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UBC Publications

The Ubyssey Oct 20, 1998

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Array e CSS drops out of
CFS Graduate
Council
Women's Field
ockey team makes
to the nationals
Ellington
andson brings
e band to Chan
the . <*
I  —• I _ yelling at the band since 1918
TUNED IN: As AMS decides whether to give more money to CiTR, "DJ J.J." must continue to work on outdated equipment, richard lam photo
CiTR funds fade away
by Sarah Galashan
Staff at CiTR are hopeful that the radio station will share in tens of thousands of dollars in extra revenue generated by AMS businesses this year.
At last week's student council meeting, AMS general
manager Bernie Peets said he expects AMS businesses to
make $480,000 this year, $55,000 more than originally
forecast. That prompted council to send the proposed
1998/99 AMS budget back to the budget committee for
review.
But whether the struggling, student-run radio station
will receive any of that money remains to be seen. AMS
finance director Sandra Matsuyama expressed a lack of
confidence in Peets' projections.
"What the budget committee wanted to prevent is
spending any money we do not have," Matsuyama said.
Still, CiTR staff say they will fight tooth and nail to
retrieve what they claim is a $15,000 cut in their proposed budget for this year.
"CiTR just can't take any cuts," said President Tobias van Veen, pointing to the dated and failing radio control boards.
On paper, it appears that the radio station received $70,000 last year,
and will receive the same amount this year. But van Veen says the figures
are misleading.
He says last year's budget was actually $85,000 because former AMS
finance director and current president Vivian Hoffmann transferred
$15,000 from the repairs and replacement fund
into the station's budget.
If that $15,000 is cut this year, the station's work
study students may all have to be fired, van Veen
said.
The station is currendy one of few in Canada
that runs with no advertising, no profit and a volunteer staff.
The spectre of diminished funds has also led
van Veen to think about holding a referendum
next January that would ask students whether
they'd be willing to pay a five dollar fee at the start
of each year to go to the station.
Matsuyama said she couldn't comment on
where the $55,000 would be allocated until first
consulting with the budget committee.
However, she did say that she considered CiTR's funding needs "a
priority."^
"What the budget
committee wanted
to prevent is
spending any money
we do not have/'
-Sandra Matsuyama
AMS finance director
J-schoofs Asian
connection
attacked
by Douglas Quan
Famed Canadian columnist
Allan Fotheringham drew gasps
and jeers last Saturday when he
openly criticised UBC's new Sing
Tao School of Journalism at
«ital2»the Ubyssey's 80th
anniversary celebration. Some in
attendance even called his
remarks racist.
Before 200 current and former Ubyssey editors and staffers,
Fotheringham (who is himself a
Ubyssey alumni) questioned the
school's connection to Hong
Kong-based Sing Tao Holdings
Ltd. He asked why funding for
the school couldn't have come
from a BC company instead.
"What does f Sing Tao] have to
do with British Columbia?" he
said. "It is goddam ridiculous."
Fotheringham also claimed that,
like sex, journalism cannot be
taught. "You're born to it," he
said.
The charitable foundation of
Asian media giant Sing Tao
donated $3 million to get the
school up and running.
After the speech, UBC president Martha Piper said she was
stunned by some of
Fotheringham's comments.
"I was surprised. I guess given
British Columbia's position in
the world, and the stature of the
Sing Tao newspapers in BC...I
was surprised."
UBC political science professor and board of governors representative Philip Resnick, who
has argued against naming
buildings after corporate sponsors, said the comments were
inappropriate.
"I didn't like the way he went
after this on the basis that the
donor [Sally Aw] is from Hong
Kong," Resnick said. "It was
under the belt."
Sing Tao school director
Donna Logan, who arrived after
Fotheringham's speech, quickly
defended the school's name,
"In today's world, it's
absolutely necessary if you want
to start something new to go to
the private sector.
"In terms of independence,
{the school] is totally independent The university runs it, and
if it didn't I wouldn't be here.** 2MmmMiU%DA\. OCTOBER 20. 1998
CLASSIFIEDS
impioymeru
ODDortunities
TRAVEL - TEACH ENGLISH: 5 Day/40 Hour
(Nov. 25-29) TESOL teacher certification course
(or by correspondence). 1000's of jobs available
NOW FREE information package, toil fee 1-
88-270-2941.
EARN WHILE YOU LEARN. Graduate debt-
free, Invest 10 hours a week. How can we
promise this? Call 895-7569 and ask for rhe student information package. Interviewing now!
PT BOOKEEPER. On campus company needs
a PT bookeeper for basic accounting tasks, probably 2-3 times per week, each time For a couple
of hours. Hours are flexible, and would be ideal
for a grad student with accounting experience.
Please fax resume to 943-7391.
ARE YOU INTERESTED IN GAINING
VALUABLE MARKETING EXPERIENCE
AND TRAVELLING FOR FREE??? BUST
LOOSE! Holidays, Western Canada's #1
Student Tour Operator is now hiring for parr
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STUDENTS! Make extra money for organizing
ski trips. Call Brad 893-8500.
PARTICIPANTS NEEDED. YOUNG WOMEN
who are members of Hong Kong astronaut (1-2
parents in Hong Kong and children in Canada)
or Hong Kong immigrant families (parents and
children in Canada) are required for a study
examining their personal and family decisions.
Call/fax Kimi Tanaka at 254-4158 or email her at
kimi@interchange.ubc.ca, or call Dr. Phyllis
Johnson at 822-4300.
$10 FOR 30 MINUTES. Got a stepfather you
love or hate? Indifferent? 17-23 years old? You
qualify! • No Interview • Anonymous, mailed
questionnaire. Contact 822-4919 or
gamache@inrerchange.ubc.ca
YOUTH EDUCATORS NEEDED! For a
health board sexual health program. Must be
between 19 and 24. No experience necessary,
traning provided. Honorarium for each presentation. Call Lu for info, 251-4345.
xtra mrr cu ar
WOMEN'S FLOOR HOCKEY. Individuals
and/or reams needed. Ail levels welcome. This is
a league, nor drop-in. Full-size gym, 5 on 5, ref-
ereed, showers and changerooms, recreational,
cosom sricks only, player and goalie equipment
available. Please 'call 733-4541.
.ccomodation
ROOM AND BOARD ACCOMODATION
AVAILABLE FOR WOMEN AND MEN.
Room and board (meal plan) is available in che
UBC Student Residences in both single and
shared rooms. Rooms are available on a first-
corn e-ftrst-served basis. Please come to the UBC
Housing Office (1874 East Mall, Brock Hall)
during working hours (weekdays from 8:30am-
4:00pm) to obtain information on rates and
availability Students can select one of three meal
plans. *Room availability may be limited for
some residence areas.
VANCOUVER - TOWNHOME FOR RENT.
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NEXT MEETING OF MARXIST-LENINIST
STUDY GROUP, Oct. 21, Wed, 12:30pm,
Buchanan B220, "Relevance of Communist
Manifesto 150 Years Later". Also, Friday, Oct.
16, Britannia Community Centre, 7:30pm,
"Necessity for Change."
PRIMA COMPUTER BOOKS: The most
important peripherals you'll ever own. Now in
the campus bookstore — Fast and easy; in a
weekend; admin guides, and more.
WHY PAY TOO MUCH FOR A COMPUTER???? IBM PC, 16MB RAM, WIN 95.
Internet Ready, Modem, VGA Monitor and
Software. $450. 738-6220.
nsceiianeous
HOME COMPUTER SUPPORT.
Personal/home office/small business. Set-up, service and repairs. Internet set-up and tutorials.
Call Todd at 730-7477.
PM calls pepper spray
MM
WW
by Alex Bustos
Ottawa Bureau Chief
OTTAWA—The RCMP used pepper spray at last
November's Asia Pacific Economic Co-operation
(APEC) summit in Vancouver because it was a
"civilised" form of crowd control, Prime Minister
Jean Chretien told the House of Commons Monday.
The controversial comment came during a heated
exchange in question period as Parliament resumed
sitting after a one-week Thanksgiving recess.
"The RCMP described pepper spray as stronger
than tear gas or mace," said New Democratic Party
MP Svend Robinson.
"This weekend I was
asked by a mother of one of
the UBC students pepper-
sprayed at APEC, why does
the PM keep joking about
her daughter's pain and will
he apologise to her and all of
the students for his shameful and arrogant insensitivi-
ty?"
Chretien's response took
Parliament by surprise.
"Instead of using a baseball bat or something else,
today it is necessary to have
more civilised methods, and that is why there were
towels at the time to help [students who were pepper-sprayed]," said Chretien.
Robinson told reporters outside the House that
Chretien's comment revealed Iiis "arrogant" nature.
"I mean, what's next from this prime minister
when he actually says that it's better that we pepper
spray them than we use baseball bats on students?"
said Robinson. "This is still a democracy in Canada,
"Instead of using a baseball bat
or something else, today it is
necessary to have more civilised
methods, and that is why there
were towels at the time to help
[students who were pepper-
sprayed]."
—Prime Minister Jean Chretien
this is not some totalitarian state."
Reform MP Jim Abbott was equally blunt in his
criticism of the prime minister.
"(Chretien) is on a different planet," said Abbott.
"He's completely out of control."
Chretien has come under attack for repeatedly
poking fun at student protesters pepper-sprayed by
the RCMP during APEC. After last year's conference
of 18 Pacific Rim leaders, the prime minister said
pepper was something he put on his plate.
On September 22, he rose in the House and conceded, "I probably should not have made [the joke]."
But on October 8, while visiting Winnipeg,
Chretien once again raised the ire of his critics by
laughing   about   "peppei
steak."
Then this past weekend,
during the annual
Parliament Hill Press
Gallery dinner, the prime
minister sprayed This How
Has 22 Minutes star Greg
Thomey with breath freshener in a jab at the peppei
spray controversy.
Meanwhile, the third
week of the APEC inquiry in
Vancouver resumed
Monday   with   testimony
from a UBC film department professor.
For the first time in the hearings, the RCMP Public
Complaints Commission panel heard testimony that
was sympathetic to the officers.
Chris Gallagher says he witnessed the "flagpole"
incident while standing on a short wall near the
Buchanan A building. He says from his vantage
point, the use of pepper-spray by RCMP officers was
"legitimate, justified and measured."*
the ubyssey.
oh baby.
V
Canadian University Press
CUP IS A COLLECTIVE OF OVER 45 STUDENT NEWSPAPERS FROM ACROSS
CANADA. IT IS THE OLDEST STUDENT ORGANISATION IN CANADA AND THE
OLDEST STUDENT PRESS ORGANISATION IN THE WORLD. SINCE 1938 CUP
HAS WORKED TO ENSURE THE ROLE OF THE STUDENT NEWSPAPER AS A
SOURCE OF CRITICAL VOICE IN STUDENT COMMUNITIES AND THE
CONTINUED TRADITION OF A CANADIAN STUDENT PRESS FREE FROM
COMMERCIAL AND POLITICAL RESTRAINTS.
the ubyssey
is proud to be a founding member of the Canadian University Press THE UBYSSEY.Tl
ffi2JU22a3
Graduate Student Society drops out of the NGC
by Marianne Birmingham
UBC's Graduate Student Society recentiy
voted overwhelmingly to drop its status as
an associate member of the National
Graduate Council, a sub-group of the
Canadian Federation of Students (CFS).
The decision came after debate on the
limited role the GSS can currently play as
part of the CFS—a national student lobby
group.
Full membership into any CFS organisation requires a student-wide referendum.
Last year's GSS referendum for CFS membership failed 451-236.
Christian Nally, GSS director, attended a
May meeting of the CFS at York University in
Ontario, and after discussions pertaining to
graduate students he was asked to leave.
Nally said he was surprised by the
request. "Our previous delegates had been
allowed to participate as much as they
wanted to, and the reason basically was
because UBC was viewed as a prospective
member.
"In my view, a student organisation that
reports to represent students should never
be excluding students from its meetings".
Nally was critical of the meeting's content
saying little was discussed pertaining specifically to graduate students.
Mike Cordon, chair of the National
Graduate Council, explained, "The new
[GSS] Executive was frustrated by the limits
that NGC membersfiip afforded, like not
being able to have input into policy decisions, in terms of our Committee deliberations, but the 'Catch-22', of course, is that
you can't have input and a voting share in
those decisions unless you're full members
[of the CFS]".
Still, Nally was one of the few members
who voted to remain associate members. "I
thought that we should try to maintain [our
membership], even though it was a difficult
relationship. I guess in the back of my mind
I hoped that we would be able to have some
influence on the NGC, and quitting it
seemed to go against that option."
Nally then suggested the vote of the GSS
to withdraw from the NGC was simply a case
of "quitting before you're fired."
According to Conlon, "it's generally not
an option just to be members of the NGC; it
was a very special and strange category that
UBC fell into."
The CFS later motioned to eliminate the
associate membership states.
"The move to eliminate [the status] was
not meant as a kind of punjtive or reactive
move to UBC, but it was, to be honest,
meant to ensure that the kind of misunderstanding we had with UBC doesn't happen
again," explains Conlon.
The GSS is now considering membersrup
with in the Canadian Graduate Council, a
lobby group specifically focused on graduate student issues.**
MMMJLM m ■ B msYJLgjt
"I think that it
should be
required that students have some
with not just Arts
and the six credits
of science. I think
they should have
more of a broader
focus."
-Adrienn Bouris,
Third Year Arts
programs
Undergrad curriculum
to see drastic changes
by Chris Lee
Undergraduates admitted to UBC in the next century will likely face a very different academic experience than previous students, according to proposed curriculum changes outlined in the university's revised vision statement, Trek
2000.
The White Paper version of the document, which differs little from the Green Paper widely circulated earlier this
year, states that by the year 2003 all undergraduates will "have a research based learning experience" that will integrate research seminars and projects into the curriculum.
Students will also be required to take more courses that are international in scope. The document states: "This
component may take many forms, such as second language instruction, history/political science or humanities courses, an international visit or exchange..."
Barry McBride, UBC's vice president academic, will head a committee of all faculty deans to draft an Academic Plan by the new year
that will incorporate the Trek 2000 proposals.
"We've only started to think about what we do", said faculty of arts
dean, Shirley Neuman. "We have some distance to go to completely
come to terms with this document.
"The devil is in the details," she said.
That said, the faculty of arts has responded to some of the document's other proposals regarding curriculum, including one that
stresses a more interdisciplinary approach to learning.
Neuman said by the year 2000 all first year arts students will be
required to take three eight credit courses in the humanities and
social sciences as part of the "Foundations" program. A joint Bachelor
of .Arts and Bachelor of Education program is also being developed.
In addition, instructors will be encouraged to hand out more group
projects, and assignments that require students to get out into the
community.
But Neena Sonik, vice president of UBC's student society, wonders
whether the university's moves to emphasise research and to broaden
the curriculum will agree with a growing number of students whose
main interest in getting a post-secondary degree is that it will land
them a career.
"[Undergraduates] are looking
for program that are more career
relevant. They want skills relevant to
their workplace and marketable," Sonik said.
Mary Russell, president of UBC's faculty association, has a different concern.
She's worried financial and faculty resources may be depleted in a rush to bring in
new teaching technologies.
"Generally, faculty are interested in exploring information technology," Russell
said," [but] we don't want to sacrifice the benefits students have from direct contact."
Russell is also worried that the university's real motive behind the curriculum
changes may be "restructuring and downsizing."
"I think people are apprehensive about this Academic Plan exercise...because it
could be such a significant change to the university," she said.*
Nova Scotia post-secondary education funding threatened by deficit
ills
"I think there
should be a lot
less students in
the upper level
courses. They
should bring in
more teachers
or utilise the
teachers more."
Fourth Year Human
Kinetics
marketable
—Neena Sonik
AMS vice president
"I think a lot of the
students know
what they want to
go into so I think
there's enough
out there to
choose from."
-Andrew Brooke,
Fourth Year
Political Science
"If you keep making it [the curriculum] more
and more general, it's just going to be harder
and harder to get it more specified when you're
older and then you're just going to end up with
a bunch of students coming out with mass
degrees with no focus."
-Elizabeth Kenward.
richard lam photos Third Year Science
 by Andrew Simpson
Atlantic Bureau
HALIFAX (CUP)—Students in Nova
Scotia are worried the province will
renege on its promise to inject
$23.8 million into universities now
that it is projecting an $82 million
deficit.
In a first-quarter budget report
released earlier this month, the
minority     Liberal     government
revealed they would not achieve
their objective of a $1.2 million surplus, and instead expect to fall $82
million in the red.
Students who are wary of spending cuts said that funding increases
to education shouldn't be sacrificed
to balance the books.
"Its up to the politicians to look
at what they promised to education and stick to their game plan,"
said Tim Mclntyre, president of the
student union at St. Francis Xavier
University in Antigonish, NS.
Just before the deficit was
announced, the province promised
it would pour much-needed cash
into Nova Scotia's 11 universities
over the next three years, replacing
funding that that has previously
been cut.
Ted Chiasson, president of
Dalhousie University's student
union, says he understands the gov
ernment is under financial pressure
but warns of the costs of cutting
education. "Cutting your knowledge
and your skills training would be
extremely short-sighted and self-
destructive in the long run."
But Education Minister Robbie
Harrison says the concern is over
nothing and the government is
committed to the $23.8 million
increase.
He says the significance of a
small deficit—which he attributes to
unforseen factors like the poor dollar and an overrun in health spending—has been overblown.
"In a $4.4 billion budget, a
deficit in the twenties of millions is
not cause for grave concern," he
said.
"We will take steps to ride out
these bumps in the road...but we
have no intention of changing
course."*> STUDENT SOCIETY OF UBC
AMS
UPDATE
visit us at www.ams.ubc.ca
The Alma Mater Society and The Student Environment Centre Presents
rams
STUDENT
RAFFI
Student Union Building (SUB) Conversation Pit
environment     Wednesday, October 28, 1998 at 12:30 - 1:30 pm
CENTRE
Reading for adults from his autobiography,
"The Life of a Children's Troubadour"
In this revealing and engaging book, get to know the man whose music
has made him a friend to millipns of children and their families.
RAFFI
The Life m a
(.'Mil DRl-N'S TROUBADOl'R
ADVANCE PRAISE
"I grew up with Raffi s music—fun, imaginative and loving,
it was music for the soul. Reading this was an opportunity
to see life through a mentor's eyes."
— Katherine Muncaster, Student, U.B.C., Vancouver
"Raffi reveals himself to be a serious-minded visionary
with a heart as big as the world."
- Daniel Goleman, Author, Emotional Intelligence
"A warm welcoming book that reveals a lot about the soul
of the author."
- Theo Colburn, Senior Scientist, WWF, Washington, DC
For more information
AMS (Alma Mater Society) External Commission
Ryan Marshall 822-2050
Does ^uxion Need
to 3e IneTeajseot'?
NO
For the past 3 years
•there has been a tuition freeze
•government funding has been stagnant
•enrollment has increased but funding has not
•inflation, increased operation costs,
opi.ni.on count.
IS THIS AFFECTING THE QUALITY OF YOUR EDUCATION?
The AMS values student input and thinks students should have a their say. The AMS is helping
to facilitate a Tuition survey put together by the University's Tuition Policy Committee. We invite
students to fill out the survey so you can help ensure a fair tuition policy is adopted by UBC. The
survey is posted on-line at www.oldadm.ubc.ca/tuitionpolicy or you can drop by any undergrad
constituency office or come by the SUB Room 238 to pick up a copy.
what's on at ubc
Got a great idea? Need
funding?
The AMS Innovative Projects Fund is jointly
administered by the University and the AMS,
and aims to fund a broad range of visible innovative projects which directly benefit the
campus community.
Projects which received funding last year include:
Blue safety lights, computer labs,
Bus racks on the 99 B-line buses,
Humanities 101 - an open learning
initiative in the
Downtown Eastside.
Students, staff, and faculty are encouraged
to apply.
Applications are available from
SUB room 238and the Old
Administration Building.
Extended: November 2
a-m.s elections!
The AMS is looking for an Elections
Committee. If you are interested in
the democratic process, and want to
ensure a fair and open elections
process in your student society this
January, we need you!
Ever wanted to be a White House
intern? (this is almost as much fun)
The AMS president is looking for an
assistant to help out with special
projects and random tasks. Gain
insight into the AMS and help
de-stress    the prez...
To apply for either of the above, drop
off your resume and a brief cover
letter to
SUB Room 238.
Attention: Nominating Committee
FREEDOM OF SPEECH IN CANADA
For the second time, the federal government has
turned down legal funding for the APEC
Complainants. The AMS is collecting donations for
these costs. Drop by any AMS commercial outlet to
contribute. If you would like to help out with
fundraising, contact Vivian Hoffmann, AMS
iPresident: 822-3972 / president@ams.ubc.ca THE UBYSSEY * TUEfflAY OfTOPFR 7P T>% S
FOOTBALL
UBC played their worst game of the year as they
were blown out 45-13 by the University of
Calgary Dinosaurs at McMahon Stadium. Since
the Canada West-leading Saskatchewan Huskies
were also upset 24-16 by Alberta, UBC can still
host in the playoffs if they beat Saskatchewan
and the Huskies lose to Calgary. The
Thunderbirds host the hapless University of
Manitoba Bisons Friday night at Thunderbird
Stadium.
WOMEN'S SOCCER
The Birds are still undefeated after a 1-1 tie with
the visiting Victoria Vikings on Saturday. Ros
Hicks scored for UBC in the 59th minute, while
Jeanette Haas scored on a penalty kick in the
73rd minute. UBC moved to 2-0-4 on the season
and stayed in second place in the Canada West
MEN'S SOCCER
The men lost 2 -0 to the Vikings at Victoria to drop
to 3-2-1 and remain in third place in the Canada
West. Both the men's and women's soccer teams
dose out the regular season at home next weekend against the University of Saskatchewan
Saturday and die University of Alberta Sunday.
WOMEN'S VOLLEYBALL
The Birds won the University of Western Ontario
tournament with a straight-sets sweep of laval
15-13, 15-10, 15-10 in the final. UBC only
dropped one set in the five games they played,
at War Memorial Gym.
MEN'S VOLLEYBALL
The men finished their preseason with a four-set
loss to Mount Royal College (16-1. 15-12, 11-15,
15-9). The T-Birds open their regualr season
Friday night at War Memorial against Regina.
MENS HOCKEY
UBC opened their 1998-99 season with an 8-0
loss to Saskatchewan Friday night, despite out-
shooting the Huskies 15-2 in the first period.
They fell to 0-2 as they lost 3-1 on Saturday. UBC
hosts Lethbridge in their home opener at the
Thunderbird Winter Sports Centre Friday and
Saturday night.
WOMEN'S BASKETBALL
The Thunderbirds went 2-1 at the Ryerson
Tournament in Toronto. UBC fell 76-58 to
McMaster Friday before beating Windsor 81-73
Saturday and the University of Toronto 72-58
Birds to nationals
by Bruce Arthur
They  came  in  ranked  as
number one, but will settle
for second place—at least for
two weeks.
The UBC women's field
hockey team finished their
1998 Canada West (CW) regular season with a 1-1 draw
against  the  University  of
Alberta   Pandas   at   Andy
Livingstone Park on Sunday.
Of the ten games played, it
was the only one that wasn't a
shutout
The  draw secured  the
Canada West title for the
Pandas and relegated the
national number-one ranked
Thunderbirds   to    second
place in the conference. UBC
does still qualify for the CIAU
championships, which will
be     held     October     29-
November 1 at Alberta. And
though they could have beaten Alberta, UBC was pleased
with the end result
"We played such a good
game," said team captain Jen
Dowdeswell. "Even though
we're not first in the Canada
West, we're going [to the]
nationals and we can beat
them there. And that's more
important"
The Birds finished the season with an 8-2-2 record for
26 points, while Alberta
wound up 9-1-2 for a conference championship 29
points. UBC lost to the Victoria Vikings 2-0
Saturday morning before demolishing
winless Manitoba Bisons 9-0 in the afternoon. They then squeaked by Calgary 1-0
on a goal by forward Stephanie Hume in
the final fifteen seconds of the match, setting the stage for a showdown with the
Pandas.
UBC defender Genevieve Adams, midfielder Kim Buker, Dowdeswell, and
defender Andria Shannon were named
Canada West AU-stars, while Bird sweeper
Leslie Magnus was awarded the Gail
Wilson trophy for her contribution to field
hockey.
"I didn't think we played as well as we
could have," said UBC head coach Hash
Kanjee, who won his second Canada West
Coach of the Year award. "I think we're a little bit tired. We had last weekend,
Thanksgiving, and because we were going
away I really worked them, and I think
there's still a little residual soreness." He
added with a rueful smile that "in two days
they probably would have been peaking."
It was a subpar weekend by UBC's standards. The Canada West is the toughest
conference in the nation. Coming into it,
UBC was ranked first, Alberta third, and
FIGHTING Alison Taylor works against Calgary's Christine Pickles in UBC's 1-0 win. richard lam photo
Victoria fourth in the CIAU. So when UBC
lost to the Vikes 2-0 to start the tourney,
they had to scramble the rest of the weekend. The blowout win over Manitoba was
expected, as the Bisons were outscored 68-
I this year. But the Calgarywin was far closer than any of the previous meetings.
"Even though we're not
first in the Canada West
we're going [to the]
nationals and we can beat
them there. And thaf s more
important."
—Jen Dowdeswell
team captain
"The rest weren't that stressful," said a
relieved Dowdeswell, who sparked the
game-winning goal with a sparkling backdoor pass to Buker, who found Hume in
front of the goal for the tap-in.
UBC was in fine form for Alberta. The
Birds pushed forward agressfvery, got a
spectacular effort from goalkeeper Ann
Harada, and went up 1-0 midway through
the half on a Hume deflection that skipped
past UA keeper Bev Porter.
But in the second half, the I>andas came
out firing. And midway thorugh the second
half, Pandas forward Jamie Dryden flipped
a backhand up and in past a prone Harada
who was playing despite a torn calf muscle
suffered while training^last week.
"I slid across, and she waited til I was
down, and then put it in the net," said
Harada.
UBC will now prepare for the CIAU
championships in two weeks, and they're
optimistic about their chances.
"I think this thing is wide open—I think
anybody can win the [CIAUs]," said Hanjee.
"I tihink we can take comfort that we're one
of the four teams that can win. But we've
got some work to da" Hanjee singled out
Harada, defender Alison Taylor, and Buker
for special mention in the UA game.
"We're going to want it so badly at the
nationals," said a smiling Dowdeswell.
UBC heads into the nationals at less
than full strength—Adams tore the anterior
cruciate ligament in her right knee in the
Calgary tournament and will not play.
"I think that's the first order of business,
is to get 'em rested and get 'em recovered,"
said ICanjee.*
Hit Canada
WWW
ifajM****1*'!
a\tav\stacanada.com
Hard.
themoStpow^1CaM*an
jflSIBfisH-"^ -f
BFR20. 1998
We've got
50 FREE PASSES
to give away for
the screening of:
STRING
SAMURAI
on Wed, Oct. 21, 7pm at
Caprice Downtown.
So rush on down
to SUB 245 now!
XEROX® QUALITY
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Mon to Fri 8am-9pm • Sat to Sun 10am-6pm
The Dal Grauer Memorial Lectures at UBC
KAREN ARMSTRONG
Leo Baeck College for the Study of Judaism and
the Training of Rabbis and Teachers, London
Acclaimed author of A History of God: The 4,000-Year
Quest of Judaism, Christianity and Islam; Through the
Narrow Gate, Beginning the World, The Gospel
According to Woman, Holy War and Muhammad.
Imagining God
1:00pm Friday, October 23, in Regent College Chapel Theatre
5800 University Blvd.
What Does Fundamentalism Mean?
4:00pm Friday, October 23 in Green College Coach House
6201 Cecil Green Park Road, UBC
A History of God   Vancouver Institute Lecture
8:15pm Saturday, October 24 in Hall 2, Woordward IRC
2194 Health Sciences Mall, UBC
PLEASE CLIP AMD SAVE!
S        eTH
Wm      william Shakespeare
Beloved an <
BELOVED
at theatres everywhere
by Nil Koksal
Goosebumps. That is what Beloved offers. The kind that come
when your blood runs cold from fear or when you are too moved
for words. The kind that you get when you watch the horrors of
slavery and know that it is more than just an incredible story.
It is 1873 and in Ohio, former slave Sethe (played by Oprah
Winfrey) has been "free" for eighteen years. However, she is being
haunted by the the spectre of her dead daughter, her sons have
ran away, and she and her one remaining daughter are outcasts.
A combination of a ghost story and a tale of redemption,
Beloved is not just "the Oprah W
Oprah and Danny Glover (who
give subtle performances that ai
haunting portrayal of the title chi
Her childlike convulsions toget
stares and clawing voice make
Beloved frighteningly real.
Kimberly Elise's portrayal of Der
perhaps what steals the show, how
sitions between frightened child an
performance is especially striking i
lines, and instead uses calculated
screen and slight but meaningful c
On the technical side, Demme's
1
WV.A
dRCt^t; - NOV.. 7 7:30pm
^lyystudio
■~J; ■" $$m tftfitre for the Pi
fc   0aJ Oct 21 preview $6
ls| ^/-TkfcttB.lteg $15 St/Sr $9
^V-.v*     Frederic Wood Box Office
M2=2
mmmnmSmlms%ai
THE MIGHTY
at theatres everywhere
by Coralie Olsen
The Mighty didn't look like much But it
turned out to be a pretty pleasant surprise.
The Mighty is a story of two outcasts who
join forces against the neighbourhood
bully. If this sounds like a tired storyline
that's been done a million times before,
that's because it has.
Based on Rodman Pliilbrick's novel for
young adults, Freak the Mighty, the film
stars Elden Henson as Maxwell Kane, a
"regressed oaf." After an early childhood
trauma, Kane has stopped talking. He
befriends Kevin Dillon (played by Kieran
Culkin, who is Macaulays little brother),
who has a crippling disease which results
in limited use of his legs. The two join
forces and with Max as the body with
strong legs, Kevin is the brain sitting high
on Max's shoulders and the premise is that
they work together as one person. As one
hero, actually—they imagine themselves
to be a knight in King Arthur's court
It may sound hokey, but The Mighty is
saved by Culkin's and Henson's performances. Acting seems to come naturally
to both, despite their youth. Cul
ticular is hilarious, and winds i
the show. His acting abilities
beyond his years, and he should
tie more staying power than his
ling. Henson also gives a gc<
mance, and in a far more challe
than anything he encounterei
such as The Mighty Ducks.
After seeing The Mighty's
trailer, I had no desire to i
effort to see it,. But while it:
be worth eight dollars at the tfc
a worthwhile endeavour for t
at the video store.* THE UBYSSFY
Eft more than
msand words
•graphs of Massimo Sciacca (left) and Judah Passow (below)
he Hong Kong Bank of Canada Building until Oct 24.
WORLD PRESS PHOTO
EXHIBITION
At the Hong Kong Bank of Canada
Building
Until October 24
by John Zaozirny
An annual monument to photojour-
Jialism's power, the World Press Photo
Exhibition returns to Vancouver this
year with an exhibition in the downtown Hong Kong Bank of Canada
Building. With subjects ranging from
the recent election in Great Britain
and gay rodeos to the suffering of
children in the developing world and
tense confrontations between Israelis
and Palestinians, the exhibition portrays the horrors—and, less frequently, the joys—of humanity through the
lens of impassioned observers. Some
of the most effective photographs
illuminate the lesser-known and
largely ignored mass tragedies occur-
ing in the world, particularly the devastation that AIDS has wrought in
Africa and the horrific chaos that has
erupted in the wake of the economic
collapse in Algeria.
Catch the exhibit before it leaves
town. Admission is free. Just one of
the exhibitions' photographs is as
informative and telling as any book
on their respective subject.*
epic journey
ah Winfrey movie." In fact, both
Arho plays Paul D, Sethe's lover)
tat act as a springboard for the
le character by Thandie Newton,
together with her mesmerising
make the ghostiy character of
if Denver, Sethe's other daughter, is
, however, with her seamless tran-
ild and defiant young woman. Her
king since she has very few actual
ated stares that bum through the
jful changes in vocal intonation,
une's directing offers the suspense
we expect from him after seeing The Silence of the Lambs and the
softer honesty he used in Philadelphia. Tak Fujimoto's amazing
photography washes beautiful shades of yellows, greens, and
pinks across the screen, which are both evocative and visually
spectacular.
Not just an adaptation of a book, the movie version of
Beloved is a compliment—in both senses and of the word—to
the novel. Morrison's words and emotions are transcribed
almost verbatim to celluloid as Sethe's story unfolds. Demme
and Winfrey (who co-produced as well as starred) allow both
fens of the novel and those new to the story to become
entranced. Beloved is a film that, like Morrison's novel, transcends the easy label of 'slave story" to become a potent tale of
injustice, identity and redemption*
1. Culkin in par-
ids up stealing
lines seem far
louldhavealit-
n his older sib-
1 good perfor-
hallenging role
itered in films
ity's lacklustre
to make any
e it might not
lie theatre, it is
for the family
we are among you. be among us.
join  the ubvssev sub 241kj
we
want
you
so
join
the
ubyssey
sub241k
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cap;&
We don t fool around! V U
3 blocks south of the village in
the heart of Fairview Residence
^    Mon. - Fri.      7:30 am - II pm
Sat. - Sun.       9 am -11 pm
Phone: 224-2326
WEST 10TH OPTOMETRY CLINIC
Dr. Patricia Rupnow, Optometrist
Dr. Stephanie Brooks, Optometrist
General Eye
and Vision Care
4320 W. 10th Ave
Vancouver, B.C.
(604) 224-2322
THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
Forum
for the
campus community
on
Proposed Ethical
Guidelines for
Preferred Supplier
Agreements
UBC is inviting input from the campus community on the
draft Ethical Guidelines for Preferred Supplier Agreements.
Comments will be incorporated into a revised document for
approval by the Board of Governors at their November
meeting.
Wednesday, Oct. 21,1998
•    12:30-1:30pm, Room 110, Henry Angus
Bldg., 2053 Main Mall
Speakers:
Dennis Pavlich, associate vice-president, Academic and
Legal Affairs
Debora Sweeney, acting director, Business Relations
Assoc. Prof. Wayne Norman, Faculty of Commerce and
Business Administration
Speakers are to be followed by Question & Answer
session.
The draft guidelines are available on the World Wide Web
at www.external-affairs.ubc.ca/ethicguide.html. gpWS&a
8 THE UBYSSEY * TUESDAY. OCTOBER 20.1999
$10 for 30 mins
GOT A STEPFATHER YOU
*&#e   or   Jiafel
ARE YOU 17 - 23 YRS OLD?
YOU QUALIFY...
• no interview
• anonymous, mailed questionniare
• student or non-student
IF YOUR MOTHER HAS REMARRIED OR HAS A LIVE-IN PARTNER
CONTACT
The UBC Counselling Psychology Department at
822-4919
and leave a message for
SUSAN GAMACHE or
E-mail: gamache@interchange.ubc.ca
Vour Friendly
Neighbourhood Pub!
Pool Table ■  Darts ■  Backgammon
Big Screen Satellite T.V
Keno - Pull Tabs
RES POOL &Jm SUNW1
Watch All The Games Here'.
Monday Night Football Specials
Including $3.99 Jerry's Burgers
Jeremiah's Pub
3681 W..4th Ave fat AlmaJ • 734-1205
Parkins at Jericho Uillafie
Great Trek Contest
Win Big!
Enter the Great Trek Month Heritage Trivia Contest. Win a
$50 book certificate, the book 80 Years of the Ubyssey Student
Newspaper, or a swell Alumni Heritage T-shirt. All you have to
do is answer these questions (correctly, of course!).
1. UBC first opened in 1915. Where?
2. Construction at Pt. Grey started in 1913 but stopped when WWI
began. Only a few Aggie barns and the skeleton of what building stood
on the campus site?
3. The Great Trek happened on October 28, 1922. Students, alumni and
faculty paraded through downtown and then started the trek up to the
bush covered campus. What did they carry with them to deposit on the
site of the cairn?
Name.
Telephone
e-mail
Deposit entries at any UBC Bookstore cash register.
Deadline for entries is October 22.
Prize draw in the front lobby of the Bookstore at 12:30, October 23.
Contest brought to you by the UBC Bookstore,
the UBC Alumni Association and the Ubyssey newspaper.
Fresh a
AUNT SYLVIE
Runs October u-November 3
Sunday-Tuesday Evenings
Arts Club Revue Theatre,
Granville Island
by Lisa Denton
Upon first hearing the title, Aunt
Sylvie, I envisioned a cute little
piece of theatre involving sweet
characters and flowery dialogue,
leaving the audience all warm
and fuzzy when the lights came
up. I did not experience what I
had first envisioned.
Aunt Sylvie, a clever, extremely
physical piece of theatre, was
originally written and performed
by Rick Dobran as a twenty-
minute long graduation project
when he was a student at Studio
58 theatre school. The play begins
with Dobran's character, a modern sculptor named Jack, under
obvious physical and emotional
strain. Encountering a fierce
artistic block, he hasn't slept in
days and is nearing a psychological breakdown, due to his artistic
frustration and the night terrors
he experiences when he does try
to sleep.
However,   as  Jack  rambles,
almost irrational at times, the
audience learns about a man who
had ambitions of becoming a
criminal but turned out to be a
sculptor due to an encounter with the neighbourhood hag, Aunt Sylvie. Jack continues to narrate and
realises that one chance encounter may have saved
him from life as a criminal, but has also driven him
near to insanity.
What is stunning about Aunt Sylvie is the extreme
physicality of the role. Dobran transforms himself
many times over using minimal props as he moves
through dream sequences and flashbacks to depict
Jack's past experiences. Often moving the audience
to hysterics, the dialogue is fresh and humourous as
Dobran portrays both his intoxicated Scottish father,
Renaissance artist Michelangelo, and blind, old Aunt
Sylvie herself. Rarely standing still, Dobran leaps and
hops all over the stage, perspiring and out of breath
by midway through the performance.
RICK DOBRAN is the writer, director and sole star of Aunt Sylvie. If s a
role that suits the talented Dobran, who's a graduate of Studio 58
The Arts Club's Revue stage is a perfect setting for
the play due to the theatre's intimacy, and I often felt
myself in an interactive role. Dobran makes the audience part of the performance, addressing them as he
moves through the story of how he came to be. The
stage design is simple, but accurately displays an
artist's pad while giving room for Dobran's performance.
And it is Dobran's performance that is the attraction of Aunt Sylvie. He manages to convey a spectrum of emotions while effectively entertaining the
audience, making Aunt Sylvie a fascinating piece of
theatre. Written and performed by an incredibly original individual, Aunt Sylvie is a warning shot from
someone who will surely be heard from in the future
of Canadian theatre.*
Duke Ellington's Orchestra
still going after all these years
DUKE ELLINGTON ORCHESTRA
At the Chan Centre
October 14
by Alison Cole
When you're 20 years old and you
want to be a jazz bandleader, it
doesn't hurt if your grandpa was
the Duke. After the death of jazz
legend Duke Ellington in 1973, his
son Mercer faithfully took over his
father's world famous orchestra.
And after Mercer Ellington's
demise in 1996, it would only
make sense that his son, Paul
Mercer Ellington, follow in the big
band footsteps of his dad.
The Duke Ellington Orchestra
stopped in on the Chan Centre
Wednesday night to give the full
house of the city's jazz enthusiasts
a sampling of authentic New York
sophistication. Playing a two-and-
a-half hour set of Duke-inspired
big band standards, his baby-faced
grandson bopped around the
stage, leading such classic tunes as
"Take the A' Train," "Satin Doll,"
"Black and Tan Fantasy,"  and
"Mood   Indigo."   Paul   Mercer
Ellington and his 15-piece ensemble displayed no shortage of raw
energy, solo work and musical
dynamism, though even in music
of this sort, one should draw the
line   between   an
upbeat stage presence and overbearing showiness.
The    Ellington
classic "Cottontail"
was     a     perfect
example   of   this
unsubdued  character.   Before  the
band      members
barely     had     a
chance to frantically grasp their sheet
music   in   place,
they were playing
at   a   ridiculously
fast and unnatural tempo. The
whole rune came out as nothing
more than a blur of rushed notes,
leaving little time to savour what
was once a greatest hit.
One must wonder of the honest
rapport between seasoned, middle-aged musicians and the inexperienced, pompous kid who, due
to family tradition, happens to be
their musical director. Paul Mercer
Ellington is obviously trying his
utmost to keep  the
orchestra's energy and
pizzazz at the same
elevated level as his
swelled head. "A lucky
prick," my jazz companion called him, and
it is certain he'd be just
another      struggling
pOmpOUS  musician on the street
if  his   name   wasn't
Ellington.    His    two
compostions       were
impressive,   however.
Now if only his less-
than-knowledgeable
audience banter had
been as impressive, and he hadn't
acted like he had known Billy
Strayhom and those other "cool
cats" that were dead before he was
born.*
One must
wonder
between seasoned, middle-
aged
their musical
director.
check up on us at www.ubvssev.bcxa THF UBYSSFY . TUESDAY. OCTOBf R 20. 1998.9
rwr slow-mot os H~z€7Tfmw*mm'Mm>~
[D0\^[p(DCD
SNOWPONY— THE SLOWMOTION WORLD OF
SNOWPONY
[Radioactive Records]
Snowpony is a band that defies a quick description.
Their groove and hipness evoke an electronica/niphop
feel reminiscent of Portishead or Morcheeba, but their
sound and instrumentation have a distinctively organic
warmth to them. The Slowmotion World of Snowpony
manages to walk the balance and produce a diverse and
engaging collection of songs.
The album kicks off with "Easy Way Down", which
mixes sweeping guitar and Katherine Gilford's clear,
deadpan vocals into music that just oozes cool. Next, "A
Way To Survive" places repeated vocals and a chiming
country guitar over a tribal rhythm. That contrasts with
the more mechanical feel of "Love Letters," which
sounds as though Snowpony called up Billy Corgan and
asked to use the drum machine from "Ava Adore". And
"Bad Sister", the album's fourth track, has vocals competing with blares of a trumpet as the narrator describes
envy of her older sibling.
All eleven tracks could be described this closely.
CLIP THIS
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Though Snowpony works with a very recognizable
sound, they do an excellent job incorporating influences and textures. This isn't to say they mix it up like
Beck or the Beastie Boys, but Snowpony uses outside
influences in a way that keeps the songs fresh.
Much has been of the former bands of Snowpony's
two central musicians. Gifford, who writes all the songs
here, was keyboardist for Stereolab between 1993 and
1995. It was to tap into her songwriting skills that she
started Snowpony with Debbie Gorge, formerly of My
Bloody Valentine. Fans of these bands should expect a
departure from their previous bands' music, but probably won't be disappointed. The Slowmotion World of
Snowpony is an excellent album with an indie sensibility and a groove of its own. It comes highly recommended. ♦
—Duncan M. McHugh
Masters   of
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an international centre for advanced learning
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SWAP is a program of the Canadian Federation of Students 10 THE UBYSSEY » TUESPAY, OCTOBER 20,1998
TUESDAY OCTOBER 20,1998
VOLUME 80 ISSUE 11
EDITORIAL BOARD
COORDINATING EDITOR
Federico Barahona
NEWS
Sarah Galashan and Douglas Quan
CULTURE
John Zaozirny
SPORTS
Bruce Arthur
NATIONAL/FEATURES
Dale Lum
PHOTO
Richard Lam
PRODUCTION
Todd Silver
COORDINATORS
CUP Cynthia Lee WEB Ronald Nurwisah
VOLUNTEERS  vacant
r/ie Ubyssey is the official student newspaper of the University of British Columbia. It
is published every Tuesday and Friday by
The Ubyssey Publications Society.
We are an autonomous, democratically run
student organisation, and all students are
encouraged to participate.
Editorials are chosen and written by the
Ubyssey staff. They are the expressed opinion of the staff, and do not necessarily
reflect the views of The Ubyssey
Publications Society or the University of
British Columbia.
The Ubyssey is a founding member of
Canadian University Press (CUP) and firmly
adheres to CUP's guiding principles.
All editorial content appearing in The
Ubyssey is the property of The Ubyssey
Publications Society. Stories, opinions, photographs and artwork contained herein
cannot be reproduced without the
expressed, written permission of The
Ubyssey Publications Society.
Letters to the editor must be under
300 words. Please include your phone number, student number and signature (not for
publication) as well as your year and faculty with all submissions. ID will be checked
when submissions are dropped off at the
editorial office of The Ubyssey, otherwise
verification will be done-by phone.
"Perspectives" are opinion pieces over 300
words but under 750 words and are run
according to space.
"Freestyles" are opinion pieces written by
Ubyssey staff members. Priority will be given
to letters and perspectives over freestyles
unless the latter is time senstitive. Opinion
pieces will not be run until the identity of the
writer has been verified.
It is agreed by all persons placing display or
classified advertising that if the Ubyssey
Publications Society fails to publish an advertisement or if an error in the ad occurs, the liability of the UPS will not be greater than the
price paid for the ad. The UPS shall not be
responsible for slight changes or typographical errors that do not lessen the value or the
impact of the ad.
EDITORIAL OFFICE
Room 241K, Student Union Building,
6138 Student Union Boulevard,
Vancouver. BC. V6T 1Z1
tel: (604) 822-2301 fax: (604) 822-9279
email: feedback@ubyssey.bc.ca
BUSINESS OFFICE
Room 245, Student Union Building
advertising: (604) 822-1654
business office: (604) 822-6681
fax: (604) 822-1658
BUSINESS MANAGER
Fernie Pereira
AD SALES
Stephanie Keane
AD DESIGN
Shalene Takara
Cynthia Lee. Douglas Quan and Dale Lum were
already drunk, so Sarah Galashan got her camera
and Bruce Arthur started writing the apologies.
Alison Cole. Duncan McHugh and Jeremy Beaulne
were hoarding the sushi, while John Zaozirny,
Richard Lam and Coralie Olson were scoffing at Jane
Wong and Ron Nurwisah who were eating their cake
with their hands. Tara Westover and Nil Koksal were
eyeing the ice sculpture as Todd Silver and Federico
Barahona were eyeing the leftover wine. When the
coat rack collapsed, John Alexander, Lisa Denton
and Chris Lee had already fled and Marianne
Birmingham and Wendy Wong still won't tell us
where the water balloons went. Everyone, though,
was ignoring the elderly pygmy man on the podium. We should have called the engineers.
SI
Cfeinadian
University
Bess
/^ NOW, NOW—WE'VE
(    ALL GOT TO MAKE
V    SACRIFICES/
CiTR worth the money
Do you listen to CiTR? You've probably tuned in
to 101.9 FM and wondered to yourself what the
hell was going on. There's a reason for that. UBC's
official campus radio station has 80 different
programs that range from Witchdoctor Highball
to Straight Outta lallundhar to Spike's Musical
Pins and Needles. There is a breadth of programming that would be difficult to find anywhere
else in North America. CiTR is the shit.
And they broadcast from their cramped,
sticker-laden den in the SUB 24 hours a day, 365
days a year, with all of two paid employees. The
other estimated 400 staff are volunteers. Not a
lot of overhead in the salary department.
But your beloved Alma Mater Society has so
far come up with a preliminary budget that
depletes CiTR's less than exhorbitant funding
further. Never mind that much of their equip
ment is decrepit. Never mind that they're one of
the only really cool projects that the AMS funds.
Never mind all that.
It looks in the AMS 1998-99 budget that
CiTR's $70,000 budget has remained intact.
Thank goodness. But the Repairs and
Replacement fund that added $15,000 for
equipment upgrades last year so far has yet to be
mentioned. So all the frayed wires, decaying
soundboards, and scratched-up turntables will
have to make do with duct tape-repairs. If only
CiTR had a duct tape budget.
It's not as if the AMS is the most financially
prudent organisation that ever existed. The
refreshment budget went from $1,000 to $4,460;
$35,000 went to joining CASA, and they've
added $1,000 in speaker's honoraria.
Thank goodness. CASA delegates can have
really nice bagels.
Having a campus radio station that increases
the range of opinion at UBC matters.
Commercial-free radio that doesn't cater to corporate interests, that is run by students, and that
does something different in this radio-godforsaken town matters.
But without funding, a station that doesn't
accept commercials, is in ttouble. CiTR isn't
even on a shoestring budget. They're on a gum-
on-the-bottom-of-your-shoe budget.
AMS General Manager Bernie Peets projects
an extra $55,000 in business revenue that is
unaccounted for in the current budget. The
budget has been sent back for those revisions,
and CiTR would be a hell of a place for some of
that money to go. Unless you need even better
bagels. ♦
Feedback
on exams?
The following is a motion being
considered by the University's
Senate. When it was first debated,
some deans of faculties opposed it
and it was referred back to the
Academic Policy Committee of
Senate.
"An examination hardship is
considered to be three or more
exams scheduled within a 24 hour
period. Any student with an examination hardship should speak
with the instructors in the courses
concerned to see if a schedule
which avoids the hardship can be
arranged. If no arrangement can
be made to avoid the hardship,
the student should contact the
dean of the faculty, in which the
student is registered. It is the
responsibility of the dean to
ensure  that  arrangements   are
made to avoid the hardship."
As your representative on that
committee I have asked the chair
of the committee to postpone it
until we could listen to students
opinions on the issue. From the
outset I have been 200% in favour
of the motion but in order to persuade members of senate to
approve it I believe a compromise
may be necessary. I would suggest
that instead of making deans
responsible to make the arrangements to avoid the hardship it
should be the heads of the
respective departments. If you
would like you opinion on this
matter to be heard by the
Academic Policy Committee you
could e-mail me your views at
antoniez@unixg.ubc.ca or make
your views known to Alma Mater
Executives for their support. I
will ensure the committee hears
your concerns or suggestions.
Antonie Zuniga
Student Senator
CORRECTION NOTICE: The Perspective entitled "Teacher's evaluations and
foul language" in the October 15 issue of the Ubyssey was attributed to the
AMS Academic Issues Committee. It should have been attributed solely to
Ed Yeung, Neena Sonik, and Augustine Park. The Ubyssey regrets the error. THE UBYSSEY * TUESPAY. OCTQgER 20, j
;i^%>™
What is the RCMP
Complaints Commission really doing?
by C. David Jago'
Set up to investigate the complaints of the student protesters who were placed under surveillance, pepper-sprayed
and arrested by the RCMP for trying to assert their constitutionally guaranteed right to assemble and protest peacefully, the Public Complaints Commission, looking into the
incidents surrounding the APEC leaders meeting at UBC in
November 1997, has quickly been transformed into an
adversarial process whose main purpose appears not to be
to expeditiously reveal the truth but to equivocate,
obfuscate and procrastinate its way to findings that will
ultimately absolve the police and their shady political
masters.
Documents obtained by the complainants under the
Freedom of Information Act indicate that the Prime
Minister's Office, if not the Prime Minister himself,
directed the RCMP to shut down protest at UBC so that
APEC leaders, especially Indonesia's nervous President
Suharto, would not have to witness the alarming spectacle
of Canadian citizens exercising their free speech to criticise
human rights abuses in China and Indonesia or APEC's
free-trade policies. As far as the Liberal's running the show
at UBC were concerned the APEC Leaders' meeting had to
be a feel-good moment.
With protest looming, the Prime Minister's office abrogated the constitutional rights of Canadian students to
keep foreign dictators comfortable and the atmosphere
friendly. The gamble was, and still is, that the potential
gains to be had from pleasing the APEC leaders outweighed respecting constitutional rights and freedoms and
that the fall-out of such a decision could be easily taken
care of later. After all, the RCMP had already amassed plenty of well-salted evidence to show that the leading anti-
APEC activists, like Jonathan Oppenheim and Jaggi Singh
(both from APEC-Alert), were radicals who, if they did not
directly pose a threat to foreign heads of state, at least
posed a threat to their own safety by protesting in a high
security area.
The bias of the RCMP reports is clearly evident in their
exaggerated characterisation of Mr. Singh as a land of
monomaniacal Captain Ahab who needed to be given a
higher "threat designation" than other anti-APEC activists
because he was "attempting to link APEC to every social
PERSPECTIVE
 OPINION	
cause currently at issue in Canada and the entire world."
But so what? To add some truth to the matter the RCMP
report might have pointed out that APEC is precisely an
instrument of "globalisation" whose goal is to establish
"open regionalism," (or free trade) among its 18 member
nations. Free trade on this scale encompasses a lot of
issues. Jaggi Singh was concerned about many of them.
Reports that Indonesian security teams, allowed into
the country by the RCMP were ready to shoot down student protesters assured that when the time for accounting
came there would be no question that the protesters had to
be repulsed and arrested for their own well-being. The
scapegoating strategy was flawless until the RCMP arrested
Craig Jones, a law student with no activist affiliations
whose crime was to mount a "free speech" sign on along
the route of the APEC motorcade.
The RCMP Public Complaints Commission from the
outset has been thoroughly politicised. Some of the
lawyers presiding over the hearing have previously contributed funds to the Liberal party. The government refuses to fund the students while pouring resources into the
RCMP's defense. With the dismissal of Ted McWhinney
from the foreign affairs committee for stating that the complainants should be given funding (the committee has
since turned down the funding proposal) it appears that
the Liberals intend to make it impossible for the students to match the RCMP's heavyweight legal
defense.   Allegations that key government officials
may have destroyed documents related to security at
APEC, and that the Solicitor General stated that
RCMP Staff Sergeant Hugh Stewart had been set up to
take the fall for the PM have further exposed the
political amoeuvering going on behind the PCC.
Meanwhile, Prime Minister Chretien has refused to
testify in front of the PCC even if subpoenaed.   Hiding
behind the Deputy Prime Minister, he avoids his responsibility as a member of Parliament to tell the truth with
integrity.   "Let the commission do its work," Herb Gray
drones, but what work is the PCC doing? Where is the fairness and impartiality in this process?
The Canadian people deserve to know the truth of
what happened at UBC, and the individuals who made the
decision to disregard our constitution for their political
convenience need to be held accountable. Since the issues
surrounding the security at APEC clearly reach beyond the
RCMP an independent judicial inquiry of the matter
should be started immediately. ♦
C. David Jago is a member of APEC-Alert.
Opportunity
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upon presentation of your Student Card [Membership: $20 Annually]
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Application Deadline: Nov. 13, 1998
For application forms, contact
Consulate General of Japan
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