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The Ubyssey Nov 25, 1971

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Array THS UBYSSEY
Vol. llll, No. 29    VANCOUVER, B.C., THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 25, 1971    «^j^->48      228-2301
CAUT action
looms at UBC
By BERTON WOODWARD
There is a possibility the Canadian
Association of University Teachers will
become involved in the present tenure
dispute in the anthrosoc department.
Faculty association president Robert
Kubicek said Wednesday he had been in
touch with CAUT officials earlier in the
week to discuss education minister
Donald Brothers' statement Nov. 16 that the
provincial government is planning revisions
in the Universities Act concerning tenure.
Kubicek said no formal application
protesting the anthrosoc tenure dispute
had been made to CAUT at that time.
However, he said, "There probably have
been some informal arrangements but
because they are informal I am not going
to comment on them."
Dr. C. L. Mitchell, head of the Personnel
Services Committee of the faculty
association, had no comment Wednesday as
to whether his committee had been
approached by anthrosoc members. He said
all dealings with the committee are
confidential.
Aggrieved faculty have the choice of
appealing    to    the    PSC,    an    internal
committee at UBC, or contacting CAUT.
CAUT, a faculty union designed
primarily as a lobbying body for
professors, will enter a dispute involving
faculty if it is asked by individuals or
collective bodies within the university.
Kubicek said CAUT would require
documentation of grievances and would
then work closely with the local faculty
association.
If unofficial discussions were to take
place with CAUT it might, as an informal
arrangement, unofficially ask the local
faculty association president to contact
concerned faculty and department heads
about their feelings on a CAUT
investigation.
This arrangement would provide CAUT
with the local background to a dispute
should a formal application be made but
would not create the sensation of a CAUT
inquiry.
Faculty would be able to continue their
grievance strategy with some insight into
CAUT reaction, should a formal
application be made.
Quebec workers favor
general strike soon
MONTREAL (CUPI) - At a rally held
Tuesday in the Paul Sauve Arena,
Confederation of National Trade Unions
president Marcel Pepin announced to a
crowd of more than four thousand that the
first general strike in Quebec's history
would occure soon.
Of the 14,000 union members consulted
so far, 95 per cent have been in favor of
the general strike. Polling will be
completed Thursday when plans will be
announced at a press conference.
"It has never happened yet in Quebec,
but there must always be a first ... we
have the heart to fight for all workers,"
said Pepin.
The rally was called by the Common
Front of the CNTU to announce plans for
the general strike and to gain the support
of the rank and file members of the CNTU
for its new labor demands.
Michel Chartrand, president of the
CNTU's Montreal central council, began
the rally with a moment of silence to
commemorate Michelle Gauthier who died
in a violent La Presse demonstration on
See page 2: QUEBEC
—david phillips photo
LIFE'S LITTLE COBWEBS come back to haunt us time and again. But then, we are all
fools and the best-laid webs of mice and men many oft-times go astray.
Independent secretary, slate president elected
Wednesday's Alma Mater
Society elections produced a
Student Coalition president and
an independent secretary.
On   the   third   count  of the
preferential     ballot     Grant
' Burnyeat, law 2, had 1,189 votes
to Til Nawatzki's 698.
Allan Caplan and Stephen
Housser were dropped after the
first and second counts.
Tom MacKinnon, law 3, won
the  position  of secretary  by a
margin of only 10 votes (1,124)
more than Hilary Powell, arts 1,
"(1,114).
"A recount for secretary will
be held Friday noon, at Powell's
request," returning officer Sandy
t, Kass said Wednesday night.
While    ballots    were    being
counted,  members   and   council
supporters    of    the     Student
Coalition     unsuccessfully
•» attempted to block a quorum of
YIPPIE ... alternate poll
the     human     government
executive's final council meeting.
A quorum was reached and the
meeting convened after Student
Coalition external affairs officer
Adrian Belshaw dropped in to
challenge the quorum and
declared anything council did
after his departure "would be
considered illegal".
(A quorum cannot be
challenged before a meeting is
convened.)
Council unanimously passed
treasurer David Mole's motion
that The Ubyssey be given $900
to cover expenses to attend the
Canadian University Press
conference at Acadia University,
Wolfville, N.S. in December.
The AMS conference fund will
cover $700 of the grant with the.
remaining $200 coming from the
gifts and donations fund.
Earlier in the day an alternate
polling booth was set up to honor
the AMS elections.
The booth, located in SUB and
sponsored by the Black Cross was
set up "to allow students to
express their individuality and
responsibility to themselves."
"Also to have a little fun," a
spokesman said.
Some people entered
make-shift ballots supplied by the
alternate poll, but 50 others used
their official ballots.
Among those voted for were
Irving Fetish, Walter Gage, Jesus
Christ, Tom Campbell, Les
Bewley, Adolph Hitler and Karl
Marx.
Mao captured third place with
three votes, the Black Cross
workers netted second place with
18 votes (all sent in by
nine-year-old girls with a tape
recorder) and 88 people used their
ballots to vote for freedom. Page 2
THE       UBYSSEY
Thursday, November 25,  1971
Quebec govt, slammed
for breaking its promises
From page 1
Oct. 29, and also the workers throughout the world
who have died fighting capitalist oppression.
"We aren't afraid and we're not in a hurry
because we're together," said Chartrand. "We will
fight to the end not only for higher wages and
better working conditions but for human dignity.
We want a revolution."
A Common Front of CNTU locals was formed
to combat the attempts of the present regime "to!
play us off one group against the other".
For many years unions presented separate
demands. The common front hopefully will give the
workers the necessary force to combat the divisive
measures of the Quebec government.
One of the measures which Quebec premier
Robert Bourassa uses to stifle the growing demand
by Quebec workers for higher wages and better
conditions is to threaten the citizens with higher
taxes, but Chartrand added that if the Quebec
government stopped the daily flow of capital into
the hands of foreign investors, the citizens already
burdened with high taxes would be among the first
to benefit.
The unions also demand that fringe benefits
including four weeks of annual paid holiday with a
$200 additional bonus so the worker can enjoy his
holiday, 1% days per month sick leave with full pay,
and maternity leave.
Other speakers at the rally included Francine
Lalonde of the Quebec Teachers' Corporation which
Tuesday pronounced its affiliation with the
Common Front on the grounds that it was no longer
a traditional union movement.
The Common Front agreed. She asked the
members of the QTC to unite again with the
Common Front to fight for a "different Quebec".
Norbert Rodrique, a representative of the
hospital workers' local of the CNTU urged all union
members to back the union demands.
He criticized the Quebec government for
promising wage parity for men and women in 1968
and then postponing it until 1974. The government
had tried to buy the hospital workers off by
offering them a wage increase of 2.5 per cent.
The workers of the Common Front of the
CNTU are currently also supporting the struggle of
the locked out employees in the five-month-old La
Presse dispute. There is as yet no solution in sight
but the workers say they are looking to the
Common Front to support the basic rights of the
workers since the Bourassa government has refused.
Table mystery remains unsolved
By TED TURNER
On Wednesday the crafts people who market
their wares from tables on the ground floor of SUB
found the number of tables had been considerably
reduced.
One leatherwork and candle creator, who goes
by the monicker of Strider attempted to acquire a
table. Here is Strider's account of the Great Table
Caper.
"After discovering that no tables were available
to us we embarked on a table search mission which
led us to the dance room on the second floor. We
(partner Zvi and I) observed that there were many
tables not in use so we proceded to remove one for
our use.
"At this point we were approached by a
custodian who informed us that these tables were in
use and we should leave them. We did.
Case continues
The union representing Jeanne Paul, dismissed
from her position in the science faculty and
re-instated as a law faculty clerk, plans to continue
its legal action on her behalf against the university.
"Our position is that she be re-instated to her
old position as administration assistant to the
science dean," said Bill Lowe, Office and Technical
Employees Union regional director.
Lowe said Wednesday that even though Paul is
being paid the same wage in her new job as
admissions statistics clerk, she was forced to take a
lower position.
"Beyond that I don't think it would be proper
to comment further because the case is still before
the provincial Labor Relations Board," he said.
"He then told us that there was a shortage of
tables and that their use was being restricted. Then
the three of us (Strider, Zvi and the custodian) went
on a search of the building seeking a spare table.
Although the search proved useless, I am certain
that I observed two unemployed tables folded in a
cubicle.
"We thanked the custodian and abandoned our
search of the second floor. Once we returned to the
ground floor, my sidekick Zvi peered into the main
foyer student offices, and spied an unused table.
"I asked Zvi for his opinion as to who we
should ask for permission to use the table and he
replied profoundly: 'This is just one of those things
you have to do yourself.' We moved the table and
started to set up shop but were approached by the
janitor who sweeps in that area (I might add that he
is also our friend) who told us we couldn't set up
the table because of orders from a fellow named
Graeme, (Graeme Vance, SUB building manager).
"Our friend told us that if we didn't remove the
table he would be forced to call the police. He was
visibly upset be having to perform this task and
explained that he was only obeying his instructions.
"We than set up shop on the floor and I set out
in search of a method of drawing the attention of
the students to our plight, a search which led me to
the offices of The Ubyssey."
The Ubyssey attempted to contact Vance to
find out if he is the person who issued the
instructions regarding the tables, and also to find
out if the instructions are related to Thunderbird
Shop pressure to oust the crafts people.
Since Vance was not available, the explanation
for the situation will have to wait for the next
episode in the Great Table Caper.
DO IT NOW!
while stock is available
If you still need first term texts, don't
wait any longer. December 13th is our
deadline to return overstocked texts to
the publishers,
After December 13th, all first term
texts will require special orders.
the bookstore
 I
DON'T PANIC !
GET HELP WITH A TUTOR
UBC TUTORING CENTRE
SUB 228 (12:30-2:30)
The relationship between
four sensual people is limited:
They must find a new way.
LARRY KRAMER 3,a MARTIN ROSEN present
ALAN BATES      OLIVER REED
GLENDA JACKSON JENNIE LINDEN
,n KEN RUSSELL'S film of
D. H. LAWRENCE'S
WOMEN IN LOVE'
THURS. 25th - 12:25
PRI. 26 & SAT. 27
7:00 & 9:30
CinemaWest
presentation
75c
HEBB THEATRE
' • • • '—Bewley
Provincial court Judge Les Bewley said Wednesday the Alma
Mater Society motion demanding his resignation from the board of
governors and the bench was based on misinformation.
The unanimously passed motion condemned Bewley for a
statement in the Province saying there was more criminality among
the poor not because there was one law for the rich and one for the
poor but because, "there are more genetically disabled and more
economically disadvantaged and more stupid people among the poor."
"Bewley is a complete asshole," AMS president Steve Garrod
said when proposing the motion.
Bewley answered with this statement to The Ubyssey:
"As an honorary life member of The Ubyssey I had expected
journalists even pretending to be worthy of the name to investigate
the facts further — and student council to do the same — before going
off, not half-cocked but completely un-cocked.
"The attribution apparently acted on was quite the reverse of
what I in fact said. If The Ubyssey is correct and the resolution did
indeed describe me as an ass, I can only conclude that I must have
been tried by a jury of my peers, although I would despair indeed if I
thought they in fact were," Bewley said.
Bewley refused to elaborate on the statement.
TONIGHT:
torn northcott
in concert
also SOLID COMFORT
Tonight at 8:30 p.m.
SUB Ballroom
Tickets $1.00
at the door
Presented by CYVR-UBC Radio and Special Events Thursday, November 25,  1971
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 3
-garry gruenke photo
Ted White discusses cardboard furniture with Sandy Kass and Bev Gelfond.
Cheap comfort comes with cardboard chairs
Furniture that can fit a student budget is now
available.
The furniture, made of corrugated cardboard, is
re-cyclable and consists of adult and children-size chairs
and a two-foot by two-foot table.
Prices are $2.98 for the adult chair, which will hold
600 pounds, $1.98 for the child's chair and $3.49 for the
table.
"The furniture is assembled by hand. The chair is in a
box shape; the seat is then formed by pushing the front
corners in along crease lines one at a time," said Ted
White, one of the originators of pop-up furniture
Wednesday.
"Most people buy the tables to set televisions on but
I have painted a chess board on one," said White. He and
Ralph Ingles, the other creator of the furniture, run the
Pop-Up Shop at 711 Seymour.
"If treated like normal chairs these will last about
two or three years."
The table is white and the chairs are white with
painted seats and backs. They come with directions
explaining how to assemble them.
White and Ingles started making the furniture six
months ago when they attempted to make a large
doll-house.
"We ran out of money so we couldn't finish it. We
had already made the furniture for it. We then made some
adult-size furniture," said White.
Two large downtown department stores offered to
buy the furniture at the retail price but they wanted to
sell it for $6 or $7, he said.
"We didn't think it was a good idea, we couldn't see
anyone buying cardboard furniture at that price."
Consequently the Pop-Up Shop opened 10 days ago.
They also sell tissue flowers, which are folded to fit into
an envelope so they can be mailed.
White said they have also designed a writing desk that
will hold 1,000 pounds but have not produced it.
The anthropology-sociology
promotion and tenure committee
voted Tuesday to send an
"addendum" to arts dean Doug
Kenny concerning the cases of
Matthew Speier and Ron Silvers.
Speier and Silvers are the
central figures in the department's
two-month dispute over whether
or not to recommend them for
tenure.
The P and T committee voted
in their favor in early October,
but anthrosoc head Cyril Belshaw
submitted his own report
recommending they not get
tenure.
The decision Tuesday to send a
new message to Kenny's faculty
of arts P and T committee
climaxed a campaign by students
and junior faculty to get the
department to reconsider the
cases.
Although it is not known what
will be said in the "addendum"
and most members of the
department expect that it will be
"non-committal", the fact that it
is being sent at all is considered to
be a defeat for Belshaw, who took
a hard line opposing any
reconsideration of the cases.
Department members are
speculating about the magnitude
of the Belshaw defeat and how it
will affect rumors that Belshaw
will resign his headship if he feels
he does not have the confidence
of the department.
The P and T committee met
New note added
to anthrosoc fight
again last night to begin
hammering out the wording of the
addendum.
Although the P and T
committee action represents a
partial victory for department
dissidents, the committee did not
do what students and junior
faculty had asked for: a motion
saying that the committee would
reconsider the Speier-Silvers cases.
News from the embattled
department continues to filter
through a curtain of secrecy.
Rumors and speculation formally
replaced open discussion as the
department's basic mode of
communication 10 days ago when
Belshaw issued a 'confidential'
memo on the subject of
confidentiality.
Although a policy of
decision-making secrecy had been
in effect for sometime, the action
by Belshaw was a significant
escalation.
Belshaw warned department
members that it was illegal for
them to make department
documentation    available    for
purposes other than departmental
use.
The intention of the Belshaw
memo was to stem the flow of
BELSHAW
information being leaked to The
Ubyssey and was the strongest in
a series of moves made by
Belshaw in his running battle with
the student press.
At the same time Belshaw
released to department members a
letter he had solicited from arts
dean Kenny.
Although the ostensible topic
of the Kenny letter was an
invitation to department members
to send Kenny any additional
views they had on the
Speier-Silvers cases, many
department members felt that the
letter contained a hidden message.
In the letter's closing paragraph
Kenny said that an atmosphere
had been created in the
department in which a mature and
dispassionate reconsideration of
the cases by the department
committee would be impossible.
In light of the Kenny letter,
the decision by the P and T
committee on Tuesday appears to
be the strongest action .the
committee could take without
declaring a state of war between
themselves and the arts dean.
Hours prior to Tuesday's P and
T meeting Belshaw issued an
undated, unaddressed, but
'confidential'   seven-page   memo
outlining his personal views on the
graduate students' tenure
committee brief.
It was the graduate student
brief, issued Oct. 29, which
sparked most of the
reconsideration talk that has
taken place in the ensuing three
weeks.
The student brief suggested
that there were disturbing
irregularities in the way the
department made its decision on
Speier and Silvers, and went on to
present new evidence in favor of
the two profs.
Belshaw's lengthy reply to the
grad students essentially rejects
the case they made.
The grad students were angered
by the Belshaw answer, which
they felt sidestepped the issues
they had raised.
While the department's paper
war — with memos flying in all
directions — goes on and students
continue to press the case for
reconsideration, they also fear
that Speier and Silvers will be
ground up in the administrative
machine.
That is, students envisage a
possible outcome that includes a
substantial change in department
procedures and even the toppling
of Belshaw as head, but one that
avoids reversing the decision to
fire the two profs. Page 4
THE       UBYSSEY
Thursday, November 25,  1971
A word to the wise
Students can be proud of their new AMS
presidential choice.
In voting for Grant Burnyeat they have
selected a person who bids fair to be the most
responsible student president UBC has seen in five
years.
May we add our sincere congratulations to
the many others Grant will be receiving in the
coming days.
We know that he and his dedicated colleagues
are going to do a really fine job for students.
But let's not forget those people who pitted
their strength against Grant, and came out
second. It's one of life's rules that not everyone
can win.
Til Nawatzki, Steve Housser and Alan
Caplan fought a good, clean fight. It was all
above-board and on the up-and-up.
That this sort of competition, in the best
spirit of the word, can still take place in our
troubled times, ought to be a lesson to all of us. If
this isn't democracy at its best, we don't know
what is.
We extend our heartfelt condolences to
Hilary Powell, Grant's running mate, who only
came second in a nip-and-tuck contest for the
position of AMS secretary.
But we know that the mere absence of an
official post will not discourage Hilary from
continuing, to lend her considerable abilities to
the exciting plans of the Students' Coalition
party.
However, we do feel the students chose most
wisely when they selected an independent
candidate for the position of secretary.
Good luck, Tom!
We're sure you'll keep an eye on the student
government — for what government can exist
without a critic or two?
When one looks at the group of students that
has triumphed under the Students' Coalition
banner, one finds a refreshing picture of what our
young people are like, and up to. Indeed, Mssrs.
Burnyeat, Belshaw, Robinson, Dick, Murray and
Swain represent some of the finest and most
upstanding families in our province. And our
Congrats to the moms and dads of these
wonderful kids.
Working in student government can be an
exciting and rewarding experience for those who
are willing to make that little extra effort at being
good citizens.
It is only unfortunate the same cannot be
said of those many students who did not cast
ballots in Wednesday's byelections.
But we are certain that once these students
get a look at what the Students' Coalition has in
store for them, they will turn out in full force to
lend their support.
As for those students who set up an
alternative poll booth, in an immature attempt to
throw the election into confusion, we are
certainly glad that they didn't succeed. Really,
that's poor sportsmanship fellas, and we're not
afraid to say it.
However, we're sure that there was no
malevolent intention here, and far be it from us
to dampen typical student enthusiasm and
hijinks.
And in all fairness, let's put in a good word.
for the human government, who saw to it that the
elections   were   carried   out   with   scrupulous
attention to the rules. (Remember, you can't play
the game without the rules!)
We didn't always agree with their activities,
but in the end they showed themselves to be good
losers — the test of true sportsmanship.
We don't know what the future holds. But if
Grant and his fellow executives work and play
hard (while making sure they don't forget their
studies) we're sure they can't go far wrong.
For, when all is said and done, governments
are like arthritis pills; an ounce of prevention is
worth a pound of cure.
Go to it, Grant!
Letters
Shzt
Dear John de Rooy, Extremely
pissed off, and Name withheld:
Before the last edition of the
piece of shzt some people call The
Ubyssey, I used to think the
Letters section was the least
shztty. Your reactions to the
engineering beard-shaving stunt is
as childish as you can get.
In order for you to reach
maturity I can only suggest three
things (items 1 & 2 also apply to
the great reporter who wrote the
article entitled "Latest gear shift:
shaving faces").
1. Get your facts straight (ie.
there was no one "tied and
gagged").
2. Sign your name to your
letters (are you ashamed of the
kind of words you use, such as
"assholes" and "pricks").
3. Look at things from other
points of view besides your own
(most of the people, including the
ones who got shaved had a great
time and besides no one was
hurt).
From your reactions one might
be led into believing that your
idea of a good time is playing
tiddly winks at parties (or do you
just sit around and watch?).
Laszlo Csanyi,
Engineering 1
Skagit
Back in yon halcyon days of
yore, people thought that God
put animals on the earth solely for
the   benefit   of   mankind.   Few
TK UBYSSEY
NOVEMBER 25, 1971
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the university year
by the Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C. Editorial opinions are
those of the writer and not of the AMS or the university administration.
Member, Canadian University Press. The Ubyssey publishes Page Friday, a
weekly commentary and review. The Ubyssey's editorial offices are located
in room 241K of the Student Union Building.
Editorial    departments,    228-2301,
228-2305; advertising, 228-3977.
228-2307;    Page    Friday,    Sports,
Editor: Leslie Plommer
Hoodrum (Hudrum?) Hodrum (Hawdrum?) an' ach hie tha new
(nu?), she said, which quickly led a brickyard peanut to her head, she being
Lesley Krueger, the audience being Sandi Shreve, Stan Persky and Bev
Gelfond. Well, fuck you, said Mike Sasges as he watched Berton Woodward
and Conrad Winkelman have pitshka envy. Ted Turner looked on in dismay
as Jan O'Brien told Sandy Kass about Paul Knox's protruding schwantz. At
this point Gord Gibson and Mike Gidora located a 36 point budini and
disappeared together. Kathy Carney wondered, Brian Loomes wandered,
Dick Betts laundered and Harpo the Floutist said: "Come on, you guys,
let's clean this bull-piss up."
believe that nowadays, except
those who still do enter the field
of "community and regional
planning".
Allan Duguid's letter about the
Skagit Valley in Tuesday's
Ubyssey is a good example.
I'm not an ecologist of any
sort, but I have a hunch that
British Columbia - or planet
Earth, for that matter - is going
to be pretty well screwed as long
as we think of nature in terms of
its "usefulness". It's disgusting to
see a human being's sensibilities so
eroded, presumably by the
benefits of higher education, that
he can see Skagit Valley only as
"a component of a regional
mosaic".
This sort of intellectual lip
service to conservation, paid by
people who couldn't appreciate
nature if it jumped out and bit
them, may be standard jargon for
the school of community and
regional planning, but it's a lot of
spineless bullshit to the rest of us.
Skagit is worth saving for its own
sake. God help us, though, if we
ever figure out what to "do" with
it.
David Lee,
Lycanthropy 2
Ross
I would like to join in thanking
Sandy Kass and John Sydor for a
very informative feature article on
the Skagit Valley controversy in
the Nov. 16 edition. One or two
points are misleading, however,
and should be cleared up.
The organization which has
been formed in opposition to the
proposed flooding is the R.O.S.S.
(Run Out Skagit Spoilers)
Committee led by Leberal MLA
Dave Brousson. The committee is
composed of the Federation of
B.C. Naturalists, SPEC, Alpine
Club of Canada (Vancouver
section), Sierra Club of B.C., B.C.
Mountaineering Club, B.C.
Wildlife Federation, SFU Outdoor
Club and Totem Fly Fishers Club.
It is this organization which is
leading the opposition to stop the
flooding, and it is this group
which is challenging the legal
validity of the International Joint
Commission proceedings to date.
Vancouver lawyer John A. Fraser
is counsel for the committee and I
have been assisting him. The
article left the impression that Mr.
Fraser and I have been carrying
the ball all on our own.
We are both anxious that
everyone who cares about saving
this beautiful valley realizes that
opposition to the flooding comes
from thousands of citizens
represented by the groups
comprising the Ross Committee.
Mr. Fraser and I are at the service
of the Ross Committee and our
efforts are only part of the overall
campaign to save the Skagit.
Alan Ross,
Law 3
Asphalt
Until last week, I was among
those who did not think that a
cycle   path   or   paved   shoulder
along Marine was really necessary.
University Boulevard and
Chancellor, yes, but Marine is
wide enough anyway that a long
and expensive cycle path would
not be justified.
What changed my mind was a
slight mishap that caused me to lie
down suddenly in the middle of
Marine. I had been riding too
close to the edge, in order to
avoid certain hurtling objects
common to that area, and my
heels slipped off the pavement; it
was only a drop of about half an
inch, but quite enough to flip my
wheels out from under me,
resulting in a slight concussion
(nothing serious, but the doctor
says that if I start acting strange in
the next few days, my parents
should call him). If there had been
a car right behind me, however,
my head would have looked like a
SUB hamburger spread all over
the asphalt.
In the interests of sanitation,
therefore, it seems that it would
not be too much to ask to have, if
not a cycle path, at least a paved
shoulder along this road. Even a
narrow strip of asphalt to taper
down that small but deadly drop
at the edge of the pavement
would be a help. I understand that
even cars can get into trouble with
it at high speed, if they hit at just
the wrong angle.
In closing I would like to thank
the drivers who stopped to help
me stuff my brains back into my
skull. It's nice to know somebody-
cares.
Douglas Brent,
Arts 2 Thursday, November 25,  1971
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 5
Letters
Glub
One of the staff members at
my place of residence, the
Vancouver Public Aquarium,
showed me my now-famous
picture on the front page of
Thursday's Ubyssey.
However, I was extremely
insulted and dismayed to discover
that I had been depicted as AMS
presidential candidate Grant
Burnyeat. Surely you can discover
some finer, worthier look-alike for
me (such as your deposed
president, Steve Garrod). Glub.
Lugosi,
Arctic white whale,
Vancouver aquarium'
Rock Cup
Everyone's in an uproar:
— My God, Martha, do you
realize that at that rock concert
there was fighting and destruction
of public and private property.
— It was worse than that. Do
you realize they . were
DRINKING. Of all things. And in
public.
— That's those lousy,
long-haired degenerates for you.
— Definitely a pinko plot.
— Those poor misguided kids.
Can't even get their dates straight.
Grey Cup isn't until next
weekend.
Bruce Rutledge,
Arts 2
Buildings
Re: UBC Academic Buildings
Committee Report:
I take exception to your article
published Nov. 19 entitled "UBC
building priorities 'poor'." Cine
question I may ask — if the
priorities are poor why did senate,
the highest academic body on
campus, pass the priority list
49-11?
According to student senator
Steve Garrod "There was no
student input as such". The
Ubyssey also states that he said
that lack of student participation
is apparent in the report.
Well, I am a student who has
participated in the deliberations
of the committee for the past two
years and I am fairly satisfied with
the report that recommends new
space for commerce, mechanical
and civil engineering, biology and
anthropology and sociology in
that order. I am sure that if one
asked the students in the
disciplines that I have just
mentioned they would agree
overwhelmingly that more or
perhaps better space is needed.
Commerce, for example, is a
faculty of 1,100 students v/ho
have never had their own
integrated space.
They have trooped all over
campus for years. Under these
conditions how can any kind of
community spirit develop?
Mechanical engineering, as
another example, has been housed
in the same building for over 40
years. In fact, the fire marshall is
waiting to condemn their building
unless expensive renovations are
made; renovations that are not
economically feasible considering
the value of the building.
Garrod and other critics would
have the university stop all
building projects until it has some
long-range view of what we want
the university to be. I believe, too,
that there should be some kind of
long-range view for a coherent
plan. In fact, our committee is
prepared to do just that. However,
when there are pressing needs
some kind of action must be
taken.
Our committee developed for
the first time in relation to
building needs on this campus a
set of criteria as a guide for
rational decision-making. Coupled
with this criteria and our own
sense of judgment and common
sense we recommended a building
program to meet urgent needs.
Of course it is not possible to
please everyone in picking a
handful out of a barrel but we
tried to do what we thought
would be best for the university at
large. Perhaps, the critics of our
report should ask the students of
commerce, mechanical and civil
engineering, biology and
anthropology and sociology
whether all building should cease?
And as an aside, perhaps The
Ubyssey in attempting to present
an accurate account of the news
could print some positive views
about our report besides negative
ones? Is that too much to ask?
Bob Jacobs,
Law 2,
Student senator
Our reporter did try to get in
touch with individuals she had
been told were in favor of the
report, but was unable to contact
them.
She did, however, manage to
get in touch with Noel Hall, a
commerce professor and senator.
We think you will find - if you
reread the story - that Hall
basically stated the same position
you hold.
Think
While reading the Letters
column in Tuesday's Ubyssey I
got all the way to the letter
headed Rawhide.
As I was savoring each pearl,
edging ever more closely to the
punchline, I suddenly ran out of
letter.
Hmmm, I thought. I'll just
have to check that once again.
My comprehension was just as
bad the second time. Then it
struck me! Aha! And glancing
down at the signature my
suspicions were confirmed. This
letter was not a joke. It was the
result of some very serious
thoughts from a diligent,
clear-thinking arts 1 brainchild.
The gist of his tantrum seemed
to centre around the fact that
some people have expressed their
concern about the selling of furs
on the campus while very
hypocritically wearing leather
shoes and chewing on a
hamburger.
He ends up by posing the
jewel: "Are sheep any more
expendable than mink?"
Both animals in the fur
industry are, of course, highly
domesticated and the writer of
the letter shows he is completely
aware of this fact. He must be
asking whether or not one
animal's life can be v/orth more
than another's.
I would like to ask some
questions myself:
How is the timber-wolf
restocking program coming along?
Are the polar bear farms still
turning out thousands of potential
rugs and relocating them to the
Arctic?
How about the Bighorn feedlot
operations? Are they still meeting
the demand?
In other words, my highly
educated fellow, the animals you
speak of (yes, including European
reindeer) are all being produced
by man. The take, so to speak, is
replaced by man to suit man's
requirements (or whims) - and
neither sheep nor mink nor
European reindeer are in danger
of extinction.
Can the same be said of the
wolf, the polar bear or any other
"fur" where there is only take and
no compensating return?
And how would you prefer to
die? With the deft, instantaneous
blow of a CO2 cartridge or by the
slow, lingering torture of either
strychnine poisoning or freezing
to death in a steel trap with a
broken leg?
Please think!
Bruce Curton,
Agriculture 3
The Ubyssey welcomes letters
from all readers.
Letters should be signed and, if
possible, typed.
Though an effort is made to
print all letters received, The
Ubyssey reserves the right to edit
for clarity, legality, brevity and
taste.
Bernard and Gilles will
do it for you
-cue
'mi n
For appointment
224-5540
University Square
DIAMONDS & ENGAGEMENT RINGS
BUY WHOLESALE
SAVE 50%
VISIT YOUR JEWELLER ON CAMPUS
DIAMOND ROOM JEWELLERS
UBC Village - Beside World Wide Travel
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pliis
It's the Sweater Season! and this
week PANTS PLUS has SKINNYi
RIBS. Long or short sleeve styles
in Banlon, Nylon or Acrylic.
Solid body with contrast sleeve
in Bicycle or Laced-stripe
patterns — Sizes S.M.L.
Regular to 1295
NOW JUST
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2140 Western Parkway
U.B.C. Square
55 W. Hastings
2115 W. 41St Mon   Tues., Wed., Sat,
\ 10 a.m.-6 p.m.
,2967 W. BrOOdway Thurs., Fri., 10 a.m.   9 p.m.
Auditions for the Theatre Department's
Production of
THE DUCHESS OF MALFI by John Webster
to be presented March 10 — 18
will be held an
MONDAY, NOVEMBER 29 &
TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 30
12:30 - 4:30
in Room 112 of the Frederic Wood Theatre Building
- Auditions Open To All UBC Faculty, Staff and Students Page 6
THE       UBYSSEY
Thursday, November 25,  1971
Hot flashes
Exams extend
Speakeasy
Speakeasy, the rap and
information service located in the
SUB foyer, is extending its hours
during the exam pressure period.
Starting Dec. 1, Speakeasy will
be open weekdays from 9:30 a.m.
until 11:30 p.m.
A. O. speecfi
Regent College is sponsoring a
speech Monday by William
Dyrness on Ingmar Bergman:
Post-Christian Film-maker.
Dryness, a grad student at
Amsterdam Free University, will
speak in Angus 207 at 7:30 p.m.
Admission is free.
Off to Mexico
International House is
organizing a visit to Mexico City
for 10 Canadian students who
speak Spanish and want to learn
about Mexican culture and family
life.
The visit will last from Dec. 22
to Jan. 4 and will cost $200 per
person.
The cost includes air fare,
room and board.
Interested students are
asked to contact the I.H. office
for further details.
Money won
Connie Bysouth, a
postgraduate student in
education, has been named the
1971-72 winner of the Sherwood
Lett Memorial Scholarship.
Bysouth is the first woman and
the first education student to win
the $1,500 award.
The award is a memorial to the
late Chief Justice Lett, who was
Chancellor from 1951 to 1957.
CnrUhing
The Vancouver Childbirth
Association will hold an
information session on infant
education Friday, at 8 p.m., in the
Dunbar community centre,
Thirtieth and Dunbar.
U BC psychology professor
Meredith Kimball will talk on
ways to enrich children's
environment.
Admission is by donation.
Adviser
sought
The education students'
association is looking for a fifth
year, non-transfer, secondary
student to sit on a presidential
advisory committee choosing a
new secondary division director.
Students interested should see
education ombudsman Gary
Gumley in room 4 by Friday.
Free money
The education students'
association has four $75 bursaries
for needy education students.
Three bursaries are being
offered to students who have
participated in EdSA; one to a
student in the secondary division,
one to a student in the elementary
division and one at large.
The fourth bursary is for a
transfer student, the criteria being
need only.
Letters of application should
be taken to room 1 of the Ed
building or left in the internal
affairs officer's mail box.
Deadline is Monday, Dec. 6.
'Tween classes
TODAY
VARSITY CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP
Roy Bell, noon, SUB 207-209.
EXPERIMENTAL COLLEGE
Discussion on Peer Gynt, 3:30 p.m.,
SUB 111.
ANGLICAN UNITED
CAMPUS MINISTRY
Robert     Clark     on     Beliefs    That
Matter, SUB 215, noon.
ACTION CANADA
Meeting, noon, SUB 113.
GAY PEOPLE'S ALLIANCE
Symbiotics in the gay ghetto, SUB
215, 7-11 p.m.
VOC
Mountaineering lecture, noon,
Chem 150.
BAHA'I CLUB
Rap session for everyone interested,
noon, Buch. 230.
SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE
31 spaces open to play Edge City
College, a game of organization and
design, Ballroom Grad Students
Centre. 4:30 - 9:30 p.m.
CCF
Dick York speaks, noon, SUB 205.
THUNDERBIRD WARGAMERS
Surprise wargame for people
interested in ancient Roman
campaign, noon, SUB 125.
ALPHA OMEGA
UKRAINAIN CLUB
Brian Marshall, federal citizenship
officer on multiculuralsim speaks,
noon, SUB 105-B.
UBC CHAPLAINS
Charismatic types, dinner meeting,
5 p.m., Lutheran campus centre.
UBC RADIO —
SPECIAL EVENTS
Tom Northcott and Solid Comfort
concert, SUB ballroom, 8 p.m.
FRIDAY
UBC ABORTION ACTION
COMMITTEE
General meeting, noon, SUB 210.
New members welcome.
PRE-SOCIAL WORK CLUB
Speaker from adoption placement
section, child welfare division. All
welcome, noon, SUB 105B.
GAY PEOPLE'S ALLIANCE
Organizational meeting, noon, in
SUB 224. Homosexuals wanting to
write to others, write Box 12, SUB.
T-BIRD MOTORCYCLE CLUB
Meeting, noon, SUB 130.
CCGF
Workshop with Silas Fox, noon,
SUB 205.
SATURDAY
VARSITY OUTDOOR CLUB
Curling   party  at  the winter sports
centre, 9:15 p.m. Ski touring trip at
Singing Pass continuing to Sunday.
Trip to Tenquille Lake continuing
to Sunday.
Totem Park & Fort Camp
present
5 MAN CARGO
DANCE
TOTEM BALLROOM
Friday, November 26
8:30 P.M.
Res. $1.00 a Head
Non Res. $1.50 a Head
Beautiful
clothes.
for
beautiful
people
LE CHATEAU
"a step ahead"
776 Granville 687-2701
lit--.
I
THE
TOWN
PUMP
THE BEST DINING
AND
ENTERTAINMENT
\D£Al IN GASTOWN
Full facilities
7 days a week
Dancing to the 'Now
£ouno" of the Town
Pumpers — Mon. thru
Sat. from 9 p.m.
Old-Time Piano from 5
p.m. Daily (4 p.m. to 10
p.m. Sundays)
8 of 9 Entree Items
$2.50 or Less
GROUP PARTIES CAN BE
ARRANGED SUN.-THUR.
CALL 683-6696
o°
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Venite Mangiate E Bevete
at the
Casa Ponderosa
ON THE WEST MALL
SPAGHETTI OUR SPECIALTY
MON.-THURS.
4:30-6:30 P.M.
REFRESHMENTS
ON TUES. & THURS.
CLASSIFIED
Rot«»: Campus - 3  linn,  1   day  $1.00;  3  days $2.50
Commarcial - 3 fines,   1   day $1.2$;  additional
Bros* 30c; 4 days price of 3.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone end me payable
in advance. Headline i» tl:3Q a.m., the day before publication.
Publications Office, Room 241 S.V.B., UBC, Van. S, B,C
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Dancei
11
STROBES. BLACK LIGHTS. BUB-
ble Machines. 10% off rental to
UBC students.  736-0944.
Greetings
12
INEXPENSIVE. RECYCLED PUR
coats and general fur access. Pap-
pas Brothers, 459 Hamilton Street
at Victory Square. We trade. Open
Monday through Saturday 12 noon-
5:30 p.m.,   681-6840.
Special Notices
15
GREY CUP BRUNCH AT INTER-
national Hou.se Sunday, Nov. 28.
Food at 11 a.m. Game at 1 p.m.
$1 for food. Sign up in advance
at   office.
XMAS IN MEXICO! CANADIAN
students will be guests of families
in Mexico City from Dec. 22 to
Jan. 4. Total cost is $200.
Register NOW at the I.H. office.
Selection will take place this
Saturday.
GREY CUP~pXRTY, SUN~ NOV7
28th, 12:30 p.m., Grad Student
Centre. Tickets 50c each includes
sandwich. Advance tickets only
till Friday 26th. Everyone welcome. Color T.V. Refreshments
available.	
"NEW DIRECTIONS FOR GOV-
ernment for People" topic of
Honorable Mrs. Grace McCarthy,
Minister Without Portfolio, at
the Fireside, 8:00 p.m. Sunday.
Nov. 28th at 6050 Chancellor. All
are   welcome.
UPSIDE. DOWNSIDE TONIGHT.
Tom Northcott in Concert at 8:00
p.m. in SUB Ballroom. Tickets
81.00.	
MARATHON GESTALT WEEK-
end Nov. 26, 27, 28. For information phone Allan Cohen, 224-5445
of John Mate, 731-7971.	
$501 REWARD FOR INFORMATION
leading to return of 1969 red 4-dr.
Datsun. Licence AAA-513. 291-1946.
TTBC FOLK SOC PRESENTS AN-
other Apple And Stone Folk Blues
Festival. Friday, Nov. 26 — 8:00
p.m.,  SUB Party Room.  $1.00.
AUTOMOTIVE
Autos For Sale
21
BUSINESS SERVICES
Photography
35
f tlje Hens! anb gutter
ikj       Cameras!
W
3010 W. BDWY. 736-7833
alto  at  Denman   Place
GADGET BAG
SPECIAL
List $16.95
Our  regular price $13.50
Special $10.95
PRINTING   YOUR   OWN
XMAS    CARDS?
We have the widest selection of
Agfa and Ilford papers at the
Best  Prices.
Scandals
37
ODS BODKINS, METHINKS LORD
Foppington's rout of the year will
be happening at the Park of Cecil
Green on the 30th of the month.
Tickets available in Buch. 472.
Pray thee come.
ANOTHER OBSCENE, DISGUST-
ing Apple And Stone Folk And
Blues Festival. Friday, Nov. 26,
8:00 p.m., SUB Party Room. Only
$1.00.	
AQUA SOC CAPILANO RIVER
Run Nov. 28, Sunday, 10 a.m.
Meet at  Salmon Pools.	
I THINK IT'S GOING TO RAIN
today—Tom Northcott at 8:00 p.m.
in SUB Ballroom. Also appearing
Solid   Comfort.   Admission   $1.00.
DO YOU HAVE A MAZDA, TOY-
ota or Datsun? Does Henneken
Auto Service it for you? If not
you're paying too much — Call
us at 263-8121 or drop in to
8914  Oakl  St.   (at  Marine).
Typing
40
TERM PAPERS ETC. SPEEDILY
& efficiently typed. 35c page. Call
Yvonne  at   738-6874   (Kits)	
ESSAYS,   ETC.   TYPED   NEATLY.
quickly  and  efficiently.  35c  page.
Phone   224-0385  after  5  p.m.
TYPING, ESSAYS, TERM PAPERS,
Theses,   Phone  224-7918.
Typing (Coni.)
40
YR. ROUND ACC. TYPING FROM
legible drafts. Phone 738-6829 from
10:00 a.m. to 9 p.m. Quick service
on  short essays. ^^
TEDIOUS TASKS—PROFESSION-
al typing. IBM Selectric — Days,
Evenings, Weekends. Phone Snarl
at 738-8745—Reasonable Rates.
EFFICIENT ELECTRIC TYPING.
my home. Essays, Thesis, etc.
Neat, accurate work. Reasonable
rates. Phone 263-5317.
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted
CI
GIRLS TO SELL MAGAZINE
downtown Thurs. & Fri. nites, all
day  Sat.   Salary  or  comm.   Phone
228-9795.
STUDENTS WANTED: $400 MTH.
part-time in management and PR
of Anti-Air & Water Pollution
Control Products. Open for male
and female who qualify. Send resume to G. W. Oijen, 81 Howe St.,
Victoria, B.C. This is ground floor
of a $100,000,000.00 Ecology Co.
—AUDITING AND  ACCOUNTING—
Various Federal Government Depts.
Duties: Employees assist in the
audits of government and agencies
while performing duties selected
to develop their knowledge and
experience.
Qualifications: Must have by 1972
a Bachelor's Degree with specializations in Accounting, Commerce,
Business Administration or Finance. It is important to note that
successful candidates may obtain
their CGA or RIA while working
for the Public Service.
Forward a UCPA application form
to: Student Placement Office,
University of British Columbia,
Vancouver, B.C. Quote Competition 72-4001.
INSTRUCTION  fc
SCHOOLS
Music Instruction
61
Tutorng Servce
62
POT    at    Potter's    Centre
another    12    week    session
to   start  JAN.   10
Register  early
w'heel   work,   hand   building
for   details   phone:    261-4764
G.   ALFRED
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
SKI    MART
Sell    your    used    Ski    Equipment
on consignment
261-4910 1379    S.W.    Marine    Dr.
 Marpole	
DYNASTAR S1430 215 cm. USED
only a few times. $100 with
marker   harness   731-2564	
MEDICAL, DENTAL STUDENTS.
Skulls $30.00 to $75.00 and other
fine osteological human products
most reasonable priced — Write
to 812-55 Maitland St. Toronto
284.  Ontario.
RENTALS & REAL ESTATE
Rooms
81
LARGE RM. IN 3-BDRM. HOUSE
14th & Burrard, Dec. 1st, $75. Prefer girl 22-28 yrs. 732-3470. Jacques
Room & Board
82
SPRING TERM HOUSING. MAKE
your reservations for January
NOW.R & B at the finest house
on campus. Hurry, vacancies] are
going! Phone 224-9691 Now. 5765
Agronomy.   Meal  passes available.
Furnished Apts.
83
FOUR ROOM APT. COOKING, PRI-
vate bath, entrance. West First,
near beach, $95 monthly. After 6.
731-3028.
Unfurnished Apts.
84
1 BR. SC. BSMT. STE.. KITS.
Dec. 1. $95' incl. ht & It. Girl only.
732-7541.
Houses—Furn. & Unfuxn.
86
PEOPLE NEEDED TO SHARE
communal house, 9th & Trimble,
224-1405. Rent depends on number
of people.	
4th GIRL TO SHARE 4 BR. HOUSE
29th & Dunbar. Dec. 1. $60. 732-
7541.	
NEEDED, GIRL FOR LGE. FURN-
ished convivial kits house. Own
bedroom. $67.50 call Jeff, Ron,
or Barb at 736-7153 Now.
°OO0O«OO0OO00OO0000OO0OOOO000O0O00OOOOO00O0000O00O000O0OO000 00 OOOOCOOOOOOO0
Use Ubyssey Classified
TO SELL - BUY - INFORM
The U.B.C. Campus
MARKET PLACE Thursday, November 25,  1971
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 7
Crew lost only once
The Thunderbird rowing crew wound up their fall season last
weekend by winning every race except one in their own UBC
invitational regatta.
Their only loss came in the Open Eights where the UBC junior
varsity crew placed second to the varsity eight from Western
Washington.
The premier race of the day was the coxed fours which matched
up UBC and U of Washington. Both crews represented their countries
at the Pan-Am games in Cali, with the American team picking up a
silver medal.
This time the result was a bit different, with UBC crossing the
finish line of Coal Harbour's 1,500 meter course a full V-h lengths
ahead of Washington.
The regatta featured a rowing oddity: a crash between the UBC
straight four and open eight. A considerable amount of damage to
each shell and the cancellation of the straight four race was the net
result of the collision which came about when the eight strayed into
the course while warming up for their race.
Star-studded
Thunderettes
Joanne Sargeant, former
Salmon Arm high school star and
a member of Canada's 1971 Pan
American games women's
basketball team now performs at
UBC.
An aggressive defensive player
and solid all-round player,
Sargeant is one of the reasons the
UBC Thunderettes look like the
team to beat in Canadian women's
basketball this season.
Wendy Grant, another Pan
American games team member,
and Terri McGovern of the 1970
Canadian world tournament team
provide the rest of the
international experience and
much of the scoring punch.
Rookie Bev Bland looked
impressive against Lethbridge on
the weekend and is proving a
valuable asset to the
Thunderettes.
Other team members are Bev
Barnes, Heather Cranston, Janice
Gee, Linda McCulloch, Debbie
Phelan and Peggy Robinson.
A team worth watching, the
Thunderettes host the Victoria
Maplettes Sunday at 1 p.m. at the
War Memorial Gym.
M
"** Sa
JOANNE SARGEANT.
. . . solid on defense
SPAGHETTI HOUSE LTD
4450 W. 10th Awe.
Hot Delicious Tasty Pizzas
famous charbroiled steaks — spare ribs
FREE DELIVERY - Right to Your Door
Phone 224-1720 -  224-6336
OPEN FOR LUNCH - SPECIAL MENU
HOURS - MON. To THURS. 11 am. to 3 am.
i FRI. & SAT. 11 a.m to 4 a.m. -SUNDAY4 (mil to 2 a.m.i
CRIME
is one of society's major social problems
— are you one of those who can accept
the challenge of trying to solve it?
THE B.C. CORRECTIONS SERVICE
is looking for graduates, both men and women,
with a background in the social sciences
to train as
PROBATION OFFICERS
see your Student Placement Office
on campus for futher details.
SP0B TS
Thunderette sports
The UBC Women's
Thunderette basketball team were
victorious over the University of
Lethbridge in two games on the
weekend. Friday, Terri McGovern
scored 18 points with Bev Bland
and Debbie Phelan each adding 10
to lead the team to a decisive
75-31 win.
Saturday, the final score was
64-22 with Debbie Phelan scoring
18 points and Terri McGovern 12.
Both games saw coach Norm
Vickery utilizing his entire team
and getting excellent play from
his younger, inexperienced
players.
The junior varsity women's
field hockey team travelled to
Pullman, Washington on Nov. 19
to compete in the Northwest
College Women's Sports
Association sponsored field
hockey tournament. The UBC
women continued the fine
showing they have recorded since
the tournament inception in
1947, by finishing with three wins
and a tie.
Playing exhibition matches in
Bellingham the Thunderette
volleyball girls suffered 0-2 and
1-2 losses to the University of
Victoria and University of
Washington    respectively,    but
Intramurals
BASKETBALL continues this
week.
NO HOCKEY games are
scheduled this week.
UNIT MANAGERS: don't
forget to pick up your posters
every Monday at noon.
BASKETBALL      results:
Division   3  —  Fijis  21,  Sigma
Chi 16; Beta 27, Carey Hall 23.
SOCCER results: pharmacy 2,
Kappa Sigma 0; forestry 1,
engineers 0; commerce 2, Beta 0.
defeated Western Washington
State College 2-0 to emerge from
the exhibition series in third
place.
The British Columbia women's
cross-country team, composed of
two UBC runners and one from
SFU took the team championship
in Halifax on the weekend. With
the UBC's Thelma Fynn finishing
second, SFU's Maureen Crowley
finishing third and UBC's Cheryl
Spowage finishing fourth, the B.C.
girls accumulated nine points to
be declared the overall winners.
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SOLDIER BLUE
CANDICE BERGEN PETER STRAUSS • DONALD PLEASENCE
J Page 8
THE       UBYSSEY
Thursday, November 25,  1971
<•/   ,,'jf;
~\"£ "JT'^:
The young unemployed
Why are they not going
back to school?
By IAN WISEMAN
Canadian University Press
An unfortunate side effect of
Canada's recent economic
recession is beginning to show as
university enrolment figures and
youth unemployment figures are
being tabulated this fall -
Canadian youth from the ages of
15 to 25 have no place to go.
The labor force, in these times
of high  unemployment  and  the
First of a series
new, rash of layoffs (due to
President Nixon's import
surcharge), cannot accommodate
more than 50 per cent of the
young workers in the job market.
And university enrolment is
down all across the country due
to the fact that the economic
squeeze has caused a severe
shortage in summer jobs for
students, tighter money in many
families of students, and higher
university admission standards
caused by provincial governments
who cannot afford to subsidize
universities to the degree that
these institutions have become
accustomed.
Furthermore, university
students are beginning to realize
that a college degree is no longer a
meal-ticket to a cushy job; as the
number of college graduates rises,
so rises the rate of unemployment
among people younger than 25
years of age. And fewer and fewer
grads are getting work in their
specific field of qualification,
It is also becoming increasingly
clear, in the midst of this
economic turmoil, that the
proliferation of government task
forces, economic reports, and
brainstorm youth employment
schemes, are really an attack on
the symptoms of youth
unemployment. The disease — a
capital-intensive industrial society
that is restricted by American
control of most Canadian
industries — continues its
cancerous course unchecked.
So now, after four frustrating
years of inflation followed by
massive unemployment, the
government has set up an
interdepartmental study group
(the term 'task force' has become
passe because of its embarrassing
connotations) to form a "brains
trust" to study the economy.
They will concentrate on high
unemployment among youth, and
the relationship of this to
underenrolment in post-secondary
educational institutes.
Projected enrolment for
post-secondary institutes this
year, you see, was 594,000
students. In reality, the figure is
only 5 19,000. Projected
enrolment for universities
(excluding the Quebec CEGEP's)
was 341,000. But the tme figure
is less than 300,000.
Where are the missing
students? One thing is certain:
they  aren't  in   the labor force.
'  ' " . , '/'  's,   /-   '
Over half of the 455,000
unemployed persons in Canada
today are under 25. This situation
has been getting worse for the
past 10 years: now it is reaching
crisis proportions.
In view of this, the Trudeau
government has set up its
"interdepartmental study group";
but, you may ask, to do what?
Yes, it's the same old story: to
discover new legislative tricks to
cover the problem, and arrive at
short term solutions that mend
the social fabric briefly, but
without ever asking the basic
question — why the problem
occurred and keeps on recurring.
The
disease
a capital-
intensive
industrial
society—
continues
its
cancerous
course
unchecked
This year the symptoms of
high youth unemployment and
low university enrolment are
going to be hard to erase. A quick
look at the following selected
items from last month's daily
newspapers quickly dispels the
myth that all is right with the
national economy:
# Underenrolment at the
University of Calgary forced the
board of governors there to
implement an immediate budget
freeze on the hiring of both
academic and support staff. The
university, with enrolment almost
2,000 below their projection of
10,600, has committed itself to
expenditures which could exceed
their known resources.
# The unemployment rate for
people under 25, despite the
federal government's
Opportunities for Youth Program
and    the    promised    economic
upswing, was higher in July (10.8
per cent) and August (9.1 per
cent) this year than a year ago.
0 University of Alberta had
1,200 less students than the
expected 19,500, and have been
subsidized by the provincial
government so that they will lose
no more than $500,000 this year.
0 The Kingston city council
asked the Ontario government to
tighten up its welfare legislation
when the councillors discovered
that 100 of the 301 single men
drawing social assistance in that
city were under 20 years of age.
9 Donald McDonald, president
of the Canadian Labor Congress,
pointed out that the federal
government's "Employee Support
Bill" would not help stave off
unemployment caused by the U.S.
import surcharge. The American
government could counteract this
immediately by implementing its
"Countervailing Tariff Law"
which prevents subsidized
industries from undercutting
American market prices. And,
after all, the States control North
American industries and markets,
and they're trying to keep
unemployment down in their
country, too.
# Laurentian University in
Sudbury froze its budget for
thirty days to study the
implications of losing $1,250,000
when only 2,100 students (100
less than last year) enrolled.
% McMaster University at
Waterloo and Carleton University
at Ottawa are studying their
budgets trying to juggle their
finances to keep the books
balanced in the face of surprising
underenrolment.
These items are an indicator
for a widespread tendency among
students — they didn't leave the
labor market this fall because they
either could not afford to go to
school fulltime or else they
figured that a university education
no longer held the certain
potential of financial security.
But half of those students
found that while they were still in
the job market, they had little
chance of breaking into the
employed labor force. It's hard
trying to sell your labor in a
capitalist country in times of
recession, and a hard economic
lesson was learned by many as
they waited in the unemployment
office queues.
The summer months are
traditionally those with the lowest
rate of unemployment. Yet in
July 514,000 Canadians (out of a
total labor force of 9,068,000)
were unemployed, for an
unemployment rate of '5.7 per
cent. And in August, 445,000
(out of 8,972,000) were out of
work (5.1 percent).
But the overall unemployment
rate is artificial in relation to
youth unemployment, which is
much higher.
The unemployment rate among
workers from 14 to 24 was 10.8
per cent during July and 9.1 per
cent  in  August. Unemployment
among persons over 25 was only
3.5 per cent in July and 3.4 per
cent in August. So government
economic policies, while helping
older workers, have not created
jobs for the young.
When these figures were
released in September, Prime
Minister Trudeau and Finance
Minister Edgar Benson boasted
that the government's fight
against     unemployment    was
working superbly for workers
older than 25. Trudeau's only
comment on youth
unemployment was that the
government did not know enough
about youth and "their attitudes
towards existing work ethics" to
explain the problem.
A few days later the prime
minister suggested that the
problem "is with the teenage
group which has entered the labor
force" and who, according to him,
were not going back to school at
their normal rate.
But why are they not going
back to school? It's a new
phenomenon, Trudeau shrugs, as
he sets up another study group to
fathom the student mystique.
Study groups and task forces put
a convenient end to parliamentary
dialogue since they provide the
stock answer: 'Well, it's being
looked into."
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The University of
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STUDENT TELEPHONE DIRECTORY 1971-72
BUY YOURS TODAY
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