. That's the case graduate
students in anthrosoc are making; those are
the questions they're asking.
Instead of answers, all they've been
getting is blanket assurances about the fair
and considered treatment the chaps on the
committee gave to the chaps whose tenure
cases were heard.
No specifics. Just generalities.
And that isn't good enough, Cyril.
Okay, so we've played it your way. No
cracks about your war years among the
watermelon, no nasty hints about political
considerations. Just some simple questions
that you have not answered.
Now let's go on to the other area you've
quickly sidestepped: the issue of tenure
itself.
We stick with our opposition to 'tenure
martyrs' and our support for an alternative
to tenure itself. We notice that you've
written us a letter which addresses itself to a
minor point (your war service) in Friday's
Ubyssey editorial.
Yet you neglect the important editorial
question of a tenure alternative. And, we
suspect, for a very good reason.
You like tenure. And you like the way
the tenure system works.
The Old Guard, which comprises most
tenure committees, shepherds the converted
into a life of academic security, while
discarding the guys who just ain't got
religion — despite the best efforts of the
academic institution.
So let's have a few more answers and lot
less snow.
In short, we want the truth.
Budgets and plots
AMS treasurer David Mole has produced a
budget.
Not only is it the earliest and
easiest-to-understand student budget in
recent memory, it's something of a surprise.
Those students who expected the first
radical majority student government at UBC
to grab the money and run, will be surprised
to notice that Mole's budget appears
eminently   responsible.
At the same time the budget emphasizes
the things that the student government
members said they would emphasize when
they ran as the human government slate.
No doubt there will be a few of the usual
grumbles and perhaps some minor budgetary
adjustments.   Clubs   are   demanding   more
THW8YSSEY
OCTOBER 19, 1971
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the
university year by the Alma Mater Society of the University of
B.C. Editorial opinions are those of the writer and not of the
AMS or the university administration. Member, Canadian
University Press. The Ubyssey publishes Page Friday, a weekly
commentary and review. The Ubyssey's editorial offices are
located in room 241K of the Student Union Building.
Editorial departments, 228-2301, 228-2307; Page Friday,
Sports, 228-2305; advertising, 228-3977.
Editor: Leslie Plommer
"I don't like innuendos," Pat Kanopski told Laurence
Leader as Art Smolensky watched. Tricia Moore said they
are in extremely poor taste, but Dick Betts and Kathy
Carney disagreed. Stan Persky suggested John Andersen
come to some conclusion on the matter for both Lesley
Krueger and Vaughn Palmer were left howling under the
chess board.
"Screw innuendos," said Sandi Shreve. "What about
blood money?" Sandy Kass thought so too and told Ian
Lindsay and Dave Schmidt they had better agree with her
or she would call Leslie Plommer on 'em. Paul Knox called
for cooler heads to prevail and they did as Randy Frith and
Mike Buck tied Leslie to her em ruler. Jan O'Brien had a
few remarks about certain arseholes but Linda Hossie didn't
have time to agree because she was busy.
David Bowerman retreated to the darkroom and Kelly
Booth was just as glad because Kent Spenser with Gord
Gibson.
Mike Sasges worked. >
green stuff, even though this year's budget
shows a significant increase for UCC.
And then there's the question of funding
for intramural sports and the revelation of a
rather slimy plot afoot.
But in this' case, the blame is on athletics
students, who appear to have initiated a
scare campaign.
They've been passing out leaflets saying
the human government has a secret plan to
put a quickie death-to-sports referendum
before the students asking that the $5
athletic fee be wiped out and that a $1
voluntary fee be instituted for intramurals
only.
A look as the AMS council minutes shows
that there is to be a sports referendum — in
January — and that it has the unanimous
support of the student council.
The referendum will give students a
whole range of choices on what to do about
the athletics fee and will be part of a general
January referendum dealing with fees of all
kinds.
Meanwhile, the $3,500 given to
intramural sports in the budget now before
council covers intramural program costs
completely, up to January, when students
can vote on the athletics issue.
And maybe the men's athletic committee
will someday get around to deciding whether
or not it can afford to allocate a tiny portion
of the more than $100,000 students have
already paid for athletics to bolster the
intramural program.
All in all, however, the AMS budget
makes more sense than Edgar Benson's
recent effort in.a similar sphere, and with
the athletics smear campaign laid to rest, the
way is open for rational debate.
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THE       UBYSSEY
Page 5
Letters
Kosygin
On Friday, Premier Alexei
, Kosygin of the USSR will be
arriving in Vancouver.
It is the first and possibly the
only time that such a high official
of the Soviet Union will be in
Vancouver.
Therefore, it is extremely
important that we as people stand
-up against the oppression that his
government stands for.
For those of you who are so
bitter about American
imperialism, I ask you not to
forget Soviet imperialism. The
invasion of Czechoslovakia in
_1968, the invasion of Hungary in
1956 (as a minimum of
examples). For those of you who
shout against authority and
scream for the right of
self-determination, how about
Soviet policies of cultural
genocide?
This is what results from the
uprooting and forced resettlement
•of    the    Estonians,    Latvians,
Lithuanians, and Ukrainians.
Cultural and religious genocide is
also a policy towards the three
million Jews who have not been
permitted to print ethnic works
since the mid-3Os.
Therefore, if you are one of
those human types who believes
in freedom and self-determination
you should be interested in taking
part in the weekend's events.
On Wednesday there will be a
general meeting at B'nai B'rith
Hillel House (behind Brock) at
12:30 p.m. Anyone interested in
supplying or receiving further
information or wishing to take
part in the weekend's
demonstrations, please come.
Wayne Greenburg,
Hillel Club.
Belshaw
Yes, indeed, for three years
during the war, at approximately
your age, I was in the colonial
service.
A major part of my task was to
assist   the people  of a war-torn
Zionists to follow
Kosygin during visit
A UBC committee plans to follow Soviet premier Alexei
Kosygin around town during his visit here.
Kosygin will be intercepted on his way to Vancouver from the
airport around 3 p.m. Friday and will be followed to the Hotel
Vancouver.
The protest will climax with a Saturday midnight rally at the
courthouse.
"The purpose of the demonstration is to indicate the concern of
" Vancouver Jewry for the Jews in the Soviet Union who are denied
their human rights stated in both the Soviet constitution and the
universal declaration of rights," said Jon Kaplan, chairman of the UBC
Soviet action committee.
He said Monday that the group is also demonstrating against
Soviet refusal to allow Jews to emigrate to Israel.
Further information can be obtained from Kaplan at 266-6442.
Library survey starts
Students using the Woodward bio-medical library will be asked
to report all missing journals in a two-week survey beginning Monday.
Students complained that many medical journals were missing
during the spring and suggested loan procedures be changed, assistant
librarian Doug Mclnnes said Monday.
'The survey may show that borrowing procedures are not at
_fault   —   that   what   is   required   is   an   improvement  in   internal
procedures," said Mclnnes.
He said the Woodward library will apply to the bio-medical
library committee to change loan regulations if they are the cause of
borrowing difficulties.
"If this survey proves helpful to us, we may also use it in other
divisions of the library," Mclnnes said.
CHEYENNE
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country create, out of indigenous
forms, institutions to do what
they wanted to do by way of
setting up businesses,
co-operatives, locally-controlled
dispensaries and schools, and
courts which reflected their own
legal ideas. And don't tell me this
was done to benefit big business,
since big business wasn't there.
And if you don't think it was
possible to do these things and at
the same time oppose the re-entry
of big business, you don't know
much about the climate of the
time and you have not read the
questions I had raised in the
English House of Commons by
Labor party bank-benchers.
The role I was playing at this
time was very much more relevant
and productive of- real benefits to
human beings than is the current
role of the Ubyssey editor.
One of the many things I learnt
was not to indulge in politics by
innuendo: indeed the whole free
world was in opposition to the
Hitlerian outcome of that
technique. It is a lesson which you
yourself have not learned. The
initial story about events in this
department, and a subsequent
editorial, were in terms of baseless
innuendo. You cannot
substantiate the material, because
your innuendos were based upon
the innuendos of your informants,
not on facts. Your next story
(October 15th) has some factual
material, but much of this is
plainly erroneous.  For example,
you state that in response to
certain events graduate students in
the department set up a
committee. Since the events you
describe occurred after the
committee had been set up
(indeed after I had talked with it),
you statement is clearly false.
And your editorial once again
uses innuendo. Come on — come
clean. Tell your readers just what
the connection is between my
service for three years in the
colonial administration, at
approximately your age, in war
time — and anything that is
relevant now. If you can. And if
you dare print this challenge.
Your faithful windmill,
Cyril Belshaw,
(Uncle Ogre).
SUB FILMS PRESENTS
WEDNESDAY NIGHT
DOUBLE FEATURES
7:00
October 27
THIS WEEK:
Witness for the Prosecution
Magnificent Seven
NEXT WEEK:
Hush, Hush Sweet Charlotte
Grapes of Wrath
Admission:
75
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FPR UBC 37 Page 6
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, October 19, 1971
Wotyf
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East European Fasonlia Soup
THURSDAY 21st-
Hunqarian Chicken Goulash
Hungarian Cream of Cauliflower
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FRIDAY 22nd-
Chinese Pineapple Sweet & Sour
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Polish - Borscht
OCTOBER 25th-29th
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1      Italian Chicken Cacciatore
I       Italian Minestrone Soup
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Greek Shish-kebab — yogurt —
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French Canadian Pea Soup
THURSDAY 28th-
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Hot Meals 85c
Soups with bread 25c & .45c
Fresh fruit salad 25c
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french bread 25c
^g UEBEC — What is the best strategy for social change in
Quebec? And what is the best strategy for containing social
change here?
Both the changers and the stoppers of change seem to be
unsure of their course as the first anniversary of last October's
kidnappings and imposition of the War Measures Act approaches.
First the regime.
The Trudeau government, which obviously ran the show
and laid down the heavy stuff in the crisis, also seems to have
been the first to catch on that the War Measures Act, the arrests
of the law-abiding left, and the extravagant language about
bleeding-heart-liberals and a-caisse-populaire-
manager-may-be-next, were all poison, electorally and otherwise,
and should be tapered off from with all prudent haste.
The Bourassa government here, which came across as much
more vacillating and conscience-stricken in October, dumbly got
on some Trudeau tough-talk just as it was no longer the thing,
and said letting the Public Order Act lapse was "illogical
softness".
Now it too has come around, and the last weeks of the first
year of post-War-Measures Quebec were devoted to sending out
cheques of apparently arbitrary amounts in compensation to
those falsely arrested in October, and dropping cases against
persons charged with the War Measures crimes that no longer
existed — membership in the FLQ, etc.
But the government has shown a certain amount of
hesitancy in its new tack. The compensated were required to sign
a document saying they had no further claim on the government.
And the charge-dropping was by a procedure which, a crown
prosecutor pointed out, enabled the government to come back
later and prosecute, although the justice minister said it was, take
my word for it, final.
Jerome Choquette, the justice minister in question, still
speaks with the same bland liberalism he has always put forward:
me, use the courts politically, arrange the order of trials to keep
the accused on a string? Never. Justice isn't perfect, but we're
working on it. But don't forget those who criticize it are
revolutionaries, they don't want to improve, they want to
destroy.
Meanwhile, it has emerged that the beatings in Orsainville
jail the night after the War Measures Act was invoked were
investigated at a closed inquiry in the spring, that it all came out
in great detail, and that the government even used it as part of its
case against a jail warden it wanted to get rid of.
Now the government could have played this up, stressed its
implacability with the breachers of civil rights even in times of
crisis. But no, that would have brought back memories, let out a
Fortune-And-Men's-Eyes glimpse of prison, scratched sores. So
they used it but didn't publicize it, and have been silent or
muddled since the news has been published.
Deeper and deeper
The pre-October atmosphere here is like that through and
through. Guy Marcil of the policemen's union speaks of
Brazilian-style death squads — of course he doesn't want them,
but he may be forced to accept them. Montreal Mayor Drapeau's
'little Canada Council' says aid to the arts must uplift the arts'
morality, as in Greece.
Bourassa flees the reporters when they learn the FLQ
charges will not be pressed, flees their questions when they catch
him.
His electoral situation is not Trudeau's: he's not up for
election for a while yet, and doesn't have to face touchy Toronto
civil libertarians when he is. Bourassa enjoyed the 99 and 44/100
per cent pure support he got in the crisis, perhaps not quite as
much as Trudeau because he had to be danced into hard-linerdom
by Mr. Choquette, but he can cling to it longer. His Anglo-Saxons
are mostly scared and ready to approve anything, and he, unlike
Trudeau, knows that anyone who has of late shown any militancy
for civil rights is pretty surely against him anyway.
He's counting on the unawakened working class whose
concern is with livelihood rather than liberties, and he sloshes
deeper and deeper in his crude capitalist cures for its problems:
foreign capital, trips to New England haunts to chat with
Rockefellers, jobs, handouts to the pulp industry, surcharge-balm
to the distilleries (maybe), jobs, grand
projects-in-the-north-financed-by-Con-Ed (maybe), jobs, capital.
It should all be qualified with maybe, really, because
unemployment is keeping "cent mille emplois" a nightmare litany
for Bourassa. And yet he is right, in a way: the average
working-class consciousness in Quebec is not yet shocked by the
thought that prosperity is when ITT deigns to let you work for
them.
Now for the revolution, which depends on consciousness
coming.
It is coming, and you can see it everywhere you look in
Quebec. In the unions — even the timid Quebec City section of
the Confederation of National Trade Unions was recently coming
on strong with the second front, social action beyond the wage
contract. In the industryless rural towns, which are in the streets
because they're tired of being industryless. In the popular arts,
where free press agencies pop up, scandal sheets reprint
revolutionary history, itinerant players take mad joual epics to
BEYOND
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Tom S. Brown of the
describes the situo
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the parish halls, rock stars tell working-class life like it is -
terribly crushed and shy but terribly alive with juice at the same
time.
And in the usual on-again off-again youth movements -
here in the capital, the kids are running a lovely, cheat,
gathering-place restaurant, starting an analytical magazine
launching an anti-finance-company movement, keeping on wit!
the anti-private-fishing-preserve movement and the defence o
political prisoners.
One steady current is the Parti Quebecois. The troops o
the left almost all support it, work for it (even the FLQ manifest!
claimed to have tried it and despaired after the election larceny
even though they know it's not socialist the way they are, knov Tuesday, October 19, 1971
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 7
" -*■*¥■-?* JlTlfi* »*» I    ill rJ it. r    r i
*t      'ff .   *•■.-    1 .
osf Post News Service
on in a notion where
ore regrouping.
>'4h
?&»
\t
Behind the political lineal in recent weeks is al
peration and discontent)
ior who live in Canada*:
they don't have more than a cheering-section role in it, know the
leaders are technocrats, sometimes even know that Pierre
Bourgault isn't, as we say here, a gift.
It's a mass party and it's not too reactionary and maybe it
can win, and there has never been a mass socialist movement in
Quebec, and isn't now, and you can always do your other work in
the little left groups as well.
Then there is the FLQ. The left is like everyone else,
doesn't know just what it is, but cheers when it strikes its blows
— at least somebody's doing something, the powers are
scandalized so don't expect us to be, somebody's denouncing the
judges for their their rich man's justice, somebody is going clearly
beyond independence.
It would seem that the FLQ continues on always, anew,'
enough young leftists who cannot bear the slow prospects of
movement-building to form a few cells, plan the acts that will
make crises without mass participation. It would seem to be a
case of constant rebirth rather than continuity. But nobody
knows.
It's all been made more difficult to judge by the recent
Vallieres-Gagnon thing. In summary:
Charles Gagnon, 1966 FLQ partner of Pierre Vallieres,
finally clear of all charges after a Haifa decade, gives an interview
to a Montreal English Establishment paper, the Gazette, to a
reporter who co-wrote an openly right-wing account of the
kipnapping crisis, No Mandate but Terror. The interview is
published just before October. Gagnon talks about revolution, the
working class, violence — takes standard Marxist positions.
Except that the standard positions - (the working class must
make revolution, must be organized, is held down by violence —
violence exercised or hovering in the air, violence that has been
the stuff of history — and may quite un-bloodthirstily feel the
need to free itself by violence) don't say what specific course is
right, here and now.
On that, Gagnon's statements seem to reflect a new
orientation. The FLQ's bombs and such were needed to shake the
workers awake, but now they are awake, and the task is rather to
organize them into a party to move toward power. Like the
Bolsheviks.
But why plead for such a new orientation on the eve of
October through the Occupant's newspaper and a rightist
reporter?
Then came the move of Vallieres. He was not clear of the
courts, he risked going back to jail, after three years in and only a
few months out, on a charge developed by the authorities in the
aftermath of October, of inciting to crime during his previous jail
time. One day Vallieres doesn't show up in court. And the next
day the papers get a communique saying he has rejoined the FLQ
underground. If this is the case, he becomes the first FLQer from
one wave to go back to the movement in a later one, and the
movement begins to take on a continuity that had not been
apparent before. Photo-Police, a crime rag, speculates that he may
have been killed by the authorities and the communique sent as a
trick. But Robert Lemieux, Vallieres' lawyer, says the
communique seems to be for real.
Where is the FLQ at ?
But most of all it seemed to imply that Vallieres did not
agree with Gagnon that the need for terrorism (the FLQ rejects
the word, but it is used here for bombs, kidnappings,
assassinations and other blows to the regime which can be carried
out by small groups and which do not in themselves bring large
numbers of workers to bear on power) is over.
And yet even this is not sure, for the FLQ has never really
stated its position in this debate. Its manifestos, and Vallieres'
book White Niggers of America, have been demonstrations of the
general need for social revolution, the injustice and anger of
Quebec as she is. They have not explained the precise choice of
terrorism, but have seemed to take it for granted as the sole path
for someone who wants to start the armed struggle immediately.
Oddly, the only person in Quebec to write profoundly on
the theme has been Charles Gagnon, who in an essay from jail
said that the culture. of the working class, its deprivation in the
realm of words, argued for violent blows to the system: 'The
bourgeois doesn't understand that, he who possesses the world by
words."
The FLQ has often rejected the notion that it is merely
terrorist, however. Vallieres' book is the precocious
autobiography of a Quebec "terrorist" in quotes, and he has
always insisted that the FLQ did other revolutionary work:
organization, etc. But it is impossible from the outside, to know
what this work was, and it is the terrorist acts, by their nature
public, which have remained the only external evaluation we can
make of the movement.
Gagnon's most recent ideas are important, no matter how
odd the place which they have turned up. There is no way of
abolishing icapitalism in Quebec without the participation of
many thousands of Quebec workers, and the FLQ, successful
though it is in staying alive and spectacular, is like all other
left-wing movements in not having found the way to engage those.
thousands. It is the citizens' committees, legal, public, and
police-harried, which have made the best start at that.
For you cannot organize large numbers of people
underground while it is still at all permitted to organize them
above ground. You cut yourself off from phones, posters,
meeting halls, magazines and other such aids to bringing people
together before their experience has told them that it is come
together clandestinely or not at all.
And in Quebec's case there is a historical reason to continue
trying the unexhausted aboveground; it is that the left is coming
to birth here — there have been mighty struggles of several kinds,
but there has never been a mass movement of workers from
France, or almost any other European land, of the United States
- or even English Canada.
It may be long. It must be done.
GESTALT
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THE       UBYSSEY
Tuesday, October  19, 1971
Gage: 'I like Green
a lot, as a person'
From page 3
cannot distinguish between sources of funds.
"Corporations exploit the consumer, and Texas Instruments is
exploiting the people of Vietnam," McDowell said.
"I don't think there's much difference in the long run."
However, at least one faculty will not use money tainted with
military origins.
Education dean Neville Scarfe said Monday he does not want
anything to do with the war in Vietnam, and if he was sure the money
funding the professorships came from a source connected with the
war, he would have nothing to do with them.
In 1963, the year before the U.S. began its major escalation in
Vietnam, TI's total sales were $276,476,571 and its net income was
more than $13 million.
By the end of last year, sales had more than tripled, increasing to
$827,641,000 and its net income had risen to almost $30 million.
Most of that growth occurred between 1964 and 1968 when
Lyndon Johnson was president and major funding was directed at
maintaining the U.S. military in southeast Asia.
Alma Mater Society president Steve Garrod called the visiting
professorships "nothing but a big-time public relations gimmick.
"The scheme is comparable to the master teacher award, in that it
increases the prestige of the university without improving the quality
of education in any way," Garrod said.
Garrod said men like Green become university "philanthropists"
when they "have huge sums of money derived from the exploitation
of the workers, military and third world nations to donate, and
influence the direction of the university.
"They give money to education to educate people to keep them
in power," Garrod said.
He added, however, that students should not hesitate to attend
lectures given by professors under this scheme, "as long as students
realize it is not their fees that are paying their profs salaries."
Pakistani teach-in today
The Emergency Committee for Pakistani refugee relief will hold a
learn-in on the refugee crisis Tuesday and Wednesday noon in the SUB
auditorium.
Each day's program will include an hour of panel and audience
discussion followed by seminar studies of practical proposals for relief
and eventual stability in Pakistan.
The results of Tuesday's seminar groups will be presented during
Wednesday's discussion along with Indian government films.
Workshop set
Professor Lynn White Jr., who
knows a lot about the history of
science and technology will take
part in a three-day history
department workshop which
begins Friday.
White will lecture on India and
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medieval Europe, Friday, 12:30
p.m., in Buch 106.
Most of the workshop will take
place in the faculty club and the
Woodward bio-medical library on
Saturday and Sunday.
Details are available from R. W.
Unger at 228-5162.
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The University of
British Columbia
STUDENT TELEPHONE DIRECTORY 1971-72
What's
your
excuse?
You could have gone water skiing or swimming or to a dance
at night. Instead you've spent
the entire day moping around
the house feeling sorry for
yourself. And why? Just because it was one of those difficult times? How silly. A lot of
girls are out there enjoying
themselves under the same circumstances. They use Tampax
tampons.
Tampax tampons are worn
internally so you can swim or
dance or do most anything you
please. There are no bulky pads
or telltale odor to give you
away. Tampax tampons are so
easy to use. Yes, even the first
time. Just follow the instructions inside each package. So
go on out and enjoy yourself.
With Tampax tampons you
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BARRIE.  ONTARIO Tuesday, October 19, 1971
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 9
Belshaw letter, memo tell different tales
(Continued from Page 1)
And he says he has been
informed that Ubyssey stories
"contributed to the underlying
anxiety" which led to the
formation of the graduate
students' tenure committee to
review the proceedings by the
departmental committee.
(There is no student
representation on the department
tenure committee, which is the
basic decision-making body on the
matter of tenure — guaranteed
life-time employment with the
university.)
Pointing at the grad students'
tenure committee, Belshaw states:
"While I have not the slightest
doubt that the members of this
committee are doing their very
best, and while I intend to
continue to meet with them, I
fear they do not understand the
nature of the fire they are playing
with, and that we may ultimately
have to treat their burns as well as
our own."
And while claiming in his
memo that 'Ubyssey innuendos'
led to the formation of the grad
students' tenure review
committee, Belshaw maintains in
a letter in today's Ubyssey that
this is not the case.
The tenure dispute arose
approximately two weeks ago,
when it became known that two
sociology profs were likely to lose
their jobs as a result of tenure
decisions by the anthrosoc tenure
and promotions committee.
The two professors, Ron
Silvers and Matt Speier, numbered
among six profs in the department
who were up for tenure decisions
that amounted to 'hire or fire'.
The other profs are: Robin
Ridington, George Gray, Bob
Ratner and Robert Macdougall.
Since that time, the
department committee has
approved three of the profs by a
clear majority for tenure; refused
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tenure to one prof; and approved
tenure for Speier and Silvers by a
narrow margin with mainly
abstentions.
As department head, Belshaw
submitted his own report on the
tenure decisions, which will now
be reviewed by the faculty of arts
tenure and promotions
committee. In his report, Belshaw
recommended against tenure for
Speier and Silvers.
The tenure proceedings and
their outcome have given rise to a
number of charges by graduate
students and some faculty
members
Some are aimed at Belshaw
personally,- and centre on claims
that he influenced committee
proceedings on the basis of a
history of personal animosity and
political disagreement with Speier
and Silvers.
As for the committee, it has
been charged that:
The quality of teaching and
graduate student supervision was
not given much weight as a
criterion for granting or refusing
tenure;
The criteria that were used by
the committee were not applied
uniformly to the cases of the six
profs;
Anthropologists,     who
NFTU brief received favorably
By LINDA HOSSIE
The Non Faculty Teachers' Union is satisfied
with the results of the workshop meeting between
faculty and graduate students Friday, NFTU
spokesman Mark Madoff said Monday.
"I would be more confident if I knew what the
pattern of decision making will be, but I'm willing
to give it a try," Madoff said.
"It will be more than has happened up to
now."
A brief outlining the past problems of the
NFTU in communicating with the administration
was presented by the union at the meeting.
The brief stressed the "delay tactics" used by
the administration in dealing with the grievances of
teaching assistants.
The brief also outlined some of the demands of
the NFTU such as a wage increase, recognition of
the TAs as teachers and the establishment of a full
time board to handle TA affairs and grievances.
Graduate studies dean Ian Cowan agreed that
work needed to be done about the situation before
the university's budget is formulated next spring,
Madoff said.
He said the workshop has agreed to meet
weekly until December when they expect to have a
comprehensive picture of how TAs are being used
by the university.
Madoff said the Friday meeting revealed the
lack of information on both sides of the table.
"There's still more to be done," Madoff said.
"But I was satisfied with the concrete things that
were settled on Friday."
dominate the committee, favor a
certain brand of sociology and are
attempting to exert influence over
the direction of the sociologists in
the combined anthrosoc
department.
In his memorandum to
department members, and a
recent barrage of letters sent to
other members of the university
community, Belshaw denies all
these charges.
On a more general level,
graduate students are belatedly
objecting to the fact that they
have little say in the department's
tenure proceedings.
Their formal participation to
date has been restricted to writing
individual letters commenting on
cases coming before the
department committee.
However the grad students'
tenure review committee, formed
as a response to the current tenure
decisions, is to submit a report to
the faculty of arts committee
when it comes to deal with the
cases of the six anthrosoc profs.
The committee, headed by
grad student James Heap, has also
met with Belshaw to discuss the
situation.
If you're about to graduate, you're also about
to move into a corporate world dominated by older
people. Older people have been known to get quite
tense about long hair and beards.
What do you do if your hair is longer than
theirs? Cut it off and feel like a cop out? Leave it and
risk losing a fine job?
Not shattering questions. But they may be
part of a thicket of little problems, all twitching at you
as you start those job interviews.
We wrote a booklet about going to job interviews. Eight pages only, but we packed it with what
we've learned about coming face to face with strangers. The thrust is simple: how to approach, engage*
in and leave an interview on your own terms.
It's called "How to separate yourself from
the herd. ' It talks about handling nervousness,
money, and the guy across the desk from you. It
talks about hair and how to turn an interview around.
Things like that.
You'll find it tucked into a much larger book,
also new, called The Employment Opportunities
Handbook. The handbook is yours for the asking at
the placement office.
Please understand, though. We don't kid
you that eight pages, packed or otherwise, are going
to pull off a miracle between now and the time you
take your first interview.
But they just might help.
IOM30N.FE
InsuranceCompany/Londori/Canada Page 10
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, October 19, 1971
TUESDAY
CHINESE STUDENTS ASS'N
Visitors from ttie People's Republic,
12:30 p.m., IH upper lounge.
CUSO
CUSO
402.
and   Indian,  7:30 p.m.,  IH
cent.
Rm.,
Program committee, 12:30 p.m., IH
406.
YOUNG SOCIALISTS
12:30 p.m., SUB 213.
KUNG FU CLUB
Lessons, 4:30  p.m., SUB ballroom.
CLUBS COMMITTEE
CUSO and Indian, 7:30 p.m., IH.
NEWMAN CLUB
12:30  p.m., St. Mark's Music Rm.
CHINESE VARSITY CLUB
General  Meeting,  12:30 p.m., SUB
Clubs' Lounge.
SPECIAL EVENTS—QUEBEC WEEK
Leandre Bergeron, 12:30 p.m., SUB
ballroom.
CCF
Singspiration, 12:30 p.m., SUB 211.
18th CENT. CLUB
Dr.   Brent   Thomas   on   18th
medicine,      Memorial
Woodward Bio-Med. Library.
SEE
12:30 p.m., SUB 119.
EdSA
Special lecture, 12:30 p.m., Ed 100.
SAILING CLUB
General     meeting    on    skippering,
12:30 p.m., Buch. 104.
EXPERIMENTAL COLLEGE
Canadian     constitutional     reform,
12:30 p.m., SUB 111.
CANOE CLUB
Forthcoming trips, 12:30 p.m., SUB
125.
VARSITY OEMOLAY
12:30 p.m., SUB 215.
WEDNESDAY
PSYCHOLOGY CLUB
Beer-nite.   Faculty  and
psych,   invited,   7   p.m.,
lounge.
AMATEUR RADSOC
Beginners    code    classes,
Radio shack. Brock 358.
students  in
,   IH   upper
p.m.,
Bus service
may backfire
A direct charter bus to the
North Shore is in danger of
backfiring.
More riders are required if the
service is to continue in the winter
months.
The cost is comparable to using
B.C. Hydro but the direct route is
about 40 per cent faster and a seat
is guaranteed.
The bus stop outside SUB
eliminates an often wet walk, to
outlying parking lots.
The bus can operate better in
snow than a car because it has the
weight in the right area, says
drivers of the charter company,
Vancouver Tours and Transit Ltd.
'Tween classes
ANTIWAR CLUB
Activists welcome, 12:30 p.m...SUB
211.
SPECIAL EVENTS—QUEBEC WEEK
Raoul    Duquay,    Quebecois    poet
reads 12:30 p.m., SUB Art Gallery.
EDUC. STUDENTS
Beer and chicken  night, 8:30 p.m.,
Cecil Green Park.
TAEKWON-DO CLUB
Practice    led    by    Mr.   Choi,   4:30
p.m.-6 p.m., Place Vanier, Ballroom.
ANGLICAN-UNITED CAMPUS
MINISTRY
Informal      supper,      5:30      p.m.,
discussion on UBC, 7 p.m.
EXPERIMENTAL COLLEGE
Freud, Jung, Adler, Reich, 10 a.m.,
SUB 111.
PRE-LAW
Organizational meeting, 12:30 p.m.,
ANGU 414.
ACE
Guest    speaker:    Dr.   Vera   Mckay,
12:30 p.m., Ed 204.
UBCSCC
Second   general    meeting   —   beer,
films. 8 p.m., SUB 212.
HILLEL
Rabbis' confrontation with    Premier
Kosygin.  12:30 p.m.,  Hillel  House.
GERMAN CLUB
Film, 12:30 p.m., IH 402.
ITALIAN CLUB
12:30 p.m., IH stage.
THURSDAY
MUSSOC
General   meeting,  12:30 p.m., SUB
125.
CHRISTIAN SCIENCE
12:30 p.m., SUB club lounge.
UBC WARGAMES
Practice, 1:30 p.m., SUB 125.
FOLK SONG SOC.
General   meeting,  12:30 p.m., Rm.
105B.
BAHA'I CLUB
12:30 p.m., Buch. 230.
KARATE CLUB
Lecture: History and Philosophy,
12:30 p.m., SUB 119.
CCF
Testimonies, 12:30 p.m., SUB 205.
VOC
General    meeting,    new    members
welcome, 12:30 p.m.. HEBB.
SPECIAL EVENTS—QUEBEC WEEK
Pierre Bourgault, 12:30 p.m., SUB
ballroom.
VOC
Used outdoor equipment sale, all
day, SUB 205.
AYN RAND SOCIETY
Indignant letter writing, 12:30 p.m.,
SUB 130.
EXPERIMENTAL COLLEGE
Dr. H. Harger and Dr. Griffiths,
How bad Amchitka? 12:30 p.m.
SUB 111, same as Wed., 3:30 p.m.,
SUB 111.
EdSA
Indian Ed — videofilm and panel
disc, 12:30 p.m., Ed 100.
ALPHA-OMEGA
Mr. John Kolasky —
"Contemporary Dissent in
Ukraine,"   12:30   p.m., SUB  105A.
FINE ARTS
Student serigraph experiment, all
day, Lasserre Lobby.
HILLEL
Prof. Fackenheim: "Jewish
Militancy," 12:30 p.m., Buch. 106.
MODERN CHINA
Film/slide discussion by Ken
Woodsworth, Centre for Continuing
Education, 12:30 p.m., SUB Audit.
Hot flashes
Students interested in the bus
line should phone Randy Frith at
985-1053.
188 get bread
The alumni association
provided scholarships and
bursaries for 188 students this
year.
Sixty-four students entering
UBC from high school were
awarded $350 N. A. MacKenzie
scholarships.
Sixteen regional college
students with averages above 65
per cent were granted $350 John
B. Macdonald bursaries.
The other 108 students were
awarded alumni bursaries from
$100 to $300 if they had averages
above 65 per cent.
"The number of 1971 awards
is the most extensive in the
history of our program," said
alumni funds chairman Kenneth
Brawner.
Job hunt on
It's recruitment time again, as
companies in such fields as oil,
lumber and chartered
accountancy begin interviews with
job-hunting students.
Student placement officer Cam
Craik said Monday students can
now make appointments for the
interviews, which continue until
about February.
Appointments should be made
through the placement office on
West Mall.
WIBI
tk^filoger
stfjoe sfjoppea
Biba Soft Unlined Suedes by Hanna Shop Corp.
Black - Peach - Dark Brown - Rust - Red - Red Onion
only $33.00
QREfTSHOBSPOHpm
jff<Mosr:vmuGEXcbOcxnot&
Open Thursday and Friday nites. C.O.D. orders accepted. Credit and Chargex cards honored.
542 Granville and 435 W. Hastings St.
776 Granville — Adams Apple Boutique
*  "Design and word Trade marks in Canada of the
Villager Shoe Shoppes Ltd."
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FRIDAY
IH BEER GARDEN
Invitation    to   jamming   musicians,
every    Fri.    4-8    p.m.,    IH    Upper
lounge.
STUDENT LIBERALS
General    meeting,    new    members
welcome, 12:30 p.m., SUB 205.
EdSA
B. McKerlich: "Open area schools,"
12:30, Ed 204.
SUNDAY
ALPHA-OMEGA SOCIETY
Soviet   suppression   of  non-Russian
peoples, 2 p.m., SUB Audit.
PANGO-PANGO (UNS) - The
crisis deepened Monday on this
former island paradise as hordes
of giant foo birds joined the
invasion of the shithawks.
Sources bere claim the
turdbirds are based on the nearby
island of Bongalokreega, home of
the popular singing group Castrati
and the Eunuchs.
Speculators speculated the
invasion results from the puce
blorg edict that the group is to be
shot on sight for their rendition of
Go Away, Little Blorg.
CLASSIFIED
Rates: Campus — 3 lines, 1 day $1.00; 3 days $2.50
Commercial — 3 lines, 1 day $1.25; additional
lines 30c; 4 days price of 3.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone and are payable
it} advance. Deadline is 11:39 a>m.,tbe day before publication.
Publications Offce, Room 241 S.U.B., UBC, Van. 8, B.C.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Dances
11
Greetings
12
FUR COATS $19 & LESS. PAPPAS
Bros. New Annex, 459-461 Hamilton
at Victory Square. Double fur bedspreads $79. Open Fri. nite 7:00-
9:30 p.m. Sat. 11:00 a.m.-5:30 p.m.
Satisfaction guaranteed!
Lost & Found
13
LOST: STERLING SILVER CHARM
bracelet. Great sentimental value.
Reward offered. Contact Sharon,
263-4134.	
LEFT BLUE TOTE BAG IN CAR
hitching Saturday night, please
call  263-8307.   3425  W.   31st.
Rides & Car Pools
14
WHEELCHAIR STUDENT IN VIC-
inity of 41st & Nanaimo requires
ride Monday thru Thursday. Call
Audrey Hill. 434-7052.
Special Notices
IS
WIN SET OF GREAT BOOKS AND
earn $123.00 week minimum doing
it. 687-8872.	
THE PTJRCELL STRING QUARTET
at Grad Student Centre, Tues., 19
Oct., 8 B.m. Tickets 75c each at
the Grad Centre office.	
THE LUTHERAN CAMPUS CEN-
tre — A human place where there
are many questions and few
answers and much in between.
Come by and ask your questions
and share your answers.	
COMMUNITY WORSHIP — STU-
dents and community, Sunday
evening 7:00-7:45 p.m. 6050 Chancellor V.S.T. Chapel. Sponsored by
residents  and   S.C.M.    All  invited.
BAZIL REPORT BY COLIN JOHN-
stone. Sunday, Oct. 24. 8:00 p.m..
6050 Chancellor V.S.T. Sponsored
by residents and S.C.M. all invited.
U.B.C. BARBER SHOP IS OPEN
Mon.-Sat. See Dino or Rick at
5736   University   Boulevard    (near
^Campus).	
FREE KITTENS. 228-4474 DAYS.
263-69471 nights.	
SOCIETY FOR ENVIRONMENTAL
education meeting in room 119
SUB. 12:30 Tuesday, all interested
welcome.	
PUBLIC SERVICE EXAMINATION,
Administrative Trainee and Foreign, Service Officers, tonight, 7:00
p.m.   Buchanan   106.	
FEDERAL GOVERNMENT BRIEF -
ing Session for Economists and
Statisticians will be held at 12:30
noon, Wednesday, October 27, 1971
in Buchanan 217.
EXCELLENT ft & R^ BLUEST
dance band for parties, Group —
Ambleside, phone 985-5713, 988-
1973.  985-7963.	
THE GRIN BIN HAS THE LAR-
gest selection in Canada of posters and pep art. Also Jokes. Gifts
and 24" x 36" photo blowups from
your own prints and negatives.
Enquiries welcome at the Grin
Bin, 3209 W. Broadwav across from
the Liquor Store.  Call 738-2311.
Wanted—Information
17
AUTOMOTIVE
Autos For Sale
21
'63 GALAXTE 500 H.T., V8. RADIO,
auto, trans., excel, cond. $495 or
sold to highest bidder. Must sell.
879-1084,  anytime.
Automobiles—Repairs
24
CAR REPAIRS TO
VOLVO,MERCEDES
PORSCHE, VOLKSWAGEN
h  Factory trained mechanics
■   Fully Guaranteed Work
'  Reasonable Rates
P.S. We also now repair
Datsun, Toyota, & Mazda Cars
SALES AND SERVICE
8914 Oak St. 263-8121
VW SPECIAL—REBUILT MOTORS
and trans, exchange service, also
repairs. Brakes relining, $25. King
and link pins. $30. 683-8078 — 760
Denman St. (rear).
Wanted—Miscellaneous
18
ARTISTS — PAINTINGS NEEDED
to be sold in a new, attractive
gallery. Phone 853-2400. House of
Fine Art, Abbotsford, B.C.	
WANTED TEN - SPEED BIKE.
Phone   736-5316.   ask   for   Karen.
Scandals
37
RUBBER BIBLES AT WHOLE-
sale prices. Place deposit with
C.I.C. Chem. 162, Tues. noon at
latest.	
C.I.C. LAB. COATS ARE STILL IN
stock. Only $4.00 each. Chem. 162,
noon hours.
BUSINESS SERVICES
Typing
40
TEDIOUS TASKS. PROFESSIONAL
typing. IBM Selectric—days, evenings, weekends. Phone Shari at
738-8745. Reasonable rates.	
FAST & ACCURATE TYPING IN
my home on IBM Exec. Reason-
able.   685-1982.	
ESSAYS AND THESES TYPED,
Experienced Typist. Mrs. Freeman,
731-8096.	
EFFICIENT ELECTRIC TYPING —
my home. Essays, thesis, etc. Neat,
accurate work. Reasonable rates.
Phone 263-5317. 	
ESSAYS AND THESES TYPED
neatly, accurately. 25c a page. Call
Carol, 732-9007 (after 6 p.m., Mon.-
Friday).	
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted
51
PART-TIME RESEACHER (Biological/Anthropological literature)
$3 hr. write Doran 2716 West 10th
Ave.. Vancouver 8.
GIVE HELP, GET DOLLARS! UBC
Tutoring centre needs tutors. All
courses. Register SUB 228, 12:30-
2:30. Open to grad students,
honour students, or.	
WANTED ORGANIST AND Guitarist, funky sound, straight-type,
no experience required, - Steve 738-
8628.
INSTRUCTION & SCHOOLS
Special Classes
62
TAI CHI CHUAN: LEARN THIS
graceful art of meditation-inaction; also for centering, increased health, dexterity & self-defense
from Raymond Chung, N.A.'s foremost master ($6 month). Also joint
hands practise for the experienced.
Contact Doug Seeley, 228-4143.
Tutoring Service
63
BTG CLASSES CONFUSING? GET
individual help with ■a tutor. Reasonable rates — all courses. UBC
Tutoring Centre, SUB 228, 12:30-
2:30.
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
KENWOOD KR-4140 95 W. AM/FM
tuner, Lenco L-75 turntable w/$60
cartridge. JMI Monitor V speakers,
Pioneer headphones (SE-45). $950
value. Offers! 987-3897.	
CUTE BLACK LABRADOR PUPPY
3 months old. Female, reg. Phone
Pat,  985-0707 after 5 p.m.
RENTALS  & REAL ESTATE
Rooms
81
ROOM WITH SHOWER & TOILET.
Private entrance. Light cooking.
$50.00 sper  month.   Phone   261-0771.
Room & Board
82
Furn. Apis.
83
FEMALE TO SHARE 1 BEDROOM
apt. 7th & Vine. $75.00 inclusive.
Phone 731-0969.	
"MATURE" MALE STUDENT
wanted to share bsmt. suite with
Van. Art School student, if musical, great. $55 month. 1705 W. 10th,
No. 5. After 5 p.m.
Unf. Apts.
84
STUDENT  SPECIAL
3  Rooms  of Furniture
From $199.95
HOUSE OF GROUPS
1278 Granville
Day 687-5043 Eve. 277-9247
LARGE, ONE BEDROOM UNFUR-
nished apartment. Available Nov.
1st. 3520 West Broadway. $120.
Houses—Furn. & Unfurn.      86
RESPONSIBLE COUPLE FOR 3-
bedroom furnished home, $250
month, UBC area. Nov. 1st to
July 31st 1972. Ring 224-6918, lease. Tuesday, October 19, 1971
THE      UBYSSEY
Page  11
FREE
CHRISTIAN SCIENCE
LECTURE
"What Makes A Happy Family"
Lecturer:
Mr. Harry Smith, C.S.B.
Thursday, Oct. 21st,
at 12:30
Clubs Lounge, S.U.B.
EVER YONE WELCOME
-garry gruenke photo
BRIAN HOLDEN successfully boots the ball past the outstretched arms of a Bison defender during
Saturday's game. UBC blockers were able to contain Manitoba rushes all game enabling Holden to get away
some long punts.
'Birds beat the best
By KENT SPENCER
They won a football game.
The 'Birds beat the number
one ranked University of
Manitoba Bisons 8-5 in an
exciting, innovative contest.
'Gnup's a genius' was the
consensus of the 400 fans at
Thunderbird Stadium.
Coach Frank Gnup tried
anything and everything to win.
On offense he came up with
the old'flying wing' formation. In
it, six players lined up in front of
the quarterback and the rest split
out wide in a second offensive
line.
Quarterback Jim Tarves would
pass to someone in the wing, and
then the blocking line would gang
up on the lone Manitoba
defender.
Gnup's three man line shut off
the vaunted Manitoba running
attack.
"Our line looped to their
strength," he said.
The 'Birds had another genius
working for them, quarterback
Jim Tarves. He completed 11 of
23 passes for 82 yards, and played
the gruesome Manitoba blitz very
coolly.
Intramurals
HOCKEY preliminaries start
Thursday at 5:15 p.m.
CYCLE DRAG goes Thursday
at noon at the John Owen Track.
SWIMMING finals are on
Thursday at noon.
SOCCER deadline is October
25.
Broomball
anyone?
All students interested in
playing broomball are invited to
the co-recreational Broomball
Night to be held on Rink 1 of the
Winter Sports Centre on Thursday
from 8-10:15 p.m.
And remember co-rec
volleyball is played every
Wednesday noon in the Memorial
Gym.
Tarves scored the winning
points with five minutes
remaining in the third quarter. It
was on a one yard sneak. It came
after defensive half Doug
Laterneau recovered a Manitoba
fumble at the Bison 48.
Seconds later Tarves hit end
Gary Gordon for a 30 yard gain.
The next play the Bisons were
caught for pass interference on
Gordon, and a roughing penalty.
From the seven Tarves sent the
backfield to the right and carried
the ball left. The Bisons went for
the fake and next play Tarves
scored.
His touchdown made it 8-5 for
UBC.
With- 5:28 left in the game,
Manitoba quarterback Wayne
Hinkel moved his team down to
the'Bird 11.
After a missed pass and a run
Star-studded
badminton
championship
The Vancouver Racquets Club
will host the Rothman's B.C.
Open Badminton Championships
on October 22, 23 and 24 at the
Vancouver Racquets Club courts,
33id and Ontario Street.
This tournament will feature
play by 13 top women and eight
top men from across Canada. All
are nationally ranked.
B.C. players include UBC's
Mike Epstein (men's singles) and
Sandra Kolb (ladies singles) as
well as Bruce Pollick, and Sharon
Whittaker.
Play starts Friday night at 8
p.m. and continues through
Saturday and Sunday.
Tickets are half price for
students and can be obtained at
the Athletic Office in the War
Memorial Gym, or at the
Vancouver Racquets Club. There
is a limited number of seats
available so get your tickets early.
into the line, the Bisons were left
with third down and nine.
A field goal would have tied it,
a touchdown would have won it.
The Bisons decide to go for it.
Hinkel tried a quarterback sweep
and was piled up.
The mighty Bisons had stalled.
The 'Birds held on the next
four minutes to win 8-5.
For the 'Birds it was a welcome
return to the conference and
respectability. It was their second
win in two years, the last one
against the University of
Saskatchewan October 10, 1970.
After the game Gnup smiled a
little as he puffed on a big, fat
cigar.
"We fooled 'em," he said.
MAX DEXAIL
OFFERS
10% Discount
to UBC Students
2617 Granville at 10th
A complete stock of all the popular makes
of shoes for the college student, as well as
HANDBAGS, BOOTS -
both Men's & Women's
Whatever your need in footwear you'll find it at
Dexall's. Pay them a visit — see the exciting new
styles — and ask for the 10% discount.
Better Shoes for less
DEXALL'S - GRANVILLE BETWEEN 10th & 11th - 738-9833
'Onthe-Spot Report
of Rabbis' Visit
to Ottawa'
Hillel House,
Wednesday,
Oct. 20,
12:30 p.m.
An eyewitness report of the
first assemblage of all Canadian
Rabbis, Conservative,
Orthodox and Reform, to
confront Premier Alexi
Kosygin on the question of
Soviet Jewry will be made at
Hillel House on Wednesday,
October 20 at 12:30 p.m.
Rabbi Marvin Hier, Orthodox,
Rabbi Harold Rubens, Reform,
and Rabbi Wilfred Solomon,
Conservative, will address the
student body on the
happenings in Ottawa, with
particular emphasis as to how
to relate this to Vancouver's
■Protest Saturday night at the
Courthouse.
All students and interested
parties are requested to attend.
PLEASE BE THERE!!!
ii
JEWISH MILITANCY:
—Why & How"
BUCHANAN 106, THUR. OCT. 21
-12:30 p.m.
Dr. Emil L. Fackenheim, regarded one of
the foremost exponents of modern
Jewish thought will speak on "Jewish
Militancy: Why & How" at Buchanan
106, Thursday, October 21, at 12:30
p.m.
A rabbi, Dr. Fackenheim is professor of
philosophy   at   University   of  Toronto
where he obtained his PhD.
Prof. E. Fackenheim
The author of numerous books, articles and essays of vital
interest to Jewish survival, his writings have had as their
consuming theme the effect of the Holocaust on Jewish faith and
that of the entire world as well.
His books include Paths to Jewish Belief and Jewish Theology.
More than 100 of his articles and reviews have appeared in
scholarship publications.
Prof. Fackenheim has received many honors including:
president's medal of University of Western Ontario; Guggenheim
Fellow, 1957-58; LLD, Laurentian university; member
international Bergen-Belsen Remembrance committee;
lectureships at Marquette university, University of Indiana,
Hebrew Union College, New York university.
The event will be presented by B'nai B'rith Hillel
Foundation at U.B.C. and all students as well as any
interested parties are welcome and invited to attend. Page 12
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, October 19, 1971
c
'anadian native Indians are held back
by the white educational system.
This is shown in the fact only five per
cent of Indian students complete 12 years
of education.
However, in North Vancouver, only
5.2 per cent of Indian students dropped
out in 1969-70, a figure much lower than
the national average.
The credit for this should at least
partially go to the Squamish Indian band
and the North Vancouver school board,
which have formed an education
committee to discuss the dropout
problem and to find some solutions.
Glen Newman, chairman of the
committee and a member of the
Squamish band outlined to The Ubyssey
recently the main problem facing Indian
students in the past.
"There was an attitude in some cases
bordering on discrimination among the
teachers.
"They said Indian children were slow
and disobedient.
"Now this is the just not true. Some
are slow and some are bright and some
are in between, the same as in any
group," Newman said.
This attitude caused the Indian
students to lose a great deal of their
self-respect, he said.
It also obscured the real problem
facing the students. They were not slow,
but they were ill-prepared for the white
educational system because their
background is so different from the
ordinary white middle class child.
"The white child is brought up quite
differently from the Indian child.
Unfortunately this difference is connoted
as superiority, but this is not true," said
James Inkster, the committee's school
board representative.
"Indian children are brought up to
speak only when they have something to
say and then only after a great deal of
thought.
"The white child, however, is
encouraged to chatter all the time."
Inkster said when the Indian child goes
to school this silence is interpreted by
many teachers as slowness, but usually it
is that the child hasn't the vocabulary to
express himself.
Also when the Indian child enters
elementary school he is unprepared for
the discipline, he said.
'The ordinary white middle-class child
has experienced this discipline all his life.
His parents are continually telling him,
what to do — or more often what not to
do — and so he has a great deal of
practice in obeying orders.
"Indians have a philosophy in direct
contradiction to this. They allow the
child to discover things for himself and
seldom forbid or order.
"Because of this the child is
independent and curious. But this
independence can work against him in
that he has a hard time adjusting to the
regimentation," Inkster said.
I he education committee has come up
with a program called Project Read as an
answer to this situation.
"It will allow the children to progress
at their own speed in the reading lessons
and in doing so will eliminate any
feelings of failure," Newman said.
Newman said this is very important in
building up the Indian child's already
shaky self-image.
"Failure can destroy the child's image
of himself and make him believe some of
the lies about Indians he hears from other
people," he said.
This program will also extend into the
junior secondary schools in North
Vancouver, specifically Hamilton Junior
Secondary.
"Project Read should eliminate the
last of the discrimination by allowing the
bright ones to excel and the slow ones to
INTE
GRA
TION
What are the consequences and
benefits to natives of integration
into the white man's schools?
Lesley Krueger looks at the
example of the North Vancouver
district's integration program.
progress to the best of their ability,"
Newman said.
Chief Joe Mathias is working on the
situation from a different angle.
He is concerned with improving the
environment of the students to help them
in their studies.
"In order to study properly the
student has to have a decent place with
good light, heat and other facilities,"
Mathias said Wednesday.
Mathias said the students often live
with their large families in small houses
which lack the privacy needed for study.
"We are working on developing better
housing. It is one of the most important
ways I am associated with the educational
aspects. But I cannot over-emphasize the
importance of education," he said.
Trained personnel are needed by the
tribe to help in its development Mathias
said.
"Right now we are being helped by
trained white people in all fields and we
appreciate their assistance. But we wait
for the time when the Indian community
can be fully responsible for its own
affairs," he said.
Most of the older Indian students from
the Squamish band and a number on the
boarding program who come to
Vancouver from isolated tribes go to
Carson Graham Senior Secondary in
North Vancouver.
Principal Tom Carlile said they had no
special program for the Indian students
who form five per cent of the student
body.
"We feel they are here for an
education on the same basis as anybody
else and will be treated the same.
Moreover that's the way they want it,"
Carlile said.
"We build up the Indian student's
self-esteem by teaching him about his
culture in different ways," he said.
Q
mne of these ways was to introduce a
section on Indian heritage in the Social
Studies 11 course.
Another was the annual celebration of
Indian Day in the school when the
non-Indian students are introduced to
many aspects of the Indian culture.
"Another important facet was the
formation in the school of an Indian
senate," Carlile said.
"The name is mis-leading. The senate
is open to non-Indians and not all the
Indians in the school belong to it," he
said.
They are actively involved in working
out different problems concerning
relations between the Indian and
non-Indian community.
Renee Taylor is a boarding student
from Alert Bay attending Carson Graham
who is actively involved in the Indian
senate.
"It was a big jolt coming down from
such a small community to such a big one
and adjusting to the boarding family
routine," Taylor said.
Taylor has experienced only isolated
incidents and these in the community
rather than the school.
"If you want to find prejudice you
will, but I have only very rarely had
someone yell 'Come here squaw' or
something.
"The attitude in Carson Graham is
very good," she said.
Carlile suggested that the attitude
extended throughout the North
Vancouver school system.
"I find effective programs such as the
one in North Vancouver are found in
pockets," Carlile said.
Renee Taylor's tribe in Alert Bay is
another one concerned about improving
the school system for Indian students
Carlile said.
"Perhaps if the other communities and
Indian bands in Canada showed an equal
amount of effort the number of Indian
students completing their education
would reach comparable levels to the
general population," he said.

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