UBC Publications

UBC Publications

UBC Publications

The Ubyssey Oct 27, 1972

Item Metadata

Download

Media
ubysseynews-1.0128115.pdf
Metadata
JSON: ubysseynews-1.0128115.json
JSON-LD: ubysseynews-1.0128115-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): ubysseynews-1.0128115-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: ubysseynews-1.0128115-rdf.json
Turtle: ubysseynews-1.0128115-turtle.txt
N-Triples: ubysseynews-1.0128115-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: ubysseynews-1.0128115-source.json
Full Text
ubysseynews-1.0128115-fulltext.txt
Citation
ubysseynews-1.0128115.ris

Full Text

Array f
Vol. LIV, No. 13
FRIDAY,
OCTOBER 27, 1972
VANCOUVER, B.C.
~4S 228-2301
Explosion
a hydrogen
garbage barf
A bomb exploded outside
SUB about 10 p.m. but no one
was injured and no damage
was caused.
A member of the UBC traffic
patrol, who declined to be
identified, said the bomb
consisted of a garbage bag
filled with hydrogen with a fuse
attached.
RCMP are investigating.
The incident is not believed
connected with 1970 bomb
explosions in Brock Hall or
with a telephoned bomb threat
in the Hennings building last
spring.
CUPE unionizes technicians
By LESLEY KRUEGER
The Canadian Union of Public Employees has approached
the B.C. Labour Relations Board to obtain certification for UBC
research assistants and technicians, CUPE organizer Ole
Johnson said Thursday.
Johnson said the union approached the board last Friday to
get certification under CUPE local 116 for about 450 previously
non-unionized workers.
He said he expects certification to be granted in three
months.
"Almost all of the workers are earning about $100 less than
unionized workers in the same field, except in the top categories
where the pay is about equal," he said.
"So naturally after certification is granted getting these
people a raise will be our first priority."
He said CUPE had organizing drives in every department
where technicians are employed on campus until they had the
requisite half of the 450 workers signed up.
CUPE also had a successful organizing drive in the health
sciences hospital, where between 30 and 40 workers will soon be
unionized, Johnson said.
"Health sciences is one of our priorities, because when the
new hospital is completed we'll be representing between 500 and
600 workers there," he said.
"So although it may not seem like much, saying CUPE
organized only 40 workers there, it's really an important start
towards unionizing all campus workers."
He said CUPE's eventual goal was to unionize all the
currently non-unionized workers on campus under the blanket
local 116.
"Of course right now some of them have formed an independent union so we can't touch them, but we're working on
getting the rest into CUPE," Johnstone said.
"But I really donft agree with any workers who want to
form independent unions.
"It's so much better to get into a powerful union where you
have power behind bargaining when the contract comes due,"
he said.
Johnstone said CUPE has other organizing drives now
under way on campus, but declined to specify in what areas,
because release of details might endanger the success of the
drive.
"DON'T MOVE," screamed blinded woman.   Nets were not needed
to  capture  a   runaway  contact   lens which escaped from an eye
—sucha singh photo
outside of Frederic Wood theatre Thursday. Gary the Game Warden
trapped the delinquent piece of glass as it hid underneath a purse.
PSA split opposed
By JOSIE BANNERMAN
BURNABY (Staff) -
Political science, sociology and
anthropolgy students at Simon
Fraser University voted
unanimously Thursday to
oppose the proposed
dissolution of their department.
Faculty members conditionally agreed three weeks
ago to split PSA into separate
sociology-anthropology and
political science departments.
Conditions under which the
faculty agreement was
reached were:
• that faculty be allowed to
choose the department to
which they will go;
• that there be equal
allocation of resources to both
new departments
• that faculty have control
over the  curriculum  taught;
PSA student Diane Sexsmith
said "it is naive of the faculty
to suppose the administration
will accept these conditions,
when they have not upheld
them in the past."
In May of 1971 the Canadian
Association of University
Teachers imposed a censure on
SFU's president and board of
governors "for their summary
dismissal of two faculty
members and the improper
treatment of five others in
disregard of academic due
process and of proper
safeguards of academic appointments and tenure."
Essentially the censure
blacklists SFU and warns
CAUT members against accepting teaching positions
there.
Sexsmith said students are
opposing the split becuase "the
faculty failed to consider the
effect   of   the   split   on   the
students. It also neglected to
take a stand on the 1971 CAUT
censure."
Concerned students feel the
CAUT censure had lead to a
serious deterioration of the
curriculum because
progressive  faculty   will   not
accept teaching positions at
SFU.
"Since the censure took
effect there have been only
three permanent faculty appointments,"   Sexsmith   said.
Vacancies in the department
have been filled by a con-
See page 2: FACULTY
Peak & BoD still at odds
BURNABY (Staff) — A lengthy meeting
between the staff and board of directors of the
Peak, Simon Fraser University's student
paper, failed to come to any conclusions
regarding the difficulties currently plaguing
the paper.
Former editor Ron Roth remained resigned.
He said he did not see the editorial position as
necessary to continued functioning of the Peak.
"I will remain as a member of the Peak staff
although my major interest is the Grape," he
said.
Part of the board's criticism centered on a
belief that the Peak was more like the Grape, a
community newspaper, than a university
paper.
Bob Mercer, former Peak editor and most
vocal of the critics said the paper was not
sufficiently responsible to the board.
He said the lack of organizational structure
and overemphasis on layout had contributed to
the inability of the Peak staff to develop the
writing skills needed to adequately report
campus news.
Peak publications society office manager
Phil Dubois said the meeting had not been
called   to   solve   structural   problems   "but
because the paper was not serving the needs of
the campus."
Meanwhile student council in attempting to
encourage the Peak to cover more on campus
events tabled a motion "that the Peak contract
not be signed and that all further Peak funds be
withheld until such time as the Peak can show
evidence of sound management specifically:
appointment of an editor and compliance with
the Peak publications society constitution
regarding membership of the board of directors."
Dubois   is   meeting   with   Simon   Fraser
student society today to advise them on any
changes that they intend to make in the Peak.
The staff was largely in favor of the board's
move to restructure the paper.
However, they were continually on the
defensive against allegations made by the
board.
Mercer told the staff, "Buckle down and
learn the skills needed in the production of a
newspaper."
The meeting was directionless and very
little attempt to find concrete solutions to the
problems was made.
However, PPS board meets again this
morning to continue discussion. Page 2
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, October 27, 1972
Socialization of women a conflict
By ROBIN BURGESS
Women are unhappy because they
have been trained to be passive and
dependent in a society trmt values
activity and independence, women's
studies speaker Meredith Kimball said
Tuesday.
Kimball, a UBC psychology
professor, told almost 300 people in the
SUB ballroom about some of the effects
of sex role socialization on women and
men.
"The socialization of women is
primarily a study in conflict. Society
presents two mutually exclusive
choices to women — to be feminine or
to be competent," said Kimball.
- Either a woman chooses to do what is
considered feminine, then she is "just a
housewife", or she chooses to compete
in a male world and she is "masculine
and aggressive."
"There just are no healthy alternatives for women," she said. -
One expression of this conflict is the
typical female attitude to achievement.
Any achievement situation is a "no-
win" situation for females, she said.
"To fail or to win are both
threatening."
Kimball described a pilot study she
made last summer with grade eight
and 12 private school students.
She and her colleagues defined
situations involving achievement in
four fields: academic, athletic,
medical and teaching.
The students were asked to write
short scenarios around the situations
describing the attitudes of, and
towards, the successful person in each
situation and projecting each into the
future.
One result the researchers didn't
predict. The grade eight girls and boys
showed no difference in their fear of
success — a possible sign that
achievement is beginning to bring
about conflict for boys too, she
suggested.
More predictably the girls showed an
increased fear of success from grade
nine to 12.
However, more research has to be
done on how women measure their own
achievement, Kimball said.
"The study of achievement has been
limited traditionally to what has been
male achievement.
The popular belief that men are more
aggressive than women has a limited
truth, she said.
Men are more physically aggressive
than women. But women are more
"verbally", "pro-socially" and "indirectly" aggressive.
These are the only aggressions they
are allowed by society.
Women are more likely to condemn
other women who deviate from their
socially acceptable roles because it's"
safer, said Kimball.
"If you are on the short end of the
power difference it is safer to aggress
against others like you than to aggress
against those with the power."
A woman who shows direct, public
aggressiveness is open to attacks on
her femininity. "The consequence of
indirect aggression is less severe."
Sex role socialization begins at birth,
she said.
"In exchange for giving up infantile
dependency a boy is rewarded by the
knowledge that what he will be and do
will be highly valued by society."
If on the other hand she goes on to
become a wife and mother she has
failed to follow through on many of the
achievement and independence desires
of her childhood."
Kimball said marriage and
motherhood are "double-binds" for
women.
Mothers who work feel guilty about
it. Those who don't work are plagued
by resentment and nagging doubts
about their abilities as mothers.
To be masculine is to be assertive,
aggressive, competent and independent, Kimball said.
She told the audience the most important thing women can do for
themselves is to take themselves
seriously.
"To take ourselves seriously one of
the first steps, it seems to me, is an
awareness that our conflicts do not
come from some biological insufficiency but from the strain of trying
to be human beings in a world that
doesn't treat us as human beings."
Three Lives, a film by Kate Millet,
will be shown Tuesday at 7:30 and 9:30
in SUB auditorium.
Federal government anxious to rid
Canada of Marxist philosopher
DOWNSVIEW (CUP) — The
Trudeau government appears
anxious to rid Canada of Istvan
Meszaros, the Hungarian-born
professor hired by York
University last March.
Three motions on the case
were heard Monday. One was a
government motion to dismiss
the application for a writ of
mandamus recently made by
Meszaros' lawyer Paul
Copeland. The writ would force
the government to make a
quick decision on the
professor's application for
landed immigrant status made
in Canada after his arrival
here Sept. 19.
Ordinary proceedings could
delay a decision. Both
Copeland and Meszaros claim
such a long wait is part of a
subtle government tactic to
psychologically discourage the
professor.
The government wants to
stop the application because
Meszaros' lawyer refused to
submit him to cross
examination on Oct. 16 before
Ivan Whitehall of the civil
litigation section of the federal
department      of      justice.
Copeland had earlier agreed to
the cross examination on the
basic facts of Meszaros' application as submitted in an
affidavit Oct. frit was at that time that the
hearing on7the writ of mandamus xvas put off until
Monday/ Meszaros also applied Wr landed status Oct. 6.
Copeland refused to let
Meszaros be cross examined
because just before
proceedings began, the
professor was served with an
appointment of collateral
deportation proceedings,
meaning the government was
trying to deport him from
Canada. Because of the
government's action, he said
the cross examination would
not proceed because the
government would have an
unfair advantage in the
deportation inquiry.
The collateral deportation
proceedings were launched to
determine if Meszaros was a
bone fide visitor when he entered Canada.
The inquiry began Oct. 19,
but Copeland and Meszaros
walked out of the proceedings
Faculty censured
From page 1
tinuous round of visiting
professors. Chairmanship of
the PSA department has not
yet been filled on a permanent
basis.
PSA students are opposing
the split because it fails to
attack the problem of the
CAUT censure, which PSA
students feel is the central
issue.
Sociology prof Karl Peter
denied the effect of the censure. "Differing faculty
opinions have lead to paralysis
in the PSA department," he
said.
Peter said the faculty hope
the proposed split will enable
each new department to
achieve a unity of outlook
which does not exist in the
present structure. Political
science faculty tend to be
conservative, the sociologists
less conservative.
"But we are not radicals,"
said Peter.
At the meeting Thursday
students also passed a
resolution to censure and
criticize the faculty for
agreeing to the split without
consulting students and for
evading the censure issue.
Students also planned the
establishment of a communication network to bring
these issues to the attention of
all students. Information coordinator Marta Geodorowicz
said "we feel that what happens in one department affects
the whole university."
Geodorowicz said the public
assume the PSA students are
"a bunch of troublemakers,
but it's just not that way.
"There are no structures in
the university through which
students can officially protest,
so we must make our own
way."
before they began. Copeland
had filed a motion to quash the
directive ordering the inquiry
and therefore said Meszaros
should not submit to the
inquiry before this motion was
heard.
Ironically Monday was the
16th anniversary of the
Hungarian uprising, in which
Meszaros was active as a
leading intellectual and
defender of civil rights. He fled
the country when the Russian
Stalinists regained power.
Meszaros applied on March
24 to the Canadian high
commission in London for
landed immigrant status but
was refused in a letter on July
24. On Sept. 19 he flew to
Toronto as a visitor and
launched a new application
through the Orillia immigration office.
The professor was refused
landed immigrant status for
unknown  "security"  reasons.
Support for Meszaros is
increasing across the country.
Academics have appealed to
the prime minister and
Mackasey to either reconsider
the charge that Meszaros is a
security risk, or to substantiate
the claim.
York professors demonstrated outside York's Keele
street gate on Monday while
Meszaros was in court. The
noon meeting dramatizes the
fact that the professor cannot
appear on campus without
risking charges of working for
York in contravention of the
immigration laws.
The UBC faculty association
is also considering sending a
protest telegram to Mackasey
in the name of the Canadian
Association of University
Teachers committee on
academic freedom and tenure.
UBC associate history
professor Jan Bak, a colleague
of Meszaros in Budapest,
personally sent a petition with
30 names to Mackasey in early
October and since then he has
added at least another 50
names to it.
PLEASED WITH MIDTERMS?
Learn efficient STUDY METHODS
6 sessions — 1 hr./week
Starts Thursday, November 2
Register in advance at *STUDENT SERVICES
I Urtd^t-
I -Co
HrtirJ     Mfla
<o e» o l<-»"+-f *-<.
■v«y.<i«*rt a.c»
LO&sT       yiAt-i-
H -STU.S>eMT
(Qri*l«*   Tr~
/_CiO/£r«. H/3X1-
plOC.4
 : 1
The Cost of Living has gone up 20%
The cost of living has gone up 20% since the Trudeau government was elected in 1968. Some of the
largest increases have been in food prices.'Time and time again NDP proposals that would have
stopped soaring prices have been ignored by the Liberals - while big supermarket chains enjoyed
spectacular increases in profit. The Liberals seem more concerned with profits than people.
The NDP proposes a Price Review Board to prevent manufacturers, wholesalers and retailers from
unjustified price increases that gouge the consumer.
yon RON JOHNSON  we.
VANCOUVER CENTRE Friday, October 27,  1972
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 3
Inmates need volunteer tutors
By KARIN NIELSEN
Greater public concern is
needed for law offenders
serving sentences in the
correctional institutes and
penitentiaries in B.C.
The UBC prison project
wants  to  create   a   pool   of
persons volunteering to assist
inmates at the B.C. correctional institutions.
The project, established one
year ago, has already succeeded in graduating 60 inmates in a first year university
correspondence course.
There are more than 100
inmates who will graduate this
year, but more tutors are
required.
The project needs help in any
of the three following phases:
People are needed to "just
rap" with the inmates, so that
these offenders will be able to
stay in close contact with the
outside world.
One offender was quoted as
saying that after receiving a
five year sentence at the age of
25 he was released at the age of
EXPLORING UBC young innocents from South Hill Open Area
School man look-out post in front of Sedgewick library. Randy is
—sucha singh photo
not really crossing the Delaware he's just amazed by the huge hole
in the ground. But he may later cross the Rubicon.
Muck a consumer column
30 still with the mind of a 25-
year-old.
For this reason a great stress
must be put on this intimate
communication with the inmates.
The individual offender must
not lose his social identity,
therefore needs to relate to
that world outside the concrete
walls and steel bars, project
spokesman Jack MacDonald
said Thursday.
He said in an interview that
tutors, with some experience in
psychology, sociology, history
and English, are needed to
upgrade the education of those
offenders taking university
correspondence and special
education courses.
"These offenders must be
given the opportunity to be
constructive and retain their
self-creativity.
"To simply ignore these
imprisoned persons would only
mean a step backwards, and in
the wrong direction for our
society.
"These inmates, when
released from the institutes or
prisons, must feel that they can
contribute something to the
society from which they were
so long absent, and not return
to their former life as social
outcasts."
Parole sponsors are needed
to act as advisors and be a
friend to those offenders out on
parole.
The sponsors will work with
the parolee in order to reestablish his place in society.
The principal parole officer
will be in close contact with the
sponsor at all times, so as to
lend him advice.
The work of the parole
sponsor will be over a 10 month
period, and the "rap sessions"
and tutor sessions will be held
every Thursday morning.
The project hopes to enlist
some of the social work
students who want to be employed on permanent part-time
basis.
All persons volunteering to
assist in this project will be
required to take a basic
screening test.
"The total objective of the
project is to get. the public
involved in this and similar
projects, and improve the
climate existing in these institutes," MacDonald said.
Those interested in assisting
on the UBC prison project can
contact MacDonald at the
school of social work.
By LINDA HOSSIE
If any of you UBC restauranteurs
want to relax over a meal in the quiet
puritan atmosphere of an  English
dining room, try the Donut Diner just
outside the gates on Tenth Avenue.
This quaint little establishment
must be the last refuge of the England
of the forties.
Fake windows on the back wall
frame posters of Picadilly and Car-
naby Street. Old gentlemen in tweed
caps sip tea at the counter. An atmosphere of quiet friendliness pervades.
But try and make that friendliness a
little more concrete and find out
exactly where this gentle old English
aura ends with a crash.
On Tuesday I went to the Diner with.
a friend for breakfast. Both of us eat
there often, and he has been a Diner
regular for years.
We sat down in one of the booths,
and during the course of our conversation, while we waited for the
menus, I leaned over and kissed him
on the cheek. On the cheek no less.
The waitress, who until this point
had been nowhere in sight, immediately loomed up beside us and
asked us not to "smooch" in the
restaurant.
"The boss doesn't like it," she said.
"There's a time and place for such
things, where they're not offensive."
"Do you find a friendly kiss offensive?" my friend asked her. She
did.
"You should see the people we get
at the counter," she said.- "It's
sickening."
I have had other hassles with this
woman. We fell into a little arm to
arm combat one night over the issue
of feet on the chairs and she was just
as belligerent then.
This particular fracas, however, led
us to the manager and owner of the
restaurant.
He thought we were disgusting too.
He doesn't like people "slobbering
over each other" in his restaurant. He
finds it obscene.
"If you want to do that sort of thing,
why don't you go to a movie where it's
dark and private," he suggested.
He intimated that if we didn't want
to come in and sit down without
making a carnal display then we>
shouldn't come in at all.
We suggested he put a sign in his
window to that effect, and left.
What I think is obscene is having
someone get that upset over
something as innocuous as a kiss on
the cheek.
I admit the Diner makes pretty
good food and its cheap. I'm not
suggesting everyone boycott the
place. What I think everyone should
do is make a point of eating there. Go
in couples and do a little
"smooching".
If only one couple does it, they think
we're obscene, but if hundreds of
couples go in the Diner and smooch,
they might think it's a movement.
They won't be able to afford to turn
away the business. Play on their
capitalistic impulses and force them
to accept brotherly love. Hoist them
on their own petard, and vive la
revolution! Page 4
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, October 27, 197.'
Shhhhhh
We're not very happy about the silence presently
shrouding the English department.
We had hoped the days of secret reports and terse "no
comments" from UBC faculty members regarding
departmental affairs were a thing of the past.
However, this doesn't seem to be the case judging
from the response Ubyssey reporter Gary Coull got in his
attempts at interviewing various members of the English
department. (See story, page 6).
The present silence can be interpreted in two ways.
We could be witnessing an attempt by well-meaning
English profs to muffle the controversy surrounding the
department for the past two years. Or we could be
witnessing the silence of a beaten department.
Either way we don't like it.
Silence of this sort leads to the writing of speculative
articles which we are not particularly happy to print. The
speculation leads to departmental documents being sealed
in plain brown envelopes and mailed to The Ubyssey
without benefit of a return address as happened several
times last year.
The silence in the department leads to distrust among
students. A good example of this is the UBC board of
governors which has alienated many students through its
refusal to make its meetings public.
The silence also denies students information as to
what is happening in the university community, a
community of which they are an integral part.
We would rather that all the facts concerning
departmental affairs were available to students. However,
it is obvious that these facts are not being made available.
Therefore, if we feel that articles are warranted
because of various knife-in-back scenes in the department,
we will print articles based on whatever facts we can get
rather than print no articles at all.
Kmickleheads
You see, we have this problem. It concerns the
letters-to-the-editors we receive. It's not that we don't like
them. On the contrary, we crave them, if only to confirm
our suspicions that everyone else is bonkers.
However, when we get so many untyped letters that
our fingers get worn down to the second knuckle typing
them out, we start to worry.
No, not about the knuckles. Knuckles, you see, are
the stupidest of the many stupid inventions that
mongrelize the human body. A set of universal joints
would be far more useful than the average set of knuckles.
Any reasonably intelligent baboon with a Meccano set and
a week to kill could come up with something better.
While we're complaining, we might as well mention
the salutory knee (another weird joint) jerk which readers
apparently feel is a vital part of writing a
letter-to-the-editors. We refer to the "Dear sir" complex.
Firstly, there are two of us, so the salutation should
be plural.
Secondly, and of more importance, one of us happens
to be a woman so the "sir" is only half right. In other
words, it's Sir Andersen but not Sir O'Brien.
Therefore, no "Dear sirs". If you have to use a
salutation, come up with something different. Be original.
To continue, we would rather wear out our knuckles
typing advice to a groping humanity rather than typing a
bunch of stupid letters.
This is not to say that we won't print your letters if
they're not typed. This is to say that if there are three
letters in the letters-to-the-editors basket, and two of them
are typed, the two typed letters will get printed before the
untyped letter.
So, unless you're a quadruple amputee with terminal
arthritis, we'd like to see you typing your letters.
If you are a quadruple amputee with terminal
arthritis, we'd also like to see you. We'll likely resemble
you in a few years.
To be continued
Letters
Modesty
I read with interest your
reporter's comments about
faculty who prescribe their own
books for their students. I cannot
speak for my colleagues, of course
- but in the case of my book,
Democracy & Discontent,
required reading in my sections of
political science 200, the
explanation is obvious, the book
is simply quite brilliant. Indeed,
by dint, of my efforts, and those
of friends and relatives at other
universities, it bids fair to become
a runaway best-seller.
But lest it be thought that one
labours in the vineyards of
academe merely to quaff the rich
vintage pressed from ripened
royalty cheques, rather than to
nurse the delicate tendrils of truth
that struggle there for light, I
must tell you that even now page
proofs of a thoroughly revised
edition await my attention in my
villa at Cap d'Antibes.
Authoritatively yours,
Walter D. Young
political science department
Mr. Klean
In reply to the letter from
Godson and Manworing. That
letter picks my ass. These
self-important people seem to
think if they get a bunch of trots,
maoists and leftists weirdos to
shout "Stop the war" that the
USA war machine will pack up
their tents and fade off into the
Tonkin Gulf.
Where the hell have they been?
You've got to admit that these
hoked up bull sessions attract
leftists and maoists etc. like
garbage attracts flies. Protests like
this roll off the Pentagon like
water off a duck's back. Agreed,
the war is a bad thing. But why do
these people always take sides?
Killing is immoral no matter who
does it, ain't it? The leftists are
always the first to scream about
American ownership of Canada,
and about importation of
American culture etc. but these
same people are engaged in
importing an American issue,
namely the Vietnam war.
They rant on about how
murderous and destructive the
U.S. war machine (what a
delightful term) is. Well, I think it
would be a safe bet to say that
Genghis Khan wiped out a hell of
a lot more people than the
Americans did in Vietnam and all
without benefit of even the most
primitive of firearms. Chances are
the Vietnam war will be over by
the time the Student Mobilization
Committee gets rolling anyhow.
Why don't these people try to do
some good for Canada, instead of
sticking their noses into other
people's problems?
Gordon Richmond
science 3
P.S. You can damn well print
this letter with America spelled
with a "c" not a "k" (a la Georgia
Strait (sic).
Lymer
As I wandered through my day
and the halls of higher learning
these past months, I've realized
that UBC has a serious epidemic
on campus. I believe the technical
name is "readious alltimeous,"
but it's more commonly known in
medical jargon as "study."
The seriousness of this
mentally addictive disease is
alarming. The majority of the
population has had some exposure
to it at one time or another and
according to all reports have never
fully recovered from its effect.
That   seems  located  within  the
confines of particular sociologic:
institutions is fortunate, but strk
measures should be taken b
responsible authorities to chee
the spread of this disease before
particular virulent strain, know
as "knowledge" does untol
damage to the general populace
The classic symptoms of th
disease are a blank, staring gaz
from decidedly pink eye
incoherent mutterings, and a
urgent, uncontrollable need t
open books of particular subject
I'm sure with proper treatmer
and facilities plus stric
preventative measures, th
particular strain, the so-calle
UBCitis, may be stamped out.
Rick Lynw
arts
More
Lymer
Any first year student wh
stumbled mistakenly into Englis
last week is now in the progress c
being sociologically masticate!
Yes, dear friends and neighbou
it was another survey poll. I
"hopes to discover wfu
post-secondary students are lik
what they feel about themselve
and their education and whethi
they are representative (in a
"elitist" university?) of i
segments of the population," (1
quote from the introductoi
blurb of this questionnaire) UB
researchers and B.C. research a
rifling the minds of the trouble
first year students.
They are doing this (so the
say) to "provide a great deal <
information which until now h
not been available to the peop
who are responsible for plannii
courses .. . etc."
I really don't mind filling
those  impersonal IBM  cards <
writing with a borrowed pene Friday, October 27,  1972
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 5
More letters
because I can't use pen or
rewriting the card after a smudge
that won't erase. I truly don't care
what my general health has to do
with the goals of a committee I've
never seen or why I'm asked to
give my student number or why
I'm supposed to give my parents'
annual salaries without their okay,
or "stating what causes me
concern: 1. Physical illness; 2.
Emotional problems; 3. Family
relationships; 4. Other
inter-personal relationships; 5.
Financial difficulties; 6.
Academic problems; 7. Career
problems," or wonder what
happens to the card after the
dissection by a computer.
After all, it's for my own good,
isn't it? Right, that's what I
thought.
Rick Lymer
arts 1
Idiocy—5
Mr. Fox, in his letter which
appeared Oct. 20, has raised a
number of points which require
some comment. In the first place
he has asked each executive
member to commit himself on
both food services and the
covered pool.
On food services I have no
hesitation. I firmly believe that it
is one of the top priorities for the
Alma Mater Society. It is a top
priority because it is a service
which affects every student on
this campus, a service with which
students are obviously dissatisfied.
It is the feeling of the executive
(and I believe the council) that
the Alma Mater Society can
operate the food service within
the student union building more
efficiently, more cheaply, and at
the same time provide a better,
more varied service to the
students. The students in general
seem to agree with this position
given the results of last spring's
referendum.
As far as the cost of taking it
over is concerned, all I can say is
that Mr. Fox doesn't know what
he is talking about. While the
purchase price will have to be
negotiated, the $500,000 figure is
obviously ludicrous. We have
never tried to hide the fact that if
students do want to own the
service and run it then it will cost
money to take it over. All we have
said is that by transferring this
capital cost onto an extension of
the $15 SUB fee we eliminate the
need to up food prices.
In regard to the covered pool, I
voted for it both in council and in
the referendum. While I do not
think that it is a high priority (and
for that reason I was not active in
the debates surrounding the pool
referendum) I do think it is a
good idea. However, I must take
issue with Mr. Fox again when he
states that the executive has
committed the students to this
money. The committment cannot
be made by the executive nor can
the committment be made by
council. The committment can
only be made by the students
themselves in a campus-wide
referendum and that is what
happened. Whether or not certain
executive members were active in
the campaign for the pool is, quite
frankly, irrelevant.
We now come to the comments
on credit unions. I am glad that
Mr. Fox is not taking credit for
the idea for, as I recall, the first
time I heard it proposed was by
the Human Government well over
a year ago. The present AMS
executive subsequently supported
an application for an OFY grant
last summer to do a national
study on the feasibility of a
student credit union system. The
application, unfortunately, was
not accepted by the federal
government. It is, however, a
question which most of us are
extremely interested in and while
I am not an expert on the subject
by any means I would hope that
more information can be obtained
on it.
As I recall, the old Canadian
Union of Students did some
preliminary work in this area.
Hopefully, this work will be
picked up and carried on by the
new National Association of
Students once it is formed.
Finally, Mr. Fox seems to feel
that our current programs are an
"incorrect assignment of
priorities". That is his opinion and
he is welcome to it. However, I
believe the present executive
made its various policy positions
quite clear during last spring's
elections and we were elected on
that basis. In addition, both
specific programs which Mr. Fox
seems to be criticizing have been
endorsed by campus-wide
referendums. It would seem then
that the student body in general
agrees with our priorities.
David S. Dick
AMS treasurer
Gay
On Thursday, Oct. 19, the Gay
People of UBC again intervened in
the election campaign. This time
our questions were directed to the
representatives    of   the    New
I
TH(U8YSSfY
OCTOBER 27, 1972
Published Tuesdays and Fridays throughout the university year by
the Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C. Editorial opinions are those of the writer and not of the AMS or the university
administration. Member, Canadian University Press. The Ubyssey
publishes Page Friday, a weekly commentary and review. The
Ubyssey's editorial offices are located in room 241K of the Student Union Building.
Editorial departments, 228-2307; Sports, 228-2305; advertising,
228-3977.
Co-editors: John Andersen, Jan O'Brien
The masses parted and the poet started. Christine Krawczyk said it was
tragic Lorri Rudland said it should be banned. Linda Hossie thought it
cozy, while Gary Coull started to drool. Ken Dodd had a cod and Jan
O'Brien did the fryin'. John Andersen didn't rhyme while Robin Burgess
spent a dime. Forrest Nelson bought a cookie from Ross Medland who was
a bookie. Paul Knox giot chicken pox from Sucha Singh who said it stings.
Simon Trueloved Roger MacNeil while Josie Bannerman ate an eel Lesley
Krueger shot a lugar at David Schmidt who fell in a pit. Kent Spencer
could not have been denser to Doug Higgins who asked for diggings. Karin
Nielsened Ed Dubois while Gary Gruenke got George Richey off. The only
one left is Sandy Kass because she saved herself for last.
Democratic party, at the meeting
in the SUB ballroom. In reply to
our questions, both Jim McKenzie
(NDP, Vancouver-Capilano), and
Nigel Nixon (NDP,
Vancouver-Quadra), supported a
uniform age of consent and
revision of the Immigration Act to
delete! any mention of
homosexuality or homosexuals.
By far the best reply came
from Paddy Neale (Vancouver
East), a well known labor leader
of the province, who said, in
regard to the age of consent, that it
was "insane" to have separate
classifications. He called the
Immigration Act "pretty
peculiar" and was for omission of
reference to homosexuals in it. He
also said that he didn't understand
why people should be
discriminated against simply
because they make love to each
other and give pleasure.
Candidates of all three parties
have now been confronted by us
at UBC. Robert Stanfield of the
Conservatives and Ron Basford of
the Liberals both gave negative
replies to questions concerning
gay civil rights. Thus far only the
NDP has shown any willingness to
change the anti-gay laws that now
exist.
We find the replies of the NDP
to be the most sympathetic and
enlightened of the parties'
positions, and we feel that these
views ought to be adopted by all
the parties.
Yours truly,
Ian Mackenzie,
Gay People of UBC
Denial
Your unsigned article or
editorial regarding Recreation
UBC on page four of The Ubyssey
of Oct. 24 is a sad example of
irresponsible journalism. It is full
of untruths and bias.
The true facts are these:
• Plans to expand the use of
recreational facilities were
initiated many months ago.
• Students were involved
actively in the planning.
• Recommendations were not
submitted to the board of
governors until the proposals had
been approved by the students'
council.
• The school of physical
education and recreation has not
given any consideration
whatsoever to the "takeover of
the SUB games area", and has no
wish to be involved with it.
• No pressure of any kind has
been exerted on the president by
the school or its director.
• The school is not responsible
for the extramural athletic
programs.
• The allocation of the present
inadequate athletic fee is not, and
should not be, an issue.
• With the completion earlier
this year of the Physical
Education Centre in Thunderbird
Park, the school has made every
effort to schedule professional
classes on a basis which leaves the
maximum amount of recreational
time available in the Memorial
Gymnasium and the new complex
for the use of voluntary student
recreation.
The only reasons for the
existence of Recreation UBC are
to extend the availability of
facilities to students, particularly
at nights and on the weekends,
and to provide under supervision -
more satisfactory opportunities
for participation. The voluntary
annual membership dues are
designed to ensure better services
and equipment for the students
who want to engage in physical
recreation.
In my opinion, the program
deserves a fair trial.
Robert F. Osborne
director
Editorials are unsigned because
they represent the opinion of the
paper not one person. Editors
write editorials so it's quite easy
to figure out the author of an
editorial. Just phone us and ask.
As to your "true facts".
Students tell us they were not
actively involved in the planning
of Recreation UBC nor was it
planned over many months.
We have also been told original
plans for Recreation UBC
included co-ordination of the
billiards area of SUB games room.
Although the phys ed
department may not be
responsible for extramural
activities you — Mr. Osborne — are
on the men's athletic committee.
The allocation of the present
"inadequate" athletic fee certainly
is an issue. That inadequate fee of
about $100,000 is spent primarily
on men's athletics for things like
flying a football team to Hawaii.
Women's athletics receive only
about 16 per cent of the budget
even though extramural sports are
funded by all students, make and
female.
Yes, that money is an issue and
as we said before a more equitable
division is needed.
Poetry
Below please find inane refrain
As   called  for   in   your   pulp
henbane:
Candy Rain Refrain
The sun appeared this afternoon
again,
Drove the clouds off, dried the
rain,
Brought the mountains and th
city plain
Back    before   my   tower
windowpane
Which for a week reflected only
bane
And   closed   my    thoughts   in
melancholy vein.
Does the weather augur fortune's
gain?
Does it mean I'll see you soon
again?
Will you read this little verse inane
And with a smile drive sadness
from my brain?
I   won't complain...  or  feign,
disdain!
(I plead insane)
Ron Adams
1825 Wesbrook Place
The Ubyssey welcomes
letters from all readers.
Letters should be signed and,
if possible, typed.
Pen names will be used when
the writer's real name is also
included for our information in
the letter, or when valid
reasons for anonymity are
given.
Although an effort is made to
publish all letters received,
The Ubyssey reserves the right
to edit letters for reasons of
brevity, legality, grammar or
taste.
Ideal for Students
SUMMER 1973
CAMPING TOURS
OF EUROPE!
5 WEEKS - SURF CAMPING TOUR - $260.00
(plus food kitty $37)
France, Spain, Portugal, Morocco
5 WEEKS - RUSSIA/SCANDINAVIA - $299.00
(plus food kitty $50)
Belgium, Holland, Germany, Denmark, Sweden, Norway, Finland, Russia,
Poland
6 WEEKS - GRAND EUROPEAN - $329.00
(Plus food kitty $45)
Belgium,  Holland, Germany, Switzerland, Austria, Italy, Monaco, Spain,
Andorra, France
9 WEEKS - GREEK/SPANISH/TURKISH - $475
(plus food kitty $67)
France,    Andorra,   Spain,    Monaco,    Italy,    Greece,   Turkey,   Bulgaria,
Yugoslavia, Austria, Switzerland, Germany, Holland, Belgium
ALSO: 2-WEEK, 3-WEEK, 4-WEEK TOURS -
INQUIRE FOR DETAILS!
Book   early!   Students   from   many   countries   are   making
reservations now. You'll meet them in Europe!
We're in "THE VILLAGE"
■Iff b*
■o
burke's
world wide travel
5700 University Blvd.
Phone 224-4391 Page 6
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, October 27,  1972
HONG KONG CHINESE FOODS
Just One Block from Campus in the Village
WE SER VEAU THEN TIC CHINESE FOOD
A T REASONABLE PRICES
EAT IN - TAKE OUT
We have enlarged our dining room to offer you
better service at no increase in prices!
Open Every Day from 4:30 p.m. to 1T p.m.
5732 University Blvd. Phone 224-6121
mtn
mm
BMM
MM
HALLOWEEN DANCE
at
INTERNATIONAL HOUSE
ft'
TONIGHT
a
mmm
9 p.m. - 1 a.m.
2 BANDS - Serenaders Steel Band & Polonia
Cheeses/Crackers/Pumpkin pies FREE —
While they last
MMMWMMWMM«MMWMi
■*
THE SALZBURG
CONNECTION
Odeon
BEST-SELLER BECOMES
MOVIE SPY-THRILLER!
871   GRANVILLE
682-7468
SHOW TIMES
12:00, 1:55
3:50, 5:45
7:40, 9:35
GENERAL
"FAT CITY is a classic-"
Archer Winsten, N.Y. Post
STACY KEACH
JEFF BRIDGES
MATURE-
SHOW TIMES:
    12:20,2:15,4:10,
851  GRANVILLE    6:05, 8:00, 9:55
685-6828
Coronet
CITY
SUNDAY—2:15, 4:10,
6:05, 8:00, 9:55
The Man with the Gunsight
Eyes is back!
LEE VAN CLEEF
"RETURNofSABATA"
Vogue
918 GRANVILLE
685-5414
SHOW TIMES:
MONEY:   1:20, 4:45, 8:10
SABATA: 2:50, 6:15, 9:40
The Green is on
the screen in . . .
"MONEY
TALKS"
Second candid
camera movie
SUNDAY: 4:45, 8:10
Kurt      Vonnegut's     Jr.'s
intellectually   intriguing story.
SHOW TIMES:7:30, 9:30.
Warning:     Occasional     coarse
language and swearing.  R. W.
Mcdonald, b.c. Dir.
varsitu
224-3730*'
4375 W. 10th
WINNER 1972 CANNES FILM
FESTIVAL JURY PRIZE AWARD
SLAUGHTERHOUSE-
piVE
ANNE ROBERT
BANCROFT      SHAW
os lady, J-nnie as lord Randolph Churchill
Hyland
KINGS'Y al KNIGHT
876-3045
YOUNG
WINSTON
RESERVED TICKETS AVAILABLE AT ODEON
THEATRE, 881 GRANVILLE — PHONE
688-2308 OR ONE HOUR BEFORE. SHOW'
TIMES.	
40 Money Saving
BONUS COUPONS
in this
year's
BIRD CALLS
— $1.00 off a Pizza
— $1.00 in gasoline
— $5.00 off collision repairs
— $1.00 off a prescription
— $1.00 off flowers
— $1.25 off lube & oil
— $2.00 off Hair Do's
— $1.00 off drycleaning
— $5.00 off contact lenses
etc., etc., etc.
BUY
YOUR COPY
TODAY
UBC BOOKSTORE AND SUB
Only
75c
By GARY COULL
Buzz!
"Hello, Dr. Commacounter here."
"Hello doctor I am with The Ubyssey
newspaper and I am doing an article on
what's happening in the English
department this year. May I speak with
you?"
"No comment."
And so it goes. After two years of
trouble, the faculty of the English
department are careful who they speak to
and what they say.
Controversial issues such as tenure,
promotions and womens' positions no
longer evoke tenacious polarized views.
People are not publicly voicing their
opinions for fear of creating new problems
or reviving old ones.
The bitter controversy regarding the
tenure of such professors as Brian Mayne,
Seymour Levitan and Dave Powell in the
last two years had been forgotten, at least
publicly, by the faculty.
The apparent vote of non-confidence in
English department head Robert Jordan,
when 17 of the 38 tenured faculty signed a
petition asking for his resignation, is also
forgotten and considered old news to
probing reporters.
The emphasis appears to have shifted
from last year's vocal discontentment to a
more relaxed, less volatile year of
discussions and evaluations.
The discussion is centred on
recommendations proposed by committees
formed last year to check into the
department.
One was the English functions
committee headed by John Stager of the
geography department. Its purpose was to
define the function of the English
department.
The other was a university enquiry, the
so-called Dunnel committee, named for
chairman Basil Dunnel, a chemistry
professor, the purpose of which was to find
out what was causing the problems.
The functions committee published a
public report but the Dunnel report was
kept secret.
All the faculty members interviewed
declined comment about details of the
Dunnel report. The most anyone would say
was that it made recommendations and the
department was discussing them. No
formal policy has yet been formulated.
So if there is so much discussion in the
department, what is it all about?
Acting department head Bill Robbins
divided the concerns into three main areas:
structure of power, teacher evaluation and
possible division of the department.
He said the faculty would hold
discussions in these areas and, toward the
spring, come to general opinions.
This word "discussion" keeps coming
up. No one has said so specifically, but
indications are the topics stem directly
from the secret Dunnel report.
Concerning the topic of structure,
Robbins said the faculty is evaluating how
the head could distribute his authority.
"I would think we are probably moving
toward a three-fold structure.
Engli
discc
to d
evak
"On top would be the department head
followed by the executive committee,
either elected or appointed, then the
department as a whole," he said.
The function of the executive
committee is to act in an advisory capacity.
Robbins said arts dean Doug Kenny
revived and appointed the executive
committee a couple of years ago.
"The main issue here is whether these
members will all be appointed, elected or a
combination of both."
Robbins thought the faculty would
eventually decide on at least half elected
members and perhaps more.
It appears the hush-hush discussions are
the result of Dunnel report
recommendations.
The second area of discussion is teacher
evaluation.
Robbins said the decision to be made is
what weight should be placed on a
teacher's scholarly publications and what
should be placed on his ability to teach.
"Unless the university is content to be
ignored, it must show scholarly standing,"
he said.
Robbins added that there are many
ways this standing can be accomplished.
"One of the better ways is to send eager
graduate students to other universities,"
he said. This in turn would indicate what
sort of education they had received at
UBC.
"An expression of the English
department's views about the relative
weight to give various criterion used to
assess the worth of a teacher will be
forwarded to the dean," he said.
JORDAN ... on political leave? Friday, October 27,   1972
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 7
>h department's vocal
itentments shifted   _
scussions,
ation
Robbins did not apply the department's
decisions directly to tenure evaluation.
However, this emphasis is an important
consideration when a teacher is being
considered for tenure.
Many people have felt that lack of
scholarly publication is not a justified
condition for refusal of tenure.
This has obviously upset the department
in the last few years. It is likely the reports
contained some sort of request for
department opinion on this subject.
The third topic of discussion, (and
possibly the third recommendation) is the
possible division of the department.
Robbins said the question to be
answered is whether the department is too
big to function effectively.
"Is it in the long run perhaps advisable
to divide into interests?" he asked.
Basically, the suggestion to split the
department would result in sections dealing
specifically with first and second year
students, service courses (English 150, for
example), senior undergraduate courses
and graduate courses.
This would allow a relatively equal role
for each section in the overall function of
the department, he said.
Those are the three questions to be
resolved by the department this year.
Someone must consider them as being
fundamental to the previous troubles in the
department or else everyone would not be
talking about them.
No one in the department will say that
these indeed were the causes of past
conflicts.
Touchy questions such as who is being
considered for tenure and promotions
received a "no comment" from Robbins.
He said he would not discuss subjects
affecting specific personnel.
However, a source inside the
department claimed that no one is up for
tenure this year. As for promotions, the
reply was "you'll have to ask Dr. Robbins
about that."
There is speculation among some
faculty members (naturally anonymous)
that Jordan took a leave of absence this
year because there was little controversial
action taking place.
A more scholarly opinion would be that
he needs the rest after the previous two
years of struggles.
Officially the one-year absence was
taken to write a book about medieval poet
Geoffrey Chaucer.
An observer close to the department
suggests the lack of discontent may be a
signal to Jordan that the department can
function better without him.
However, after talking to more faculty
members, it appears previous years
opposition to Jordan was hasty and not
well thought out. Pensive thinking and
discussion have caused many opponents to
reconsider their positions.
As one staff member put it:
"I was disatisfied with the whole scene,
not just Jordan's actions," adding that
things appeared to be working out.
The one issue that people appear to
want to talk about, but will not, is the
position of women in the English
department.
Of the 102 faculty members only 24 are
women. In the 82 professorial ranks, only
10 are women. There is one woman full
professor, Patricia Merivale.
There are 61 tenured faculty in the
department. Of these only seven are
women.
When told only 10 women held
professional rank, one faculty member
exclaimed: "That's discrimination!"
Not so, says Robbins.
Robbins said the statistics represent the
number of women who have applied for
positions to teach.
Commenting on the fact there are few
women with high professorial rank,
Robbins said:
"In some cases women come with their
husbands and take on lecturers positions
because that is all they have time for. This
does not stop them from going on to
higher standing later on."
All these explanations are fine, but the
fact still remains that only 24 women (less
than one-quarter of the faculty) are
teaching courses compulsory for everyone
entering UBC.
If any area of study demands equal
teacher representation of men and women,
it is English.
Yet these facts will not draw direct
comment from faculty members. This
appears to be a touchy topic within the
department or else there would be no
reason for faculty to remain tight-lipped.
Perhaps womens' status will be the next
area of discussion by the department.
Although the outside appearance of the
department appears quiet, the faculty is
interested in establishing policies in areas
that have affected them in the past.
The faculty is tired of arguing loudly
around in circles.
The trend now is towards talking softly
with direction.
STUDENTS   SUPPORT   English   profs   in   now   forgotten  tenure   dispute of 1970. Page 8
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, October 27,  1972
AMS budget finally passes
with more than two-thirds
rushant
** CAMERAS     *
0538 W.10 224-5858
NEVER UNDERSOLD!
BELLY   DANCING
The   Dance   of   the   HareemJ
taught by a professional.
Phone ASMARA
2545676
By LORHI RUDLAND
The Alma Mater Society's
1972-73 budget passed its third
and final reading Wednesday
evening with a majority of 21 to
eight and one abstention.
Previous amendments to the
budget included increases to
men's and women's intramurals of $900 and $300
respectively, $10,800 to The
Ubyssey and to the speakers
and education committee,
$2,000.
Under new amendments the
Palmer Proposal, a guaranteed income plan for undergraduate societies, was
increased by $1,740 to bring the
proposal up to a $200 grant and
30 cents per student.
A motion was introduced to
reduce The Ubyssey budget by
$1,740, which would exclude
membership in the Canadian
University Press wire service,
and re-allocate the money to
the Palmer Proposal. This
increase would return the
guaranteed income plan to its
original projection of 40 cents
per student. The motion was
defeated.
Council's operating budget
was reduced by a $500 grant to
the daycare plan which
provides for day care of the
children of faculty, students
and staff. The provincial
government matched this
grant to bring the daycare
budget up to $1,000.
The AMS will fund
publication of the Women's
Action Group report on the
status of women at UBC, by reallocating $600 from the clubs
committee  to  publications.
Overall, the margin reserve
for emergency funding was
reduced by $2,285, Open House
'73 by $2,000 and community
visitations by $500.
Ubyssey co-editor Jan
O'Brien submitted a motion to
publish The Ubyssey three
times a week. This would cost
an additional $5,000 and could
be taken from the operating
reserves, she said.
Treasurer Dick replied the
money should not be taken out
of the operating reserves
because that fund is only for
emergencies.
Graduate student
representative Stan Persky
said although it was not an
emergency year for The
Ubyssey, O'Brien's motion was
a vote on principle.
"The campus newspaper is
the strongest voice on campus
and its function is to improve
conditions here," said Persky.
"For this reason I feel we
should make an exception this
year and take the money out of
the operating reserves or
margin to increase the
publication of The Ubyssey,"
he said.
AMS president Doug
Aldridge said money shouldn't
be taken out of the margin or
the operating reserves for The
Ubyssey because other
projects such as an intramural
fund increase would want a
larger grant as well.
"Council would be making a
grave error to touch the
operating reserves and setting
a precedent until finally no
money would be left," he said.
A vote was held and the
motion was defeated.
Aldridge asked councillors to
consider participation in the
master teacher award this
year.
Last year both the AMS and
the graduate students
association refused to participate in picking candidates
lor this award.
Persky said the GSA had
decided to participate this
year.
When questioned later on
this decision, Persky replied,
"the master teacher award is a
political award of the administration       to       make
Multi-cultural states
a source of conflict
By FORREST NELSON
All over the world multi-cultural states are in trouble,
Stanley Burke, former Canadian Broadcasting Corporation
newscaster, said on campus Tuesday.
Burke lectured at international house as a part of United
Nations week activities. He formerly covered the Biafrian War
and spent five years as CBC correspondent to the UN. For
another five years he was a correspondent in Paris.
The subjects he discussed ranged from cultural conflict, to
church humanitarian efforts, to the media.
"The root of killing is cultural killing," he said. "The major
need is to deal with cultural conflicts." As examples Burke cited
Pakistan and Nigeria.
"The entire world had the European nation-state imposed on
it. The nation-state is perhaps not a viable entity. More and
more nations are based on culture.
"What should have been a major story in Canada was that
Czechoslovakia had to split up." Another was when Tito was in
Canada and CBC reporter Ron Collister was doing an interview:
"One question he didn't ask him was: What about separation in
his own country."
Cultural differences are a source of problems, Vietnam for
instance: "Americans, if they had understood the Asian
mentality, they would not have been sucked into the war."
There is much hue and cry that there is no Canadian identity,
Burke said. "Wouldn't we be better off inspiring and engendering that which is there?"
Our actions are "based upon the assumption that the other
guy is the same as we are," he said.
Burke criticised the churches and humanitarian efforts in
both Biafra and Bangla Desh. In Biafra: "If we had any degree
of sincerity, when the bombs first began to go off we might have
addressed ourselves to the cause of the trouble."
Only after their initial aid in Biafra did the churches realize
"they were up to their wingtips in politics."
Responding to the question of aid to Bangla Desh now, Burke
expressed bitterness at the world's reluctance to give aid at the
time it was needed.
everything on campus seem all
right."
"Last year we didn't participate and our protest was
quickly forgotten.
"This year we are going into
it with a militant attitude. We
intend to nominate one of the
teachers who has been unfairly
treated by this administration."
Persky said it is always the
case that teachers who really
represent the students such as
Ron Silvers or Dave Powell,
two professors denied tenure
last year, are shafted by the
administration.
MAW
^tV automatic transmissions
Over 17 Years Experience
COMPLETE SERVICE BAND ADJUSTMENT
ALL MAKES & MODELS
FREE TRANSMISSION INSPECTION
ONE DAY SERVICE
FREE PICK-UP & DELIVERY
We Specialize in TRANSMISSIONS -
They Are Our Only Business
879-9710
res 874-1784
18th & Main - West of Jim Pattison's
Vancouver. B.C.
ELECT
RUPERT BEEBE
INDEPENDENT
The ONLY candidate that is not bound by party policy.
The ONLY candidate that can sit and vote with any government
that is formed, BUT
The ONLY candidate that is not committed to party line and can vote "NO" if necessary.
The ONLY candidate calling for disclosure of the source and amount of campaign funds.
The ONLY candidate calling for radio broadcast of PARLIAMENT.
The ONLY candidate calling for revision of industrial banking.
The ONLY candidate calling for new Securities laws to encourage new enterprises.
The ONLY candidate calling for more CANADIAN CONTENT on retail shelves.
The ONLY candidate that pledges a monthly "OTTAWA REPORT and QUESTIONNAIRE" in
your local paper.
VOTE BEEBE
The  ONLY  candidate  that  can  give the Voter true  unbiased
representation.	
FREE LIST SUSPENDED
ALL SEATS — $3.50
STANLEY 733-2622
GRANVILLE AT 12th AVE.
EVENINGS— 7:30. 9:30 SIMON WARD as Young Winston, reviewed on this week's pf2. at
4560 W 10th.
919 Robson St.
1032 W Hastings
670 Seymour
duthie
BOOKS
Films
The difference is in the cuff,
and it does make the difference!
MS STOP-
PMJhAHS
162 W. Hastings)      861 Granville
COR. CAMBIE THEATRE ROW
760 Columbia 1316 Douglu, Victoria
NEW WEST.      1/2 block north ol Yates
A OIV. OF MURRAY GOLDMAN
Self-conscious epic
lacks humanity, guts
Biographical movies have
been successfully made
before so the form is not
impossible.
But Young Winston deals
with a character and a story
Young Winston. Staring
Robert Shaw, ' Anne
Bancroft, Simon Ward.
Written and produced
by Carl Foreman.
Directed by Richard
Attenborough. At the
Hyland.
that make it difficult almost
beyond comprehension.
Foreman and Attenborough
try nobly but their film does
not succeed — at least not in
the style of a $6 1/2 million
epic road show.
Impressed with
Foreman's The Guns of
Navarone, Sir Winston
Churchill himself asked this
prominent film-maker to
take on the project which
after a decade was to
become Young Winston.
At first Foreman was'
flattered but leery   ("This
was not at all my kind of
project.") Later, he went
ahead with the job and
wrote the screenplay
himself; adapting Churchill's own autobiography
My Early Life.
The respect that Foreman
shows the Old Warrior is
impressive, but it
precipitates a film that
suffers from too much
delicacy and sensitivity.
From the beginning it is
obvious that every effort at
candor has been made. We
see Winston as a brash,
overambitious young officer
and as mediocre schoolboy,
but nevah do we get beyond
the protective shield of
reverence that envelopes
this man whose memory is
so dear. For a British
director to make a
detached, objective film
about Churchill is as
unlikely as the Russians
doing a life of Lenin that
would be free from
prejudice. Young Winston is
too self-conscious; as if they
were afraid of showing too
much weakness in the great
man. It lacks humanity and
guts.
The shape is there but
there's no soul. The young
boy pines for love and attention from his parents but
they give him almost none of
either. Winston's father
Lord Randolph fails after a
colorful        career in
Parliament and it becomes
an obsession with the son to
win where father lost.
These are real facts of
alienation and lonely
struggle but we never feel
them as we should. It's an
intimate story but the
audience is not taken into
the intimacy. If agonies of
self-doubt, loneliness, and
fear were part of the early
life that formed this great
leader and statesman, then
we see them only in an
analytical, formal way.
The settings of the opulent
early life at Blenheim,
Harrow, and the House of
Commons are superb, but
overall this film doesn't
achieve the majestic
grandeur and emotion of
previous giants Lawrence of
Arabia and Doctor Zhivago.
■&!*." x^>
Things happening
Some of the things that don't get fuller
treatment in pf this week:
If you can get away at lunchtime, City
Stage at 591 Howe presents English actor-
playwright John Grillo's Wilfred Blubber's Last
Fling from next Tuesday Oct 31 to Nov. 11.
Wayne Robson plays the title role —
according to a City Stage press release, "the
downtrodden little man whose pathetic attempt
at self-assertion leads to an unexpected
mid-Atlantic conference with God — and results
in saving the world from inevitable destruction."
The rest of the cast is Robert Graham and
Yvonne Adalian. Director is George Plawski,
show time is 12:15 and 1:15 p.m. weekdays
and 12:30 and 1:30 Saturdays, and admission
1123-1125 ROBSON STREET
20% DISCOUNT TO U.B.C. STUDENTS
ON PRESENTATION OF THIS AD
*t
CO
i-H
CM
r*s
CO
to
*fr
l-i
i-H
r*
rx
CO
.
vo
CC
1-
Urn
<
o3
CO
CO
■
CC
z
D
O
X
1-
2
■
s
z
Ol
LU
O)
Q_
_1
The battle scenes are
conventional and not really
exciting. The best visual
sequence is the opening,
which incorporates sepia-
toned photos and newsreels
from V.E. with the crowds
cheering old Winnie. It
proved later that the only
truly acceptable portraits of
Churchill were given by
himself.
Simon Ward was chosen
for the title role from 400
actors and is an acceptable
look-alike. He performs
Churchill's famous voice in
the omnipresent narration
and he reproduces the well-
remembered bulldog expression (out-thrust jaw,
hand on hip, etc.) with
considerable ability. No one
could have done it better;
but so close a representation
should never have been
attempted. Imagine
someone trying to do a
serious characterization of
Ed Sullivan. The point is
that both would unavoidably
be caricatures, and that's
what happens here.
There was no need to try
to portray the rotund, cigar-
.smoking, brandy-loving
orator who usually had his
tongue well into his cheek.
These were characteristics
that no doubt came later.
The movie ends, after all, 36
years before the outbreak of
World War II.
Winston's mother and
father are recreated with
great competence by Robert
Shaw and Anne Bancroft.
Lord Randolph's rakishness
is played down and Lady
Jennie's pushiness and
ambition is soft-pedalled,
but they're great anyway.
In a straight documentary
sense, it is inferior to The
Valiant Years, a masterful
piece of reporting made in
the 60s using the famous
Churchill speeches as a
basis for the narration.
As a feature film, it is too
much like a slow-moving,
over-detailed history class.
Neither   fish   nor   fowl,
Young   Winston   is   sandwiched   between   the   two
forms and suffers thereby.
—Clive Bird
FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE
SIX CHARACTERS IN
SEARCH OF AN AUTHOR
by Pirandello
November 1-11     8:00 p.m.
Directed by Raymond Clarke
Setting & Lighting Designed By Richard Kent Wilcox
Costumes Designed By David Lovett
Student Ticket Price:     $1.00
box o.fice    + FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE
$1. Reservations at 688-7013.
Also at City Stage, the Vancouver Repertory Theatre presents three of Michael
McLure's Gargoyle Cartoons Nov. 6-10 and
Nov. 14-18 at 8:30 p.m. with admission by
donation.
In the world of art, the gallery at Simon
Fraser University is showing contemporary
works by B.C. artists to Nov. 3. It's open from
10 a.m. to 4 p.m. daily.
At the Burnaby art gallery, Polish artist
Kolzwan Nowicka's work is on display to Nov.
5.
And watch for a show on the alternate
press, including copies from past years of your
very own favorite campus newspaper, in the
near future at the UBC fine arts gallery.
Room 207
Support Your Campus Theatre
Page Friday, 2
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, October 27, 1972 Art
Environmental
realism
What a relief to escape from the gray concrete backdrop of
the New Westminster setting into the colorful array of landscape paintings comprising the Environmental art show.
I was greeted at the door by "Sunflowers" and "Dahlias"
beaming vibrantly from the walls and by the artist himself,
Robin Harger. Robin eagerly introduced me to his works and
was very tolerant of my limited artistic knowledge, for which I
was grateful since I can barely distinguish a Boticelli from a
Pucci ni (?).
But I can really get into Van Gogh. In most of the versatile
impasto paintings on exhibition I could detect some of the appealing neo-impressionistic color contrasts and moving patterns..
Although Harger's color effects parallel those of Van Gogh,
his personal style was clearly evident. The gallery directors,
Dave Skrypnyk and Louis Nagy, have termed this style "environmental realism", one to be "pursued in the next decade".
Of these paintings, I would recommend "Pirate's Cove" for
a starter. The directors consider this one their favorite. They
pointed out the subtle characteristics in this work reminiscent
of the Group of Seven.
When I asked the artist how he managed to translate that
image of the Gulf Island setting into such bold depiction, he
quickly sketched it for me on note paper. The sketch is
reproduced here on this page but, unfortunately, the color
impressions could not be paperized.
"Dahlias" and "Gabriola Island" represent semi-pictorial
images with definite patterns, whereas "Fraser Falls",
"Suburbs" and other fall shots emerge from broken spots, dabs
and patterns of superimposed colors.
"Dirt Track" represents yet another stage of the artist's
style development, since he utilizes brush as well as pallette
knife to evoke a vivid, undulating effect coupled with bold,
powerful lines.
One of my favorites was the "Morning Glory" complete with
heart-shaped leaves and black outlines, displaying its "...
yeaterday-today-tomorrow ..." flowers enveloped in soft blue
halos.
And the "Barn on Lulu Island" projects a foreboding impression with a rippled verdant foreground that appears out-of-
focus in contrast to the well-delineated towering trees.
The show on opening night Wednesday was quite successful.
Five paintings were sold and several bottles of booze consumed.
The exhibition will remain on display at the New Westminster Art Gallery until Nov. 1. It will be televised on channels
2 and 8. The artist will be present tonight and refreshments will
be served. —Maria MacDuff
Theatre
Opera MacBeth: an empty cliche
The Mussoc production of MacBeth,
A Rock Opera, seems to be an attempt
to help modern audiences relate to the
Shakespearian tragedy.
Producer Richard Ouzounian tries to
retain MacBeth's basic tortured
madness while clothing him in scenes
supposedly more familiar and also
more relevant to 1970s' audiences.
Which is an interesting idea, since
MacBeth is almost an archetypal
portrayal of human emotions and so is
universally relevant, and to move the
characters into the 1970's would serve
to reinforce this point.
So if Ouzounian had stopped at
changing the props, MacBeth might
have survived and prospered.
But Ouzounian changed the script
too — leaving in only 26 lines of the
original play.
In stripping the characters of
Shakespeare's lines, with all the
inherent subtleties and symbolic
references, Ouzounian has stripped
them of their complexities and depth.
They are left as shallow and apparently
unmotivated puppets: cliches in improbable circumstances.
MacBeth, A Rock Opera. Directed by
Richard Ouzounian, music by Marek
Norman. Starring Victor Young and
Susan Hershberg. UBC Old
Auditorium.	
MacBeth is a soldier stationed in
Vietnam in 1976 and Duncan is his
general, a man with presidential
aspirations who forces MacBeth to run
as vice-president on his right-wing
ticket.
They return to America for the
presidential campaign to find Lady
MacBeth, here renamed Allison, has
become a junkie and is heading a cult
of Satan worshippers.
In this play MacDuff is the second in
command and Banquo is a war
correspondant and friend of Mac-
Beth's. MacDuff's wife appears
briefly, and a daughter, Penelope, has
been introduced into the play. Rounding out the cast is Banquo's son,
Penelope's lover, Fleance.
Susan Hershberg as Allison turns in
perhaps the best performance of the
play. Although working with rather
facile lines, she has a strong voice and
good manner which help her to overcome the libretto — although not
always the music, which tended to
drown out the singers at times on
Wednesday night.
But Marek Norman's musical score
is one of the better things in the opera.
It's often good, but sometimes
descends into a Burt Bacharach
popular hit-type song — notably
Felicity Roche's solo as Penelope
called Blue Grey Morning, a cloying
song about the first time she met
Fleance.
However the opera drags with Victor
Young's performance as MacBeth.
As he progresses deeper into his
madness, murdering first Duncan,
then Banquo and later MacDuff's wife
Leah, Young's acting gets
progressively worse.
Apparently trying to look mad, he
shakes, he trembles, he tries to look
anguished, and he ends up looking like
a cross between a wino with the terminal DT's and a very small boy who
has to go to the bathroom.
But Young has a pleasing voice and
carries off some of the songs fairly
well, pulling his performance up to the
mediocrity level.
Marc Akerstream as Fleance has
about the strongest voice among the
men in the opera. Although sometimes
over-smooth, he has a good range and
carries off his part rather well.
It's just unfortunate that it's such a
cliched part.
He is Banquo's rebellious son, and
after refusing to embrace his father in
a typical rebellious son-type way, he
runs off and joins MacBeth, meets
Penelope and "spends his first night"
with her — as the program coyly puts
it.
He sees MacBeth murder his father
and runs to Penelope, and after Allison
takes an overdose of heroin and
MacDuff murders MacBeth, the two of
them "Run to Jerusalem", as the song
goes.
But it is their manner of going that is
most objectionable. They encounter a
group of national guards, dressed in
white helmets and white capes and
carrying white guns, coming with
MacDuff to kill MacBeth.
Penelope and Fleance help and
guardsmen and women pull off their
helmets and capes and then they all
throw their guns offstage, joining in a
final chorus sung into sunset, or sunrise
(or something red offstage at any
rate).
Ken Irwin and Ross Douglas turned
in forgettable performances as Duncan
and MacDuff respectively.
Felicity Roche turned in perhaps the
weakest performance of the play. Her
voice really isn't strong enough for the
role, and she squeaks along rather
inadequately to music that is, unmercifully and just this once, low
enough to hear the singer clearly.
And after it all — the shallow lines,
the sometimes weak singing, the often
shaky acting — over the weak applause
of the audience, one heard another
sound buzzing from the audience.
Was it boredom, or could it possibly
be the earthy, full sound of rich
Elizabethan curses flowing onto the
stage? —Lesley Krueger
Friday, October 27, 1972
THE       UBYSSEY
Page Friday, 3 If someone told me that I must watch all the
shows on five television channels all at the same
time I would react by commenting not only on the
absurdity, but on the impossibility, of such an
undertaking.
I might, just as a joke, attempt the impossible
but I would soon discover that in the effort to watch
everything I would end up watching virtually
nothing with any concentration, understanding,
relaxation or enjoyment. So much time would be
spent in mid-channel and in worrying and wondering about what was happening on the other four
channels that finally I would cry in outrage:
"Enough of this nonsense! Why the hell can't the
best shows from all the channels be shown on just
one or two?"
How much more absurd is the attempt to come
to terms with five massive reading lists and the
other demands of five courses! Show me the
student who has read all the required books and all
the background material for every lecture or
seminar,'and who is fully prepared for every class,
and I will show you the blear-eyed student who
labors seven days and seven nights a week at his or
her studies. But sheer exhaustion should never be
mistaken for true learning. And obviously there is
more to life than university and more to university
than work.
The five-course system can be directly blamed
lor much of the cynicism, boredom, frustration,
depression and anti-intellectualism to be found
amongst arts undergraduates at UBC. Perhaps it is
at least indirectly to blame for some of their attempted and completed suicides and for the
dropping-out of many gifted students. The massive
apathy of students and the almost total lack of
community at UBC stem directly from the very
nature of the five-course system.
Professors have been doing a lot of playing
around with their individual reading lists in the last
few years in the hope that students will commit
themselves fully to at least one course. Some
professors have done the reasonable and sane
thing. They have reduced the course curriculum to
a handful of good books. But the gesture is
meaningless when other course curricula make
simply outrageous demands on the student.
The mini-program is what many courses have
become at UBC. Eager professors, convinced of the
narrow, fragmented nature of the straight subject-
oriented reading list, have included works from
related fields. For instance some political science
reading lists include sociological and psychological
works. But what field isn't related to every other?
Any one of these mini-programs provides ample
material for a year's reading, reflection, discussion
and writing, reflection, discussion and writing. But
how on earth does one handle five of them? Finally,
many courses have been left intact as tedious
surveys.
But no matter how the individual course is redesigned the essential absurdity of the five-course
approach to learning and to education is manifest
The serious student, that is the student who
views education not as a mere game or just a joke,
fails to satisfactorily come to terms with this
system. He or she usually finds that the amount of
material contained in about two, possibly three
courses would constitute a reasonable amount for a
Battery-feeding the ar
Battery-feeding the ai
Battery-feeding the a
An essay by Robert Perry on the absurdity of the five-course system.
good year's work. Beyond this saturation point
everything is superfluous, a mere hindrance to
learning.
'Priority' courses are usually chosen. But as
everyone knows, each student chooses different
priority courses. It is therefore rare to enter a class
in which every student has read and reflected upon,
let alone got a hold of, the material under
discussion. Few, therefore, are the classes which
succeed in getting off the ground and lucky are
those students who happen to be in a really successful course or two at UBC.
The highly successful Arts 1 program, the New
Arts 2 program which flourished and died a couple
of years ago, the philosophy and history honors
programs, a combined nineteenth-century and
early modern English literature program, a six-
unit History 115 and Philosophy 100 program and
"an inter-departmental seminar on the history,
economics and literature of French Canada," are
all attempts to cut through the false course and
departmental divisions of knowledge at UBC.
Yet a very small proportion of UBC students
actually participate in these innovative programs.
Most UBC students and probably most faculty
accept the five-course system as an unalterable
part of the human condition. But the course as we
know it is a relatively recent invention.
The person who came up with the unmagical
number five for the number of courses a student
must take in a year should try doing all the work
that five courses entails. (It would help if he
possessed five heads).
If that mad inventor fails in that attempt he
should be stood up against the belltower and unmercifully shot. Education is not a contest among
professors to see how many dozens of books each
can ram, in the shortest possible time, down the
throats of students. Neither is it the student's at-
**>■£■■
tempt to read as many thousand pages of books per
week as possible. Battery-feeding is not good for the
digestion. The books most worthy of the student's
attention deserve slow intellectual chewing and
imaginative savoring, not hurried gulping, which
is usually what happens at UBC.
UBC has yet to accept the full challenge of the
college system. As Walter Young, head of the
Department of Political Science, recently wrote:
From   time   to   time   various   faculty   and
university   committees   have   toyed   with
proposals  for   providing   some   collegiate
structure for  the  university.  None of these,
beyond the Arts 1 program, has ever been acted
upon. But the objectives have been similar: to
overcome the mechanical and the impersonal
flavor of the contemporary multiversity.
Not  only  is  this  university   impersonal  and
mechanical. UBC might very easily be mistaken
sometimes for a suburban shopping centre or an
industrial park, so vacuous, so sterile, so lacking in
real atmosphere, and so incredibly unaesthetic and
banal in its architecture is our campus. There are
no interesting ideas in the air — a fatal characteristic for a university. Must all ideas and debates
be neatly and efficiently packaged and tied up with
a bow as self-contained courses, or confined to the
obscure,  moldy pages of journals? One longs for
an end to the smugness that poisons the atmosphere
of UBC.
To have been at a Parisienne university when
existentialism flourished! Or even to have been at
the University of Toronto when the shallow but
provocative ideas of Marshall McLuhan appeared
on the scene! Almost anything that would bring
some intellectual excitement to this campus would
be appreciated. Why, for instance, couldn't there be
a university-wide debate on the merits of
federalism or structuralism?
BE CRITICAL OF
SPEED READING COURSES!
Ever investigated speed reading? Maybe now's the time. And
when you do, be sure to ask about other things besides speed
—like unaerstonding, retention, concentration. Obviously you
hove to enjoy and remember what you read or there's fiot
much point in increasing your speed. Sure speed's important.
Some people do read-many thousands of words o minute but
that's not all there is to it. Come to a free demonstration by
the world's most honored reading school — and be critical.
ATTEND A FREE DEMONSTRATION
EVELYN WOOD READING DYNAMICS
Saturday, Oct 28th, 3 p.m.
Thursday, Nov. 2nd, 8 p.m.
GRADUATES:
TAKE    ADVANTAGE    OF    YOUR    LIFETIME   MEMBERSHIP   AND
ATTEND THE FREE CLASSES AND THE WORKSHOPS.
□
Evelyn Wood Beading Dynamics
Soonswed by Dynamic Learning Centre (B.C.)
556 West Broadway, Vancouver, B.C.      Call 872-8201
_yw<? to 5ee the excitina
{Dark " ^riniih ~_W
LIMITED
Granville at Pender Since 1904
; 300.00
32.50
^*J
A SUB FILM
KEN
RUSSELL'S
Film
"THE it
MUSIC
uovmns
RICHARD
CHAMBERLAIN
GLENDA
JACKSON,
PANAVISION
COLOR
by DeLum
The music lov
He had a lov«
He reached o
And was bun
demanded a 1
Tonight &
7:00 & 9:
Saturday
Sunday 7:00
Page Friday, 4
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, October 27,  1972 s student
s student
s student
Because so few professors give a damn about
vhat goes on outside their narrow, carefully
;taked-out claims on knowledge — that's why! And
low can students be expected to really get into any
arge and important issue when both the size and
he sprawling chaotic nature, of the curriculum
nediate against the possibility of such an immersion?
Is the one absolutely central question that should
je asked at universities — what is the good life? —
considered to be an unnecessary one at UBC? Is it
low a dead issue? One would think so, judging from
he reluctance of so many professors to come out
?rom behind their virtuoso, balanced, on-the-one-
land-but-the-other-hand lectures and submit their
jersonal, or rather public (since this is a public
nstitution) points, of view on this 'sine qua non'
question to the criticism of students and other
Drofessors.
No wonder then that so many good students have
iropped out of UBC, have retreated into the worlds
rf drugs and apathy. Many of the best of our
generation have not been slaughtered in a World
War but rather are continually being lost to this
university and to our society through their refusal
to go along with a university education which is just
a mere shadow, a parody of what it should be.
UBC is very atomistic in nature. At the moment
probably no campus in the world is as fitting a place
as  UBC  at  which  to  read  T.   S.   Eliot's   The
Wasteland:
"Unreal UBC,
Under the brown fog of a campus dawn,
A crowd flowed out of SUB, so many,
I had not though courses had undone so many.
Sighs, short and infrequent, were exhaled,
And each student fixed his eyes before his feet,
Flowed past the Librarv and down Buchanan
halls . . ."
It really isn't a joking matter. The scandalous
fact is that far too many faculty at this university
are much more intent on cultivating ephemeral
critical reputations, than on accepting the vastly
more important challenge and obligation of attempting to create at UBC a real educational
community, at the core of which is a coherent
liberal education, in which wisdom and kindness
are the ultimate governing principles and the
ultimate ends.
The student revolution which hit UBC in the late
60s, and which has long since disappeared, had at
least one positive aspect. It gave students and
professors a sense of what education should be —
something more than the sum total of a large
number of anarchic courses. It gave us a glimpse of
the university as an intellectual, cultural, artistic
and above all, human community.
The failure of UBC as a cultural community can
be seen in the fact that as soon as summer-break or
sabbatical year comes around, large numbers of
our faculty rush off to English and European
universities to soak up as much culture as possible,
the arrival of a cultured man or woman from
abroad for a lecture or poetry reading is a major
event. Like suddenly coming across water after
weeks of aimlessly wandering around a parched
desert. Unfortunately there exists a very strong
colonial and provincial mentality at UBC. A really
good university should have literally dozens and
dozens of good poetry readings, public lectures,
colloquia, symposia, concerts, films and plays
every term — many, many more, than the present,
rather meagre offerings on this campus.
That we are here to read, reflect upon, discuss,
interpret, digest, write about and reread, in a
relaxed, but systematic and rigorous manner, the
best that has been thought and said, is a fact that is
far too often forgotten or neglected in the student's
and professor's insane scramble to successfully
'get through' or 'get on with' unreasonably heavy
course requirements.
Professors who demand an intimate knowledge
of each of at least five books or subjects are really
being downright nonsensical. One book or one
theme is quite enough for the average student to
handle at one time. Students have a right to be
indignant when they can't really get into a book or
subject because the gaining of a degree requires
satisfying the demands of five (six, in many honors
programs) insatiable masters.
If the university does not provide, in its
curriculum and in its methods of teaching, a sense
of the unity and oneness of human wisdom, and if no
attempt is made to relate apparently dissimilar
studies, then it is a failure. If it does not reflect, in
its physical and cultural environment or matrix,
the enormous cultural wealth of a society or
civilization, then it is a failure. If the university is
not a community, it is a failure. And if students do
not have one main, central focus of their critical
attention they are largely wasting their time,
unless they happen to possess absolutely extraordinary powers of comprehension and synthesis.
But for us ordinary mortals the continuing and
unrelenting tyranny of the five-course system
remains an outrage, and its uncritical supporters
worthy of derision.
F"*
'RESENTATION
SUB AUD.
50<
Rudy & Peters Motors Ltd.
VOLKSWAGEN SPECIALISTS
Quality  Workmanship
Competitive Prices
Genuine Volkswagen  Parts Only
All Work Guaranteed
Complete Body Repairs and Paintirtg
225 E. 2nd Ave. 879-0491
WMMMrtMflMMMMrtflMIMMMI
Toward Wholly Togetherness
In Being.
A continuous series of weekly
workshops at Gestalt House, 334 W.
12th or call 731-0773 Monday
evenings 7:30-10:30.
(MMIMMMMMMflMMimiMMfVIM
theBOOKFINDER
• COLES NOTES
SCHAUAAS
• NEW AND USED TEXTS
• POSTERS • CANADIANA
WE SELL BOOKS ON CONSIGNMENT!
4444 W. 10th Ave.
228-8933
V.S.C.I.
FILM-MAKING
TECHNIQUES
WORKSHOP
CINEMATOGRAPHY,
LIGHTING,
SPECIAL EFFECTS,
SOUND, SYNC
SOUND SHOOTING,
EDITING,
DIRECTING
Lecture
Starts Nov. 1
7-10 p.m
14 classes, $55
Rm. 334, 2500
W. 10th Ave.
Workshop
Starts Nov. 4
9a.rn.-6 p.m.
14 classes, $160
Maritime
Museum
Combined: $195.
(all film and equipment
included)
Phone Daronne Krown at
872-2851 or write to Box 6889
P.O. Sta. 'S', Van. 16, for more
info.
rUSHAnt
** CAMERAS     *
4538 W.10 224-5858
NEVER UNDERSOLD!
TUXEDO
RENTAL & SALES
+ D.B. & S.B. Tuxedos
+ D.B. & S.B. White Coats
+ D.B. & S.B. Suits
+ COLORED SHIRTS
Parking at Rear
BLACKS LEE
Formal Wear Rentals
631 Howe
688-2481
&*&&«. X
%u learn
something
new every day
One of the wonderful things
about growing up is trying different things. Like Yoga. And
forming your own opinion about
all your new learning. Another
part of growing up is finding out
about sanitary protection.
Maybe you're wondering if
you're old enough for Tampax
tampons. If you're of menstrual
age, you're probably old enough.
Many girls start right off with
Tampax tampons.
They come in three absorb-
encies: Regular, Super and
Junior. There's one to fit your
needs. And they're easy to use.
Just follow the simple directions
inside every package. You'll
learn something new and simplify your life.
Our only interest is protecting you.
DEVELOPED BY A  DOCTOR
NOW  USED SY  MILLIONS OF WOMEN
TAMPAX TAMPONS ARE MADE ONLY BY
CANADIAN TAMPAX CORPORATION LTD..
BARRIE,  ONTARIO
Friday, October 27,  1972
THE       UBYSSEY
Page Friday, 5 Revenge on clubs
The non-reservation policy of a growing
number of Vancouver nightclubs is
frustrating the entertainment-seeking
public.
Block-long line-ups in front of places like
the Body Shop, Medicine Man Charlie's,
Sneaky Pete's and the Town Pump are
becoming common occurences Friday and
Saturday nights.
The public seems to accept the line-ups,
proven by the fact they exist, but a large
number of people are getting frustrated at
having to wait two hours to fork out about
$2.50 per person to dance and buy inflation-
priced drinks.
Take this unintentional Page Friday
survey, for example:
The evening began with a reasonably
priced top quality dinner at the
Blacksmith's Shop, a new help-yourself-to-
a-salad-and-bread steak house at Seventh
and Main.
It ended in fatigue after more than two
hours of gruelling line-ups outside six
downtown night spots.
In between were unsuccessful attempts
to get into the Body Shop, Oil Can Harry's,
Treehouse, Town Pump and the Bayshore
Inn's Bayside and Marine Rooms.
Success at reaching the front of the Body
Shop's line was dispelled when the man at
the door said: "We'll let you in, but we
don't have room to let you sit with your
friends."
A Page Friday survey this week of
Vancouver night spots revealed amazingly
enough that the non-reservation policy
appears to exist only at rock-oriented
clubs.
Places like the Arlington, Club Diner,
Down Under Club, Pig and Whistle and
Purple Steer will be more than happy to
take your reservation.
Lasseter's Den will reserve seats only
during weekends while Image One and Ore
Shaft will take reservations anytime during
the week and Fridays and Saturdays up to 9
p.m.
But to take advantage of a reserved seat,
a person must decide well in advance
where and when he or she wants to go. Most
places are booked, especially for Saturday
nights, several days in advance; if they
aren't booked it's usually for a very good
reason.
There are, however, at least two ways of
getting to the place of your choice the same
night, even a Saturday, provided the spot
accepts reservations.
Walk into the club and tell the proprietor
you have a reservation. If your name is not
on the reserved seat list, loudly exclaim:
"Why that's nonsense. I made my reservation a week ago."
Most places will give you a table rather
than create a scene. It helps if there are a
lot of other customers around and if you use
a fairly common name like Smith or Jones.
Common names are also an advantage if
you decide you'd rather argue through the
telephone than in person. Simply call the
club and say two persons of your whatever-
' number party will not be coming. You just
thought it would be nice to let the club know
before coming down.
Again, it's very hard for a proprietor to
say no. Most places keep one or two extra
tables for just these sorts of accidents.
But for those clubs which refuse to
reserve seats, the waiting public is just out
of luck. Lines are shorter the earlier you
go, but dinner first virtually guarantees a
space in the queue.
The non-reservation policy will work as
long as the public will accept it. As long as
people will wait, clubs will not alter their
profit-making operations.
Meanwhile, it will soon be winter.
—Sandy Kass
t^VWVMnMMAAAMMMMMArtMftMMIMOTAmAMrtfMMVMMWMU
NOW ON STAGE
MACBETH
A ROCK OPERA
by Richard Ouzounian and Marek Norman
Oct. 25 — Nov. 4
U.B.C. OLD AUDITORIUM - 8:30 p.m.
Students $1.00-$1.50, Oct. 29-30
INFORMATION 228-3776 RESER VA TIONS
WWWWW<W<MWMWI¥WI*WMMWIWWMWW»W^»IAW#MWIWW¥i
w**
*      & SPAOHtfT! HOUSE IW««:
Steaks-Pizza-Spaghetti-Lasagna-Ravioli-Rigatoni-Chicken Cacciatoreil
4i>
OPEN
Mon. - Thurs.
11 a.m. - 3 a.m.
Fri. - Sat.
11 a.m. -4 a.m.
Sun.
4p.m.-1 a.m.
TAKE OUT ORDERS
HOME DELIVERY    /OO'VdzU
I
I
DINING
LOUNGE
FULL
FACILITIES
3618W. Broadway'
(at Dunbar)
738-1113'
YOUR PRESCRIPTION . . .
. . . For Glasses
for that smartJook in glasses ...
look to
PtescliptioH. Optical
Student Discount Given
WE HAVE AN OFFICE NEAR YOU
The Playhouse Theatre Company's
10th Season of Professional Theatre
ALAN BENNETT'S
DIRECTED BY PAXTON WHITEHEAD
Now thru Nov. 4
Nightly at 8:30 p.m.
Famous Artists Box Office     The Bay - Phone 681-3351
If
ttieHfilage*
sfjoe sfjoppes
C3^S[P(BS IQt&S DOEr
Thick Crepe Sole and
Heel in Black
or Brown Leather
Only $33.99
GRBJTSHOBSFDXfHB
/n-<Mm*VLUjKBRHXXXnON?
Open Thursday and Friday Nites
C.O.D. orders accepted. Credit and Chargex cards honored
VILLAGER SHOE SHOPPES LTD.
542 Granville 435 W. Hastings
Le Chateau Branch 776 Granville
Guildford Town Shopping Centre, Surrey
1324 Douglas St. in Victoria
•"Design and Word Trade Marks in Canada of the Villager Shoe Shoppes Ltd."
Page Friday, 6
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, October 27,  1972 Films
Weak plot needs
more than gore
The Other could have been
a suspense-filled, psycho-
drama. All the ingredients
are there. The story and
setting have good
possibilities; Robert Sur-
tees' photography is excellent; and the period, the
late 1930's, is faithfully
recreated by director
Robert Mulligan (Summer
of '42). But this film is just
the kind of sloppy, expensive, waste of celluloid
The Other. Director:
Robert Mulligan.
Screenplay: Thomas
Tryon, based on his
novel. Photography:
Robert Surtees. At the
Downtown.
that Hollywood produces
when artistic integrity is
sacrificed to marketability.
The film is based on actor
(star of The Cardinal)
Thomas Tryon's novel
about a decaying family of
Connecticut landed gentry.
The youngest members of
the family, a pair of bright,
ail-American, 12-year-old
identical twins, have been
overly affected by some
quasi - supernatural
"games" taught them by
their Russian maternal
grandmother.
On the surface, the twins
(played competently by
Chris and Martin Ud-
varnoky) are opposites.
Niles is sweet and innocent;
Holland is sullen and "bad".
But appearance turns out to
be deceptive, and the
grandmother, who belatedly
realizes that her "games"
have become twisted, is
powerless against the evil
she has unintentionally
spawned. Insanity and
death are the result.
Great! This is the stuff
that made The Turin of the
Screw a classic chiller. The
psychological and supernatural aspects of such
stories can be fascinating.
And Roman Polanski
showed us in Rosemary's
Baby that gothic tales can
be terrifying even in the age
of moon landings, if they are
coherently developed and
subtly handled.
There's the rub.
Coherence and subtlety are
totally absent from The
Other. Robert Mulligan's
directing is good enough,
but he is stuck with a script
that rapidly goes from
promising to ridiculous.
Apparently he isn't a good
enough director to realize
that he is filming crap.
Screenwriter Tryon's
original novel starts out
with a good idea, but he
destroys it because he is
confused about the nature of
the horror he is trying to
create. This confusion survives unscathed in his
screenplay. On the other
hand, he does develop some
aspects of the book well. The
relationships between the
twin brothers, and between
Niles and his grandmother,
are deep enough to make the
first half of the novel
credible.   This   depth   is
I studiously eliminated from
the movie version.
Did I mention insanity and
CHRIS   UDVARNOKY   as   Niles
ail-American boy in The Other.
Perry,   the   not-so-innocent
death? When "The End"
mercifully appears on the
screen, a rough body count
would include eight dead
(by fire, pitchfork,
drowning, etc.), and three
insane (one wrongly accused of murder, another a
total cripple). That's approximately one major
tragedy every ten minutes.
You can imagine how much
time the film has in between
to build tension. Even Hitchcock could not sustain
suspense through such a
continual bloodbath.
Subtlety? King Kong was
more subtle. The events
aren't foreshadowed; they
are literally spelled out in
advance. By the time they
take place, we are already
aware of every detail. There
are no innuendoes; nothing
is left to the imagination.
This explicitness successfully destroys any
suspense the film might
otherwise have had. I have
carefully avoided giving
away the one surprise twist
in the plot in case someone
still wants to see it. The
movie itself has no such
qualms. It clumsily reveals
the secret half-way through,
then drags anti-
climactically on.
Did I mention coherence?
Tryon's screenplay makes a
greedy grab for all shades 0/
horror, and comes up empty-handed! He does not have
the skill to balance the
supernatural with the
psychological as James
does in The Turn of the
Screw and Polanski does in
Rosemary's Baby; so he has
to go at them one at a time.
The first half of the film is a
reasonable study of the
ego's projection of evil onto
something outside itself.
As I have said, this has
possibilities. But then comes
the revelation of the secret,
and the last half of the film
is a dragged-out story of
supernatural possession.
Needless to say, the two
halves are somewhat incongruous. But by this time
we are so worn down by the
tedious orgy of carnage,
that we don't give a damn.
—David MacKinlay
A MAN IN
THE MIDDLE
OF THINGS
GRANT DEACHMAN
was first elected to the House of Commons as the Member of
Parliament for Vancouver-Quadra in the General Election of
1963. He was re-elected in the General Elections of 1965 and
1968. In three Parliaments, over a period of nine years, he has
been one of the most active men in the House of Commons and a
diligent worker for the people of Vancouver-Quadra. What,
exactly, does a Member of Parliament do in Ottawa? What does
he achieve for Canada and for his community? Here is the record
of a man in the middle of things.. .
In the House of Commons he has been Chairman of the Standing
Committee on Fisheries and the Standing Committee on National
Defense. He was Chairman of the national Liberal Caucus. He is
the Chief Government Whip, the man who is responsible for the
day-to-day management of government business in the House of
Commons.
For his constituency of Vancouver-Quadra he is a tireless
lobbyist. Around the Department of National Defence he is
known as "The Member of Parliament for Jericho Beach".
Federal grants to U.B.C. have reached such proportions in recent
years that the Minister of National Health and Welfare accused
him of paving U.B.C. with gold.
When the federal government allocated $10 millions for grants to
be distributed throughout B.C. during the 1971 centennial year,
Deachman turned up at U.B.C. with a cheque in his pocket for a
quarter of the total amount — $2.5 millions. The grant will build
a magnificent museum of West Coast Indian culture.
While in Ottawa he often surprises constituents who write or wire
to him by phoning them long distance. In response to one urgent
plea for help from anxious parents Deachman persuaded
government officials to divert a Canadian plane to Greece to pick
up a Vancouver boy injured in a car accident.
Keep Vancouver-Quadra in the
m iddle of things I
ON OCTOBER 30th RE-ELECT
GRANT DEACHMAN
LIBERAL
For Information and Transportation
phone 872-7851
Published by the Vancouver-Quadra Campaign Committee
4063 Cambie Street
Friday, October 27, 1972
THE      UBYSSEY
Page Friday, 7 Books
Canadians ignorant of
American experience
Every Canadian should
rethink his attitudes towards
Americans living in Canada.
Most Canadians are woefully
ignorant about the American
experience. Their ideas of
American life come from the
movies, and from a vague but
deep-rooted assumption that
living in the U.S. is like living
in Canada, only more so, and
worse.
The       New       Refugees:
American Voices in Canada.
Edited by Jim Christy.
Peter    Martin    Associates.
$7.95.
Canadian nationalism has
not cured the great Canadian
inferiortity complex; it has
simply introduced a new, coexistent complex: Canadian
bigotry. Canadians are
childishly eager to display
their courageous defiance of
Big Daddy. Flippant anti-
Americanism has become a
part of everyday thought and
speech.
How many times have you
been in a gathering where
someone got shit because he or
she was an American? Talk to
any American living in this
country and he will tell you
about the innumerable occasions when Canadians have
showed their zealous disapproval of the U.S. by slighting
him personally. The worst
thing about this kind of stupid,
smug mindlessness, is that it is
* often done by people who are
otherwise reasonable and
intelligent. Canadians are so
unaccustomed to dealing with
real conflict situations that
they become appallingly
careless.
They assume that each
American must answer for all
things American, and they
treat individual Americans as
if they were the embodiment of
all things American. They
think nothing of displaying
anything from mild distrust to
open scorn towards a person
simply because they find out
that he is an American,
irrespective of his individual
merits. In doing so, they fail to
make the vital distinction
between human beings and
abstractions. Being nasty to an
American you meet at a party
because you are against
American ownership of
Canadian industry is like
blaming an Alberta ranch hand
for the suppression of French-
Canadian intellectuals under
the War Measures Act. It's also
A the same as being nasty to
someone because he is black.
The   New    Refugees   is    a
collection of personal writings
by American immigrants in
Canada. It is roughly divided
^ into three sections: writings
about growing up in the States;
writings concerning personal
experiences in Vietnam; and
writings about experiences in
Canada. The collection tries to
include pieces by a broad
cross-section of draft-dodgers
and deserters rather than by
just  a  group  of   intellectual
"spokesmen". Several of the
pieces in the book are interviews,  presumably  with
people who would not otherwise have been included.
It is not surprising that the
most effective pieces in the
book are the most personal
ones, and the least articulate
ones. We've all heard and read
articulate characterizations of
the American refugees as a
group in Canada. The two or
three essays that indulge in
"summing it all up" are a
bore.
The most interesting, and
touching, pieces are those that
tell in a personal way what it
was like to grow up in the
States and then leave it.
Together, these pieces form a
real insight into the American
experience. Growing up in
Canada. It is more intense,
more intimidating, more
engaging and more complicated.
And for the last ten years,
young American males have
had to face the draft and the
possibility of being sent to
Vietnam. The middle part of
the book thoroughly
documents, through personal
experiences, the whole range
of military experience — from
boot camp to the slaughter of
Vietnamese civilians. None of
this is new, since Life
magazine has already shown
us full-color pictures, but it is a
necessary part of the book. It
explains why many felt that
they had no alternative but to
leave.
The best third of the book is
equally balanced between
rapturous prose extolling the
wondrous freedom and waving
wheat of this fair land, and
some cogent critical insights
into Canadian foibles. The first
is understandable considering
the circumstances under which
these people left their own
country. The second is
valuable. It gives Canadians a
chance to see themselves
through eyes that haven't seen
"Don Messer and his Islanders".
Every Canadian owes it to
himself to read this book. It
will force you to re-adjust some
of your assumptions about
people in the U.S. It will also
force you to see that
Americans living here are not
necessarily representatives of
all the evil that the U.S.
symbolizes for you. It may
even prompt you to judge in-
divudual Americans on their
individual merits.
David MacKinlay
IN VANCOUVER CENTRE
elect
NICK
ZAMBUS
SOCIAL
CREDIT
WHY NICK ZAMBUS?
—He is young, honest, full of energy, efficient and ready to
work for you in Ottawa.
—He is aware of the people's needs in Vancouver Centre.
—He doesn't just talk about a problem, he does something
about it.
ABOUT THE MAN
—He is a realtor by profession and a graduate of the U.B.C.
diploma course.
—Zambus knows Vancouver Centre.
— He has worked and lived here for many years.
—He's held office in many service organizations in Vancouver.
—He knows Vancouver Centre is a good place to live, and
raise his family, but he wants to make it better.
—He wants to make home ownership possible for every
family.
—He wants social security for all Canadians.
—He wants more jobs for people.
—He wants to stop inflation.
It is time we had an MP
who will represent you full time.
MAKE AN EFFORT TO MEET HIM
IZAMBUS, Nick IXI
THE MAN ON THE MOVE
Zambus Campaign — 2486 Stephens St.
IpoCQflaeBBOOOQOQOOOQOOflOOBOOOQ
YOU ARE INVITED TO A
DESSERT PARTY
HEAR SPEAKER
BERNICE GERARD
Tell About Her Visit With
Charismatic Catholics in Rome
THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 2
7:30 p.m., Lutheran Campus Centre
INFORMATION: 733-7067 Sponsored by Charismatic Campus Ministry
POINT
V      SHOP
3-Speeds
$69.00
FREE — FREE
wth   10-SPEEDS
Fenders - Carrier - Light Set
We're Overstocked!
STUDENT DISCOUNT
Theft Insurance - Cables - Locks
3771 W. 10th (near Alma)
224-3536
iiniirWiffiini^
THE VILLAGE RESTAURANT
Featuring the finest in
CHINESE AND CANADIAN CUISINE
Luncheons and Dinners
DINING ROOM
FULLY AIR CONDITIONED FOR YOUR COMFORT!
Mon.-Fri. 10 a.m.-9 p.m.
Sat.-Sun and Holidays — 10 a.m.-8 p.m.
TAKE-OUT SERVICE
5778 University Blvd.
(34 block from Gymnasium)
224-0640
^p^Mr^Mi^JlMW^Jirr5JWr5Jlr^JWr5JWg^
I
NOTICE
TO ALL
STUDENTS
FACULTY & STAFF
HOW DOES THIS SOUND
TO YOU . . .
15% OFF
THE MANUFACTURERS SUGGESTED LIST
ON ALL OUR STEREO
COMPONENTS & ACCESSORIES
Bring in your I.D. card and receive our.opportunities for
youth  grant.
COME IN AND SEE OUR LARGE
SELECTION OF STEREO EQUIPMENT
MILLERS
4 STORES TO SERVE YOU
1123 DAVIE ST.
683-1326
Open 9 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. Mon. to Fri.
Saturday 9:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m.
782 GRANVILLE ST.
683-1395
9:30 a.m. to 6:00 p.m.
Mon. to Sat.
Thurs. & Fri. 9 - 9
622 COLUMBIA ST
524-2016
9 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Mon.-Sat.
Thurs. & Fri. 9 - 9
726 YATES ST.
388-6295
9 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.
Mon.-Sat. Fri. 9- 9
CHARGEX   •   EASY TERMS   •   LAYAWAY
Page Friday, 8
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, October 27, 1972 Friday, October 27,  1972
THE       UBYSSEY
Page  17
Arts consider tightening
majors program structure
By CHRISTINE KRAWCZYK
The faculty of arts will meet at noon today to
consider a recommendation by the faculty's
curriculum development committee to tighten
the structure of majors programs.
A September report of the standing committee views the purpose of majors programs
as assuring that every student acquires some
degree of mastery of at least one subject or
field of study," although it does recognize that
curriculum structure in itself cannot insure
that this purpose will be achieved.
The report also expresses the concern that
students should be left free to sample courses
other than those in their field of study. One rule
states -that all students must take six units
outside their area in their third and fourth
years combined.
Present majors programs are criticized for
lacking depth. A more structured program is
recommended as a means of correcting the
situation.
"We would envisage a larger number of
major programs than the present 30 to 35,
resulting both from the subdivision of majors
within some of the larger departments, and
from the establishment of more interdisciplinary major programs administered by
more than one department," the report said.
Another criticism of the current majors
program is that there are no compulsory
seminars for third and fourth year students.
The seminar is seen by the authors of the
report as an "indispensable element in a
program of studies ... in which the student is
forced to meet the intellectual challenge of
grappling with problems in his chosen field of
study."
The report also recommends that the number
of students in a majors program be limited. The
students accepted into a field should have a
"common core of courses and seminars in the
third and fourth year which they would take as
a group."
"Each major program would be developed
by a small group of faculty," says the report.
This would "foster interaction between faculty
and students."
Pesticides endanger body
By KEN DODD
Nobody's likely to see a death certificate
listing liver cancer caused by DDT, pollution
probe advisor Donald Chant said Tuesday.
"There are strong indications that there is a
relation between the degree of concentration of
pesticides in the body, hypertension and liver
cancer," he said.
Chant, a founder of Pollution Probe and
chairman of the zoology department at the
University of Toronto was speaking to about 100
people in Angus 110 as part of the Death of
Progress series.
The build-up is caused by subtle food-chain
effects, he said. As pesticides work their way
up the chain from simple to higher organisms
they have a greater effect on organic functions.
The chain effect has caused reproductive
failures in birds and mammals.
He said it is very difficult to trace this buildup as pesticides move "incredible distances
through the environment". For instance, a
pesticide applied in Florida could affect a bird
in Georgia flying to the Canadian arctic where
it has a reproductive failure.
This underscores the need to take into account the indirect effects of pesticides rather
than the usual narrow analysis which only
considers improvement in production.
Dance still on
Engineers removed all the
signs, but the Hallowe'en
dance goes on tonight at International House, 9 p.m. to 1
a.m.
Costumes are optional,
admission $2.00 and remember: IH is for everyone, not
only foreign students.
Hallowe'en is traditionally
celebrated Oct. 31, but the
International House couldn't
wait.
Chant was critical of industry's refusal to
look beyond its own doors.
"A big word in industry today is the 'tradeoff between necessary pollution and environmental preservation," he said.
However, Chant said, the use of pesticides is
necessary. "There is a return of five dollars for
every dollar used on crop control in Canada
today. If we didn't use pesticides we would lose
20 to 25 per cent of our crops yearly."
He said "there are currently 150 species
around the world controlled by non-pesticides.
Indeed the return by organic methods is $55 for
every one dollar used." It is a far better buy, he
added, but also takes far greater research.
Instead, we must consider how pesticides
could be used more sensibly, said Chant.
"Man should use other organisims as indicators of environmental quality. If animals
are suffering from the effects of pesticides we
should take this as a warning."
"We suffer from lack of knowledge. We
could study ourselves to death." He said man
does know pesticides harm him notably by
cancerous formations and genetic defects. Also
pesticides are very mobile and highly souble in
body fat.
Knowing such things, he said, we can "make
pretty sound judgements as to how we want to
handle these materials in the future."
City r\igh~ts Tfuatre
6BS-5e3l 150S.Ha*&iff4
FRIDAY & SATURDAY
ONLY
William Golding's
"LORDOFTHEFLIEES"
9:15
Directed by Peter Brook
Plus "HEAD" at 7:30
MIDNIGHT SHOW—Fri. & Sat
Marx Bros, in
"THE BIG STORE" 99c
STARTS SUNDAY (One Week Only)
99c-TRIPLE BILL-99c
"TARZAN ESCAPES"
6:15
(1933) —Weismuller
"TAKING OFF"
8:00
Milos Forman Film
"BARBELLA"
9:45
Jane Fonda
Midnight Shows Halloween
99c
"THE HAUNTING"
'VILLAGE OF THE DAMNED'
TORONTO $129
LONDON $245
Association of Student Councils
CHARTER FLIGHTS
Room 100 B-S.U.B.
224-0111
VARSITY GRILL
4381 W. 10th
(Beside Varsity Theatre)
CHINESE & WESTERN
FOOD
FREE QUICK DELIVER Y
Serving Students
for 16 years.
224-1822 224-3944
First
with
Class
Peugeot
OVERSEAS DELIVERIES
for your winter vacation!
Jay's B & E Mtrs. Ltd.
685-4714      1257 Seymou r St
NEW and USED
BOOKS
• University Text Books • Quality Paper Backs
• Pocket Books • Magazines
• Largest Selection of Review Notes in Vancouver
BETTER BUY BOOKS
4393 W. 10 Ave.
224-4144 - open 11-8 p.m.
9to9
Mon.-Fri.
IS ON NOW!
SAT.
Reg. Price.
Four £
Seasons ▼
Special
. VERY EXPENSIVE
►•99
PLUS: MADE IN AUSTRIA
DYNO-GLASS f ibreglass SKI   tlftlM
CRACKED OR ONE PIECE EDGE «I #1 U tOO
MANUFACTURERS SUGG. LIST $85.00
SPECIAL
49
SUPER SAVINGS ON SKI CLOTHING
WARM-UP 1
PANTS 1
Large Selection
of
Colors and
Sizes.
MEN'S* LADIES'
NANCY GREENE
SKI JACKETS
Down & fibre! it led, many
styles & colors M.S.L
$65.00
$47-88
IMPORTED
MEN'S & LADIES'
SWEATERS
100%   wool.   Assortment
colors & styles. Sugg, list
00     $1788
NO DOWN PAYMENT* LAYAWAY • CHARGEX
"DEAL WITH US AND
BANK THE DIFFERENCE"
FOUR SEASONS
LEISURE WORLD
1503 KINGSWAY       873-2481 Page   18
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, October 27,  1972
Day care responsibility
ignored by university
By LINDA HOSSIE
For more than three years
the university administration
has avoided taking responsibility for the development of
daycare centres on campus,
daycare council president
Roderick Barman said
Tuesday.
"I would like the university
administration to at least come
around and say that provision
of daycare centres is part of
the university scene,
especially in view of the fact
that they provide married
student residences."
Barman said in an interview
there is a trend to older
married students now, and
provision of daycare centres
for these students' children is a
necessity.
"That doesn't mean they
should pay for the centres," he
said. "If they just set up sites
or provided backing for loans it
would be a help."
Barman said the council is
renovating a building on
Acadia Road but without the
necessary funds it is difficult to
get the work completed.
If the university would help
arrange some kind of interest
free loan for the council, setting up the centres would be
much easier, he said.
"I don't say the university is
hostile," Barman said. "We're
grateful for what it has done.
But it is neutral land and it's
this neutrality that gets us
down."
What the university has done
lor daycare is to make
available two buildings on
Acadia Road. But, the daycare
centres that occupy these
buildings have no real legal
right to be there. They were
DAYCARE CENTRES . . . necessity for older students
never given a lease, Barman
said.
The two units are under
pressure from the board of
governors to move so married
student housing can go in that
area.
The university is taking no
responsibility for providing
alternate facilities for these
daycare units,  Barman said.
He said the daycare council
is "trying to do a great deal on
very limited resources."
The parent-run daycare
units are co-operatives. Each
parent has to put in four of five
hours of work a week in one of
the centres.
This, on top of their own
work or studies, leaves them
little time for the council work,
fund raising and building that
has to be done.
Money is short. The centres
operate on the fees from
parents and some government
subsidies for parents who can't
afford the full $80 a month.
Each unit for children under
three years must have one
qualified supervisor or teacher
for every four children. Units
for children over three must
have a ratio of one teacher for
every eight children.
The qualified staff are paid
from $450 to $550 a month.
Even this money is getting to
be hard to come by. Barman
said.
"What we really need is a
paid full — or even part-time
co-ordinator — to implement
council decisions and talk to
the various centres," he said.
The university gives no funds
or financial support to the
centres to help them accomplish these goals.
Barman said the graduate
student centre gave the
daycare council $300.
Alma Mater Society
treasurer David Dick said
Thursday the AMS has given
the council $500 and made a
$2,000 interest-free loan.
Dick said the funds would
probably be matched by the
provincial government.
Barman is also hopeful the
recent change in B.C. government will mean funds for
daycare and other student
needs (like student loans) will
be easier to come by.
So far the work in daycare
has continued to be managed
on spare time and a shoestring
economy.
United Nations ineffective
By DAVID SCHMIDT
The United Nations has been ineffective in
solving world conflicts, Mark Zacher, head of
UBC's international relations department, said
Thursday.
Zacher was speaking to about 15 students at
an international students program committee
meeting held at noon to observe United Nations
Day.
Zachar classified the conflicts in the past 25
years into five different types: between the
Soviet and Western blocks; between two
countries within a single block; between two
non-aligned nations; between a non-aligned
nation and an "aggressive" block nation, and
between an "aggressive" non-aligned nation
and a block nation.
"Most of the conflicts the United Nations got
involved with were of the block aggressor
versus a non-aligned nation type," Zachar said.
The  intra-block  and  intra-non-aligned
conflicts were settled outside the UN so there
was no possibility of the states losing their
status, he said.
Zachar suggested it would become more and
more difficult to get support for individual
conflicts.
"There is going to be more emphasis on
informal diplomatic bargaining. Nations are
more and more reluctant to come down hard on
any conflicting states," he said.
He said he sees the area of environmental
management becoming the UN's major area of
activity. He cited the problems of oceans and
outer space and the world's supply of non-
reusable resources being major concerns of the
UN in the future.
"Global agencies and regional agencies will j
work together on pollution problems," he said.!
"Often these may produce only a shimmer
of action rather than a reality of action,"
Zachar said.
SPAGHETTI HOUSE LTD.
4450 West 10th Ave.
Hot Delicious Tasty Pizzas
- 22 DIFFERENT FLAVORS -
BARBECUED SPARERIBS - CHARBROILED STEAKS
FREE DELIVERY - Right to Your Door
Phone 224-1720 - 224-6336
HOURS - MON. To THURS. 11 a.m. to 3 a.m.
FRI. &«SAT. 11 a.m. to 4 a.m. - SUNDAY 4 p.m. to 2 a.m.
THE
ADVENTURERS
Saturday, Oct. 28, 1972
8:30 p.m.
at HILLEL HOUSE
behind Brock Hall
Free Popcorn
members 50c
Refreshments
non-members 75e
u i
BAD COMPANY'
IS GOOD COMPANY.
GO SEE IT!"
—Richard Schickel, Life Magazine
<*
Pinmnunl Pn-turcs. Present!.
A Jatfilms. Inc. Production
BAD COMPANY
♦»
JEFF BRIDGES BARRY BROWN
JIM DAVIS DAVID HUDDLESTON    Produced by Stanley R. Jaffc
Directed bv Robert Benton   Written by David Newman and Robert Benton
MATURE ENTERTAINMENT
"WARNING — SOME COARSE
LANGUAGE AND VIOLENCE"
— R. W. McDonald, B.C. Director
W'^i
Starts TODAY
STRAND   681-2362
600 W. GEORGIA ST.
12:15, 1:45, 3:45, 5:40, 7:40, 9:40 Friday, October 27,  1972
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 19
Student senator says
'PM wants to win'
Student senator Svend
Robinson, who appeared on a
Liberal party financed
television program with prime
minister Pierre Trudeau
Tuesday night, said Thursday
all the PM wants to do is win in
Monday's federal election.
Robinson said Trudeau
doesn't care about voters'
opinions as long as he is reelected.
The hour-long interview
show moderated by broadcaster Jack Webster included
questions from a panel of
Robinson, labor leader Pat
O'Neal, social worker Darlene
Marzari, Vancouver alderman
Walter Hardwick, also a UBC
urban geographer and investment broker Michael
Ryan.
The public was given two
telephone numbers to call to
ask questions of the prime
minister.
Robinson in a Thursday
interview described Trudeau's
final campaign appearance in
B.C.   as   self-assured   and
"downright arrogant".
He said the PM was evasive
about answering questions,
and didn't have accurate
answers to the questions he did
answer.
"For example, the PM said
the federal government
couldn't do anything about a
proposed superport facility for
Squamish. Yet, environment
minister Jack Davis said
Wednesday the development
would be halted."
Potato farmers in
SASKATOON (CUP) — National Farmers Union president
Roy Atkinson has called on the Prince Edward Island government to pass legislation certifying the NFU as the bargaining
agent for PEI potato farmers, following a plebiscite last week.
The plebiscite, supervised by the PEI government, asked
potato farmers whether they favoured certification of the NFU
as their collective bargaining agent. Farmers supported the
NFU with a vote of 415 to 233.
The NFU has been attempting to obtain collective
bargaining rights for Canadian farmers for several years. No
provincial government has yet seen fit to pass the enabling
legislation that would provide the legal structure under which
farmers could bargain collectively for a fair price for their
produce.
PEI premier Alex Campbell has indicated that the
government will have to study the results of the plebiscite
before deciding on any action.
Snake oil transcended
by cure-all meditation
By MAUREEN O'ROURKE
Transcendental meditation
not only can relieve the
pressure to drink and smoke
but can improve the capacity
of the brain as well.
Psychologist David Cox said
in a lecture Thursday in Bu. 202
that people drink and smoke
because of stress, and
meditation gets rid of this
stress.
Meditation is also useful for
drug addicts because it lessens
withdrawl symptoms, Cox
said.
Cox said because of stress
and tension people use only 10
to 15 per cent of their brains,
rhrough only 40 minutes of
meditation daily the brain can
be rested and refreshed.
"The tension in the world is
due to manifestations of individual stress," Cox said.
Transcendental meditation
is also helpful in developing
positive tendencies. "The
purpose is to live in your
situation harmoniously, to
snjoy    your    friends     and
possessions more," Cox said.
"Meditation follows the
natural tendencies of the mind.
We just point the mind in the
right direction."
The technique used by the
Vancouver Centre for Transcendental Meditation is to sit
in a normal position in a
comfortable chair and "just
meditate and take it as it
comes."
Cox said 20 minutes of
meditation in the morning and
evening is a stress release.
"There are no prerequisites,
belief system or knowledge of
MAMS
CRAFTS
leather belts & bags 9 batik
, pottery 9 jewellery 9 macrame}
stained glass 9 candles
DISCOUNT WITH AMS CARD
& THIS AD
Mon- Sat 10:30-5:30
Fri'til 9:00
1124 Robson St       688-3979
philosophy necessary for this
course," Cox said.
STUDENTS
FACULTY & STAFF
10°/c
o
off on all
BOOKS
Just show your I.D. card
SEE OUR WIDE SELECTION
Mfr"s.
Suggested List
• All the latest fiction
• Serendipity section
• Children's friezes
• Canadiana
• Dover colouring books
CHARGEX * EASY TERMS
DRIVE IN & SAVE
• Handyman's corner
• Children's books
• Gen. book dept.
• Art supplies
• Gift books
MILLERS
1123 DAVIE ST. 683-1326
Hours 9 a.m.-9 p.m. Mon.-Fri. Sat. 9 a.m.-6 p.m.
CROSS COMM
No Hawaii for Peddler this
winter! And no more stuffy
indoor weekends at home...
Peddler's getting ready to
enjoy the snowy beauties of
B.C. by inexpensively fitting
himself out with comfortable
lightweight equipment for
easily-learned cross country
skiing.
It's a safe sport enjoyed in
Scandinavia for years by
millions of families.
Every Peddler bicycle centre
is geared-up now to set your
whole family off too, on the
healthiest happiest winter
they've ever spent!
4638 E. Hastings 291-6071
4385 W. 10th Ave. 228-8732
620 E. Broadway 874-8611
7007 Kingsway 524-9768
CHARGEX • TERMS • LAYAWAYS
tojoy your Winter This year/
peddler
bicycle centres
BILL
CLARKE
The big election will be decided by YOU on Monday.
As a candidate, I have been working on your behalf
for 18 months. If elected, I shall continue to give to
my new career as your representative the same sort of
hard work and effort that I have shown throughout
the campaign.
I have now called on over 20,000 homes, apartments
and student residences in Quadra. You know I feel
that I can provide far more effective representation
for Quadra than the incumbent. You know how I
have spoken out on the issues that affect Vancouver's
future quality of life such as: more parkland at
Jericho, preserving the harbor waterfront for people
(west of Main St.), expansion of port facilities at
Robert's Bank, no ferry terminal at Wreck Beach,
rapid transit rather than freeways in Vancouver etc.
But let me also reiterate my views on the national
issues. The Canadian people are now fully aware that
the principal issue of this election is the Trudeau
government's mismanagement of the national economy. This management costs you, the taxpaying
citizen, an enormous price in terms of wasted tax
dollars, lost jobs, lost opportunities, and erosion of
your purchasing power.
The voters know there IS an alternative — a positive
alternative and a better alternative. It is a Progressive
Conservative government with the ability to restore
the confidence of Canadians in themselves and to get
Canada back to work. Our programs will help put
Canada back together again into a society of
opportunity and achievement.
Here are some of our solutions:
1) We will make the creation of new jobs our first
priority.
2) We will reduce personal income tax and allow the
average Canadian more opportunity to control
more of his money as he or she sees fit.
3) We will stop the personal income tax increases
that are planned by the Trudeau government. By
so doing we will stimulate the demand for goods
and services and thereby create new job
opportunities.
4) We will stop using inflation to obtain hidden
personal tax increases which take an increasing
percentage of your income each year.
5) We will give our pensioners better protection by
making old-age pension payments fully reflect
increases in the cost of living since their last major
adjustment.
6) We will reduce the size and cost of bureaucracy,
and we will eliminate non-productive government
programs.
7) We will provide incentives to small businesses and
help young people get started through venture
capital assistance.
8) If we have to arrest an emergency round of
inflation, we will do so through temporary wage
and price controls.
9) We will operate an open government.
10)  And we will tell Canadians the truth.
We have shown throughout the campaign that a
Progressive Conservative government under the
proven leadership and integrity of Robert Stanfield
CAN do better.
To ensure this program, and better representation for
Quadra, I ask for your support at the polls on
Monday.
*   *   *
Bill Clarke is the Progressive Conservative
Candidate in Vancouver Quadra. For assistance to the polls, please call his
headquarters- 261-2292. Page 20
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, October 27, 1972
Third radical protests deportation
TORONTO (CUP) — A decision by
the Immigration Appeal Board is
expected next week on the case of a
third foreign radical in a , series
protesting Canadian deportation orders.
Immigration authorities were attempting to have former Black. Panther Edwin Hogan, accused of being an
accomplice to a 1969 robbery in Ohio,
deported to the U:S. Hogan's case
follows the attempted extradition to the
U.S. of anti-war activist Karleton
Armstrong, and the attempted
deportation and extradition of Puerto
Rican independentista Humberto
Pagan.
LrAt a two-day hearing Oct. 18 and 19 '
defense lawyer Charles Roach, who is
acting for Hogan without pay because
the prisoner has been denied legal aid,
fought the deportation on similar
grounds to those used by Pagan and
Armstrong.
Like Pagan, he tried to show that as a
radical political activist, Hogan faces
personal danger if he returns to the
U.S. Roach cited several cases of police
shootings of Black Panthers, including
Fred Hampton, who was murdered
while asleep.
And Roach has tried to show that, as
in Armstrong's case, the accusations
against Hogan are essentially based on
"activities of a political nature".
I f either of these points can be proven
to the satisfaction of the immigration
appeal board, deportation can be
delayed or quashed. Hogan is ad-
.mitting that he has resided illegally in
Canada as a landed immigrant, this in
itself sufficient grounds for deportation.
Hogan has lodged an appeal with
manpower and immigration minister
Bryce Mackasey, a step similar to one
taken by Prof. Istvan Meszaros who
has been unable to take up a teaching
post at York University because he was
labelled a security risk and denied
landed immigrant status.
Hogan has asked Mackasey to intervene and deport him to a country of
his choice. Tanzania, Cuba and Algeria
are considering offering him sanctuary.
Last June Hogan walked away from
a minimum-security dormitory for
honor inmates outside the walls of
Ohio's main penitentiary in Columbus
and came to Toronto June 17. He was
arrested by the RCMP ten days later
and has been in the Don jail since.
Hogan says he faces assassination or
at least long-term denial of parole if he
is returned to Ohio because he is now a
marked man.
Prison administrators will be out to
make things difficult for him, he
testified, because of his revelations at
the hearings that guns and explosives
were readily available to inmates in
the honor dormitory.
The prison warden, a political enemy
of the state governor, assigned these
inmates to work at parties at the
governor's mansion, expecting that one
of them would resort to violence and set
back the governor's penal reform
program.
Hogan said he had contemplated
seizing the governor as a hostage to
gain the release of some political
prisoners, but decided that it would
only result in hardship to prisoners left
behind.
Ihe only evidence linking Hogan to
the scene of the 1969 robbery were
pieces of material which police investigators found at the restaurant
where the manager was killed after
firing a shotgun blast at one of the
robbers, Roach said.
Roach charged that Canadian
government officials have consciously
put obstacles in the way of Hogan's
attempts to free himself of legal
bondage. Legal aid and bail have been
denied, although Roach says there are
adequate grounds for granting both.
Hogan said friends of his in New
York were told by FBI officials that
they were determined to get him back
"one way or another".
Roach suggested that because the
American government was not asking
for extradition, and only the Canadian
immigration department was
requesting deportation, "Why not let
him go (elsewhere) voluntarily?"
/Although the hearings were
nominally open, observers were
searched and their names taken. One
person who refused to identify himself
was refused entry.
Roach entered a formal, protest,
saying that the hearing was being
carried out in an intimidating manner.
This may later be used as grounds for
appeal of the board's decision.
Meanwhile, Armstrong is appealing
a judge's ruling ordering him extradited to the U.S., while Pagan will
remain in Canada at least another 18
months, pending the U.S. government
appeal of a decision refusing to deport
Pagan to Puerto Rico.
Deportation proceedings against
Meszaros began last week.
QUEEN ELIZABETH THEATRE — TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 7 AT 8:30 P.M.
DANCERS OF MALI
NATIONAL SPECTACULAR FROM AFRICA
Direct from Timbuktu, Bamako, Niori
and the Six Regions and Twelve Major
Tribes that constitute One of the Oldest
Civilizations Known to Man
MUSICIANS • DRUMMERS • DANCERS • SINGERS • WARRIORS • ACROBATS
SC.25 $4*25 $Q.75 $0.75
Tickets on Sale at the Bay Box Offices *  Downtown - Lougheed - Richmond - Surrey *
Phone Reservations—681-3351—Charge Your Tickets to Your Bay Charge Account Friday, October 27,  1972
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 21
Mi^
Hot flashes
Education
in China
UESC anthropology professor
Bill Willmott and Mordecai
Briemberg, former .Simon Fraser
University political science,
sociology and anthropology
department head, will address the
Canada-China Friendship
Association tonight.
Topic of the 8 p.m. lecture at
the main branch of the Vancouver
public library is Education in China
Today. Slides and discussion will
folio w.
bread
An annual $500 librarianship
scholarship in honor of former
Friends of UBC president Stanley
Arkley has been established by the
alumni association.
The scholarship will recognizee
librarianship student's
long-standing service to the
university and interest in UBC
libraries.
Park brief
The Jericho park committee, a
concerned     citizens    group
attempting to obtain 38 acres of
federal land in Point Grey for use
by the city as a park, will present a
brief to city counci I Tuesday.
The brief, committee chairman
Denis Gray-Grant said Thursday,
will call for stepped up action to
acquire the land. Interested
students are asked to be on hand at
the council chambers, city hall, at 2
p.m.
Dance
An arts undergraduate society
concert-dance with Firewood is
happening today from noon to 2
p.m. in the SUB ballroom.
Admission is 25 cents.
Water safe
The fourth of a series of
Westwater Research Centre
seminars concerning
environmental management will
feature Canadian Broadcasting
Corporation director Richard
Bocking.
Bocking will present the film
Canada's Water — For Sale? at 3
p.m. today at the Woodward
instructional resources centre in
lecture hall one.
Safety
A one-day B.C. Safety Council
course on how to drive
motorcycles will be held 12 to 3
p.m. Nov. 5.
Displays, films and techniques
will be featured at the Boundary
Bay seminar. Admission is free.
Call Gary Walton at 684-1351
to find out how to get there.
Eco art
Robin Harger, Environmental
Systems Community Organization
research director and former UBC
professor, will present an exhibit of
environmental art tonight at the
New Westminster art gallery.
The exhibit will remain on
display until Tuesday.
Puppet school
Dirk Oertel, president of
Vancouver puppetry guild will
teach an eight-week course in
puppetry sponsored by the
Playhouse Holiday school of
Drama.
For information on the classes
which began Monday at the
playhouse theatre company
building, 575 Beatty, phone Lynn
Cartwright at 684-5361.
Tween classes
TODAY
INSTITUTE OF ASIAN AND
SLAVONIC RESEARCH
Herschel Webb talks on Candor and
Discretion in Japanese Historical
Sources, 4 p.m., faculty club, salon,
B. Webb speaks on the Imperial
Institution in Japan at noon, Bu.
218.
ALLIANCE FRANCAIS
General meeting, noon, IH upper
lounge.
UBC NOP
Meeting and student mobilization
committee speaker, noon, SUB 213.
PRE-SOCIAL WORK CLUB
Guest speaker from children's aid,
noon, SUB 105B.
EXPERIMENTAL COLLEGE
Prof. Winiata on the World
Monetary System,   noon, SUB 111.
SKYDIVING CLUB
Annual Bash, 8 p.m., SUB 212.
SATURDAY
NVC
Hallowe'en    masquerade    party,    8
p.m.   to  1 a.m., SUB clubs lounge,
75   cents   for   members,   $1.25  for
non-members.
HILLEL
Film, The Adventurers, Hillel
House, 8:30 p.m.
SUNDAY
LUTHERAN CAMPUS MINISTRY
Discussion with mining engineer
Gordon Hilchie 9:30 a.m. Worship
reformation festival 10:30 a.m.
Lutheran Campus Centre.
VST CHOIR
Don Forbes conducts at 4
p.m., Chapel of the Epiphany, 6050
Chancellor.
FIRESIDE
Dr. K. Erdman speaks about
Triumf, 8 p.m., Fireside room, 6050
Chancellor.
MONDAY
ELCIRCULO
Coffee House and general meeting,
noon, IH 402.
KING FU CLUB
Practice,   4:30  to  6:30   p.m.,  SUB
ballroom, Also Thursday.
TUESDAY
ANGLICAN-UNITED
CAMPUS MINISTRY
Eucharist    soup    and    discussion,
noon, Lutheran centre.
AQUA SOC
Night dive, 8 p.m., Whytecliff Park.
ANTHRO-SOC UNDERGRADS
Monster    business    meeting,    noon,
Angus 303.
NEWMAN CLUB
Meeting, noon, SUB 105B.
WEDNESDAY
CHRISTIAN SCIENCE CLUB
Meeting, noon, SUB 212A.
LUTHERAN CAMPUS MINISTRY
Worship, soup and discussion, noon,
Lutheran centre.
IL CAFFE
M.  Coviello speaks about Sardinia,
noon, IH stage, Free coffee.
NATURAL FOOD ,
RESTAURANT
HORN OF
PfeENTY
Mon.-Wed. 8:30- 4 p.m.
Thurs. & Fri.      8:30-10 p.m.
Sat. 10 a.m.-IOp.m.
INVITES YOU TO BUY Ya A MEAL AND GET THE
OTHER HALF FREE (WITH THIS AD).
OR JUST DROP IN FOR A CUP OF ROSEHIP TEA.
"Great for Vitamin C"
Offer ends Nov. 12th, 1972 687-5225
511 Howe at Pender (downtown Vancouver)
Great Pumpjkin Bicycle Race
DATE:    Tues, Oct. 31  at  12:30
PLACE: Start and Finish outside Memorial Gym.
CYCLISTS: Members from any organization on  campus   (Contact Laurie Wilson in Rm. 202 Main Gym.)
PRIZES:    First prize goes to the  organization  who  sponsors
winning cyclist.   (The Draw  will   be  in  the Gym,
Mon. at noon.)
TICKETS:    Available  in the  Gym   (Foyer or  Room  208)   and
Sub at a mere cost of 50c.
Come out and support your club or organization
Buy a Ticket and take your chances at the Draw!
CLASSIFIED
Rates: Campus — 3 lines, 1 day $1.00; additional lines, 25c;
Commercial - 3 lines, 1 day $1.50; additional lines
35c; additional days $1.25 &.30c.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone and are payable in
advance. Deadline is 11:30 a.m.. the day before publication.
Publications 8ffice, Room 241 S.U.B.. UBC. Van. 8, B.C
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Dances
11
DANCE TO STREETLIGHT, GRAD.
Student Centre, Friday, Oct. 27,
9 p.m.-l a.m. Admission $1.00 per
person. Everyone Welcome!
CROSS TOWN BUS WILL PLAY
on. Tonight at "Lil Abner" in the
Winter Sports Center. Loads of
costume and door prizes. 9:00 to
1:00. $2.00 per couple. Don't miss it!
Greeting
12
SATURDAY SALE 100 PUR COATS,
jackets, many vintage items, $29
or less — all day Saturday, 10 a.m.
6 p.m. Pappas Bros. Purs, 459
Hamilton Street at Victory Square.
Phone 681-6840 weekdays 12-6 p.m.
Lost & Found
13
LOST: GREEK HISTORY NOTE
book. Red York University cover.
Contact Rene Goldman, Department Asian Studies or 224-9104
(home).  Reward.
POUND: MEN'S RING AT THE
Bay—Richmond. Inquire at SUB
Lost and Found, 105A.
Special Notices
15
DISCOUNT STEREO, EXAMPLE:
AM-PM receiver, turntable, base,
cover, cartridge, t.wo speakers, 2-
year guarantee, list $200, your
cost $125. Carry Akai, A.G.S.,
Zenith TVs.  Call 732-6769.
NO. 5 ORANGE STREET, MAIN AT
POWELL is having a Junk Contest! JUNK! Like stop signs, airplane wings, toilet seats, and as
original as you can get, cuz if we
pick your junk as a winner, you
too can win a dinner for two at
the White Lunch, a Free Bus Ride
to Burnaby, a gift certificate at
the Army & Navy, and many other
swell stuff. What will we do with
this Junk you ask? We're going to
plaster our walls, celling, and all
available places with it so that you
can point to a wrinkled stained
bedsheet for instance, and proudly
tell your friends "I did that."
So, starting when you want, start
bringing it in. Bring as many
as you can, but securely tie your
name, address and phone number
to each piece, so we'll know who
to contact. And don't forget, we
got second, third and fourth prizes
too, like 2 dinners for 2 at the
White Lunch, and 5 Free Bus Rides
to Burnaby. OKAY?
DON'T MISS THIS GIANT BAZAAR
and Thrift Sale featuring door
prizes, handicraft and other gift
items, new & used clothing and
appliances. Novelties at exceptionally low prices. Sponsored by the
Scottish Women Association at
Scottish Auditorium, 12th & Fir
Street.  November 4,  1-5 p.m.
TRY, IT, YOU'LL LIKE IT!!! LIVE
Radio—Comedy. Doctor Bundolo's
Pandemonium Medicine Show —
Wednesday, Nov. 1, 8:00 p.m., SUB
Theatre. FREE!!
$75 FOR 75<
40 Bonus Coupons In This
Year's Bird Calls
AVAILABLE   NOW
BUY   YOURS   TODAY!
Bookstore and SUB
Travel Opportunities
16
ASSOCIATION OP STUDENT
Councils Travel Service, Room
100-B,   SUB,  224-0111.
Wanted—Information
17
REWARD FOR INFORMATION TO
anyone who saw cyclist ride into
Gold Chevy, Wed., 8:30 a.m., then
kicked car going into parking lot
South Sub,  327-7684 after 6 p.m.
Wanted—Miscellaneous
18
RECORDS — 78's — SHEP FIELDS,
Blue Barron — Frankie Masters —
Henry King.  736-6250.
AUTOMOTIVE
Autos For Sale
21
1971 MG MIDGET. EXCELLENT
condition. Must sell — leaving
country. All reasonable offers considered. Call Linda, 325-1108.
I960 FORD PAIRLANE. CITY TEST-
ed.  Call Pat after 4 p.m.  224-0127.
Use Your
Ubyssey
Classified
Automobiles—Parts
23
TWO SNOW TIRES ON VOLVO
wheels. Whitewalls. Hubcaps. $40.
Ian, 228-8396 before 5:45 p.m.
BUSINESS SERVICES
Photography
35
Now! For The First
Time In Vancouver
B & W Unicolor Paper
B & W   Unicolor   Chemicals
Have you also tried the Unicolor Developing & Printing
Kits? It makes color work as
easy as can be.
3010 W. Brdwy.     736-7833
Scandals
37
MACBETH—A ROCK OPERA—BY
Richard Ouzounian and Marek
Norman, Oct. 25-Nov. 4. Student
performances Oct. 29-30, $1.00-$1.50
tickets now available UBC Old
Auditorium  Box Office,   228-3176.
DOCTOR BUNDOLO SNEAKS HIS
Pandemonium Medicine Show back
on campus this Wednesday, Nov. 1
at 8:00 p.m. in SUB Theatre. It's
FREE!!
TOMORROW NIGHT IS KLONDIKE
Night at 5745 Agronomy Road —
Karnes of chance, 1880's bar, girls
from the Silver Slipper Saloon. Pop
on your bowler, trim your 'stache,
shuffle on over!
C-90 CASSETTES WITH PLEXI-
glas case. Buy minimum of 6 at
$1.50 each — get 3 FREE! Guaranteed against defects. Pickup point
on campus can be arranged. Call
732-6769.
YAC (YOUNG ALUMNI CLUB) IS
back! At Cecil Green Park on
campus. Every Thursday from 8-12
mid. and Fridays, 4:30-12:30 a.m.
For alumni & graduating students.
Typing
40
TYPING — PAST, EFFICIENT —
Essays, Papers, Theses. 41st and
Marine Drive.  266-5053.
ESSAYS AND THESES TYPED.
Experienced typist. Mrs. Freeman,
731-8096.
TYPING OF ESSAYS, ETC. DONE
quickly and efficiently, 35c a page.
Phone 224-0385 after 5:30 p.m.
EFFICIENT ELECTRIC TYPING —
my home. Essays, thesis, etc. Neat,
accurate   work.   Reasonable   rates.
263-5317.
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted
51
FEMALE SALES CLERK FOR
delicatessen, Saturdays 4-12, or
Sundays 12-8:30 p.m. Apply 848
Granville St.
GIRL AS MOTHER'S HELPER, 2
or 3 mornings per week ex. Sunday;
one mile from gates. $1.75 per hour.
Phone Mrs. Andrade, 224-7658.
INSTRUCTION & SCHOOLS
WANTED: EDUCATION STUDENT
who has taken "Math. Methods" to
tutor Gr. 6 boy in arithmetic. Mrs.
Weinstein, 228-4808.
Tutoring Service
63
IS YOUR MIND BOGGLED BY
Professional Obfuscation? If so,
call the UBC Tutorial Center, a
program of the UBC Alumni Association in co-operation with
Speak-Easy. 12:30-2:30 p.m. to
register. The $1 registration fee
will be returned if you are not
"matched". Tutoring rates are arranged between the tutor and the
student. Call 228-4557 or see Doug
Brock at Speak-Easy.
RENTALS & REAL ESTATE
Rooms
81
OWN ROOM IN TWO BEDROOM
apartment, $42 & one-third utilities
in West End.  681-0849. Nov. 1st.
ACC. 1, BSMT. ROOM NEAR VAR-
sity. Share full plumb., kitchenette.
Available  Nov.   1.   $45.   224-3070.
Room & Board
82
CAMPUS ROOM AND BOARD, 5785
Agronomy Road. Sauna, color TV,
good food, recreational area. Phone
224-9684.
SPACIOUS SEMI-FURNISHED,
Southlands apartment for married
couple at reduced rent for occasional day and night babysitting.
263-8538 after 10:00 a.m. Page 22
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, October 27,  1972
rushant|
** CAMERAS     *!
4538 W.10 224-5858
NEVER UNDERSOLD!
CROSSTOWN BUS plays
TONIGHT AT THE
WINTER SPORTS CENTRE
"LI'L ABNER" Masquerade DANCE
Doors — 8:00, Dancing — 9:00, Door & Costume Prizes
TICKETS: $2.00 per couple from A.M.S. or E.U.S
or in S.U.B. Lobby at noon
THUNDERBIRD
FOOTBALL
U.B.C. Thunderbirds
vs
Univ. of Saskatchewan
SATURDAY, OCT. 28 - 2 p.
THUNDERBIRD STADIUM
General Admission 'I.00 — U.B.C. Students Free
HOCKEY
CANADA COLLEGIATE TOURNAMENT
NOV. 3, 4, 5
AT THUNDERBIRD WINTER SPORTS CENTRE
The Draw:—
Friday
Saturday
Sunday
—Un. of Calgary vs Un. of Victoria — 8 p.m.
— 6 p.m. — Un. of Alberta vs Lakehead Un.
— 9 p.m. — U.B.C. vs winner of Friday's game
— 12:30 noon — Consolation game
— 3:00 p.m. — Championship game
General Admission—$250 Students—$125
TICKETS AVAILABLE AT WINTER SPORTS CENTRE AND MEMORIAL GYM
.so is this
—sucha singh photo
The Huskies
are coming
By BRIAN MURPHY
The University of Saskatchewan Huskies featuring the
biggest team in the western conference will be on campus
Saturday to face the Thunderbird football team.
The game must be considered important because a loss for
the 'Birds will place them in a last place tie with the Huskies
while a win would assure the 'Birds of being out of the league
cellar for the first time in memory.
Last weekend the 'Birds lost to the University of Alberta
Golden Bears 7-31. Alberta's win moved them into top spot in the
Western Intercollegiate Football League, with a 5-1 record, as
Saskatchewan downed Manitoba 19-8 for their first win of the
year.
When the 'Birds and the Huskies met earlier in the season in
Saskatoon, UBC scored a narrow 13-11 victory.
That Saskatchewan will be tough and ready to play is an
understatement, not only because of their previous loss to the
'Birds but especially in view of their recent victory over first
place Manitoba.
The return to the UBC lineup of Jim Tarves — last year's
all-star quarterback will hopefully be a big plus as now the team
has a quarterback able to pass the ball to flanker Henry
Thiessen who is usually clear of defenders downfield.
Rookie back Gord Penn (the league's fifth ranked ball
carrier) will also have a further chance to display his talents as
it is expected that he will handle most of the ball carrying
chores. .
The 'Birds will be attempting to shake off their two latest
defeats and the criticism of this reporter by notching a victory.
Game time is 2 p.m. Saturday at Thunderbird Stadium.
Intramurals
There will be a meeting
today at 12:30 p.m. in room 213
War Memorial Gym for all
Women's Intramural Unit
Managers.
Congratulations to Dental
Hygiene and Rehab. Medicine
who tied for first place in flag
football.    Education    came
second, pharmacy third,
agriculture fourth and
recreation and Place Vanier
tied for fifth place.
Upcoming sports are hockey
which will be for two days only
— Nov. 13 and 16, and
volleyball which takes place
from Nov. 13 - Dec. 7.
Anyone who is interested in
refereeing for Intramural
games should contact Teresa
MacKenzie at 732-3265. Friday, October 27,  1972
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 23
Hoop, hockey
Basketball:
'Birds to start
Hockey:
The 1972 edition of the 'Birds
basketball team is starting to shape up.
Coach Peter Mullins Is holding daily
practices as the 'Birds get in shape for
the annual grad game to be held on
Friday, Nov. 3.
The Grad game marks the start of
the 1972-73 season where the 'Birds will
be attempting to defend the Canadian
championship which they won last year
by defeating Acadia University in the
national finals. This year they will have
to do it without star Ron Thorsen who
was probably the best guard in Canada
last year. Thorsen has graduated from
UBC and is now coaching the freshman
basketball team.
The loss of Thorsen has hurt the
'Birds but the team has improved in
other departments. The starting lineup
appears to be set with Stan Callegari
and Bob Dickson at guards, Ron
Matheson and Daryll Gjernes playing
forward and John Mills at centre.
Mills has consistently been the best
player in practice, shewing excellent
moves around the basket and
rebounding well. Despite his relatively
short height of 6'3" Mills is the best
driving centre in the league and should
be a key man if the birds are to repeat
there '72 performance.
The guards, Dickson and Callegari
are both exceptionally quick on offense
and move the ball well. Callegari's
magic shot is still a shade off but when
he gets his aim back he will give the
'Birds that much needed outside
scoring threat.
The forwards, Matheson and Gjernes
have been moving the ball well on the
fast break and have been consistent on
defense. Gjernes should be a key man
in the rebounding department.
The 'Birds are still lacking a tall man
under the basket and must rely on the
aggressive rebounding of Mills and
Gjernes if they are to win against
bigger teams.
The 'Birds do have some rebounding
strength on the bench with the much
improved Peter Herd and newcomers
Ed Blewett and Mike Ireland. Herd has
lost much of his awkwardness under
the basket and has been deadly on short
hook shots and jumpers. Blewett and
Ireland are both big men and have
shown an ability to get high in the air
for rebounds.
Doug Kripps, a latecomer to the
'Birds last season may have a chance
to crack the starting lineup at guard.
Kripps has shown fine moves in man
on man drills and has / played consistently well in scrimmages. His
playmaking and defensive abilities
should make him a valuable addition to
the 'Birds.
Coach Mullins still has his charges
working one on one and two on two
drills in practice. He seemed
displeased with the 'Birds' "shootin"
generally and occasionally stopped
scrimmage to coach players on the
finer points of shooting and checking.
The players have been keeping
spirits up during gruelling three hour
workouts and are rarin' to go for the
1972-73 season.
Soccer
The Thunderbird soccer team will be
on the road for their season opener
against Victoria,Sunday.
The team recently completed a six
game exhibition tour in the U.S. but the
Victoria game should give Johnson a
chance to see if his players can perform as well under the pressure of
league play.
The 'Birds will also be playing interlocking games with Inter City
League teams which will eventually
lead them to a direct confrontation with
SFU. If the rivalry between the UBC
and SFU is as great in soccer as it is in
other sports then this game promises to
be one of the season's highlights.
BOB HINDMARCH'S hockey 'Birds are working out hard weeknights at 5:30 p.m. at
Thunderbird Winter Sports Centre in preparation for the up-coming Hockey Canada
Tournament Nov. 3, 4, and 5. Team is depleted this year by professional signings of top
players, as is the rest of the Western College circuit.
t \ ..' ^. s, *!?"?:;■' * *
FORESTRY QUARTERBACK Steve Potten drops back to pass as Beta's linemen
rush forward during men's intramural football final Wednesday. Betas, with Bill
Ruby at q.b. went on to a 19-12 win.
Intramural talk
By SIMON TRUELOVE
An astonishing fact was revealed
Wednesday at noon on the War
Memorial Gym field — there are
good football players at UBC!
About 200 spectators, half of them
standing in the dismal Vancouver
drizzle, watched a fine display of
precision and team work as Betas
beat forestry 19-12 in the men's
intramural touch football final.
The foresters were less well-
organized, but ran some exciting
plays including one fantastic 40 yard
pass completion.
Playing on the winning Betas
team were: Larry Kancs (captain),
Bill Ruby (quarterback), Robin
Elliot, John Loden, Don Hunter,
Doug   Wilson,   J.   White,   James
Strilesky, Bob Grimsdick, and
Gordon Mulligan.
The intramural softball final
resulted in an 8-7 score as dentistry
came from behind to realize the
dream of team captain Tom Fell
who has been trying to win the
softball trophy since 1959.
The score was 6-0 for forestry at
the top of the third inning but the
dentists held them to only one more
run and scored all their runs in the
last three innings.
In Division II football a controversial game resulted in a 15-0
win for Fort Camp over Betas. Fort
Camp does not even exist any more
as a residence but the ex-residents
do not seem to have noticed; they
still produce winning teams.
The UBC Thunderbird hockey team
will have a new look this fall as a result
of the loss of half of last year's team.
UBC has lost four key players to
professional hockey leagues and
several more to graduation.
Gone are Ian Wilkie, Laurie Van
zella, Mike Darnbrough, Steve Fera,
Tom Williamson, Doug Buhr, Jin-
Fowler, Laurie Yaworski, and Bot
McAneeley. Wilkie, Buhr, Yaworsk;
and McAneeley all now play pre
hockey.
The biggest loss is probably Wilkie,
last year's starting goalie.
Coach Bob Hindmarch hopes to fill
the holes with a blend of solid veterans
and talented rookies. Offensively, the
'Birds should be exciting with the
return of all-star forwards Richard
Longpre and Doug Buchanon.
Longpre was a first team all-star at
left-wing and Buchanon second team
all-star at right-wing.
Veterans Brian DeBiasio, a 34 goal
scorer last year, and 13 goal man Bill
Cartwright should improve this year.
Veteran Alex Dick was a last minute
addition to the team at centre.
Hindmarch hopes to compensate for
the loss of his stars with some of the
promising rookies in camp.
The newcomers include Bill Ennos, a
centre from Weyburn, Saskatchewan
and formerly of the Vancouver Nats,
Jim Lawrence from the Vernon
Juniors, and Craig Thomas, a transfer
from the Harvard University team.
Other new team forwards are Bob
Murray of the Mt. Royal College team
in Calgary and Bob Gaston, a former
Vancouver junior star. Up from the
Jayvees are forwards Brian Bourassa,
John Cumberbich, and Chuck Carigan.
On the 'Birds' team the defence
suffered the heaviest losses. Only Arnie
Pedersen and Bill Gaston are back.
Bruce Brill and Warwick Reid are up
from last year's Jayvee squad.
The return of former 'Bird defenceman Bob Trenaman will help
strengthen the team.
Goaltending will probably be the
'Birds' biggest question mark. Both
last year's back-up Fred Masuch and
Jayvee Rob Smith lack varsity experience.
However, Hindmarch feels that they
will be good enough for the university
league. How well Masuch and Smith
play in league action remains to be
seen. So far both have shown good in
practice.
Hindmarch is worrying ^about his
team defensively.
"A young team needs time to develop
co-ordination," he said. "The defence
is young but in time should be stronger
than last year's.
The 'Birds' first action is on the
weekend against the rugged Powell
River Regals, at Powell River.
Their first home games are during
the upcoming Hockey Canada Tournament Nov. 3, 4, and 5.
S**^"^*
\Tf-v
Wrestling
preview
By GEORGE RICHEY
Wrestling practices are now in
session at Thunderbird Stadium in rm.
214.
Practices are Monday, Wednesday
and Friday 4:30-6:30 p.m.
The team is looking for competitive,
athletically inclined students who
would like to participate in the most
demanding amateur athletic sport on
campus. Men in the lighter and
heavyweight classes are needed most.
Serious training has already begun
for the UBC Invitational Wrestling
Tournament Nov. 18. This tournament
is generally regarded as one of the best
in the Northwest. Page 24
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, October 27, 1972
p*0
BILL CLARKE
>   •?-*
f- .>-
A message from Bill Clarke
to Quadra Voters:
Don't you think we need a
Member of Parliament from Quadra
who cares about the issues that really affect Vancouver's future? Many
of you know from what I have said
or written that I really do CARE
FOR QUADRA.
I feel I am in tune with the average voter in Quadra. I am an energetic 39 year-old. am married and
have three children. I own my own
home in our riding. I am a chartered
accountant and work as an independent small businessman. In short. I
am ready to represent you. and am
well qualified to do so.
SPREAD THE WORD!
ELECT

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
http://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.ubysseynews.1-0128115/manifest

Comment

Related Items