UBC Publications

UBC Publications

UBC Publications

The Ubyssey Nov 5, 1971

Item Metadata

Download

Media
ubysseynews-1.0128122.pdf
Metadata
JSON: ubysseynews-1.0128122.json
JSON-LD: ubysseynews-1.0128122-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): ubysseynews-1.0128122-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: ubysseynews-1.0128122-rdf.json
Turtle: ubysseynews-1.0128122-turtle.txt
N-Triples: ubysseynews-1.0128122-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: ubysseynews-1.0128122-source.json
Full Text
ubysseynews-1.0128122-fulltext.txt
Citation
ubysseynews-1.0128122.ris

Full Text

 —david phillips photo
THE MOON or the Anglican Theological College - that is the question. Does each try to shine brighter
beneath foreboding clouds?Can the wrath of God possibly intervene with any hope of calming the storm?
THE UBYSSEY
Thunderbird Shop
Corporation
threatens
craft tables
By MIKE SASGES
The Thunderbird Shop is threatening to force the Alma Mater
Society to remove non-student crafts displays from SUB.
The shop's management, Collegiate Advertising Ltd., has alleged
the AMS is breaking the 1968 lease in allowing outsiders to sell their
wares in SUB.
"It's the opinion of AMS lawyer Ben Trevino that we are in fact
breaking the lease and our case would be legally untenable," AMS
co-ordinator Sue Kennedy said Thursday.
The management of the shop located in the SUB basement can
pressure the AMS in two ways, AMS general manager Brian Robinson
said Thursday.
"First the shop could refuse to pay its rent and we would have to
go to court to collect," he said.
"We would lose the rent during the court hearing and they also
could win by showing we'd broken the lease."
The company pays $7,500 a year to October, 1973 and $10,000
a year to October, 1975, according to the 1968 lease.
"The company's contention is that if non-students can set up
displays free of charge why can't the privilege be extended to it," said
Robinson.
The company could also move some of its wares upstairs to the
SUB foyer, said Robinson, and compete with the crafts salesmen.
Both Robinson and building manager Graeme Vance say they are
opposed to city people selling their wares in SUB.
"What's to prevent the shop from setting up tables upstairs?" said
Robinson.
The SUB management committee will be asking outside salesmen
to leave, Kennedy told The Ubyssey.
However, said Robinson, Collegiate Advertising representative
Lou Gere told Robinson and Vance on Tuesday the company
wouldn't force the issue until a new executive is elected to replace the
human government executive.
"We're being forced to act against what we consider to be best for
students because of the power of that corporation," said Kennedy.
The company, she said, seems to have no complaint against the
recently-opened students' crafts co-op beside the south entrance of
the cafeteria.
"And they can't touch the alternate food service because it's an
AMS service," said Kennedy.
She said a group of students will meet Tuesday, 12:30 p.m., in
SUB 130 to plan boycott action against the shop.
Collegiate Advertising merged with an American company, the
National Student Marketing Corporation in 1968 and representatives
of both companies signed the lease with the AMS.
Since then National Advertising broke away from NSMC.
Nominations open
Nominations open today for seven Alma Mater Society executive
positions to be vacated by the present human government slate Dec. 1.
Nomination forms are available from the AMS executive offices
in SUB for the positions of president, vice-president, internal and
external affairs officers, treasurer and co-ordinator.
Nominations will close Nov. 17.
All positions will be filled from a single election slate, to be held
Nov. 24.
The positions will become vacant following the defeat of the
referendum Oct. 27 in which the human government slate asked
students for a vote of confidence.
The referendum was one of human government's election
promises made at the end of the 1970-71 school year.
Pit cuts beer prices; closure looming?
By JOHN TWIGG
Glug, glug, glug, ahhhhh.
And another bottle dribbles down the throbbing
throat of well-known lush Irving Fetish, arts 13, resident
of the Pit!
Fetish's sigh of content will probably be joined by
many others following the decision Thursday to lower
beer prices in the student watering hole.
The Pit managers decided effective Wednesday to
lower the price of beer from 40 cents per bottle to 35
cents and institute a three bottles for $1 policy.
However, The Ubyssey learned from Pit patrons that
unless the Pit's business increases about 20 per cent it may
be forced to close before Christmas.
Pit officials declined to comment on the possible
closure.
If the business doesn't increase above the present
adequate levels it is unlikely that the price would be
returned to 40 cents per bottle.
"The Pit will close before raising the price of beer
again," the patrons said.
"We're trying to make the Pit, which is a student
service, more available to students," said night managers
Erwin Epp and Bill McKee.
"We think more students can afford three bottles for
$ 1 and we feel the increase in business will be enough to
cover our costs."
Students having tokens they purchased at 40 cents
each will be able to cash them in until Tuesday, the two
managers said.
Imported beer will cost two tokens (70 cents)
compared to the previous price of 80 cents. Cider will also
decrease in price but the exact figure had not been
decided upon at press time.
Epp and McKee also announced that the Pit will
install a juke box by Tuesday containing " a good variety
of music" at five cents per play.
"We'll still have the tapes going but if patrons want to
hear a particular record, perhaps one they can dance to,
they can put a nickel in the juke box and the tape
automatically turns off," they said.
A color TV will also be installed at one end of the Pit
every Wednesday so patrons can watch hockey games at 5
p.m.
They said the TV could also be set up for other major
events such as political speeches or football games.
The drop in price returns the Pit's charges to the same
as last year despite an increase in the cost of beer and
increased wages for the 16 students who work part-time in
the Pit.
See page 2: PIT Page 2
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, November 5, 1971
Guess who's coming to teach
By LESLEY KRUEGER
Picasso, Andy Warhol and Jean-Paul Sartre
are among those people suggested by the
Alma Mater Society special events committee
as possible visiting professors for the program
sponsored by Cecil Green.
"The committee was divided about
whether we should have anything to do with
the blood money, but we decided we should
try and see the money put to the best possible
use," Julian Wake, special events committee
chairman said Thursday.
Also included in the list of 15 people are
Simone de Beauvoir; Herbert Marcuse;
Quebecois poet Claude Peloquin; French
revolutionary Regis Debray; intellectual Roger
Garody; David Cooper, author of Death of the
Family; Monthly Review editor Paul Sweezy;
economists Ernest Mandel and Joan
Robinson; Shulamith Firestone, author of
Dialectic of Sex; and Pablo Neruda, the
Chilean ambassador to France recently
awarded the Nobel Prize for literature.
"If these people were to come I suspect
they would only ask for travel costs, expenses
and a small honorarium that any field laborer
would ask," Wake said.
The inter-faculty special lecturers
committee has not previously taken student
suggestions about speakers but Wake said he
hopes in this case they will make an
exception.
Physics department head George Volkoff,
who is chairman of the committee
administering Green's $600,000 grant told
The Ubyssey his committee has not drawn up
a list of visiting professors yet.
He declined to comment on the possibility
of student representation on the committee.
GIANT
$SALE
Flowering Shrubs
Pampas Grass
Junipers
$1.00 each
Daffodils
25 for $1.00
Tulips
15 for $1.00
Please call, phone or write for you»
free coloured brochure.
MURRAY
Nurseries Limited
2893 W. 41st Ave.,
261-2151
Christmas
Student
SKI "^.
SPECIAL
EXAMS? Who worries about exams, especially when snow is making the local scene. Photographer David Bowerman schussed on down to the
local J. C. Barfoot viewpoint on Northwest Marine to snap this spiffy pose. Enjoy it, kiddies, the weathermen ain't betting his winter clothes
on the Lions in the Grey Cup. (For those searching, the Lions are out of the picture.)
Pit makes life-or-death changes
B.C.'s LEADING TRAVEL ORGANIZATION
From page 1
The decrease makes the Pit's
price per ounce of local beer 2.75
cents compared to more than
three cents per ounce in
downtown beer parlors.
The Pit pays its employees a
basic wage of $1.85 per hour
compared to $1.75 last year. It
provides 120 hours of
employment per week.
"I think all students should
come to the aid of the Pit," said
Ginny Gait, arts 2.
"I'd rather pay 40 cents and be
sure that the Pit will stay in
business," said John Gibbs, arts 3.
"If the Pit doesn't do well at 35
cents per bottle it will have to
close."
"Who would complain about
the price decrease?" said Cathy
Bruce, arts 2.
"It's about time," said John
Pohoski, arts 4.
"I    think   it's   a   good   idea
because 40 cents was an
unjustified price increase," he
added.
"I don't think a student-run
pub should make a profit," said
Nick Orchard, arts 4.
"If they are going to make a
profit at 35 cents they should
lower the price even more.
"Why in hell students didn't
vote in favor of proper facilities
downstairs is beyond me," said
Orchard.
"That's great," said John Ince,
arts 2. "But I have a political
complaint against this place (the
Pit).
"It sells Labatt's beer, and the
Labatt's has a controlling interest
in Brascan, the company that
exploits Brazilian workers," Ince
said.
"Brascan has a monopoly in
Sao Paulo and Rio de Janeiro. In
fact, workers in Eastern Canada
are trying to get a boycott going
against Labatt's."
Paul Knox chimed in with
another political note:
"Of all the major political
events since the Second World
War this is bound to have the
most far-reaching effect on the
future direction of our society.
"In short," said the arts 4
student, "I like it."
"I hope the Pit stays open,"
said Sandi Shreve, arts 4.
"After all, what would The
Ubyssey staff do if the Pit closed?"
Epp and McKee said the Pit has
been averaging about 300 patrons
per night since September, and
has been selling 75 cases nightly.
However, it is still operating on
a day-to-day basis despite its
apparent permanence.
Each day the Pit opens
(Tuesday, Wednesday and
Thursday) the managers must take
out a banquet and entertainment
licence.
Efforts in the past three years
to get a more permanent licence
have    been    thwarted
provincial government.
by    the    I
5700 University Blvd.
224-4391
OR
Room 226 SUB
228-2980 (1-4 p.m.)
f
HILLTOP GULF
SERVICE
- JOE    MIZSAK -
Tune-Up Specialists For All Makes
Specializing in Repairs to
JAPANESE & EUROPEAN CARS
All Repairs Guaranteed — 4000 Miles or 90 Days
Student Special: 20% Discount off Labor Charges
4305 W. 10 Ave. at Discovery 224-7212
Community to control police?
By DAVID SCHMIDT
The B.C. Civil Liberties Association will
recommend far-reaching changes in the Vancouver
Board of Police Commissioners when it meets with
the B.C. attorney-general in the next few weeks.
"If the only thing that results from the Gastown
riot and the subsequent Dohm Commission report is
the firing or punishment of three or four police
officers, then it will indicate the poverty of
imaginative ideas among those responsible for law
bp Nichol to read
Canadian poet bp Nichol will be reading his
poetrv Monday noon in the SUB art gallery as part
of the ■ Canadian poetry series sponsored by the
Alma Mater Society special events committee.
Nichol's published works include Konfessions
of an Elizabethan Fan Dancer and Letters Home,
Journeying and the Returns both published in 1967.
Nichol first gained notoriety for his "sound
poems".
In his latest book, Monotones (1971) Nichol
returned to more traditional forms of verse.
enforcement in this city," BCCLA president Reg
Robson said Thursday.
The association proposes the present three-man
board of police commissioners be expanded to
12 men, six of which would be elected by the
citizens of Vancouver, and the others to be
appointed by the attorney-general from various civic
groups.
In a brief prepared for the attorney-general, the
association also recommends the mayor should not
be chairman of the board of police commissioners
but that the members should elect their own
chairman.
The brief proposes the enlarged board become
much more active than the present board and
should have full responsibility for the overall policy
of the police force, including recruitment, training,
equipment, descipline, law enforcement strategies
and policies and community relations.
The brief states that for most citizen complaints
concerning the police force, a member of the
commission should meet with the complainant and
the officer involved and try to iron out the problem.
The few complaints that cannot be settled by
this method should be dealt with by an independent
tribunal.
BIRD CALLS
Your Souvenir of UBC
The University of  m
British Columbia
STUDENT TELEPHONE DIRECTORY 1971-72
BUY YOURS TODAY 7C
UBC BOOKSTORE AND SUB #   W Friday, November 5,  1971
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 3
Gay Alliance struggles for survival
By JOHN GIBBS
Homosexual students at UBC are organizing
themselves as a campus group for the first time.
The Gay People's Alliance is trying to form a nucleus
for a homosexual social life on campus - as opposed to
"rip-off clubs" downtown - and to acquaint "straight"
students with its existence.
But it's a slow, painful start and the 20 or 30 gays
currently grouped around the month-old Alliance are still
wrestling with issues centered on who is to bring coffee to
the next social evening.
"We are the last struggle to be recognized because we
are the last to organize," said one member Thursday.
"And that's because we haven't had to organize for
our survival. There is nothing that marks most of us as
homosexuals, we can hide as straights."
The 15 gays at an alliance organization meeting
Thursday in SUB - while refusing to become involved in
any "political action" - are among the growing number
of homosexuals who are tired of hiding.
(They are still reluctant, however, to have their names
published.)
"There are students walking around this campus as if
homosexuals didn't exist.
"We want to communicate to straights because it's
only after they come to know homosexuals, that we will
be treated equally."
How many gays are there at UBC?
It's impossible to get any accurate figure, but alliance
members said that scientifically it is reasonable to expect
one in every 10 persons to be homosexual. That would
mean about 2,000 at UBC.
The Alliance is also hoping to help the many "closet
cases" — the majority of gays who are still hiding —
"straighten their heads out" and come to terms with their
homosexuality.
"The only way they are going to come out is if
they are shown that homosexuals aren't weirdos hanging
around on Granville Street.
"It'll   be   a   better   situation   here   at   UBC   for
homosexual students coming out than to be ripped off
at the gay bars. That's too commercial."
Although the Alliance was initiated by two members
of the now-defunct and politically radical, Gay Liberation
Front, it wants no part of public demonstrations.
"We have enough trouble just getting people to come
to meetings," one explained. "Most gays are, after all, nice
middle-class boys."
He said the off-campus Gay Alliance Toward
Equality, which is involved in demonstrations, scares off
the many people who need to declare their homosexuality
more gradually.
One woman attended Thursday's meeting.
The campus organization is sponsoring a series of
social meetings with speakers where gays can meet other
gays and discuss their mutual problems.
The Alliance is also hoping to attract "straights" to
the meetings.
Meeting times and locations will be announced in
Tween Classes in The Ubyssey.
ESallet was part of Walter Zuber Armstrong jazz program in SUB ballroom Thursday, an AMS special events presentation.
Trudeau shrugs shoulders on Amchitka
By VAUGHN PALMER
Prime minister Pierre Trudeau told a
protest delegation from Prince George
Wednesday he feels he has done everything
within the powers of his office to protest
the Amchitka blast.
Ronnie Holtby, one of the three
members of the Stop Testing or Perish
group (STOP) who flew to Ottawa this
week, said Trudeau told the delegation in
Ottawa he couldn't do anything as an
individual because then he'd be behaving
like a "president".
Trudeau said he felt all his protest
actions had to be within the bounds of the
House of Commons, Holtby said.
Holtby said her protest delegation
which met with Trudeau, transport and
communications minister Don Jamieson
and environment minister Jack Davis, was
organized in "a sort of a last minute rush".
"It was really fantastic," she said. "We
raised $ 1,200 in a day and a half and got
approval and $250 from the Prince George
city council.
"In fact acting mayor Joe ter Hiede was
one of the members of the delegation,"
Holtby said.
The other member was Phil Thatcher, a
Prince George church minister.
Holtby said the most enthusiastic
reception came from Jamieson, "who
backed us 100 per cent. He even asked us
for a Greenpeace button.
"I'm not much of a Trudeau fan,"
Holtby said, "but he was interested and
not as rigid and nasty as I expected him to
be."
In an eight minute interview Trudeau
was asked if Canada couldn't use economic
sanctions to retaliate against atomic blasts.
Holtby said Trudeau replied: "That's
fine, but would the people of Canada be
willing to accept the economic
consequences of such an action?"
He suggested the group take some sort
of sampling of national opinion on the idea
of economic retaliation, she said.
Holtby said the group talked to Davis
for a half hour.
"He was, of course, opposed to the
blast, but then I think everybody is."
She said the group "asked him about
the environmental effects of the blast, but
he didn't seem to know about many of the
issues.
"For example we wanted to know
whether the blast would disturb the 900
tons of nerve gas dumped in that area
several years ago, but I don't think he'd
heard of it before," Holtby said.
"Davis dismissed the possibility of
earthquakes as being very remote and he
said he felt the main effect of the blast
would be radiation leakage into the water,"
she said.
Holtby said her group managed to
squeeze the parliamentary period into their
nectic itinerary and the issue of Amchitka
was mentioned briefly, by Skeena MP
Frank Howard.
"We rushed our ass off and we've still a
lot of digesting to do but we're reasonably
satisfied with our trip, because at least we
were listened to," she said.
Holtby said the group had given
Trudeau a Greenpeace protest button but
added "I doubt whether he'll wear it."
Anthrosoc letter to be sent
By SANDISHREVE
The junior faculty of the
anthropology-sociology department
drafted a letter to be sent to its promotion
and tenure committee for assistant
professors, at a meeting Wednesday night.
"We agreed unanimously the content of
the letter could not be made public before
it is sent to the PAT committee," assistant
professor Ricardo Muratorio said
Thursday.
Muratorio said the letter will be signed
by all junior faculty members and sent to
the committee by Monday.
The meeting was a closed session of all
non-tenured assistant profs in the
department, aimed at deciding "what
recommendations     could    be    made
Bethune death marked
The thirty-second anniversary of
Norman Bethune's death will be marked
Nov. 13 by a meeting at 7 p.m. of the
Canadian Friends of China Association in
the Fisherman's Hall, 138 E. Cordova
Street.
Bethune's former acquaintance, Jack
Scott, will speak at the meeting which also
features the revolutionary film Hit at the
U.S.    Aggressors!     from    the    People's
. Republic of China.
The CFCA is also sponsoring the present
tour of- 'China by several Vancouver
residents, including former UBC student
Ralph Stanton.
concerning recent events in the
department".
"The next steps depend on the
outcomes of the letter," Muratorio said.
Thursday anthrosoc undergrad union
representative, Colin Portruff sent a letter
to department head Cyril Belshaw
concerning two motions to be presented at
the next department meeting.
The letter says the union will move for
undergrad and grad student representation
on the department PAT committee and for
this committee to "convene within one
week to reconsider the tenure cases of
profs Ronald Silvers and Matthew Speier
and to hear evidence from undergraduate
and graduate students on these cases."
PANGO-PANGO (UNS) - This limited
island kingdom remained deep in shock
and horror today following what was
described  as   an   anal   disaster. Page 4
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, November 5,  1971
Burp!
This university is a godawful place, isn't it. Belch.
Most classes are monotonous and what few good
profs are left at this factory are getting canned by the
basket. Awww . . . belch.
The walk from D lot seems to be getting longer as
the weather gets wetter.
You've just finished flunking your midterms and
the Christmas exams loom ominously.
It's enough to drive you to drink.
Which reminds us.
It reminds us of what the governor of North
Carolina wrote to the governor of South Carolina on a
parched piece of parchment.
What did the governor of North Carolina write to
the governor of South Carolina, you ask?
"It's been a long time between drunks."
Which reminds ire.
The Pit is in deep trouble.
The Pit, for the uninitiated, is the local dispensary
of that yellow, viscous fluid known as horsepiss to the
initiated, that froth of life skimmed and concocted from
the choosiest hops and malts and purest springing water
into the burpiest liquid to slip between your lips.
Getting to the pint, the Pit needs customers.
Biting, brawling, bloated, beery, burping, barfing
customers. Festering, freewheeling, frolicking, fucking,
farting customers.
You want a balanced diet? Go to the Pit and it's:
yours — a pint in each hand.
Yet who invented beer? And why are we here? And
what was the name of Paul Revere's horse? I mean, I
mean . . . who did all the work in running through New
England   warning   people   the   British   were   coming?
Tweren't Paul. Twas the horse.
That horse had clarrs, as well as a horse's . . .
Which reminds us . . .
Clarss is what this world needs. Where would this
world be without clarss?
In the immortal words of Irving:
"Just hippetyhop to the pissereenee.
And raise a 60 point Budinee,
They sell all kinds and types of brew,
Labatts and Cartings, Molsons too.
The brew beats vodka, scotch and rye,
So drink it up or we'll go dry."
-J.T.
Teacup
I wish to reply to the letter
entitled Chariot in The Ubyssey,
Nov. 2, signed by the Engineering
Undergraduate Society.
They have decided that the
annual chariot race will be held
next year as it always has been. If
the EUS is truly interested in the
charity aspect of this event I
sincerely hope it will change its
mind.
Judging from my own
experience and the experience of
others I have spoken to, it was the
chariot race that kept so many
people away from this year's
teacup football game. I do not
believe it was lack of publicity, as
suggested by an organizer quoted
in The Ubyssey.
Of the 5,000 who attended in
1970, I think most went primarily
for the teacup game, not the
chariot race. This year the
attendance was only about 1,200.
I think most of those people
who chose to stay away from this
year's event did so because they
didn't think it was worth
attending if they had to sit
through the half-time chariot race
spectacle and run the risk of being
hit by flying shit.
In its letter, the EUS said
attendance at this event is
voluntary and therefore admission
charges are irrelevant. I couldn't
disagree more. Since this is a
money-raising    event    in    the
THE UBYSSEY
NOVEMBER 5, 1971
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the university year
by the Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C. Editorial opinions are
those of the writer and not of the AMS or the university administration.
Member, Canadian University Press. The Ubyssey publishes Page Friday, a
weekly commentary and review. The Ubyssey's editorial offices are located
in room 241K of the Student Union Building.
Editorial    departments,    228-2301,    228-2307;    Page    Friday,    Sports,
228-2305; advertising, 228-3977.
EDITOR:  LESLIE PLOMMER
Terror reigned in the shady corridors as Ubyssey staffers got Pitted
once more. It began with John Twigg who figured he could out-chug-a-lug
the rest of the motleys, but John Gibbs and Sandi Shreve soon proved him
wrong. Mike Sasges actually out-chugged them all, but was disqualified for
drinking his beer with a straw. David Schmidt challenged Laurence Leader
to a boat race, but were prevented by Vaughn Palmer who drank both their
beer before they could begin. David Phillips and Garry Gruenke had their
own boat race in the darkroom, while Gord Gibson lectured Kent Spencer
on the evils of devil spirits. It didn't seem to bother Lesley Krueger,
however, and she led Ginny Gait and Paul Knox in a round of cheers.
Bernard Bischoff scoffed at the garbling turkeys but snuck chugs
when they weren't looking. Jan O.Brien and her bottle isolated themselves
in the inner sanctum but were forced to leave when Leslie Plommer kicked
them out. They returned when it was learned all Leslie wanted was her
ruler. Sandy Kass cried when she discovered she was the only sober one of
the group but said she was saving hers for the drunk and animal acts
expected Saturday at the residence on the bulletin board.
Jkl CAQE THAT
isnrrWrinrwjHPD
IN MIND.... I HflVF
THIS LAST
OUTFIT...
From the Sheaf, Saskatoon
Letters
interests of charity, I think it
should be everybody's concern to
see that the event is run in such a
way as to raise the most money.
That's definitely not how it's
being run at the moment.
I would strongly encourage the
EUS to consider separating the
teacup game and the chariot race
next year. This way, those
students who are interested only
in the teacup game can go and
enjoy the game in peace. The
chariot race fans could watch
their event on a separate day.
I am convinced that if the EUS
tried this for one year, it would
find that the combined
attendance would be at least as
high as the 5,000 who came out in
1970.
The big winner then, would be
charity.
Gary Davidson,
Science 4
Future
The objections raised by some
critics to Mr. Cecil Green's
institution of a $600,000 fund for
visiting professorships mainly
concerned the fund's origins in
the American military-industrial-
complex and the use, in the war in
Viet Nam, of the military
hardware produced by him and
his affiliates.
The university committee
should give some thought to the
possibility that the initial criticism
heard about the fund may have a
life and future character that will
exceed present estimations.
The outcome of the war in
Viet Nam is uncertain at the
present and is not likely to have a
clear and convenient conclusion.
It would be prudent then to
anticipate the 'future
consequences of associating the
university's name with an event
whose symbolic memory, if not
its acutal moral dimensions, will
be the subject of public
debate,even action, for quite some
time.
In order to allay present
criticism and avoid the risk of
compromising the reputation of
the university in the future, I
propose that these academic
positions offered by Mr. Green be
used to commemorate Dr. Daniel
Ellsberg's courageous moral
gesture. Under the name of the
Daniel Ellsberg Visiting
Professorships the integrity of Mr.
Green's fund could be guaranteed.
Dr. Ellsberg's career as a
government consultant has been
typical of the sort of academic
professionalism that has
contributed to shaping the Cold
War during the last few decades.
Yet his maturing ethical
sensitivity, despite his successful
career, represents a remarkable
course of personal progress at a
professional level where the
imperatives of official business
and the temptations of ethical
relativism dissolve the best
intentions of most men. It is the
ethical dimension of his act of
moral courage -that will long
survive    the    memory    of    his
intimate     association     with     a
disastrous war.
International opinion has long
since silently dissociated itself
from this effort. In America, some
of the chief architects of the war
have voluntarily and quietly left
the government. A few of them
have left dramatically,
accompanied with much
publicity. Others, among them
senior American military officers
have begun to be concerned about
the widespread disintegration of
discipline in their forces and have
begun to draw parallels with the
condition of morale of the French
and Czarist armies in the First ,
World War at their point of
collapse.
For more than three million
American veterans of the war in
Viet Nam their tours of duty are
seldom recalled with a sense of
pride but are usually remembered
as sort of a mistake. While public
opinion on America's
international position is still
equivocal, it has certainly become
more precise about the war in
Viet Nam. Only a very few today
would move beyond positions of
anger, distrust, disappointment, or
the more widespread feeling of
doubt about the wisdom of the
entire enterprise.
Whatever the motives, these,
have been indications of the first
real withdrawals from the war in
Viet Nam. Dr. Ellsberg's dramatic
and principled exit has been the
most recent in this trend and in .
some ways he has personally gone Friday, November 5,  1971
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 5
Letters
much further than many of his
former colleagues.
At a time when the general
public at the very least seems to
want to forget this war, (although
it is entering its most crucial
phase), the university has
equipped itself with a permanent
reminder of the sort of
collaboration that has been
instrumental in maintaining the
disasters that so frequently
emanate from the conference
tables at which Daniel Ellsberg
once sat.
The critical reaction to Mr.
Green's place in the American
military-industrial complex and
recent indications of scientific
research on campus under the
auspices of the U.S. department
of defence have in them the
suggestion that, for this
university, the respect
traditionally accorded to
institutions of higher learning has
been seriously compromised.
Unless the university can
demonstrate a position that
transcends these associations it
must share in the reputations
engendered by its benefactors.
Among the clarifications
resulting from Dr. Ellsberg's
special delivery of the Pentagon
Papers is that of the co-operation
given by the Canadian
government, at the diplomatic
level, to American strategy in Viet
Nam. It is a most ill-advised
decision to allow the
commemoration, in the present
name of this fund, of the
benefactor's military service at a
lower but much more essential
level.
Whether or not the idea of a
war crimes trial becomes a reality
someday, beyond the suggestive
preliminaries already held, in the
hearts and" minds of reasonable
people everywhere, the process of
judgment has already begun. The
university committee should give
its attention to the possible future
consequences of this tendency.
This university is still a
relatively new addition to the
academic communities of the
world and, given the nature of our
present society, funds for its
development need to be accepted
from any quarter. But, this
necessity should not disqualify
the university from continuing in
the tradition it seeks to imitate.
Its administrators should be
sensitive    to    the    determining
character of the endowments they
solicit on its behalf. As suggested,
under the title of the Daniel
Ellsberg Visiting Professorships, a
subtle compromise would be
achieved, in which the university's
future would be less contingent
upon forces apparently beyond its
reach.
Anthony Grinkus,
Grad 7,
GSA rep, AMS Council
Nolan
One person per car is not only
poor ecology, but also fucking
unfriendly.
Johnny Nolan,
Arts 7
Acid
Regarding the letter from a Mr.
Name Withheld, Arts 2, in
Tuesday's Ubyssey.
We would like to point out for
Mr. Withheld's enlightenment that
it was in fact sciencemen rather
than engineers who were spraying
acid at the teacup football game
several years ago.
This is why science has not
been allowed to enter the chariot
race since that time.
This is only one more example
of the constant distortion of facts
by those who feel they must
denigrade engineers.
20 signatures,
Engineering.
The Ubyssey welcomes letters
from all readers.
Letters should be signed and, if
possible, typed.
Though an effort is made to
print all letters received, The
Ubyssey reserves the right to edit
for clarity, legality, brevity and
taste.
Letters should be sent to:
Letters, The Ubyssey, SUB 241K,
UBC.
PANGO-PANGO (UNS) - Wily
mottled blorgs of all glues
gathered in this tiny island
beerdom today to smear the name
of Rickhardt Sixton, former head
of the Blorgian Interna tion
Conspiracy.
Slimey gnomes were heard to
remark that Sixton not only was,
but never wasn't a rat at all times,
even Sunday primrose teas and all
that.
.2   ■"
.-*§ v
p*tpp*2-
ppppNBFr
l
/*. . ••    '■
"'.'"■5f*aj;*-:!^*W"*f y*- i
—david phillips photo
MacMILLAN-BLOEDEL JR. takes shape near East Mall as Point Grey fog heightens university symbolism.
Highrise office tower, the product of powerplays by former arts dean John Young, is an extension of the
Buchanan building, mainly designed to contain professorial cubbyholes.
Workers and profs win strike
MONTREAL - The strike by faculty and
non-teaching staff at l'Universite du Quebec a
Montreal (UQAM) ended Monday when the
administration gave in to faculty demands that the
blue-collar workers be paid for the strike period.
The strike began Oct. 13 and involved about
600 faculty members.
By Friday, the striking professors had come to
an agreement in principle concerning proposed
collective agreement worked out by the two sides in
the dispute. The collective agreement, which expires
May 31 of next year, is the first working contract
between centrally-affiliated unionized professors
and a Quebec university.
The Syndicat des Professeurs de L'Universite du
Quebec (SPUQ) had insisted, however, that no
official agreement would be reached until the
university acceded to demands from non-teaching
staff for full compensation during the strike period.
Non-teaching employees of UQAM are
members of the Canadian Union of Public
Employees, which is affiliated with the Quebec
Federation of Labor.
The original administration proposal offered
only two days' pay out of a possible 13 working
days during the strike period. Because of pressure
from the professors, non-teaching staff will receive
altogether $390,000 based on a daily mass-earning
of $30,000.
Classroom Report
By LESLIE PLOMMER
Patterns and drawings involving optical illusions
were used Thursday by psychology lecturer John
Collins as the basis for a lecture on perception.
(Or, in psychologists' terms, a lecture on principles
of perceptual organization.)
Using an overhead projector, Collins showed
students in the psych 100 class some of the well-known
patterns that trick the eye: straight lines which,
because of the lines around them, seem to curve, or
appear to differ in length when they are in fact equal.
And he showed drawings of structures which at
first glance appear normal, but on closer examination
prove to be composed of deceptive angles or impossible
perspectives such that, as Collins said, "they could be
drawn but never actually built."
In order to illustrate "the principle of prior
experience" as it applies to perceptual organization,
Collins showed a figure of a man's head — which could
also be seen as a mouse - and a series of three drawings
of women's heads. The first was that of a young
woman, the second, of an ambiguous figure, and the
third, of an old woman.
The point, in true psychological-testing fashion,
was that when paired with one or the other
unambiguous figure, the ambiguous figure takes on the
character of that other figure.
This affects the observer's perception of the
ambiguous figure.
(A kitchen-table psychologist might use the term
association here.)
Abandoning the patterns and drawings, Collins
proceeded to briefly discuss other principles of
perception: those of "constancy" (or, a book is a book
is a book) and "good configuration" (or, when is a
hexagon a cube, and which did you see first?). And he
talked about J.J. Gibson's "gradient theory" (or, how
gradual changes are perceived; gradient, gradual... get
it?)
"When do we need to know about these constancy
principles?" he asked rhetorically.
Unfortunately, he failed to provide the answer.
This ties in with a couple of observations on
Collins' ability as a teacher.
In   Thursday's  class,  he  appeared  excellent  at
explaining the obvious, but less skilled when faced with
conveying more difficult concepts.
However, since most of the lecture material fell
into the realm of the obvious anyway, this was no great
failure.
The Thursday class had a casual atmosphere, with
occasional interchanges between Collins and some of
the 100 students. The level of noise in the class was
high, but the acoustics of Angus 104 partly account for
this.
Collins often put questions to the class, though
some were almost insulting in their simplicity.
The students, however, appeared to find him
moderately interesting, though there is an element of
self-importance in his classroom tone.
But by and large, Collins (a part-time lecturer) is a
good teacher by UBC standards. It is only unfortunate
that the subject matter he has to deal with tends to
obscure rather than clarify the real world.
Current efforts aimed at renovating psych 100
may alter this state of affairs. In the meantime, Collins'
class takes place in Angus 104, Monday, Wednesday
and Thursday at 3:30 p.m. Page 6
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, November 5,  1971
Women taught to fear their own success
The forces that determine
women's roles in our society can
be divided into two major areas —
the subtle internal, psychological
forces and the obvious external,
sociological forces.
These are the primary factors
that dictate how a woman thinks
of herself and therefore determine
what she will choose to do with
her life, UBC psychologist
Meredith Kimball told about 600
people at the women's studies
program Tuesday.
Discussing the psychological
factors, Kimball said women form
their self image from what others
think of them, and by virtue of
this, fear the consequences of
their own success, as well as their
own failure.
Generally, they assume
anything a woman does is less
worthy and useful than what a
man docs.
"In early development girls are
in a way less pressured. They learn
others will accept them for who
they arc and that they do not
have to prove themselves worthy
of that acceptance," she said.
"The girl, while having an
easier time of it in early
childhood, in adolescence is faced
with sudden and quite dramatic
physical changes with the onset of
menstruation.
"These changes have
tremendous psychological
implications and the girl is faced
seriously with the question — who
am 1 really?
"Just when she is beginning to
ask this question society begins to
tell her that her real measure of
'Teacher
demand
to decline'
By LAURENCE LEADER
The British Columbia Research
Council predicts a decline in the
demand for new teachers, despite
the B.C. education department's
research and standards branch
claim there is no teacher surplus.
By 1972, only 531 new
teachers will be needed, declining
to 98 by 1979, BCRC
computer-produced projections
claim.
There also is an estimated
decline in total enrolment in the
schools: from an 11,000 increase
per year in 1972 down to a 3,450
increase in 1979.
All UBC and Simon Fraser
University grads could be hired to
fulfill B.C.'s present demand for
new teachers, but every year there
are education grads who cannot
find jobs within the province.
The B.C. education
department's statistics show 32
per cent of all teachers hired are
from outside the province.
If this policy continues, 169
UBC education grads will not find
work in B.C. next year.
To try and decrease the
surplus, B.C. education minister
Donald Brothers introduced a
6.5% limit on wage increases Oct.
26.
Brothers, however, could
eliminate the annual teacher
surplus by direct approaches.
He could limit enrolment in
education faculties or stop hiring
teachers from outside the
province.
But so far he has not done
either.
success is in how other people see
her — especially males," said
Kimball.
"One thing that adolescents
and young adult women perceive
as threatening their relationships
with men, is success."
Kimball said Matina Horner, a
psychologist interested in
achievement motivation, carried,
out a study of fear of success with
first-year students in a large
university in the U.S.
Female students were asked to
give their reaction to a story:
After the first-term finals, Anne
finds herself at the top of her
medical school class. Male
students were given the same
story with the name John
substituted for Anne.
Greenpeace Too vigil begins
A vigil to demonstrate solidarity with the
people on board the Greenpeace Too began
Thursday night in front of the U.S. Consulate at
Burrard and Georgia streets.
"Basically we want to remind people of the
Greenpeace mission to the Amchitka site,"
organizer Frank David said Thursday.
David said the protests, co-sponsored by the
Don't Make A Wave Committee and the families of
those on the Greenpeace, would be held every
night at the consulate until the Greenpeace Too
returns to Vancouver. x
Paddy Bergthorson, communications officer for
the committee, said she doesn't know how many
people will show up for the vigils, but expects a
large turn-out since many of the families' members
and friends of those on the mission had been
contacted.
She said anyone interested should contact the
committee at 921-7317 or show up, between 8
and 11 p.m. in front of the U.S. consulate any
evening from now until the ship returns to
Vancouver.
"T^^Ss.'Y'O
- nur * ,s*w&/r* tys&i '--
"The difference between the
sexes was highly significant with
65 per cent of the female stories
reflecting fear of success and 10
per cent of the male stories
reflecting fear of success," she
said.
In discussing external forces,
Kimball said outright job
discrimination and the care of
children are major determining
forces.
Kimball said studies of children
of working mothers indicate very
small, but consistent, differences
from children of mothers who
stay at home.
The mother feels guilty and
therefore tends to over-protect
her children. But these children
are less sex-role stereotyped than
their peers whose mothers stay at
home, she said.
IF YOU WOULD LIKE TO
BUILD YOUR FUTURE WHILE
WE'RE BUILDING OURS
COME ANDTALK TO US.
Who are we ?
The largest food company in Western Canada.
We've been around since the Klondike gold
rush days but we're as up-to-date as anyone
can get. We like to innovate new products and
merchandising ideas. We have established one
of the most modern and progressive retail food
chains in the country. We've expanded into
such rapidly growing areas as paints, industrial
finishes and catering. We manufacture a large
variety of quality food products including the
largest selling brand of groundcoffee in Canada.
Ours is a large, exciting business, and we have
room for young people who would like to be
a part of it.
Who are we looking for ?
We're looking for enthusiasm . . . the ability to
get along with people . . . the initiative to follow
a problem through to a successful conclusion . ..
the willingness to learn. We need people of this
calibre in our retail, wholesale, manufacturing,
financial and merchandising fields. If you can
convince us you can make it, we'll offer you a
good salary and the promise of a very bright
future. Tell us about yourself. Write:
EXECUTIVE OFFICE
KELLY,   DOUGLAS   &   COMPANY,   LIMITED
P.O. BOX 389, BURNABY 1, B.C.  BEING INSIDE OUT Nov
Wknd.    TOGETHER   13&14
procedures drawn from
Laingian concepts * Gestalt therapy * Jungian therapy * Autogenic
therapy * Bio Energetic therapy *
Primal Scream * Savasanna & Kun-
dalini Yoga. Phone 731-0773.
4444 W. 10TH
XSS^       228-8933
•
GENERAL
NEW*
AND
USED
TEXTS
STUDY
GUIDES >$ft>
POSTERS^
Beautiful
clothes. . .
for
beautiful
people
Le chAteau
"a step ahead"
776Granville 687-2701
BROADWAY AUCTION
•
WE BUY - SELL
ANYTHING
•
YOUR
BEER BOTTLE DEPOT
•
2486 BAYSWATER
(AT BROADWAY)
UBC GATE
BARBERS
4605 W. 10th Ave.
Telephone 228-9345
i
Closed Mondays
ZAIDA MERIO
Internationally
Trained Hairstylists
SAVE $ $ $
ON NEW AND USED
[VOLKSWAGEN!
MARGARET ZITTIER
AT
your Volkswagen dealer
KIRKPATRICK
MOTORS
IN KERRISDALE
5799 W. Boulevard
266-8391 277,0848
SHRUG FOR THE PEOPLE
Shrug: Trudeau in Power, by
Walter Stewart, Toronto:
New Press, 1971.
Walter Stewart's analysis of
the Trudeau government's
performance since it came to
power in 1968 is the latest
expression of two trends
currently fashionable in
Canadian  popular journalism.
First of all, he is one of an
ever-growing number of
Canadian intellectuals (mostly
Eastern journalists and political
scientists) who have become
disenchanted with the Trudeau
phenomenon. They have seen
it for what it is: a
n o w-y o u -see-it-now-you-don't
kind of egalitarianism, an
arrogance which betrays a
snobbish lack of sensitivity
(the product of an upper-class
background), a technocrat
ruthlessness which sees the
solution to all problems of the
state in the application of oil
and grease to a political
machine whose existence is
taken for granted.
Second, Stewart's book
epitomizes the dilemma of the
muckracking, government-
embarrassing journalist the
world over — a dilemma which
has reached monstrous
proportions in Canada with the
publication of a few of this
country's most recent books.
This is the dilemma of the
writer who spends months
researching his subject and long
hours writing a devastating
critique of the present
situation, and suddenly finds
that he has burned himself out
when he reaches the last
chapter. Here the reader (by
this time craving for a solution
to the reprehensible evils
described earlier in the book) is
forced to draw his own
conclusions as to what to do
about the situation.
Books     which    express
at
919 Robson St.
1032 W Hastings
670 Seymour
4560 W 10th.
duthie
BOOKS
disenchantment with Trudeau
include Charles Taylor's The
Pattern of Politics, Ed
Broadbent's The Liberal
Rip-off, and the
recently-published Bleeding
Hearts, Bleeding Country,
written by Denis Smith.
Taylor's book was probably
the first to correctly analyze
the Trudeau phenomenon:
published early in 1971, it
showed how the charismatic
flower-sporting man from
Westmount was perfectly
suited to the demands of the
politics of technocracy and
consensus.
The crisis of October, 1970
speeded up the process, and
put the Liberal regime in a
clearer light which enabled
more and more intellectuals to
grasp the basis on which it
rests. In a special issue of the
left-wing quarterly Our
Generation, produced just after
the War Measures Act was
introduced, two articles were
devoted to the "functionalist"
politics of Trudeau - his
obsession with the oiling of the
corporate   capitalist   machine.
Then James Eayrs of the
University of Toronto wrote an
article in Saturday Night
magazine entitled Dilettante in
Power, which forecast danger
ahead for the Canadian
political system if a man who
seemed to regard politics as a
spearfishing expedition was
allowed to continue in office.
And now we have Stewart's
book.
Its   critique   is   excellent.
Stewart has a knack of slicing
through bullshit, for picking
out the effect that economic
and political programs will
have on the people of Canada.
He identifies with the Winnipeg
prostitute and the New
Brunswick dirt farmer, the
people who have been
short-circuited by the
input-output models of the
"new politics".
His chapters on Trudeau's
economic policy are
particularly good, for they
show how Trudeau ignored
even the advice of liberal
economists who told him that
a fight against inflation would
inevitably produce
unemployment and not falling
price acceleration, because
"the major source of inflation
is a spillover from the U.S."
The chapter on Eric Kierans
— a virtual reprint of an article
Stewart wrote for Maclean's
last     summer    —    is    also
MMk
*m
MM
LABOR WEEK
From November 15 to 19
Special Events will present a
week on Canadian labor seen
through the eyes of some of its
leaders and representatives.
Canadian trade unionists
from various areas of Canada
will offer an analysis of the
role and struggles of labor
today.
•KIM
mmmtm^mmm
enlightening for the insights it
gives into the workings of the
"Supergroup" - the name
Stewart gives to the collection
of advisers and flunkeys who,
he maintains, run the
government of Canada by
making the most important
decisions over the heads of the
cabinet and the House of
Commons.
But one is left with a
tremendous sense of despair
after reading Shrug, because
Stewart is a victim of the
dilemma described above. His
answer to the problem of the
Liberal regime is a complicated
mish-mash of paragraphs
detailing how he would vote in
different regions of the
country if he were a Liberal, a
Conservative, or a New
Democrat. He says at the
outset that he is a firm believer
in Parliament, and that it
should be restored to centre of
Canadian political society. But
his critique of the opposition
in the House of Commons is as
devastating as his attack on the
Liberals. Thus his complicated
ideal voting pattern set out at
the end of Shrug represents a
cop-out. The reader feels
cheated.
This major flaw seems
endemic to modern Canadian
journalism. The same
unanswered question remains,
for instance, in Ian Adams'
penetrating study of poverty in
' Canada, The Poverty Wall:
what the hell do we do about
the situation? The reason, I
think, is that too many
Canadian journalists have
allowed the liberal technocracy
which they so vehemently
attack to absorb them because,
as Charles Taylor points out,
the liberal model contains no
concept of power. Critiques
such as those of Adams and
Stewart are of much less value
than if they gave us tools to
help re-organize the power
relationships in our society,
and it is becoming increasingly
clear that voting for the right
MP is simply not enough.
Stewart tries to back out of
the dilemma by drawing an
analogy with the music critic,
who is "trained to recognize
sour notes, not strike sweet
ones". But the experience of
twentieth century journalism
suggests that this is phony.
Sixty years after Upton
Sinclair's expose of the
Chicago meat industry, food is
still full of all kinds of guck.
Six decades after the heyday of
the muckracking magazines
that flourished in the U.S. and
Canada at the turn of the
century, our society is more
gross and inhuman than ever.
To accurately describe the
present we must give positive
suggestions and forecasts for
the future, because history is a
process and still photographs
of it are distorting. Canadian
political journalists will have to
come to grips with this if their
work is to do anything but
increase the feelings of
hopelessness which have always
stood in the way of real
political change in Canada.
-Paul Knox
Page Friday, 2
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, November 5, 1971 Canada's rulers
By PHIL RESNICK
The Canadian bourgeoisie
can be traced back, at least to
the English merchants in
Montreal of the post-Conquest
period. From the exploitation
of the courreurs des bois and
Indians of the fur trade, that
bourgeoisie has not stopped to
look back in its appropriation
of the surplus value of labour.
The Montreal fur traders went
on to organize the Bank of
Montreal in 1817, the first, and
still one of the most important
institutions of finance
capitalism in Canda. In their
concentration on Canadian
staples such as fur and wood
for export to the metropolitan
market of England, they hit
upon the key to future
capitalist development — the
progressive expoitation of the
staples and natural resources of
Quebec, Ontario, and Western
Canada for their own benefit
and for the benefit of
metropolitan capitalism.
Exploitation not simple of
inert commodities, but of the
trappers, farmers, and
labourers through whose work
fur, wood, wheat, and minerals
acquired their value, and the
canals, and railways which
transported them were built.
The Canadian bourgeoisie
has not varied all that greatly
since 1867. In its development
of the country, i.e. the
progressive subjection of all the
regions of Canada to capitalist
relations of exploitation, the
Canadian bourgeoisie made use
of two chief sources of capital.
The first was the central state
which it controlled, and
through which it could vote
itself the funds for the building
of the CPR, and later of the
Northern and Pacific Trunk
Railways, and still later the
Beauharnois Dam, and still
later the American-owned
Trans Canada Pipleline. The
history of this first great rip-off
of the working people of
Canada is in part recorded in
Gustavus Myers' History of
Canadian Wealth. Though like
so much else, it is part of a
history we are never taught.
The second chief source of
capital was the metropolitan
centres in Britain and the
United States. The role of
British portfolio investment in
the financing of Canadian
railways was central. Still more
important in the long run was
the direct American investment
that began to flow into
Canadda in the period arround
Confederation, and which was
actually encouraged by the
tariff walls Canada began
erecting from 1879 on. The
Canadian bourgeoisie did not
begin its bigamous relationship
to British and American capital
in recent years. Foreign branch
plants in Canada were
welcomed with open arms
sixty and eighty years ago.
Whether one can delineate
an independent Canadian
bourgeoisie is, therefore, very
much an open question.
Though there are sectors where
an independent Canadian
capitalism develops fairly early
on — electricity, textiles,
transportation,     farm
implements, banking — there
are others, particularly in
mining, manufacturing, and
utilities, including electricity in
provinces like Quebec, where
the role of foreign capital is
crucial from the beginning.
One of the specificities of
Canadian capitalist
development is the extent to
which the native bourgeoisie
accepts this high degree of
British and American
participation, linking its
destiny to that of the British
and American Empires. The
consequences, as we know
today, has been Canadian
capitalism's continental
vocation, and the mortgaging
of "Canada's treasure house of
resources" to American
imperialism. Internationally,
this has meant Canadian junior
partnership to American
imperialism across the boards.
One of the most important
characteristics of Canadian
capitalism at this moment is
the increasing amount of
concentration at the top. The
latest report published under
the Company and Labour
Union Reporting Act
(CLURA), states:
The concentration of both
foreign and Canadian-owned
corporations in the highest
asset     size     increased
significantly over the four
years   1965   to  1968. The
proportion of the assets of
all    CLURA   non-financial
corporations represented by
corporations with assets of
$25     million    and    over
increased by 3$ to 56% at
the end of 1968. All of this
increase   occurred   in   the
$100 million and over size
group . . .
This     concentration    is
highest  among  foreign-owned
corporations     (mostly
American), some 276 of these
having   assets   exceeding   $25
million,   responsible   for   over
60%    of   the    sales    of   all
foreign-owned corporations in
Canada.   Of   Canadian-owned
corporations,    186   had   sales
exceeding $25 million, but this
equaled only 23% of the sales
of     all     Canadian-owned
corporations.    The    tendency
towards  monopoly  capital  is
growing,    and    is    already
preponderant   in   the   mining
and manufacturing sectors of
the Canadian economy. It is no
accident   that   these   are   the
sectors   in   which   American
multi-national corporations are
also most important.
Any definition of the
C a n a d ian boureoisie must
embrace the directors and chief
executives of the dominant
financial and industrial
corporations. Unlike Porter in
his definition of the economic
"elite", our definition must
include the managers of the
major American-owned
corporations in this country,
and in certain respects, their
directors as well. Unlike Porter
again, we must define this
group that commands the
heights of Canadian economy
(and the base figure of $25
million in assets which CLURA
uses may well be a convenient
yard-stick   for   separating  big
from middle level capitalists) as
a class, whose power flows
from their cumulative control
over the principal means of
production. Various
interlocking directorships bind
members of this class to one
another, and large banks or
trust companies, such as the
Bank of Montreal or Royal
Trust represent clusters of
these big capitalist interests,
both Canadian and
metropolitan. In mapping these
clusters of interests, as groups
in Quebec and Ontario have
started to do, one is in fact
mapping the Canadian
bourgeoisie itself.
Let us move on to explore
the relationship betwen the
Canadian bourgeoisie state.
This capitalist state has, of
course, greatly grown in
importance in the last fifty
years, and to a certain extent,
the state apparatus, both
federal and provincial,
represents an autonomous
power in Canadian and Quebec
society. This means that
occasionally these governments
may take steps towards limited
income redistribution or
towards controlling capital
movements that go against the
wishes of the elements of the
big bourgeoisie. It is not
necessary from the point fo
view of a Marxist analysis to
see the Canadian or provincial
governments as emanations,
pure and simple, of the board
rooms of Montreal, Toronto,
or New York. It suffices that
the big bourgeoisie sets the
outside limits within which
these governments operate.
In Canada, on the whole,
these limits have been narrow
indeed. Public ownership has
been confined to small sectors
of the economy, often
debt-ridden ones like the CNR
set up by Robert Borden to
bail out the Mann and
Mackenzie inteiestss. The lion's
share of ec omomic
development remains in
corporate hands. Businessmen
and corporate lawyers move in
and out of the top echelons of
Liberal and Conservative
Governments, and social
democratic gorernments like
Manitoba's, are easily
contained. Indeed, large
corporations can play off
province against province, and
scarcely a week goes by
without ahother rip-off of
public funds (Michelin in Nova
Scotia, ITT and the James Bay
consortium in Quebec,
Churchill Falls in Manitoba
...). When a White Paper on
Taxation proves too radical for
the bourgeoisie (it made
mention of a capital gains tax.
it is torn to shreds by the
representatives of the big
bourgeoisie in the Canadian
Senate. When Canadian
nationalism threatens to get
out of hand, the bourgeoisie
forces the Quebec Government
to appoint a General Concil of
Industry, "a very strong group
of businessmen to assist the
Government", in the works of
its first President, or stages the
Brinks coup of April, 1970.
The autonomy of Canadian
governments is relative at best.
HONG KONG CHINESE FOODS
Just One Block from Campus in the Village
WE SER VEAU THEN TIC CHINESE FOOD
A T REASONABLE PRICES
EAT IN - TAKE OUT
We have enlarged our dining room
to offer you better service.
Open Every Day from 4:30 p.m. to 11 p.m.
5732 University Blvd.
Phone 224-6121
ROYAL
BANK
THE HELPFUL BANK
CANADA  STUDENT LOANS
Deposit Accounts-General Banking Services
University Area Branch — Dave Stewart, Manager
10th at Sasamat 224-4348
IMPORTANT NOTICE TO ALL
STUDENTS APPLYING TO ENTER LAW
All students applying for entrance into the UBC Faculty of
Law must submit with their applications a score from the
Law School Admission Test. Although most students apply
between April and June, the Law School Admission Test
must be written well before.this. It will be given at UBC on
December 18th, February 12th, and April 8th, and at U.
Vic. on the February and April dates. It does not matter
which date you choose, but you must register for the test at
least a month in advance. This means that you must have
registered for the test by about the middle of March at the
latest, if you plan to enter the Faculty of Law in
September, 1972.
For an information sheet on the test, please write to the
Law Faculty or drop in at the Law Building.
——jfe-^-'   M
g   YOUR PRESCRIPTION . .
OTHfc^
ffi                            ... For Glasses
Jw   for that smart look in glass** ...
\                         look to
WW iliilBs. m.  m
I   Plesclibtion Optical
WW iiiiiiiK^HI
H                    |Tmskiumk]|
IB         \mmmmmmmmmmW£:]i3Mmm\AA\
■                               II 0PTICIANS U
1          V3&/
■   ^BHrS?           ^■'WLw
H             Student Discount Given
WE HAVE AN OFFICE NEAR YOU
CRABBY APPLET0N
TONIGHT & TOMORROW
W
i&L
^mjfWmtK 5EVEM ALEXANDER
niirmonum)
w
5715
'•f%Cf
ADMIT ONE COUPLE FREE
WITH THIS COUPON MON.-THURS.
Two for the price of one— Fri. & Sat.
CATCH"THE DRUNKARD"
WED. through SAT. 8 P.M. till 10 P.M.
I COMPLIMENTS OF CKVN RADIO <
Friday, November 5,  1971
THE      UBYSSEY
Page Friday, 3 Region and Revolution
or
The Birth of a Notion
By DICK BETTS
Historical periods are
marked by certain trends
which appear more or less
synonymously with changes in
life-style and outlook.
This truism is becoming
something which has pressed
on more and more quickly as
time has passed throughout the
last 20-odd years. In other
words we are apt to see,- in the
western areas of the globe, an
economic and political
instability which is likely to
speed up events in our life
time.
Within the capitalist
nation-state with the growth of
mass, technological society,
trends which before manifested
themselves as being critical of
the status quo are becoming
assimilated within the
dominant political and cultural
set-up. Thus the trends move
quickly. They lose their critical
content and later on their
market potential. Thus they
lose interest for all classes.
The bohemian, the vamp,
the beatnik, the hippie; all had
roots in alienation from and
dissatisfaction with the present
social structure. All have had
their political potential
removed to some extent.
Canada has not been
without these and other
phenomena. We have seen the
rise and eclipse of
couuter-politics as regularly
and as quickly as other areas in
the west. Many of our trends
have been derived from the
United States, many have
arisen as a result of our satellite
dependency on same.
The labour militancy of the
thirties has of course cooled
while the potential in the trade
union movement remains the
basic hope for social change.
All the same interesting
developments leading the
present era of Canadian social
criticism are worth
chronicling briefly. These
include the intellectual and
student political trends in
English Canada as they formed
the so-called New Left.
In the fifties and early
sixties the Old Left
(Communist Party, CCF
coalitions etc.) were rejected
by young radicals as political
alternatives for Canada. The
Cold War nuclear threats were
pouring from the mouths of
not-so-rational statesmen and
opposition   forces   organizing
themselves against nuclear
weapons. The Student Union
for Peace Action and the
Combined Universities
Campaign for Nuclear
Disarmament were the focal
points of the growing youth
consciousness.
These movements were
fairly well plugged into the
U.S. radical movement but
when Pearson brought in U.S.
Bomarc missiles Canada's
neo-colonial relationship to the
states was becoming apparent.
Along with the
consciousness of our defence
dependency upon America
came the realization that our
economy was fairly well
integrated into U.S.
monopoly capitalism and its
war machine.
This was to remain an
under-the-surface ■ realization
while radicals battled" within
the CCF, on campus for
educational change, against the
Vietnam war with a solely
peace analysis all the while
approaching a critique of the
Canadian political economy.
Meanwhile, during the
mid-sixties in anticipation of
the centennial celebration, the
powers that were and still are
began the mystique of the
"Canadian identity", that
indefinable something that
made us Canadians. It was not
simply the quest of
Canadiana that embarked PR
government flack-men on a
Confederation trip. It was the
growing nationalism of the
Quebecois, the post-box and
armories bombings, the
popular demonstrations
culminating in the 1968 St.
Jean Baptiste Day parade demo
which began the barrage of
propaganda which sought to
artificially unify two separate
and distinct nations.
As an example of the
growing sense of Quebec
liberation students began to
organize on their own in
Quebec forming in 1965 the
Union Generale des Etudiantes
du Quebec as distinct from
the Canadian Union of
Students.
Thus a radical nationalism
began its most modern form in
Quebec after a history of
national self-identity of a
couple of hundred years.
In response to this
development the federal
government began its program
of "nationalism" which played
upon metaphysical notions
"nation-hood" during the
Diefenbaker years and the
anti-separatist pro-continent-
alist stance of Canadian
liberals.
Prior to this the
counter-insurgency of the
federal government had
concerned itself with buying
off radical youth through the
Company of Young Canadians
and other package deals for
"concerned" youth of which
Opportunities for Youth is the
latest. Now Canadian radicals,
through the parallel experience
of the Quebecois, were
beginning to formulate a
critique of resource sell-out
and cultural domination by the
U.S.
A radical (and in some
cases, rabid) nationalism was
was developing. Liberal
continentalism was the object
of attack and this led to the
narrow left nationalist stance
which permeates many groups
today.     The     left-wing
nationalism of concern for
people's livelihood as a
national oppressed group is
certainly more positive than
the present "Canada, stand
together" shit. Yet a total
emphasis on the nationalist
thing, the stance of many
Ontario radicals leaves aside
the more horrendous aspects of
possible Canadian
development.
Put quite simply Canada is a
branch-plant with an economy
tied to the States but it is also
corporate branch-plant. That is
to say its productive apparatus
is industrial. The effects of this
on social and cultural things is
obvious. Our culture represents
the technology out of which it
was born. It is a mass uniform
development which seeks to
standardize individuals by
standard roles.
As well as culture is a
reflection of class society. The
' culture is the property of the
elites sometimes leased to the
people. The effects of this sort
of social arrangement are
oppressive. They also bear a
marked difference from
underdeveloped nations
presently foreign controlled.
A liberation strategy for the
Third World always includes an
emphasis of nationality and
program of national
development. Canada's
proto-colonial situation is
much closer to a developed
nation. We lack a certain
amount of secondary industry
which need only be added to
the already advanced
industrialization upon
repatriation of the economy.
Thus the demands of a cultural
radicalization are much greater
than a national program.
A cultural radicalization
would base itself in the regions
of Canada: the coastal regions,
the prairies, the east (not
counting Quebec whose
cultural consciousness is far
developed and is pursuing
national goals) and the
Maritimes. It is on this level
where the action must take
place. This is where cultural
and popular sensitivities lie
primarily. The enforced
nation-state which the NDP,
the Waffle and some eastern
radicals favor as a liberation
strategy is illusory.
"Canadian" radicalism which
includes Quebec as a
mandatory part of Canada is
preposterous.
In the first place foriegn
domination of the Canadian
economy effects the regions of
Canada. Second the cultural
aspects of Canada are regional
as already mentioned. Third
the chance of starting political
programs for the benefit of the
people only arises in the
reDions.
The national programs lead
to the parliamentarianism of
the Waffle to the Canadian
capitalism of the Committee
for an Independent Canada.
Neither relates to the needs of
the people of Canada. Both
would force a national
development which would, in
the case of the CIC, subordinate
the poorer regions to the
already profitable areas of
Ontario and B.C. In the case of
the Waffle a national program
of state capitalism would pass
for socialism and be legislated by
parliament to boot.
Regional control and
assessment of needs and
development is the most
democratic and, apparently,
the most effective means to
develop a free Canada. This is
where people understand their
environment and this is where
the culturally and politically
unifying trends exist.
As well a regional resistance
strategy to foreign takeover
with the ultimate view to
public ownership would free
the economy from the
monopoly encroachments from
within and from without.
It's not a question then of
nationalism or of national
identity. Both these cloak what
is primarily a liberation
strategy, economically,
politically and culturally. As
well the nationalist banner as it
is currently being put forward
in demands for quotas on
foreign professors, Canadian
studies, percentages of legal
control of industry etc. reflects
a naivety about capitalism,
both private and state.
The system which is causing
the problems in Canada is
foreign capitalism. Our own
would be (at best) a slightly
moderate improvement. The
issue for Canada, once the
nationalism has passed, is
people's control and ownership
of wealth. It is the end to
almost a quartet-of Canadians
living below the poverty line. It
is a free existence.
This seems to be one trend
which should grow and endure.
Page Friday, 4
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, November 5,  1971 Mac-Bio: De-forest King
"A company whose power is based on influence
and privilege with the government."
That was MLA Bob Williams (NDP-Vancouver
East) describing MacMillan Bloedel in the legislature
Not an unreasonable statement for a company
whose founder H. R. MacMillan, is a former
government forestry official, whose chairman J. V.
Clyne is a former supreme court justice and Whose
number two man Robert Bonner is a former attorney
general.
MacMillan Bloedel is the largest single company in
B.C., controlling about 40 per cent of the province's
largest industry.
Its operations extend across Canada, to Belgium,
Spain, Britain, Australia and the U.S.
Although MacMillan Bloedel is still about 80 per
cent Canadian owned, its largest single shareholder is
the Wisconsin Corporation, the U.S. based trust of the
Bloedel family which holds 14 per cent of the
company's stock.
Closely behind is the Canadian Pacific Railroad.
(Somewhere in Canada, there may be an industrial pie
in which the CPR doesn't have its finger, but don't bet
on it.)
Last April, the annual report of Canadian Pacific
Investments listed the company's holdings in
MacMillan Bloedel as 10.26 per cent.
Added to what CPR has bought since and the
shares they control without directly owning, that
brings their total interest in MacMillan Bloedel to an
estimated 20 per cent.
It is also not inconceivable that MacMillan Bloedel
may soon become the target of a proxy battle between
CPR and one of the large U.S. conglomerates, who
must see the company as a very juicy plum to pick.
H. R. MacMillan, who built the whole empire, has
virtually retired from the active operation of the
company, but still personally owns 3 per cent, or $20
million worth. It is impossible to determine how much
more he owns through various holding companies and
trust funds.
A native of Ontario, MacMillan came to B.C. as the
province's first Chief Forester in 1912 and drafted the
first controlling legislation of the forest industry, the
B.C. timber royalty act.
He went to Ottawa in 1915 as the federal
government's timber trade commissioner, and in 1917
became assistant director of the imperial munitions
board, with the special responsibility of expediting the
production of wartime airplane spruce.
At the same time, he was manager of a Chemainus
lumber company, a position he held until he was fired
in 1919.
Using the contacts and knowledge of prime timber
stands gained during his civil servant days, he then
began the H. R. MacMillan Export Company.
The new company quickly gained almost complete
control over the B.C. export lumber market, and began
acquiring sawmills and timber stands.
Its dominant position was not challenged until the
mid-thirties, when the Seaboard export group was
formed.
When the second world war began, MacMillan
became timber controller for all of Canada, a position
which naturally increased his dominance of the
industry.
Before MacMillan left the civil service and struck
out on his own, two other companies that were to
became a part of his empire had already began
operations.
American-owned Bloedel, Stewart and Welch Ltd.
began logging on the lower mainland in 1911.
It began expansion into lumber milling in 1923
and opened its first pulp mill in 1946. Throughout the
years, the company acquired large holdings on
Vancouver Island.
Minneapolis-based Brooks, Scanlon and O'Brien
Ltd. came to B.C. as a logging company in 1908. In
1911, it bought out a Canadian company that held
water and timber rights to the area of a stream named
for Victoria physician Israel Powell.
The newly-named Powell River Company opened
B.C.'s first pulp mill in 1912.
MacMillan export and Bloedel Stewart merged in
1951, the same year Powell River took over the
Canadian owned Salmon River Logging Company.
By 1959, MacMillan and Bloedel Ltd. and Powell
River were the two largest companies in the forest
industry.
The "merger" of the two that took place in that
year was one of the classic corporate takeovers of all
time.
At the time of the merger, both provincial CCF
leader Robert Strachan and provincial Conservative
leader Deane Finlayson attacked it as
monopolistic. Federal justice minister Davie Fulton
told the house of commons the merger would be
investigated by the combines branch, but nothing more
was heard.
Under the terms of the merger, the board of the
new MacMillan Bloedel and Powell River Company was
evenly divided between MacMillan Bloedel and Powell
River representatives. MacBlo's J. V. Clyne was
chairman and Powell River's M. J. Foley was president
of the company.
It took J. V. Clyne less than three years to purge
virtually all Powell River men from the company's
board and top level executive positions.
Foley resigned as president in April 1961, after 20
former Powell River executives had already quit the
new company.
The final confrontation came at the company's
1962 annual meeting, when former Powell River
directors Conley Brooks, J. S. Sample, G. W. O'Brien
and H. F. Letson were removed from the board.
Clyne charged that the four men had attempted to
deliver control of the company to the American-owned
St. Regis Paper Company.
O'Brien said Clyne's charges were false and were
raised only as an excuse to complete the MacMillan
Bloedel takeover. He said the shares offered to St.
Regis amounted to less than 25 per cent of the
company and were offered at a price higher than the
current market price.
Whatever the case, the coup was now complete.
In 1967, the reference to Powell River was
dropped from the company's name.
Of 15 Powell River directors on the merged board,
only two remain on the current MacMillan Bloedel
board.
The total assets of the two companies at the time
of the 1959 merger was about $200 million. MacMillan
Bloedel's  are  now close to $800 million and still
growing.
By NATE SMITH
THE FUTURE CANADA
It's 1990 and you're in a plane travelling across
Canada about 100 miles south of the &$$&«, af!;'," -,
What you see below could Vt(^'.i^At,^m^^,
the fate of a vast development.Scheme vaEfeS,SM
Mid-Canada Development Comdoiv . /'•->, "VV^v '*
The view from your plane could,1*is8 W ifeij^Of a
string of Sudburys and Trail* (coflSogtcalfj&l^tal.
no-man's-lands otherwise known as«i$rtt$g towr^^h
long strings of ore trains headitgp SGJMtil.-lo tHe'j&S
The Corridor scheme first hit $&- newspa^jn
1969. '     ,•      .'.   v''
It proposed the development by aewJ/Ofdwaadians
of cities, industrial plants. rai8$$£:CMl■ V***fe a*10"
lumbering in the area immediately south oriStiada's
tree-line.
Coupled with this would be modern traiispi-rtitinn
and communications systems to link the various
growth centres.
And its not a nickel ami diinii affair. "A-
Toronto-based engineering firm, Acres Ltd., has
already spent well over $100,000 doing preliminary
research into the plan.
Acres estimates that
would cost from $4 to $5
years.
Despite the size of the job. The developers are
confident the scheme can be accomplished.
They see the operation as having three stages.
First, they hope for growing public (and
corporate) interest and support for the idea.
The most important part of the first stage has
already been accomplished.
Although public support for the plan has not been
particularly noticable (the Canadian public remains
profoundly ignorant of the scheme's existence)
businessmen have been tripping over their tickertape in
their support of the Corridor.
Next comes support from both the federal and
provincial levels of government through the setting up
of a federal-provincial development corporation to
research all phases of the program.
'■Iff
By JOHN ANDERSEN
Fina^fWf^'-^e tft§
. 5**
states,' h&m
dehtfjcf;
corj
oC*c
Cens?jrY#
3>f£<$Eftfit'tr
of the Corridor scheme will only make the situation
can    be    made    despite    the
er   that   only Canadians and
ns   will   be   involved   in   the
of this viewpoint can be seen by
of those attending the kick-off of
ference at Lakehead University at
in August, 1969.
tangle    of   modern    corporate
HlkPotential effects on development
>yal Trust, Stelco and the CPR
ajor corporations represented at
implementation of the plan
billion spread ovei 20 to 25
cot ndorj^
shares to\*3
tlndini! of debt', money in CtnadhirTrtiaYii
rioo^vjrv, in fbnjjin markers"      '..••  ■..,-.. u.»v,n;M.,y,  < *.-«^
IIk tm.il tw wordi of The quQU; m jWcral - . ^'*RoVafrnfift08f N|| directors on Gulf Oil, Goodyear,
despite .hi-* ideals of Canadian. dta*ljgj&ient ^;:vjJCk Victor' m$$0 Telephone, all American-owned.
Mi&Canada. KnlmK-i is practically adjfetting.-Jwr'*'". *$tcfcp ^Mjjraljtothman's of South Africa, Union
■necessity fur lnri-ian la-ad U.S.) capital in the sdh^-V.''(^.^s^ll^/jmii  and  Steel   and   the   Asbestos
Despite   thr.   tin.   pie«s   was   enthusiast^;-. Foj['. rapxtpjim?-'   r£^
example, rhi* e.M.i-ipt li.»m lli-_- M.wli-al QftWsKc of   ' '   i^BL'fe'toeteai'.ftito the American Growth Fund.
July 15,1969
''Once in. a very long #hil- an idea conse&.i^Ofi^'' %.
that grabs the imagination and open.- up a'wh^'$$w£>. '
series of vistas of what Canada might someday
"Confederation was such a concept. Jjfo.wai
building or the CPR. More recently Inert? hasbeeiS t$&
Trudeau concept of a truly bicultural country from-sea
towa.
"Now there's the Mid-Canada Development
Corridor." And at first glance the project appears to be
just what Canada needs. After all, settlement and
industrialization in Canada is concentrated along the
49th parallel — it would therefore be good to develop
the northern barrens."
But development by who and for whom?
The answer to this question caii be found by
examining the nature of the Canadian economy.
To put it simply, Canada is a resource warehouse
for the United States. And it appears implementation
gr, fowls',-,those wonderful people who have
-jj* jsficctive  hatchet job  on Canada
the.milHi-iational corporation are elbowing to
| ©I'thii'srjfamble for Mid-Canada's resources.
jiideSpite any attempts by Rohmer to keep the
;..^6^*^d|an.hands, in the end it will be the
,,..,._„ :=wfjp|?8d;i^8,ibe capital who have the final say in
' tte*mnmn?nt. "
Meanwhile, Rohmer, as head of the Mid-Canada
Development Foundation, continues work on the
project from his Toronto office.
Preliminary plans are being put together and
tenders are being called for some of the intial
construction.
Little is being heard about the influences of the
multi-national corporations on the development.
But don't be surprised if one day on the door of a
Toronto office a sign appears reading "Mid-Canada
Development Corridor (Canada) Ltd."
Friday, November 5,  1971
THE      UBYSSEY
Page Friday, 5 2?
OO
CD
O
o
CL
E
c
CD
Q
DENVER, HOST CITY FOR
1976 WINTER OLYMPIAD
In cooperation with Northwttt Releasing Corporation
Proudly Present*
THE DENVER SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA
BRIAN PRIESTMAN, Music Director
and Conductor
First Northwest Tour
QUEEN ELIZABETH THEATRE
FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 5, 1971
8:30 P.M.
"Denver Symphony Orchestra rated
brilliant... opening concerts sold out."
Denver Post, September 1971
"Denver Orchestra attains quintessential
brilliance." Salt Lake Tribune, April 1971
Piono Soloist: Donn-Alexondre Feder
"Elegant,   Clear  and   Imaginative"  N.Y.  Times
PROGRAM
WALTON: Portsmouth Point Overture
KHATCHATURIAN: Concerto for Piano and
Orchestra
WEBER: Bassoon Concerto In F Major, Op. 75
George Zukerman, Soloist
VAUGHAN WILLIAMS: Symphony No. 4
in F Minor
TICKETS — 5.25, 4.25, 3.75, 2.75
Students with cards $2.00
THE BAY BOX OFFICE, FOURTH FLOOR, THE BAY
DAILY 10 to 5:30 — PHONE 681-3351
ALSO: THE BAY RICHMOND AND LOUGHEED STORES
PHONE RESERVATIONS ACCEPTED — 681-3351
CHARGE TICKETS TO YOUR BAY CHARGE ACCOUNT
HASSELBLAD
THE BEST!
Buy Now
Factory Price
Increases Dec. 1st
MOVE UP TO THE ULTIMATE IN CAMERAS
UNLIMITED VERSATILITY - PROVEN RELIABILITY
Kerrisdale is your Hasselblad Headquarters
COMPLETE STOCK SELECTION AVAILABLE
FOR INSTANT DELIVERY
• CHARGEX • TERMS • TRADES • LAYAWAYS
WEST VAN. I KERRISDALE I NORTH VAN. I BURNABY
1550 Marine     I   2170 West 41st   I    1325 Lonsdale
926-5451 266-8381 985-9505
Fri. Till 9 p.m.   |     Thurs. & Fri.      |    Fri. Till 9 p.m.
till 9 p.m.
'Low Everyday Prices— Qualified Personnel —
Largest Stock"
Old Orchard
Shopping Centre
Kingsway and
Willingdon
437-8551
Fri. Till 9 p.m.
KERRISDALE
CAMERAS
■ NOW IN BURNABY-
NEW and USED
BOOKS
• Quality Paper Backs
• University Text Books
• Pocket Books " Magazines
• Largest Selection of Review Notes in Vancouver
BETTER BUY BOOKS
4393 W. 10 Ave.
224-4144 - open 11-8 p.m.
TOMORROW ONLY
Ingmar Bergman's
"WINTER LIGHT
HEBB THEATRE, U.B.C.
7:30 & 9:30 P.M.
75tf FOR EVERYONE
Unions: A worker's view
Cops bust two Canadians on strike against U.S. branch-plant.
By BRIAN SPROULE
Two-thirds of the organized
workers in Canada belong to
United States-based
"international unions".
The main trade union centre
in Canada, the Canadian
Labour Congress, with only a
few exceptions, is composed of
American-based unions. These
unions are not truly
international. The only
members outside the U.S. are
in Canada.
The Canadian membership
is allowed a measure of control
or autonomy as long as it toes
the line. But time after time
the American headquarters has
interfered with the affairs of a
Canadian local, usually to curb
militant activity.
This interference has taken
the form of suspensions,
expulsions or placing a local
under trusteeship — direct
control from international
headquarters.
During the Winnipeg general
strike the American union
headquarters ordered their
members not to walk out in
sympathy strikes which
brought the city to a standstill.
During the McCarthy era
conservative "international"
leaders co-operated in the
purge of Communist or
suspected Communist union
members from Canadian locals.
Where necessary whole unions
were smashed as in the case of
the Canadian Seamen's Union.
Canadian union leaders
(often appointed by and
responsible to international
headquarters) who defend the
present system claim it is
necessary to have strong united
unions in order to negotiate on
behalf of workers in both
countries since the
corporations which use the
workers are also international.
The truth of the matter
however is that almost all these
corporations are American
with Canadian branch-plants.
The leadership of the American
unions is fully integrated into
the capitalist system. George
Meany,    president    of    the
AFL-CIO is a friend and
supporter of Nixon.
In addition the AFL-CIO
supports the American ruling
administration on such foreign
policy matters as the Vietnam
war. In Canada their role is
that of keeping the Canadian
workers on a leash and the
economy "safe" for foreign
rip-off.
I belong to the Laborers
union, one of over a dozen
craft (organized by trade)
unions in the construction
industry. All are
"international" unions. Each
jealously defends its area of
jurisdiction from the rest and
competes with them for wage
increases. The job stewards, the
links between ourselves and the
unions are appointed by union
officials, not elected by us.
Elections and union
meetings are conducted in such
a way that rank and file
participation is discouraged.
The union is run as a business.
The membership is needed
only to pay dues. Nobody
-knows what percentage of dues
goes south of the border.
The first meeting I attended
was held at a Quesnel
construction site. Two officials
from Vancouver delivered long
and boring raps. They hardly
responded to questions and
seemed rather impatient to
leave as they were about to
depart for a convention of
international unions in Miami
(a well-known labor town!)
These porkchoppers were
businessmen, not workers.
We need a general union of
all construction workers —
skilled and unskilled — which is
democratically controlled by
its Canadian members. The
task of building Canadian
worker unity will be long and
hard.
They must take up the
struggle against foreign
domination and fight for the
rights of all workers, organized
and unorganized as well as
unemployed.
The most significant
non-international union center
is the Quebec union, Le
Conseil Syndicates Nationaux
(The Confederation of
National Trade Unions). As the
Quebec national struggle has
heightened the CSN and
Quebec Federation of Labor
(predominantly international)
have on occasion co-operated.
The War Measures Act of a
year ago saw the two groups
work together.
The emergence of one
strong national labor
movement in Quebec is a
strong possibility for the
future.
In Canada presently there
exists the Council of Canadian
Unions. It is an independent
grouping of unions and
represents some 20,000
Canadian workers. Its stated
goal is a united Canadian labor
movement free from American
domination. One of its
affiliates recently went through
a struggle with an interfering
international union.
The United Fishermen and
Allied Workers was expelled by
the Canadian Labor Congress
(the Canadian arm of the
AFL-CIO) for alleged
communist domination.
In the midst of strike action
in Nova Scotia several months
ago the UFAWU was raided by
a rightist AFL affiliate with the
blessing of the fisheries
magnates. This effectively
deprived the strikers of the
union of their choice although
they fought long and hard to
preserve the UFAWU. The
"international union's" stated
policy was to wipe out the
independent  Canadian  union.
There is nothing inherently
good about Canadian unions.
They can be as bad as some of
their   American   counterparts.
The internationals' could
never have gained in Canada if
they hadn't found willing
flunkeys in Canada. However
the shackles must be broken
before Canadian workers can
come together to build a new
society free from foreign and
internal exploitation.
Page Friday, 6
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, November 5,  1971 Prairie farms are dying
By STEVE BLOCK
They're talking revolution
on the prairies. Why?
It seems that thousands of
farmers are being forced off
the land, and it's an historical
fact as well as being a fact of
life that when people are
forced off the land their
forefathers and mothers
homesteaded and built up it
makes for a pretty volatile
situation.
The official government
position goes something like
this. There are too many wheat
farmers and too small a
market.
Anyone who has reflected
at all on world food shortages
realizes the total absurdity of
the official government
explanation.
The farmers see things
somewhat differently.
They lay the blame on
profiteering in the agricultural
business. They claim that
private wheat buyers and huge
international agricultural
conglomerates intent on
making exhorbitant profits are
acting in collusion with the
federal government to for£e
the farmers off the land.
Big business control of the
prairie farms is nothing new.
A hundred years ago or so,
the federal government, acting
on behalf of east-coast
financiers, passed the
homestead act and attempted
to encourage people to develop
the land and raise cattle.
The prairies became a
resource area for east-coast
capital. In return for the
resources which the west
supplied, the east coast would
manufacture goods and sell
them back to the west.
Thus the growth of the
Chicago meat plants and
transportation centres.
As well, the farmers bought
all their machinery from the
east to further develop the land
and to maximize centres.
That was under British rule.
Things have changed under
American rule.
Vertical conglomerates (the
same company controls all
aspects of one business) from
the U.S. have been bullying
their way into the Canadian
wheat market.
For instance, Tennaco
Industries and its subsidiary
the Kern County Land Co.
own eight million acres of land
in California which they use as
feed lots for their 100,000
head of cattle.
Tennaco Industries also
owns the H. I. Case Co. which
manufactures tractors, seeders,
plows, harrows and other farm
implements. Tennaco also
owns the Gates Rubber Co. of
fan-belt, conveyor-belt and
pulley-belt fame. Tennaco also
owns B. F. Goodrich Co. and
the White Motor Co. which
makes diesel trucks for goods
transport.
Tennaco decided that it
needed stores to sell its goods
and meat products. Over 40 of
those stores are known to us
colonials as Safeway.
Tennaco is only one
example of a vertical
conglomerate which is
monopolizing many aspects of
farming and forcing small
farmers out of business.
The National Grain
Company is the largest grain
buyer in the world.
It operates in Canada out of
Winnipeg and is a subsidiary of
the Peavey Co. of Minneapolis.
National Grain is buying up
huge amounts of land and is
buying up feed lots.
A hog feed lot in
Abbotsford, B.C., for 100,000
hogs is one of its purchases.
Under these circumstances
small, independent farrrl
owners cannot compete and
are going into debt. So
National Grain has figured out
a way to make a profit by
taking further advantage of the
farmers' weakened position.
National Grain has opened
up farm stores to sell its own
products to the farmers. Under
the Farmway label it sells
fencing, fertilizers, feed,
chemical   water   treater   and
medicine for cattle — all on
credit. In return farmers must
sell their grain to the National
Grain Company.
The company reserves the
right to work back on its
contracts and may take over
land from farmers who cannot
make payments.
Meanwhile, back in Ottawa
(not so coincidentally), the
Canadian government wishes to
eliminate two-thirds of
Canadian farmers.
It seems that agri-business
and its conglomerates are able
to operate more economically.
And while huge businesses
take over control of the
farming industry and maintain
their independence the small
farmers sell under increasing
control of the government-
retraining programs.
The problem is that
unemployment in industrial
areas is over 10 per cent. Now
isn't it foolish to take
50-year-old people off the land
to "re-train" them for an
overcrowded work force.
Other more insiduous ways
of retraining people are being
employed.
Schools in the farming areas
don't relate at all to the
farming environment.
Traditionally the offspring of
farmers were raised to take
over from their parents, now
university schools of
agriculture are teaching
students to relate to the
agri-business way of operating.
Instead of teaching
traditional farming methods,
they now teach the chemistry
of agri-business and even labor
relations. The schools have
already taken for granted the
agri-business takeover of the
farms.
INTERNATIONAL MARK 9
Climbs Hills The Way
Ail 10 Speeds Should
See At
INTERNATIONAL BICYCLE SHOP
4425 W. 10th Ave 224-3433
oft
0.0. O&a*
a
Utile
biwqet
(joesa
WYUjj
wnq
way
Because so
many young
couples have
young budgets
we make it a
special point to
have a foil
selection of
moderately
priced bridal sets
on display at
all times. That
way you won't
have to compromise on the
style you want
... or the
quality cither.
DIAMOND  RINGS
from $100
^~.<    Registered Jeweller AMKRICAN C.FM SOCIETY
Granville at Pender
Since 1904
r
RESTRICTED
For the use of persons between the
ages of 12 and 28 years.
YOUTH FARE
Prices   on   regular   scheduled   Airlines,   such   as
AIR CANADA, CP AIR, B.O.A.C, LUFTHANSA,
OLYMPIC, etc.
TICKETS ARE VALID ONE YEAR  )
TRAVEL ANY DAY OF THE YEAR
SAMPLE FARES
Vancouver to London and return
Vancouver    to    Amsterdam    and
return
$308.00
$333.00
Combine   your   Air   Ticket   with   a   STUDENT
EURAIL PASS, good for travel to 13 countries in
Europe, unlimited travel for TWO MONTHS!
$125.00
Jeni
*
*#
Dixie
Elizabeth
Lynn *f ft Norma
PROFESSIONAL TRAVEL CONSULTANTS
MAPLE LEAF TRAVEL LTD
1271 HOWE STREET
VANCOUVER 1, B.C.
681-5164
Friday, November 5,  1971
THE       UBYSSEY
Page Friday, 7 MOVIE GUIDE
FOR   RECORDED THEATRE
INFORMATION
681-4255
Dear Mom & Dad, Have gone to Chicago
to seek fame and fortune. Don't wait up.
-Love.T.R. *  _
THE 5# x 7" x 10" UNIVERSITY
The Great Books are a distillation of the world's most significant writing.
443 works in all, by 74 authors. And the 163,000 ideas in them are all
indexed in the unique Syntopicon. So instead of spending hours in the
library and wading through piles of useless material for essays, you have
TIME to think what the ideas mean.
To learn more about how the Great Books can help you
budget your time and work more productively, write the
GREAT IDEAS PROGRAMME
607-509 Richards
Vancouver 2, B.C.
i—"V
(imount Pictures Presents
TR.BASICIN
A Herberl Ross-Peter Hyoms Production
CANDICE BERGEN -PETER BOYLE-MARCIA RODD
,.„i JAMES  CAAN     Written and Produced by Peter Hyams ■ Directed by Herbert Ross
[ IQUWQtRACK M.BUM AVA*ABH OH PABAJMOUHT RECOUPS j r;0lol by TECHNICOLOR" A Poro.n
STANLEY  733-2622
GRANVILLE AT T2th AVE.
EVES. 7:00. 9:00
MAT. SAT., SUN. 2:00
W!v
LQUGHEED   MALI.
CINEMA 2
937-3461  FREE PARKING
EVES. 7.00, 9:00
MAT. SATURDAY 1:00
The
boys
from
THEY'VE GOT IT MADE...(w*,,™st,
An underground film
a rock band
a commune
...AND THE GIRLS
DON SCARDINO
SUE HELEN PETRIE
Directed by
RALPH ENDERSBY ""^^^^^" DONALD SHEBIB
THEY'VE MADE IT...(but definitely)
The funniest film of the year
EVENINGS 7:30, 9:30
DENMAN  PLACE
1737 COMOX STREET  683-4647
SUZUKI-NORTON
'71 Year-End
Clearance
Now Here
72 Sample Models
4497 Dunbar
228-9639
5& 10 SPEED DEALER
INEXPENSIVE ORIGINAL
PAINTINGS
BERGLAND
GALLERIES
A Gallery of Original
Modern Art
Prices M5-$50
(Inc. Frame)
2297 W. Broadway
(Broadway at Vine)
738-3612
12 Noon to 9 P.M.
Every day but Wednesday
1972 PACIFIC INTERNATIONAL
FEATURING
GREAT CARS
OF THE WORLD
FOR THE FIRST TIME
UNDER ONE ROOF!
Hundreds of
Domestic and Imported Cars
PLUS
Lamborghini
Ferrari
Maserati-Citroen
Porsche 914
Aston Martin
Excalibur
Pantera
Gullwing Mercedes
Jensen Interceptor
PLUS A MOVING COLLAGE OF FASHIONS
FROM MR. ROBERTS NEW YORK FUR
OPENS TUESDAY NOV. 9-THROUGH TO SUNDAY NOV. 14th
PACIFIC COLISEUM
Sponsored by the Automobile Dealers Assoc.
of Greater Vancouver
TICKETS-$1.50 ADULTS      STUDENTS-$1
AVAILABLE AT THE DOOR
Friday 5
& Saturday 6
7:00 & 9:30
Sunday 7-7:00
SUBTHEATRE-50?
a SUB FILM SOC presentation
THE REVOLUTIONARY
Page Friday, 8
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, November 5,  1971 Friday, November 5,  1971
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 15
Hot flashes
Ecology topic
of science meet
Over 600 elementary, high
school and university science
teachers from western Canada and
the United States will attend a
combined regional conference of
the National Science Teachers
Association and the International
Science Education Symposium to
be held at the Bayshore Inn, Nov.
11 to 13.
The central theme of the
conference will be the
introduction of ecology and
environmental science, especially
as they affect the Pacific Rim,
into teaching programs from the
elementary to the university level.
Other topics include discussion
of a new junior high school
science program which is more
dependent on lab work, and new
methods of science education for
handicapped students.
A conference featuring a
number of the Pacific Rim experts
assembled for the conference is
scheduled for Nov. 12, at 11 a.m.
in the Coquitlam and Cowichan
rooms of the Bayshore.
Will he?
Zoology professor Dr. David
Suzuki will give a speech titled
Science, the University, You and
I, today at 12:30 in the SUB
ballroom.
Suzuki denied Thursday
rumors that he was going to
announce his resignation at the
meeting but added "I've been
considering resigning from this
university for nine years now."
He said he was still considering
the resignation and wouldn't
make a decision until he has
planned today's speech.
"There has been a lot of stuff
going through my head recently,"
said Suzuki. "I want to talk to a
few people about it."
Star man talks
Astronomer David Rodger,
director of the H.R. Macmillan
Planetarium, will speak to the
Vancouver Institute Saturday at
8:15 p.m. in Buchanan 106.
He will describe the history
and development of the
planetarium. Admission to the
meeting is free.
Another one
A demonstration opposing the
Cannikin test on AmchJtka Island
will be held 2 p.m. Saturday in
front of the U.S. consulate.
The Canadian People's United
Front against U.S. Imperialism
plans   to   protest   the  testing  of
nuclear weapons and the spread of
U.S. imperialism in Canada.
Further information can be
obtained at 2904 W. Fourth
Avenue.
Eskimo art
The current Canadian Eskimo
Art exhibit in the Simon Fraser
university art gallery will continue
until Nov. 12.
The exhibit features works by
such artists as Kenojuak,
Osoweetokia and Pitseolok.
In conjunction with the
exhibit, professor Robert
Williamson, director of the
University of Saskatchewan Arctic
Research and Training Centre at
Rankin Inlet, Northwest
Territories, will lecture on the
Culture of the Eskimo,
Wednesday at 1:30 p.m. in the
Vancouver Art Gallery and 8 p.m.
in the Old Auditorium Annex,
UBC.
George Swinton, Canadian
authority on the Eskimo culture
will speak at the SFU art gallery
at 12:30 Monday and at the Hebb
Theatre UBC, at 8 p.m. Nov. 12.
James Houston, author of The
White Dawn, will hold a
lecture-demonstration of Eskimo
print-making on Nov. 12 from 9
a.m. to 4:30 p.m. in the Maritime
Museum.
'Tween classes
TODAY
ALLIANCE-FRANCAISE
General   meeting  at   noon  in  upper
lounge, International House.
UBC NDP
General   meeting   at   noon   in  SUB
113.
UBC CYCLE CLUB
Bike   maintenance   clinic   at   noon,
SUB 205.
GERMAN CLUB
Polka party at International House
from 9:00 p.m. to 1:00 a.m.
COMMITTEE FOR
INDEPENDENT CANADA
Canadian publisher Jack McClelland
will   speak   at   noon   in SUB Clubs
Lounge, room 212.
SPECIAL EVENTS
Dr. David Suzuki speaks at noon in
the SUB ballroom.
COLD MOUNTAIN INSTITUTE
Philosopher Paul Reps will speak at
8:00 p.m. in Hebb Theatre.
UBC STUDENT LIBERALS
Dr.  Pat  McGeer speaks at noon  in
SUB 211.
SATURDAY
cvc
Car   rally  and  after   party. Meet at
Oakridge parking lot, 7:30 p.m.
SUNDAY
NEWMAN CLUB
Folk mass at  11 a.m. in St. Mark's
Chapel.
UBC SCC
Gymkana at noon in lower D lot.
MONDAY
SPECIAL EVENTS
Canadian poet bp Nichol will read
at noon in the SUB art gallery.
UBC CAVE CLUB
Meeting at noon, SUB 205.
EL CIRCULO
Conversation    hour    in    room   402,
International House at noon.
UBC CONSERVATIVE CLUB
General   meeting   at   noon   in  SUB
211.
io speeds   SCQ.9R
UNASSEMBLED   "51
WHEELER DEALER
CYCLE CENTER LTD.
2320 W. 4th 731-5531
Rudy & Peters Motors Ltd.
VOLKSWAGEN SPECIALISTS
Quality   Workmanship
Competitive Prices
Genuine Volkswagen  Parts Only
All Work Guaranteed
Complete Body Repairs and Painting
225 E. 2nd Ave.
879-0491
FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE
THE PLAYBOY
OF THE WESTERN WORLD
by J. M. Synge
NOVEMBER 5-17 8:00 p.m.
Directed by STANLEY WEESE
Costumes and Settings by RICHARD KENT WILCOX
Lighting Designed by BRIAN PARKER
Student Ticket Price: $1.00
BOX OFFICE * FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE * ROOM 207
ZZ^^^I^^^I^ZI^^^IIZIZZZZ^   Support Your Campus Theatre ~
CLASSIFIED
Rates: Campus - 3 lines, 1 day $1.00; 3 doys $2.50
Commercial — 3 lines, 1 day $1.25; additional
lines 30c; 4 days price of 3.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone and are payable
in advance. Deadline is 11:30 a.m., the day before publication.
Publications Offce, Room 241 S.V.B., UBC, Van. 8, B.C.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Dances
11
POLKA PARTY — DANCING AND
great refreshments, Friday, Nov. 5,
from 9 p.m. - 1 a.m. at Interna-
tional House.	
ENGINEERS MIXER FRI. NOV. 5,
9:00 p.m. Lions Gate Hall. 2611 W.
4th. __
DANCE TO CARIB 71 GRAD STU-
dent centre, Sat. Nov. 6th. 9 p.m.-
1 a.m. Tickets $1.00 each at Grad
Centre  Office.	
Lost 8c Found
13
LOST LAST WEEK: SQUARE
brown glasses, either hitching to
or walking around campus. Des-
perate  521-0882.	
LOST: WIRE FRAME GLASSKS IN
brown case. In 't>7 Parisienne stn.
wagon. Quebec plates while hitching Tues. Oct. 26. Phone Garnett,
224-9545.	
LOST K & E SLIDE RULE LIGHT
tan case. Name on. inside of case.
Finder please contact Peter, 732-
6769.	
LOST: GLASSES, OVAL WIRE
rims, between C-Lot and Anatomy
building.   Please phone  732-7034.
Special Notices 15
MALE AND FEMALE DANCERS
and singers needed for Songfest
'72. Performing February — Students—contact Rory, 224-9691. Au-
dltions  Nov.   7,   Partyroom,   SUB.
SUNDAY INFORMAL WORSHIP.
"Chapel Loft" 7:00 - 7:45 p.m.
FIRESIDE Lounge. 8:00 p.m.
Guest John Williams "What Is A
Typical Indian?" V.S.T. 6050
Chancellor.	
SKI   WHISTLER
OR
MOUNT  BAKER
Six week ski course at above areas,
only    $32.00    Includes    return    bus
transportation  and   1%   hour lesson.
Further information from:
Canadian Youth Hostels Association.
1406  West  Broadway,   Vancouver  9,
738-3128.	
CYPRESS LODGE YOUTH
HOSTEL
WHISTLER  MOUNTAIN
Open Dec.  1st until Apr.  30th,  1972.
Special Midweek Package:  5 nights
accommodation with  3 meals a day
$22.00
Further information from: Canadian
Youth    Hostels    Assn.,    1406    West
Broadway, Vancouver 9, 738-3128.
HEAR  DR.   NORMAN  MacKENZIE
speak   on    the   Student   Christian
Movement  Fri.   Nov.   12th.   Dinner
at 7:30 p.m. J2.50 per person, $1.50
for   students.   Please   register   by
Mon.   Nov.  8th.   Contact  Rev.   An-
derson 228-9031 or 224-0069.	
WANT TO PLAY IN A CONCERT
band? Former high school musicians and anybody elsei who can
play, welcome. Phone Pete 684-
77501 or Cathie 939-0741.
THE GRIN BIN
has the  largest selection  in
Canada of posters
and  pop  art.
Also Jokes, Gifts and 24" x 36" Photo
Blowups from your own prints and
negatives.
Enquiries welcome at
THE GRIN BIN
3209 W. Broadway
across from the Liquor Store
Call 738-2311
AN ADDITION TO THE FAMILY?
Education for the Childbearing
Year. Classes for an easier more
rewarding childbirth. For Infor-
mation Phone 266-8612 or 872-7315.
REMEMBRANCE SUNDAY—AT ST.
Anselm's and University Hill
Churches on University Boulevard.
Services aK St. Anselm's at 8 and
11 a.m.; at University Hill at 11
a.m.	
FREE    KITTYS.
228-8975
Wanted—Information
17
ANYONE WITNESSING OLD MAN
walking into red Datsun Tuesday,
Oct. 28th, 4:00 p.m. (at Cypress
and Broadway). Please phone 736-
6809,  reward.
Wanted—Miscellaneous
18
NEEDED PHYSICS 219 NOTEBOOK
with completed good data and results. Will pay, phone Mike 876-
4684.	
AUTOMOTIVE
Autos For Sale
21
1964 RAMBLER WHITE CONVERT
$450, only 43,000 miles, one owner.
733-1873 or Mil 3-2474.	
'68 AUSTIN 1100 STN. WGN. 30,000
miles. Excellent condition, new
brakes. Extra snow tires. Phone
224-4480.
Autos For Sale—Cont.
21
1970 SUNBEAM ALPINE G.T. Excellent condition. Must sell. Phone
6S1-1708.   Best   offer   takes.	
1965 BLUE BUICK FOUR DOOR.
Comfortable Commuter. $800.00
plus your trade worth $100.00.
Auto France, 1234 Kingsway. Call
873-2454.
Automobiles—Parts
23
STUDDED SNOW TIRES. HARD-
ly used 5.50x12 whitewall, Uni-
royal. Mounted and balanced, $45.
-'24-3469. 	
BUSINESS SERVICES
Photography
35
INFORMAL PORTRAITS BY
Carol Gordon. May be taken outdoors. Ideal Xmas gifts. 733-0715
or 736-4923.
Rentals—Misc.
36
Scandals
37
MALE NEGRO SINGER-DANCER
interested in performing early
February Songfest '72, contact
Rory, 224, 9691, Auditions Nov. 7.
UBC BICYCLE CLUB. BICYCLE
maintenance clinic. Film of Cycling at UBC. Everyone welcome,
Fri.  12:30.  SUB 205.
Typing
40
ESSAYS. ETC. TYPED NEATLY,
quickly and efficiently. 35c page.
Phone   224-0385  after  5  p.m.
ESSAYS AND THESES TYPED.
Experienced Typists. Mrs. Free-
man.   731-8096.	
EFFICIENT ELECTRIC TYPING.
My home, essays, thesis, etc. Neat,
accurate work. Reasonable rate*.
Phone 263-5317.	
TEDIOUS TASKS. PROFESSIONAL
typing. IBM Selectric—days, evenings, weekends. Phone Shari at
738-8745.   Reasonable  rates.	
EXPERT TYPIST — ELECTRIC
typewriter—Would like to type
students' papers, etc.. at home.
Phone  926-3478.	
YR. ROUND ACC. TYPING FROM
legible drafts. Phone 738-6829 from
10:00 a.m. to 9 p.m. Quick service
on   short  essays.	
I0XPERT IBM SELECTRIC TYPIST
Experienced essay and thesis typist. Reasonable rates. Mrs. Ellis,
321-3838.	
RETIRED PUBLISHER WILL ED-
it essays, theses, mss for grammar, punctuation, syntax, spelling,
clarity, etc. 263-6565.
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted
51
SECRETARY WANTED. PART
time. Five hours a week. Apply
Student Christian Movement (224-
3722) (224-0069). Write Room 39,
6000  Iona Drive.	
POSITION AVAILABLE ALMA
Mater Society general office clerk
typist (temporary full time) December 1 '71 to February 29 '72.
Salary $315 to $335 per month
(presently under review). Apply
in writing to Mr. D. Wey. Office
Manager, Student Union Building
by November lath, 1971.
INSTRUCTION & SCHOOLS
Music Instruction
61
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE 71^
2(K/, OFF ON AFGHAN COATS TO
UBC members, Persian Boutique,
211 Columbia, Gastown. Also assorted Persian handicrafts, an-
tigues &. carpets.	
KNEISSL WHITESTAR RS. BIND-
inss $75; Blizzard Formel total
bindings $125. Both 210cm. 526-
3378.	
96 BASS ACCORDION IN! EXCEL-
lent condition for sale. Good
Christmas present. Phone Donna
228-9531   evenings.	
ONE FRAMUS 12-STRING GUITAR
Good condition. Offers considered.
John,   943-5244.	
RENTALS & REAL ESTATE
Rooms
81
TO RENT. SLEEPING ROOM ONE
Block from gates. Male, priv. ent.
224-4746
Room & Board
82
ROOM AND BOARD — $110 MO.
Males. Excellent food. Color TV.
Sauna. 5785 Agronomy Rd., Ph.
224-9684.	
MEAL PASSES AVAILABLE AT
the DKE House, 5765 Agronomy,
224-9691. Enjoy excellent home-
cooked meals on campus at prices
you   can   afford.
Furnished Apts.
 83
FURN. BSMT. SUITE. PRIVATE
entrance, bath, cooking. Near
gates. One person $100. Avail. Dec.
1. Phone 224-3882.	
BASEMENT SUITE FOR RENT
partly furnished, two males. Kits
area. Private entrance, phone 731-
1629.
The Handiest1 Book on Campus -
BIRD  CALLS
The UBC Student Telephone Directory
NOW ON SALE   - 75c Page 16
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, November 5, 1971
See Us At The
UTO SHOW!
Nov.
9-14
P.N.E.
inberaubo
1845 W. 4th Ave.       732-3731
U.B.C.
BIKE COLD?
Drive the
MONTE CARLO
WINNER
CALL JIM CLELAND
873-2454
1234K1NGSWAY
>MA
#i
al
Sj
fieturday NOVEfTlDER 13
Ticket/»OP15 69 DLACK 5HEEP DOUTIQUE5 ROHAN b    s,
THUNDERDIRD bHOP GRENNAN'5. TOTEm ITHJ5IC 5TORE5
LONDON El DRUGS
OPTICAL   * DEPARTMENT
Save on your eyeglass prescription
SINGLE VISION
GLASSES
13
.90
I ncludes
Frames — Lenses — Case
' Depending upon your prescription
and type of frame you select.
OPTICAL
PRESCRIPTION
TO US
CONTACT LENSES
(Regular)
Any Color
One Price Only
$4Q.50
We have the NEW
SOFT Contact Lenses- $129.50
ANOTHER
NEW OFFICE
PACIFIC CENTRE
MALL Now Open
Operated by Save-on Optical Ltd.
* 677 Granville-681-6174 * 697 W. Broadway-879-9401
* 2987 Granville at 14th-736-7347 * 5618 Cambie-327-9451
* 4068 E. Hastings, N. Bnby. (across from Wosks)-291-8491
* 1825 Lonsdale, N. Van.-987*-2264       *  0391 Fraser at 48th-321-1911
* Richmond Sq. Mali -273-6177  * 675 Columbia, New Westr.-521-0751
Alma Mater Society
OFFICIAL
NOTICE
Election of
New Executive
NOMINATIONS   are   now   open   for   the   following
executive positions;
PRESIDENT
VICE-PRESIDENT
TREASURER
SECRETARY
COORDINATOR OF ACTIVITIES
EXTERNAL AFFAIRS OFFICER
INTERNAL AFFAIRS OFFICER
Nominations will close at 4 p.m. Wednesday, November 17.
Nomination forms may be picked up from the Secretary's office
SUB-256.
The Election will take place
WEDNESDAY. NOV. 24
Voters conned by
ILast Post News Service
here is a traditional truce that allows the
ruling Liberals in Ottawa and the ruling
Conservatives in Queen's Park to work together to
prevent any opening to the left — but the
magnitude of the Tory sweep in the Oct. 21
Ontario election can give little comfort to Pierre
Elliott Trudeau.
The truce was in effect as strongly as ever in
this campaign, which initially held out the promise
of substantial gains for the New Democratic Party.
But what actually happened, so far from being
an opening to the left, was a sizeable swing to the
right. Both the Liberals and, to a lesser extent, the
NDP, lost seats to the triumphant Tories; the New
Democrats increased their popular vote slightly (at
the expense of the Liberals), but not nearly as
much as they had hoped for.
This had little to do with issues discussed
during the campaign, to the extent that there were
any issues discussed during the campaign.
Bill Davis had begun by running a
Trudeau-style no-promises campaign; although he
relented in the last week and pledged a three per
cent tax cut, a Tory vote was a vote for little more
than a continuation of the kind of government
Ontario had now had for 28 years.
As the deep-blue Ottawa Journal put it,
"shrewd, careful old Ontario was certainly not
going to be lured from tried and true men and
policies by an unreasoned cry that it was 'time for
a change.' " No, indeed.
Q
n election night, Davis appeared at his
campaign headquarters in Brampton, in the
western wing of the lush exurban sprawl that fans
out from Metropolitan Toronto, his wife and five
children at his side, the picture of stability. It was
the image that had been projected successfully by
the multi-million-dollar Tory campaign; the leaders
of the other parties said the voters had been
conned.
But there were reasons why the safe,
hard-rock image had been such a big seller. For if
there were no issues in the campaign, there were
strong undercurrents.
One of these was the latent
Protestant-Catholic divergence that is still a factor
in Ontario politics and that Davis injected into the
campaign through the separate schools issue.
Davis's move to withdraw government aid
from separate schools for the senior high-school
grades was less important in itself than for what it
represented.
Each party was able to express its position on
separate schools in terms of freedom, democracy,
equality and natural justice and the issue aroused
little debate during the campaign.
But it was nevertheless a factor leading a
substantial number of people to switch their votes,
in some cases away from the Tories, in many more
cases in their favor.
To these voters, Davis emerged as a man who
would stand up to the Catholics. His victory bodes
ill for the advancement in English Canada of the
hated bilingualism, and for the increasing presence
in high places of French Canadians — policies
particularly identified with Pierre Elliott Trudeau.
A
second undercurrent had to do with the
uncertainties caused by the changes in Canada's,
The Ontario Tory
victory was a
sizeable swing to
the right.   There
were no issues in
the campaign,
only strong
undercurrents.
Voters went for
a moderate,
conservative
Madison Avenue
image. Ontario
voted against
Trudeau and for
stability.   The NDP
lost because it was
not a significant
alternative.
relations with the outside world, and particularly
the United States.
Ontario's Americanized economy was one
issue that singularly failed to take root; the only
statement of Davis's on the question that attracted
any public attention was his identification of the
interests of the United States with those of
Ontario soon after becoming Conservative leader
last March.
Nor did the other party leaders succeed in
making American control a major issue in the
campaign. The instance of American intervention
that caused the biggest stir was the revelation that
the Tories had employed a Detroit polling outfit
during the campaign.
Davis repeatedly refused to deal with the
question of U.S. President Richard Nixon's New
Economic Policy, saying that it was the
responsibility of Trudeau's federal government.
And Trudeau, meanwhile, was busy
entertaining Premier Alexei Kosygin of the Soviet Friday, November 5,  1971
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 17
no-promises campaign
Me
lei Watkins, one of the Waffle leaders and
campaign manager in Dovercourt for Stephen
Penner, another leading Waffle commented:
"I'm very unhappy about how the party did
in the province as a whole, but you can't say, as
Stephen Lewis has been implying and saying, that
the Waffle hurt the NDP's electoral chances.
"The Waffle, on the contrary, helped get some
of the only NDP gains in a contest of general
defeat.
"Here in Dovercourt we fought a real socialist
campaign, in a majority immigrant riding, we
raised unemployment, Americanization,
nationalization, plant shutdowns, the structure of
the economy, and we did not run a social
democratic campaign; we raised the basic issues
and the people responded fantastically."
There is no reason why Dovercourt should be
a particularly progressive riding. It is not a classic
working-class riding: there are many little stores,
many immigrants on the bottom rung of the social
ladder and intent on climbing it.
Dovercourt was taken by a Liberal in the last
election, with the New Democrat almost 2,000
votes behind him. Now it will probably be held by
a Tory, with the NDP-Waffle only 50 votes behind.
What does this show?
In the words of one experienced campaign
worker: "Stephen Lewis pulled a Tom Berger. He
attacked Madison Avenue politics, and the
image-making machine of the Tories, but tried to
create the same moderate, conservative image. The
people went for a real conservative Madison
Avenue image, not the bargain-basement version.
"We've learned that lesson since Ramsay
MacDonald — you can't run a me-too campaign.
But they keep doing it. The NDP lost because it
was not a significant alternative. Where it was, it
made impressive gains. Lewis was more scared of
socialism than a lot of voters."
CONSERVATIVE CAMPAIGN POSTER
Union, who was regaling his audience in Ottawa's
Rideau Club with a strong denunciation of
American economic policies.
Just how Trudeau's move away from exclusive
dependence on the American connection will work
out has not yet been settled, and Ontario voters
are vaguely uneasy. On top of that, the large
Eastern European population in the province is
unhappy about the PM's flirtation with the Soviet
Union. As one observer said, "Richard Nixon won.
this election and Alexei Kosygin lost it."
Charles Taylor, the political science professor
who has several times run unsuccessfully as an
NDP federal candidate in the Montreal area, noted
the depth of anti-Trudeau feeling in the province.
"The first thing that happened is that the Liberal
vote collapsed," he said. "The second thing that
happened is that we failed to pick it up. Ontario
voted against Trudeau and for stability."
Ihe third undercurrent is economic. Ontario
is a province that has not yet experienced the
reality of widespread economic hardship, but is
faced with the possibility that it will happen in the
not too distant future.
Seasonally-adjusted unemployment in Ontario
in September was 5.6 per cent, an increase of 0.6
per cent since the Nixon surcharge was announced
in August — too high, but considerably less than
the Canadian average of 7.1 per cent. By contrast,
in the Atlantic provinces the rate went up 0.9 per
cent to 10.3 per cent, and in Quebec it went up
1.1 per cent to 9.3 per cent.
There have been factory slowdowns here and
there in the province, mostly of American-owned
branch plants, and layoffs at General Motors and
elsewhere. Something is happening; the voters are
not quite sure what it is; they are neither
disillusioned enough to cast a massive protest vote
nor secure enough to take a chance.
I or the NDP, the result means that some
long-accepted truths will have to be re-examined.
The door-to-door canvass techniques that is a
staple of all NDP campaigns seems to have
produced some results; the most successful
constituencies for the NDP, like Ottawa Centre
where candidate Mike Cassidy won by 200 votes in
what had previously been a dry area for the party
or Dovercourt in central Toronto where Stephen
Penner came within 50 votes of winning in equally
unpromising territory, were also among the most
heavily canvassed.
But the other major element of the campaign,
Stephen Lewis's leadership, is already coming
under serious scrutiny.
Jim Laxer, who ran unsuccessfully as the
Waffle candidate for the party's federal leadership
against Stephen's father David last April, was
asked whether it was his impression that Stephen
Lewis tried to sell conservative and moderate
social democracy and failed because he did not
fight on a socialist platform, whereas in ridings
where the Waffle fought a campaign on an
avowedly socialist stance it actually gained a
surprisingly number of votes.
"Right," Laxer said.
I he worst shock of the night came when the
NDP lost the United Auto Workers bastion of
Oshawa. Dennis McDermott, Canadian district
chief for the UAW, could only blame the people.
They were "naive", "unsophisticated" and "it
seems that the fanners of Saskatchewan know
better where it's at than the people of Ontario."
Blame the victim.
The major significance of the election within
the NDP itself is unspoken so far, but obvious;
Stephen Lewis, who even in his own seat won by
less than 400 votes, is politically ruined. He led the
party to defeat, with fewer seats than it had before
dissolution. His worst enemies, the Waffle, which
ran campaigns without any support from the NDP
establishment, made great gains. The lesson will
not be lost at the next convention of the
provincial NDP. There's a good chance now that
the Waffle, which got around 30 per cent of the
votes at the last convention, can push it up to 50
per cent and take over the Ontario party.
And after the Ontario party, the federal party
is not far out of reach.
If the NDP establishment is going to try to
crush the Waffle, it will do it now. In a few
months, after the Ontario Federation of Labor
convention in November where the Waffle hopes
to build a substantial labor base, it will be too late.
Then, it will be only a matter of waiting for David
Lewis to pass from the scene.
Can the Waffle build a labor base? It's an open
question. But as Dennis McDermott showed in his
bitterness at the loss of Oshawa, the large unions
that are the backbone of the NDP can no longer be
safely delivered by their bureaucrats into the
hands of David Lewis.
The NDP is a lot more worried about the
Waffle today, both in Ontario and in Ottawa, than
it is about the Tories or the Liberals. Page 18
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, November 5,  1971
Old Timers open season
Derek Sankey, Bob Molinski,
Phil Langley, Ian Dixon. The
names are familiar, if old, and
they plus Morris Douglas, Steve
Spencer, Bob Barazzuol, Ed
Suderman, Dave Way, and Neil
Murray are ex-UBC Thunderbirds.
and good ones.
They're back tonight at 8:00
p.m. to play in the Grad Reunion
Game against the 1971
Thunderbirds. The 'Birds, sporting
the likes of Ron Thorsen and Stan
Callegari, are a group that is not
easily awed. But if any team they
are to play this year will beat them,
it's this bunch they play tonight.
All of the returnees were stars in
their years with the 'Birds and the
majority of them were WCIAA
all-stars.
And, unlike the usual image of
the   ex-athlete,  these  gentlemen
aren't. Ex-athletes that is. Both
Molinski and Sankey were part of
Canada's Pan-American basketball
BOB MOLINSKI ...
... 'Duke' returns as grad
team at Cali this summer and all
of the others are active in
top-flight local competition.
For the 'Birds, Coach Peter
Mullins plans to use a three guard,
double post system starting guards
Bob Dickson, Stan Callegari and
Ron Thorsen with forwards John
Mills and Darryl Gjernes. It's the
first time out for the "new look"
'Birds and Mullins is counting
heavily on improved ball handling
from Thorsen and Callegari to
make the system work.
For the fans, tonight's game is
a fun affair and a chance to see
former UBC stars. But for the
Grads it's strictly a pride
encounter, and a chance to prove
that they "haven't lost it".' For
the 'Birds it's a test, and chance to
prove that they have got the
touch. In any event it will be
exciting basketball tonight at 8:00
p.m. in War Memorial Gym.
FfiapPYing FBaiden
it* fi s^-frf-ii
The third album
IT'S  A
LTC I Al
[tUTHTL
DAY
COMING SOON TO ALL RECORD STORES
Check 'em cut LIVE
SATLRLAy, NCV.13,
ATTHE GARDENS
.COLUMBIA RECORDS
Campus league tennis
The men's tennis team takes
over at the armories after the
women's campus league Mondays
at 7 p.m. They have a hard act to
follow.
Look in sometime. See a
vicious hard hitting arts 1 feminist
slam a volley into the educated
feet of a science major
(majorette?). See an amazing
display of slice services and cross
court backhands.
Sound intriguing? If you are a
woman (girls qualify too) put on a
pair of sneakers, any colour, and
drop by Mondays 5-7 p.m. and
Thursdays 9-11 p.m.
There are rackets and balls
provided, and if you are no
feminine Arthur Ashe or Rod
Laver, there is always someone
willing to help you, and maybe
even   throw  the  balls  for  you.
(Sometimes she may give up and
throw the balls at you, but such
incidents are few and far
between.)
Usually 14 or so dramatically
attired girls in anything from
whites to jeans, bounce out on
the courts for a 'friendly' set of
doubles. There are always plenty
of good games and the injuries are
few. Broken legs are down to once
every two or three weeks. Present
mortality rate is the lowest its
ever been.
Monday nights, the women are
bodily dragged off the courts by
the men's tennis team promptly at
7.
Thursdays are fun — the girls
do the dragging.
If tennis is your racket, join
the girls. There's always a court
waiting for you.
—harold crandall photo
IT'S A BIRD, a plane, superman; no, it's cycle drag. This blur was all part
of the fun at the intramural cycle race held last week. Dentistry won the
meet.
As predicted, dentistry came away
with top honors in the intramural cycle
drag.
A pit stop late in the 12Vz mile race
proved costly to forestry who had to
settle for second place by a ten second
second margin.
Ron   Mattison   led the 'jocks',
third place.
to
The top three teams were:
dentistry, T. Fell, W. Peace, S.
Blackburn; forestry, D. Meehan, B.
Brasnett, R. Ellis, R. Krag, W. Aspinall,
D. Willford: and physical education, R.
Mattison,   J.   Clark,   T.   Feenstra,   B.
Burgen, C. Johnston.
Meanwhile back in the Gym,
women's intramurals had quite a
different racket going. Kathy McKay,
rahab. medicine, was smashing her way
to victory over Colleen Ray of home
ec. in the badminton championships.
Aggie, Lindsay McDonald got away
from the cows long enough to defeat
Sarah Rendall of rehab, for third place.
SOCCER schedule will be up
Monday. Check outside the
intramural office.
TENNIS finals continue until
November 19.
Weekend Action Box
Date
Sport
Opponent
Place
Time
Nov. 6
Football
U. of Calgary
Calgary
2:00 p.m.
Nov. 5-6
Hockey
Powell River
Powell River
8:00 p.m.
Nov. 6
Hockey J.V.
Selkirk Co.
Arena
3:30 p.m.
Nov. 5
Basketball
Grads
Mem. Gym
7:30 p.m.
Nov. 6
Rugby
Ex-Britannia
UBC
2:30 p.m.
Nov. 6
Rugby 2nd
Scribes
UBC
1:15 p.m.
Nov. 6
Rugby 3rd
Delta
Ladner
1:15 p.m.
Nov. 6
Rugby 4th
Scribes
UBC
1:15 p.m.
Nov. 6
Rugby J.C.
Douglas Co.
Douglas Co.
1:15 p.m.
Nov. 6
Soccer
North Shore
Kinsman
2:00 p.m. Friday, November 5,  1971
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 19
Arena challenges 'Birds first
Rugby men victoriously
shut out everyone
The UBC Thunderbird rugby
team trounced the Seattle rugby
club 42-0 last weekend in Seattle.
Winger John Mitchell
accounted for most of the scoring
with six tries and two converts for
28 points.
Although the opposition was
tough and the number of penalties
high (50), the Bird backs were far
superior in their play.
Tries were also scored by
Dennis Quigley, Ray ianks, and
Eric Lillie, with Banks adding one
convert.
The 'Birds are still undefeated
in Vancouver league play, and
have games in hand over the other
teams.
Saturday, the 'Birds take on
number two ranked Ex-Britannia
at Thunderbird Park starting at
2:30.
In other action last weekend,
the Frosh beat Capilano College
32-0 to take top place in their
league, the Totems beat Seattle,
the Tomahawks won over the
Trojans 18-0, but Braves suffered
the only UBC defeat at the hands
of Puget Sound.
The UBC hockey team may be
without an arena this year. The
UBC Safety Committee is not
satisfied with the present
protective facilities at the
Thunderbird Sports Centre. They
want protective screening of some
sorts installed, and they want the
UBC Athletic Department to pay
for it.
The arena management agrees
that screening should be installed
and that the Athletic Department
should pay for it. Stan Floyd, the
arena manager, said that the arena
has lost over $226,000 since
January of this year because of
the repairs and closure of the dual
rinks due to faulty beams which
support the roof, and is in no
position to pay for any
improvements at all to the centre.
"The only way we can raise the
money for the screening is to
increase the fees. This building is
basically for the students, not for
intercollegiate teams, so why
should we expect the students to
pay for the improvements, when
hoop shots
STORY AND PHOTO BY KEITH DUNBAR
His nickname is "Thor", and like the Norse
god of thunder, UBC's Ron Thorsen is still to be
heard from.
It is the last year for the 6'1" guard, and he is
setting records each time he scores a point.
Ron is entering his 4th year as a member of
the Varsity squad, and all of them have been
action-packed.
Two years ago he scored 48 points in one
game; and when the Thunderbirds won the
Canadian championship, he was selected as the
Most Valuable Player.
He is continually showing new moves, passes
the ball very well, and is an excellent ball
handler.
If any flaw is to be found in Thorsen as a
college basketball player, it would be in his
outside shooting.
The vital cog in the Thunderbird machine,
however, assumes a very confident, yet quiet air
about his basketball prowess. Although the most
publicized player on the team, he takes every
opportunity he can to boost the rest of the Birds.
When approached this year, he quickly suggested
other team members that he felt should receive
some ink.
However, there is no denying the drawing
power that Thorsen is to basketball at UBC. He is
probably the most exciting player in Canada to
watch, and does most everything well. Pages and
pages could be written on his abilities, but the
best proof of all is to read no more and to go and
see him play.
You will get that chance this evening in War
Memorial Gym. Festivities begin at 8:00 p.m.
with the Old Timers game. The young grads
against this year's Thunderbirds begins at nine.
Admission is free to all UBC students.
these improvements are for the
benefit of one of these teams?'
Floyd said.
Floyd also said that the arena
had spent $35,000 on building
team rooms for both the Varsity
and Jayvee teams. "In view of
this, I don't think that we're being
unreasonable in asking the
Athletic Department to pay for
the screening."
The Athletic Department,
naturally enough, has a different
opinion on the subject. "Buzz"
Moore, Assistant Director of
Athletics said, "Why come to us?
We simply rent the place."
Director of Athletics, Bus
Phillips, said "The screening
would certainly be desirable, but I
can't see it as being essential. No
other rink that we play hockey in
is equipped with protective
screening, and right now the
Athletic Department can't afford
it."
really care who pays for the
screening. A spokesman for the
committee said, "The Committee
has met and decided that
something must be done to
improve the safety of the
spectators. It's not up to us to
decide the financing though we do
recognize the problems involved."
Both the Athletic Department
and the arena have proposed
alternatives to the installation of
the screening. Neither of them are
workable though. Moore said,
"We offered to play our games
without spectators. See how the
students like that." Not to be
outdone, Floyd said, "We can
always rent the ice to someone
else at that time."
As it stands now, the arena and
the Athletic Department are
pointing at each other and saying
"You pay for it." And the hockey
teams continue to practice,
seemingly unaware of the
controversy they're in the middle
The Safety Committee doesn't    of.
Judo team cleans up
The UBC judo team competed
against eight other teams in
Campbell River, Saturday. Seven
of the eight man team placed
third or better in their categories.
Charles Maingon of UBC was
the Black Belt Grand Champion.
Other division winners were
Jim Nakamoto, second, Laurie
Hunter, second, Bill Byrd, second,
and John MacDonald, third in the
Green Belt and under Divisions.
In   the   Black   Belt   Division,
Charles Maingon obtained a first,
Gary Forsgren, a third, and Joe
Laing, a first.
The judo team practices
Mondays 8-10 p.m., Wednesdays
and Thursdays 4:30-6:30 p.m.
and Saturdays 2-4:30 p.m.
Anyone who wants to try out for
the team should contact Forsgren
and Laing or come to the
Appartus Gym in the Memorial
Gym at the above times.
Hockey Braves success on road
University of British
Columbia's junior varsity hockey
team, the Braves, hit the warpath
during the weekend and
continued to slaughter their
competition.
After setting the pace last
weekend with 8-3 and 11-3
season-opening wins over SFU and
BCIT, the Braves continued their
rampage on the raod by
clobbering Cariboo College 12-3
in Kamloops Friday, shattering
Selkirk College Saints 12-2 in
Trail Saturday and battling
Gonzaga University Bulldogs to a
7-3 decision in Spokane, Wash, on
Sunday.
"They are one heck of a
team," said Braves coach Frank
Carney about his players.
Vogue
g|i||]Iig]|il2]|2]|i||ililililig]Iililililili]Ig
El     AdultEnt. SIDNEY PORTER as VIRGIL TIBBS
IWlililMT'THE ORGANIZATIONS"
£1
I
m
a
O 6S5   6»2S
BARBARA McNAIR
"JtT-si'iT" 12:15,2:30,4:40,6:55,9:05
lllIl@[lllll[rI]|rJ]If]]llIlIlIlPlllllIl@[lll]
Coronet
Directed By
JACK NICHOLSON
=; "DRIVE HE SAID"
KAREN    BLACK
LEE MARVIN
BURT LANCASTER
"THE
PROFESSIONALS"
6:55,     10:25.
Drive     He    Said:     12:05,     3:25,
Professionals: 1:30,4:55,8:20.
  Swearing:  Very coarse  language and  male nudity.
[»n     —B.C. Director
■J ADULT
|P|ENTERTAINME
m
Odeon
[pi     ST  GRANVILLE
l«J 682-7468
[Si
H.
!■	
InJ   CAMBJE ,t l«th
iENTjuliEchRisriE aIan bATFs
ThE qobETAX/EEIN
Warning: Contains one very intimate scene.
—B.C. Director
SHOW TIMES: 12:10, 2:30, 4:45, 7:05, 9:25
E El HI El HI HI SI HI El HI 0 HI El SI Hi HI HI HI HI HI H
GLENDA JACKSON -PETER FINCH
MURRAY HEAD
SUNDAY BLOODY SUNDAY"
SHOWTIMES: 7:30, 9:30
WARNING:    Sex    involving   three   people,   some
swearing and coarse language. —B.C. Director
S76-2747
[Si
Is)
LSI
D
m
Is)
u
n
h
a
m
LUCHINO VISCtTOS
ANNIVERSARY     --»^ .     S       -
VarsityAm   Psaaftyfa*'
M4-3730W ADULT ENT. * mm; :mM
WINNER
GRAND PRIX
CANNES 25th
ANNIVERSARY
AWARD
DIRK BOGARDt
224-3730* ADULT ENT.
4375 W. 10th   SHOW TIMES: 7:30, 9:30
HI E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E
ONE INCREDIBLE AFTERNOON NAPOLEON
MET WELLINGTON - AT
Dunbar
224-7252
DUNIAR at 30th
"WATERLOO"
ROD STEIGER - CHRISTOPHER PLUMMER
ORSON WELLES - JACK HAWKINS
SHOW TIMES: 7:30, 9:30 Page 20
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, November 5, T971
mm STEREO RECORD SALE
mmt^mtmi
SRM2    7500   BUDDY   MILES
LIVE 2 LPs. iA   4,
Sugg, list $7.98 . *^«*»
*4
THS—5 EVERY GOOD BOY
DESERVES FAVOUR —
MOODY BLUES. S^.77
Sugg, list $6.29 .J
SRM614—LOOK        AT
YOURSELF — Uriah Heep.
Sugg, list $6.29 $0.77
OV 1415 — GET OFF IN
CHICAGO — Harvey Mandel.
Sugg, list $5.98 $0.33
PAS 71047 — STREET
CORNER TALKIN' — Savoy
Brown. ««.   ,,
Sugg, list $5.98 'J
SRMI — 609 EVERY
PICTURE TELLS A STORY
— Rod Stewart. $4.69
Sugg, list $6.29 ... .    * J
PAS
PAS
PAS
PAS
SR
SR
SR
SR
SR
SR
SR
SLP
PS
PS
PS
PS
PS
PS
PS
PS
PS
PS
DES
71027
71036
71040
71042
61237
61295
61264
61280
61294
61324
61 345
18139
402
420
451
429
476
509
529
539
572
589
18012
BLUE MATTER—SAVOY BROWN
RAW SIENNA—SAVOY BROWN
CHILLIWACK
LOOKING IN—SAVOY BROWN
THE ROD STEWART ALBUM
FIVE BRIDGES SUITE THE NICE
GASOLINE ALLEY—ROD STEWART
THEM CHANGES—BUDDY MILES
URIAH HEEP
ELEGY THE NICE
THRESHOLD PAUL CARBEY
KRIS KRISTOFFERSON
12x5 ROLLING STONES
THE ROLLING STONES, NOW
DECEMBER'S CHILDREN —
ROLLING STONES
OUT OF OUR HEADS-
ROLLING STONES
AFTERMATH—ROLLING STONES
FLOWERS—ROLLING STONES
BLUES BEAKERS CRUSADE-
JOHN MAYALL
BEGGAR'S BANQUET-
ROLLING STONES
MANTOVANI TODAY
LIVE IN EUROPE—JOHN MAYALL
DAYS OF FUTURED PASSED—
MOODY BLUES
DES   18017   IN SEARCH OF THE LOST CHORD-
MOODY BLUES
DES   18021    STONEHEDGE—TEN YEARS AFTER
DES   18029   Sssh!—TEN YEARS AFTER,
DES   18038   CRICKLEWOOO GREEN-
TEN YEARS AFTER
DES   18052   THE MUSIC OF ERIK SATIE — THE
CAMARATA CONTEMPORARY
CHAMBER ORCHESTRA
DES   18057   OVERDOG—KEEF HARTLEY BAND
DES   18059   ARKANSAS  TRAP — GEORGE
"HARMONICA" SMITH
PAS   71014   TOM JONES LIVE!
PAS   71019    FEVER ZONE—TOM JONES
PAS   71028   THIS IS TOM JONES
SRM—1—608—A MESSAGE TO THE PEOPLE— _
BUDDY MILES. Sugg, list 6.29 $3.86
SR       61319 SALISBURY—URIAH HEEP
Z 30679   SILVER TONGUED DEVIL AND I—
KRIS KRISTOFFERSON
NPS—6-STONE AGE—ROLLING STONES *_ „„
Sugg, list 6.29 $3.86
PNS—3—THROUGH THE PAST DARKLY— .„ „_
ROLLING STONES. Sugg, list 6.29 $3.86
THS—1—TO OUR CHILDREN'S CHILDREN'S
CHILDREN—MOODY BLUES.       ,.
Sugg, list 6.29 $3.86
DES   18016   UNDEAD—TEN YEARS AFTER
Mail orders promptly filled: Just tick off the
records you want; enclose your list with
remittance, plus 5% tax and postage, and we'll
get your order away promptly. First record
35c—each additional record 20c postage and
handling charge.
Plus Hundreds More! Hurry!   Quantities Limited.
STEREO SYSTEM SPECIAL
The symbol of
excellence
in sound
STA-701B - 90 Watt   FM/AM Stereo Receiver
1C-FET Solid State
• 2 FET 4 IF STAGE
supersensitive front-end • IC
circuit equivalent to two IF stages
produces the maximum useable
sensitivity of 1.8 microvolts. ■ Silicon transistors are
used for the local oscillator in the
re-stage to eliminate
drifting. • Circuit breaker
protection eliminates fuses and
protects against costly
burnouts. • Noise cancellation
circuit provides improved
rejection of unwanted signals. 2
FET-21C-32 Tansistors - 24
Diodoes — 1 Zener Diode.
2RSC
BASS REFLEX SPEAKERS
• 1-12" WOOFER
• 1-31/2" TWEETER
• 25 WATTS-HANDLING POWER
• FINISHED IN OILED WALNUT
CABINETS
Mcdonald
510 turntable
Complete with base, cover
and magnetic cartridge.
Features:
• Anti-skatinij
• Damped Cueing
• Manual, Automatic
operating
556 SEYMOUR ST.
PHONE 682-6144
OPEN THURSDAY & FRIDAY 'TIL 9 P.M.

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
https://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.ubysseynews.1-0128122/manifest

Comment

Related Items