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The Ubyssey Mar 11, 1969

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Array To keep it in
or
to haul it out
THE U8YSSEY
that's the
CUSsed
question
Vol. L, No. 49
VANCOUVER, B.C., TUESDAY, MARCH 11, 1969
228-2305
PENSIVE  POLITICOS  ponder   profound   prose   pouring   pedant icly par excellence. Heavies are, from left (relatively speaking);
Martin  Loney, Wynton  Semple, Carey  Linde,  Rod   Ramage,  Dave Zirnhelt, Fraser Hodge, and Tobin  Robbins.
Pro, con CUS guns pop
The Canadian Union of Students must be rebuilt — but
from within or from without?
That is the situation and the alternatives which were presented to 150 students in the SUB ballroom Monday noon. The
occasion was a debate on the CUS referendum today and Wednesday.
"There is no hope of CUS increasing its membership unless
something drastic is done," said Alma Mater Society president
Dave Zirnhelt.
"UBC pulling out will be a constructive step that will start
the ball rolling towards a refounding of CUS."
Former AMS vice-president Carey Linde said CUS is necessary as a national student union. "If CUS is non-existent we will
be wasting valuable time," Linde said. "We can't afford to spend
two years forming another union."
Linde said the criticism most often directed at CUS could
just as well be applied to the AMS. "I am constantly amazed
at the reasons given in council chambers for pulling out of CUS
— 'inefficent', 'bureaucratic' — things the AMS is guilty of," he
said.
"I challenge Dave Zirnhelt to hold a referendum asking
students if they want to pull out of the AMS."
AMS president-elect Fraser Hodge said a strong national
union is necessary but CUS is not a strong national union.
"It never will be strengthened unless something constructive
is done," Hodge said. "The idea of working for change from
within just dosen't work."
CUS vice-president Wynton Semple said there will be no
national student union for at least five years if UBC pulls out
of CUS.
"Student councillors are saying 'we won't develop our own
analysis and our own ideas for CUS; we'll just opt out.'
"If that was done throughout society we'd have a pretty
chaotic society," Semple said.
AMS external affairs officer Tobin Robbins said CUS is
controlled by a minority that is not representative of Canadian
students.
Robbins also challenged the effectiveness of CUS as a national student lobby and criticized the operation of the CUS
travel and life insurance plans.
CUS president-elect Martin Loney answered him by saying:
"Tobin Robbins might have gotten around to voicing his
complaints at the two national congresses he attended.
"If you want to change CUS you can go to the conference,
present your ideas, change policies, change personnel or change
the whole organization.
"You can do this because CUS is a democratic organization."
CUS PRO and CON pages 6, 7
High schools unionize
By NADER MIRHADY
Student activism is moving downwards from
the universities to the high schools.
Some high school students in Vancouver
have discovered that they don't like the present
school system.
And they want to do something about it.
More to their surprise, they discovered that
something could be done about it. They organized and formed the Inter-High School Students' Union.
It started in May of last year with the
realization that there was a striving demand
for change of the present system.
The creation of an organization of high
school students who would work toward the
ideal of the best possible education for the
individual student was the method the students
chose to try to solve their problems.
They started with few members, less than
a dozen people, getting together irregularly.
As the word spread and the movement grew
it became necessary to meet in members' homes.
The metings were held every Sunday, and at
one they decided to write a brief outlining the
basic Inter-High School Union policy.
The  brief included discussion  of such re
forms as the replacement of the present examination and grading system with continuous
subjective evaluation of the pupil's work; a
system of continuous progress (the student
working at his own pace); a standard of behaviour dictated by common respect and
courtesy for fellow human beings; a tri-semes-
ter system which would enable the schools to
operate year-round; non-compulsory attendance; a less factual and more personal approach
to teaching and learning; oral teaching of
foreign languages; and more student say in
educational decisions.
A second mass meeting was held at the
Unitarian Church of Vancouver on Nov. 2.
More people attended that meting and following it a formal structure for the body was
adopted.
They also made up the organization's general policy, which included such things as:
• The Inter-High School Student Union
will not affiliate with any political or other
body except for another student organization.
• Anyone may attent meetings and offer
suggestions, but only high school students will
have the right to vote.
To page 3
See: HIGH SCHOOL
Frontier College
Frontier College needs
students again.
Each summer, third
and fourth-year students
work alongside laborers
on regular shifts, then
teach the men high school
sujects for a few hours
afterwards.
Frontier College operates on the idea that a
university student, from
any faculty, is generally
equipped to teach anyone
up to the hig'h school
level.
Students receive full
laborer's pay, which • is
often quite high, and jobs
are assigned all over Canada.
Students from all faculties are welcome, but
all applicants must be
male. There will be a recruiting meeting - Wednesday noon in Bu 106.
Carillon
wins fee
conflict
REGINA (CUP) — The fee
collection conflict at the University of Saskatchewan ended
Wednesday when the board of
governors finally agreed to
student demands that it continue to collect student union
fees at source.
The conflict began December
31 when the board announced
it would no longer collect
union fees, a fairly obvious
attempt to throttle its major
campus antagonist, the student
newspaper. The Carillon. Ever
since then, students have demanded the board recant and
leave The Carillon alone and
slowly built up general student
support for that position. The
negotiations staggered on for
over six weeks as the board
waited for student pressure to
subside.
The negotiations themselves
kept stumbling over various
issues — at first the question
of openness but later the major
problem of The Carillon. The
student negotiators were adamant throughout that The Carillon be independent of the
university administration and
directed solely by the students.
The Carillon has repeatedly
proved a major source of embarrassment to the board and
the provincial government.
The agreement itself reads in
part:
• The university (administration) will collect student
fees from all students as determined by the student union.
• Each year a majority of
students at a general meeting
or a referendum must approve
the fees before they will be
collected.
In an attempt to avoid further confrontation between the
board and students, the parties
agreed to set up a liason committee to deal generally with
all matters of common interest.
The student victory at the
bargaining table was a clear
vindication of the student
strategy to involve the mass of
students and the community in
the dispute. All decisions were
made in large open meetings
and abided with by student
leaders. The Saskatchewan
community was continually informed on the situation and
frequently called on for support.
The administration gave up
when it became apparent there
would be no violent action by
the students to prejudice their
case and when it was obvious
that the general mass of students would not support the
administration in its bid to destroy the student union and
The Carillon. This week's
election — in a large turnout
—of strongly pro-union student
leaders convinced the board
they couldn't win. Page 2
THE       UBYSSEY
Tuesday, March 11, 1969
PANGO PANGO — Shock and disbelief ran rampart early
today as the Asses and Mules Society accused the Daily Busybody, local squalid journal, of not being radical enough.
BLURBLU BLURBLU BLURBLU BLURBLU
Blues Great
BIG
MILLER
Blues, Baby
■Sr^r^r^r^r=Jr=-Jr=ii
THURSDAYS 12:30
SUB Ballroom 50c
Tutors  needed
Would you be willing to devote a small amount of your
time to tutoring potential
school drop-outs?
If so, Cool-Aid needs you for
its tutorial program .
A meeting will be held today
at noon in SUB 207 and 209
for anyone who is interested.
Sheltersville
For those of you out there in
sheltersville who have never
been   confronted  with   a   real
JEWISH LEADER TO DISCUSS
NEW YORK RACE CONFLICT
Students are invited to Hillel House on Wednesday,
March 12th at 12:30 p.m. to hear a foremost American
Jewish leader, Henry N. Rapaport, President of the United
Synagogues of America. This distinguished U.S. personality
recently returned from a special conference convened in
Jerusalem by the late Israeli Premier, Levi Eshkol.
Mr. Rapaport will discuss the current problem of tensions existing between the Jewish and Negro communities
in New York City, the civil rights drive and the current
wave of Negro anti-Semitism which Mr. Rapaport says stems
from a minority of militant Negroes and "does not represent
the mainstream of the Negro community."
TOMORROW NOON - HILLEL HOUSE
THE FOLLOWING AMS COUNCIL REPRESENTATIVES
AND REPRESENTATIVES-ELECT URGE YOU TO
VOTE NO
IN WEDNESDAY'S C.U.S. REFERENDUM
DAVE  ZIRNHELT - AMS President
FRASER HODGE-AMS President-elect & President Engineering Undergrad Society
DONN   AVEN - AMS Treasurer
CHUCK CAMPBELL-AMS Treasurer-elect
TOBIN  ROBBINS - AMS External Affairs Officer
MIKE DOYLE-AMS External Affairs Officer-elect
ROD RAMAGE - AMS Co-ordinator
TONY HODGE - AMS Vice-President-elect
DAVE GIBSON - AMS Internal Affairs Officer-elect
ANN JACOBS - AMS Secretary-elect
FRANK GREGORY - Forestry Representative
SUSAN SHAW - Education Representative
PETER BRAUND - Past AMS President and Law
Representative
ANN SMITH - Rehab. Medicine President
JENNIFER JOHNSTON - Nursing Representative
ED. FUKUSHIMA - Dentistry President
GERRY GRAFTON - Pharmacy President
GARY TINDALL - President  University Clubs Committee
JOE KENWARD - Physical Education  Representative
DWAYNE ZILM - President-elect Engineering Undergraduate
Society
live wino, here your chance to
see how he lives.
That's just part of a multimedia symposium held by the
Inner-City Service Project. It
starts tonight and continues
daily through Friday.
The topic is the different
aspects of the city, from the
skid road to the British properties. Slides, films and tape
will be used to give a close-up,
real-life view of our urban environment.
A fifteen-minute film was
produced by the National Film
Board,   and   directed   by   the
symposium members. The cost
is $1.00.
Cultures  meet
Indians and Eurasians had
cultural reations many moons
ago, according to evidence re-
centy uncovered by archaeology prof Charles E. Borden.
He will give a talk on his
findings Wednesday for the
Archaeological Society in the
auditorium of the Centennial
Museum, 1100 Chestnut Street.
Students of archaeology and
all others interested are invited to attend.
50% for CUS vote
By JOHN GIBBS
Ubyssey Council Reporter
Council Monday night enjoyed a chicken and chips dinner
in SUB and evening parlour games in the council chambers.
Despite a preoccupation with the recreational uses of
Roberts' Rules of Orders, the AMS elite managed to churn out
a few motions.
They passed a motion making a simple majority of fifty
per cent binding in the CUS referendum. (Normally a referendum needs a two-thirds majority to be binding.)
The move was in response to a charge by Bret Smiley, arts
vice-president elect, that the wording of the referendum was
unconstitutional.
The wording implies a two-thirds vote is needed to stay
in the union.
Council also decided to refer two specific parts of Carey
Linde's constitutional revisons to the March 20 general meeting.
(Lack of a quorum at a previous general meeting left the revision
on the drawing board.)
The two parts deal with allowing undergrad societies to levy
their own fees, and a system or representation by population on
the council.
The revisions would allow a society to levy fees providing
it was voted on by 25 per cent of the body and was passed by a
two-thirds majority. Rep by pop would give those faculties with
membership over a thousand, an extra rep on council for every
additional thousand.
A report from the joint conference on faculty council and
student discipline was also endorsed.
In layman's language the report deals with a system of
courts to be set up giving students greater control over their
own court which is now controlled by the faculty council.
Edmonton Public School Board
SPECIALIST TEACHERS 1969-70
The Edmonton Public School System subscribes to a philosophy of education
which places the emphasis on the development of the pupil rather than on
subject matter or course content, believing that the ultimate purpose of education is that of fitting man for life.
Staffing   requirements   are   adequately   supplied   in   most   areas   for
1969-70. Some  specialized* personnel  are  still  required.
Applications   are   solicited   from   well-qualified,   certificated   teachers   in   the
following   areas   only:
1. SCHOOL PSYCHOLOGIST
(minimum of Master's degree or equivalent in  clinical psychology)
2. SPEECH CLINICIAN
(minimum of Bachelor's degree or equivalent)
3. SPECIAL EDUCATION
(a)  Educable  Mentally   Retarded
'(b)  Hard  of Hearing
(c) Neurologically  Impaired
(d) Emotionally Disturbed
(e) Low Vision
4. SECONDARY VOCATIONAL IN THE FOLLOWING TRADES
ONLY:
(a) Horticulture
(b) Custodial  Services
(c) Food Preparation (Chef qualifications)
5. TEACHER LIBRARIANS
(minimum of 3 university courses in library science)
6. ORAL/AURAL   FRENCH   SPECIALISTS   AT   MOST   GRADE
LEVELS
7. SECONDARY   INDUSTRIAL  ARTS-(MULTI-ACTIVITY)
All applicants must be eligible for Alberta teacher certification requiring a
minimum of two years post-secondary education beyond British Columbia
grade  13 including formal teacher education.
For application forms and employment information, write giving a brief
outline of qualifications and experience to the address below. Also indicate
which hours from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Wednesday, April 2, would be convenient for a Vancouver interview with a Board presentative. In writing refer
to  Recruiting  Competition   1969-5.
WRITE: Personnel Department
EDMONTON PUBLIC SCHOOL BOARD
10010-107  A  Avenue EDMONTON   17,  Alberta Tuesday, March  11,  1969
THE      U BYSSEY
Page 3
Whole place shakin' away
■*M
d X *■
•Xx*
'.1 *
By IRENE WASILEWSKI
Down in California a lot of people are
quivering in anticipation of the 'Great Quake'.
In recent months many noted geologists,
seers, and quacks have been predicting a
massive earthquake in California.
Dr. Charles Richter, the geologist who devised the Richter scale for measuring earthquake intensity has said, "We are in danger
of a major earthquake I don't believe anything
can stop it."
The civil authorities in California have
enough faith in the calculations of the geological experts that they have made extensive preparations for the disaster, food has been stockpiled and arrangements have been made for
large mortuaries.
The visionaries have been even more for-
boding in their predictions.
Although most seers have jumped on the
bandwagon of predicting an earthquake because the odds are in their favor, the more
courageous visionaries have predicted that most
of the state of California will disappear entirely-
One of best known seers, Edgar Cayce, now
dead, not only predicted that California would
sink but also that simultaneously the lost
continent of Atlantis would rise off the coast
of Florida.
On the basis of these predictions many
religious groups have evacuated to behind the
Rockies, property values along the coast have
gone down, and several prophetic songs have
come close to the top of the teeny bopper hit
parade.
When told that the most popular prediction
date for the quake was 3:13 p.m., April 4, 1969
Dr. W. H. Mathews, head of the Geology department at UBC, said that he would be down
in California buying property the day before,
if he had the money.
"There may be a quake, in the next few
years," he said.
He denied that it was possible that any
earthquake could be strong enough to cause
the sinking of a land mass such as the coast
of California.
As for Atlantis he said "There may have
been a continent off the coast of Florida, but
that was probably Africa."
There is no geological evidence that the
continent of Atlantis exists there, no evidence
that it will arise.
He said that if an earthquake occured in
California it would not be felt here. Vancouver would be protected from any tidal wave
by Vancouver Island.
Vancouver geologists may be optimistic but
I have a strange feeling that MANY people will
be up on Mount Seymour, waiting for the
earth-shaking news while singing "If you
don't know how to swim, you better learn
Jim ..."
— gordie tong photo
NOT  HERE  WE  HEAR;  BUT????
High school unions meet, plan, act, face harassment
From page 1
The organization was also involved in the recent
civic elections in which they gathered all the material
they could on the candidates for school trustees and
actively supported those that met their standards:
• the candidate must be willing to give students
a voice in decision-making in the schools; and
• the candidate must regard education as something which students must relate to contemporary
society.
In December, 1968, they condensed all of their
proposals into a twelve-point policy which they distributed in the form of a petition to be presented
to the school board and the British Columbia Curriculum Review Board in hopes of some positive
action.
In a third mass meeting in the first week of
February two hundred students and teachers heard
four students and a senior counsellor from John
Young's progressive Campbell River school system
which embodies many of the improvements the union
would like to see in Vancouver.
At the same time, the Vancouver Parent-Teacher
Council approached the union and invited the mem
bers to send a delegation with PTAs to Victoria to
discuss Bill 86, the controversial school financing
legislation, with the government.
Due to lack of funds they were not able to go
but sent their support of the PTA's brief in letters
to MLAs.
Replies to these letters ranged from simple
acknowledgements from some members of the government to words of encouragement from some members of the opposition.
The petition containing their twelve points was
having trouble because it is forbidden for any group
which is not directly affiliated with a school to distribute printed material to the students or use the
bulletin boards  or public address  systems.
This has made it difficult to publicize the union's
existence, let alone what it is doing or plans to do
for the students with their support.
Information is getting around though, by word
of mouth and by handbills passed around off the
school grounds.
This has resulted in representatives from almost
all of the Vancouver schools attending meetings and
core groups, organizing within individual schools, in
Churchill, Point Grey, Eric Hamber and Prince of
Wales high schools.
So far most of the union's support is from those
schools, especially Churchill.
The union has sent letters to all principals of
Vancouver area high schools and to the heads of
students' councils asking for permission to distribute
information about the union in the  schools.
But all of the principals that have replied so far
have abided by the present policy or referred them
to the school board. The union has requested a meeting with the board several times but there has so
far been no reply.
Union member Mark Goodman, of Eric Hamber
said of the delays in talks with the school board,
"They are stalling until June, when we won't be
around any more to bother them."
Most of the students in the union are in the
senior grades in high school, and have just realized
that together they have some influence but have
only one or two years to get anything they can use
themselves done.
They are impatient. A bureaucracy takes longer
than that to act.
SFU SDU statement
during trial of 114
Today in this courtroom we are
witnessing how the Simon Fraser administration attempts to deal with
those problems arising out of an irrational, authoritarian and privileged
admissions system.
The November occupation of the
administration building cannot be
separated from the Four Demands. It
is our unaltered conviction that we
were acting with a valid and legitimate case that demanded direct
action after all other attempts to effect meaningful change had been exhausted. Therefore, we can offer no
apology to this court or to anyone
else for the action taken. The Four
Demands that call for a just, higher
education admissions policy remain as
relevant and as important as ever.
Our struggle continues around these
demands:
(1) Freedom of transfer within the
the B.C. educational system and automatic acceptance of program and
course credits from all B.C. colleges
with   academic   programs   and  from
high  schools with  a   Grade   13   program.
(2) The opening of all administration flies to a student investigating
committee to determine the extent
of alleged discrimination and to ensure the redress of all individual
grievances.
(3) The establishment of an elected
parity student-faculty admissions review board which would hear all appeals, set new academic-only entrance
criteria, and make all final admissions decisions.
(4) An end to the school construction "freeze", the repeal of Bill 86
and an end to the unequal financing
of education which favours upper and
middle class sectors of the population.
On the second day of the student
occupation a general meeting of the
Simon Fraser Student Society voted
overwhelmingly to support the Four
Demands and the action of occupation.
In the weeks following the police
occupation of  Simon Fraser campus
many trade unions from the lower
mainland voted to support our struggle around the Four Demands. We
distributed leaflets and our newspaper ISSUE outside union meetings
and at factory gates. As we were
able to explain our case we found
evidence of growing support. For the
demands do not just concern students, they affect every working
man and woman in B.C*
The demands raise basic questions
concerning the class nature of the
university. People are beginning to
ask such questions as: Who goes to
university? Who pays for universities?
and Who controls those universities?
At stake lies the fundamental question: Whom do universities serve?
The wider struggle to which we are
committed is to make the universities serve the working people.
The movement around the Four
Demands involved students from different campuses and individual supporters. The issue of university admissions policy affects everyone. Inside the occupied building all those
who supported our actions were our
comrades. We were all students of
Vancouver City College. We were all
students of the University of B.C. We
were all students of SFU. We were
all being denied admission. Any attempt by the prosecutor to discrim
inate against individuals must be regarded as a diversion from the real
issues facing this court which we
have attempted to explain.
Today we appear in this courtroom because the ruling academic
body of the university, the SFU senate, refused to engage in rational
dialogue. Rather than discussing the
real grievances of countless students,
the senate acted in a most arbitrary
and arrogant fashion. Rather than
entering into serious negotiation with
the students on the basis of their proposals for the solution of real problem?, the administration called in
the forces of the state. By laying
charges that same administration
may hope to divert the students'
struggle away from the real issues.
The student protest is then presented
as a challenge to "law and order".
In all this, of course, the authorities have the ready support of the
bourgeois media which is only too
happy to malign, slander and vilify
the developing student movement in
English Canada.
By these people we are accused
of challenging "law and order".
Workers have learnt the same lesson
when they fought to defend their
their rights and interests.
Today we plead guilty to disturbing that order which maintains an
irrational, authoritarian and privileged admissions system. Page 4
THE
UBYSSEY
Tuesday, March 11, 1969
Three months after the occupation,
not one of the demands has been implemented
By  JOHN  CLEVELAND
(From   The   Peak)
The parity appeal board has no elected student
representatives, is forced to apply the same calendar
criteria and has severely limited access to the files.
Meyers still uses the Senate Undergraduate Admissions Committee he used to chair to hold up cases
from getting to the appeal board.There is no freedom
of transfer. Government policy on the de facto
school freeze and "streaming" system is unchanged.
The files are still open to the RCMP and closed to
students.
Strand's "solution" to the admissions scandal was
to call the cops. The 114 will be sentenced March 19.
Predictably, the politics of moderation have
achieved nothing in the way of progress on this
front. Council hasn't even discussed action to implement the demands passed overwhelmingly at massive
student body meetings last November.
Gloomy? Not really. The facts about the B.C.
educational system exposed by last semester's struggle have become public issues. Most of organized
labor has given explicit support to the four demands.
Bennett was forced to increase the education budget
although the bias against non-universities is even
more grossly revealed in its breakdown.
Strand thinks he has killed the four demands by
using the courts and the police. But the students at
this university will not be so easily intimidated.
John Conway and Donn Korbin raised the demands again in Senate Monday night. Students in
several departments are beginning to mobilize to
stop the "corporate mergers" which are stages in the
creation of a branch plant knowledge factory on the
American model. The struggle for an open university
with autonomous student-faculty controlled departments carries on.
The demands have been reformulated as follows:
A. A non-elitest university
open to all classes	
1. an autonomous admissions board with power to
make final decisions on admissions and set its
own criteria.
Equal   representation    of   students   and   faculty
elected at large.
Terms of reference designed to cut across the
effects of a public school system which channels
students through five "streams'' into dead-end
institutions or narrow jobs. Counsellors are now
explicitly directed to advise "children with working class parents" not to apply for the academic
stream — the only one that leads to university.
Students in vocational, technical and the lower
academic streams end up respectively in vocational, technical or junior colleges and cannot
transfer out.
The priorities for admission would be:
(a) all students from racial minorities, especially
Native Canadian Indians, regardless of formal
educational background. A racist public school
system forces these students to drop out
early. Special "make-up" programs would be
necessary in each department for equal credit
without the penalty of extra hours. An autonomous Native Canadian Studies department
is another alternative to prevent assimilation.
(b) students applying from any stream, in this
order:
i)    non-academic stream applicants,
ii)   transfer  students from junior vocational
or technical colleges.
iii) academic stream and 'mature' students,
(c) all others who meet minimum standards.
There must be no artifical elitist standards
created by raising the required grade average
as was done recently at UBC. People's needs,
not the government's lies about its inability
to provide adequate finances, must determine
the size of enrolment.
2. an autonomous parity appeals board with full
access to all university files. Personal files of
students must be open to the individual at any
time and to no one else except those explicity
authorized by him or her. All official connections
with the RCMP which give them access to files
must be officially ended by a Senate resolution.
3. An elected Investigation Committee to examine
and report to the student body on the 'political'
documents in the secret files.
4. Freedom of transfer (as specified in the Korbin-
Sperling motion) without loss of credit.
B. An end to Corporate chanelling
Professor Okuda introduced a motion to the last
Senate meeting calling for a bell-curve grading
system. It is still pending.
The effect of imposing a bell curve system is that
half of the students in each class automatically get a
mark of "C" or below. Students are not evaluated
on the basis of their academic work but are 'ranked'
competitively and derive their grade from their place
on the scale.
The links with the discriminatory admissions
policy are clear. In California, the bell-curve is used
to guarantee the failure of 50 % of the freshmen students every year (modified up and down in terms
of the demands of the job market). If the admissions
policy and streaming system can't keep students out,
bell-curve grading will kick them out.
Probably a majority of professors already grade
on some version of the bell-curve. Freedom for students to continue their education without external
'manpower' controls is impossible without the abolition of grading and streaming, financial independence, and integrated institutions of higher education with equal facilities regardless of specialty.
Hence we demand:
1.   Abolition of grading by stages
(a) commitment by Senate to abolition of grading
in principle.
(b) immediate implementation of pass-fail.
(c) Senate's budget to the government must be
based on full payment by the university of
all tuition fees and the cost of books.
Senate must demand a new government system of student aid unrelated to grades in the
form of stipends.
(d) indication by Senate that they will recognize
some credit courses without grades if any
departments submit a list of such courses in
future.
Graduate students in PSA have already drafted a series of proposals based on this principle. Seminars on different topics will be
student-run without grades. Academic trans-
scripts will record the areas covered by students who take these seminars as full credits.
(e) five-credit lower level courses.
This is the first step towards abolishing the
course unit, to be replaced by more flexible
and personailized intedisciplinary study programs.
2. commitment by Senate to pressure the government to end the system of "streaming" and compulsory government exams in public schools.
Abolition of the counselling system to be replaced
by increased student and teacher autonomy and
power in decision making.
3. The segregation of higher education institutions
into dead-end training schools tied closely to the
job  market must be ended.
Private corporations actually have the power at
present to dictate directly (usually via the Manpower centre) what short-term study programs
are set up at the technical, vocational and junior
colleges. Industry's control over universities is
more subtly manipulated by corporate research
grants, a business-dominated Board and lay members on Senate.
(a) Senate must commit itself to demanding that
the   government   replace  the   current  segregated     system    with     regional     universities
throughout the province taking students from
all streams.
Specialization must be achieved within an
integrated university complex which provides
common social and cultural facilities and
equal access to laboratories and classroom
space. The economies of scale will make more
effective use of tax money.
(b) Transfer will thus be between courses and
programs. It will not require the financial
and psychological strain of having to shift
institutions, residence and fee level.
This reform will make possible the implementation of real interdisciplinary studies for
all students whatever their specialty or social
background.
C. Stop the creation of a
branch-plant knowledge factory
Strand's White Papers and the recent talks of
merger between BSF and SPF as well as PDP and the
Communications Centre (thus ending any semblance
of autonomy for the Theatre) are clear indications of
where this university is going.
The ground is being held for the creation of a .
professional multiversity where research and narrow
specialization replace autonomous departments which
have the potential of putting learning—and students
— first.
1. No change in departmental structure, by corporate merger or "administrative separation" of
disciplines, or the creation of new (research)
institutes outside the decision making processes of
existing departments without the explicit authorization of a majority of students in each department concerned and the Student Society by vote.
Students must have equal power in the drafting
and implementation of any such changes.
2. Departments must not only be autonomous but
responsive to the needs and priorities of the
students in their curriculum and staffing.
Students must be guaranteed parity and veto in
the hiring and firing (the students in the Theatre
must decide about John Juliani) and curriculum
design as proposed in the Student Implementation
Report.
Strand has tried to intimidate us by the use of
force to stop fighting for these demands and the goal
of an open university. We must begin again to build
support for these demands and confront the power
structure to demand their immediate implementation.
THI UBYSSEY
Published Tuesdays and Fridays throughout the university year by the
Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C. Editorial opinions are those
of the writer and not of the AMS or the univefsity administration.
Member, Canadian University Press. The Ubyssey also subscribes to the
press services of Pacific Student Press, of which it is a founding member.
Ubyssey News Service supports one foreign correspondent in Pango-
Pango. Authorized second class mail by the Post Office Department,
Ottawa, and for payment of postage in cash. The Ubyssey publishes
Page Friday, a weekly commentary and review. City editor, 228-2305;
editor, 228-2301; Page Friday, 228-2309; sports, 228-2308; advertising,
228-3977.
MARCH 11,  1969
Response
MR. JAMES TWEEDIE:
Please accept my apologies
for neglecting to respond to
your letter before this time. I
am sure you realize the time-
consuming nature of the job
of president of the AMS with
which I am presently familiarizing myself in order that all
that has gone before me will
not be lost in transition. On
top of this I am trying to complete 4th year engineering
which is, in itself, a full-time
job.
With reference to your ques
tions as printed in The Ubyssey
Friday, I was NOT aware of
the letter Mr. Chylick sent out
to former Slipstick advertisers
until approximately ten days
after it was sent. On this basis
I don't feel you have any
legitimate criticisms, of me
merely because my name was
quoted in a letter written by
someone else and sent to someone else again.
Although I can understand
that Mr. Chyplick's motives in
writing these letters were
based on a frustration resulting from former advertisers
refusing to advertise in this
year's Slipstick because of student unrest (and you are wel-
MORE
LETTERS
Page 9
come to read some of the letters he has received in this
regard), I want to make it
quite clear at this time that it
is very definitely not this
scapegoat reaction I am solicit-
ng from the people of this province but more  so an under-
To Page 9
See: LETTERS Tuesday, March  11,   1969
THE        UBYSSEY
Page 5
Stuart-Stubbs studies stack situation
By FRANK FLYNN
Ubyssey: How would you describe the physical
structure and condition of the main library building?
Stubbs: This building, by contemporary standards, is almost totally unsatisfactory for library
purposes. It's built on the antiquated concept that
you keep your stacks in a block and surround them
with public seating areas.
The more prevalent concept now is to integrate
the stacks and the seating to a larger degree all in
high ceiling areas so the students can feel they are
in them and are part of them.
This building is almost impossible for a person
to understand unless he's acquainted with it for at
least a year as a student.
For our own staff members it takes at least a
month for them to be able to find their way around
it when they are hired.
The space in which the books exist is not space
that was ever intended for humans. It was for the
old closed stack system.
The fire marshal is correct in saying that it isn't
a safe building in terms of fire prevention. But
there's practically nothing that can be done about
that.
It's totally inflexible because most of the walls
are supporting walls so that we can't alter the structure and open it up.
The standard of lighting varies from place to
place. There are some areas where it is being improved as much as it can be and it still isn't good
enough.
Ubyssey: How well paid are the members of the
staff for our library?
Stubbs: The salaries of the library assistants, the
personnel who are not graduate librarians, have
been improved the last couple of years and are now
competitive with salaries being paid at other local
institutions across Canada.
As far as the librarians go, the salary that is paid
here is not competitive, the floors were not raised
last year, and we are roughly $500 to $700 a year
below the floors in other Canadian and North American institutions.
If we don't have competitive salaries for librarians, one of two things will happen. Firstly, we will
not be able to attract to the university the people
we would like to get. The other is if our salaries
get too far out of line, we would be risking the
possibility of losing staff we have now.
Ubyssey: How is the library preparing for the
future by automation and other methods and techniques?
Stubbs: In many respects this library has the
best record of any I know of in North America as
far as automation of procedures goes. I'm talking
about clerical routines.
The circulation system, -which was so happily
tampered with this year, is the largest circulation
system of its type in the world. So they had the
pleasure of tampering with something that is good
and big.
I'm hoping that with the development of larger
and better computers we can provide faster and
better service.
As for miniaturization such as microfilms, there
will unquestionably be more and more of this. There
is already a tremendous amount up on floor six in
the stacks.
We   probably   have   more   individual   items   on
By 1974, University of British Columbia will have
34,000 students, if enrolment is not restricted. UBC's
library, which is forced to serve 20,000 now, was built
for 13,000.
In A Plan for Future Service, published in January,
head librarian Basil Staurt-Stubbs and assistant librarian
W- J. Watson outlined the library's needs over the next
five years. The report called for a system of nine campus
libraries, most of which now exist on a reduced scale,
and construction of an additional 780,761 square feet
of library space. Staff, which totalled 1.265 in 1967-68,
would rise to 2,380. In this interview with Ubyssey
staffer Frank Flynn, Stubbs talks about the library's
shortcomings and plans for the future.
microfilm than we have in catalogue form in the
library.
As libraries accumulate more and more material,
clearly they are going to have to do one of three
things. Firstly, they can decide to destroy some
material. I doubt that they will make that decision,
for it would be extremely risky.
Or they are going to have a find storage space
for the original documents — build a warehouse
somewhere for compact storage.
Or they can go to some kind of miniaturization.
The way they're working at it now, they're coming
up with all kinds of refined systems.
Ubyssey: How fast is the library's book collection
growing?
Stubbs: We probably have something like 1,100,-
000 volumes. For the next two years we will probably be adding around 100,000 volumes per year.
Ubyssey: In the Resources of Canadian Academic
and Research Libraries prepared by R. B. Downs
and published in 1967, a table indicated that we
have a deficiency of greater than 1,200,000 volumes.
Yet at the same time the University of Toronto
had a surplus of more than 250,000 volumes. What
are our prospects for future growth of volumes?
Stubbs: One of the main features of the formula
used to falculate these volumes is the number of
academic .'programs which are being given. As you
know, this university offers practically everything.
That is why we seem to be so deficient.
For the kind of academic program we are giving
here with more and more doctorates being offered
in more and more specialized fields, there is no
question that we would be better off if we were
Harvard. <In 1966 the library volumes in the Harvard library numbered 7,600,357.)
We can only do as much as we can. The thing
that we have to do is to be careful with how we
use our money.
Ubyssey: The Downs report calls for an annual
grant of $150 per student to the libraries as a minimum, or ten percent of the university's operating
funds each year. Obviously our library is not getting
these funds.
Stubbs: There are very few Canadian institutions
getting that amount of money or that percentage.
We are around the eight percent mark. If you measure it in dollars per student, it can look pretty bad.
One think about a library is that it's a permanent
form of investment. If you provide a good book and
providing nobody walks off with it, it's a joy and
treasure forever.
Every year we get better and better.
DARK, GLOOMY library stacks are unfit for human occupation, says head librarian Basil Stuart-Stubbs.
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or write SIMS, Box 141 UBC, or 926-1484 Page 6
THE       UBYSSEY
Tuesday, March 11, 1969
CUS
NO
WEDNESDAY
BREAD €r BUTTER:    a critique of CUS  services
By   TOBIN   ROBBINS
AMS   External   Affairs  Officer
It seems quite ironical that
those fighting to see UBC retain membership in CUS are
Using services (lobby, charter
flights, life insurance, etc.) as
one of their major justifications. This approach interests
me for it indicates the bankruptcy of the oranization. For
the past two years, the CUS
Presidents, Armstrong and
Warrian, have been claiming
that services are irrelevant,
and that the Union should con-
em i'self solely with political
questions. Well, now that there
is trouble on a campus, the
service "lollipop" is pulled out
in order to try and swing the
referendum.
Let's take a look at some of
the services CUS offers.
(1) Travel program — for
years UBC got along fine without the CUS Travel Department and in fact there are at
least two Vancouver agencies
which would dearly love to
take over the on-campus student    travel    business.     Both
groups would provide as many
or more services than CUS offers and would be willing to
pay for the privilege of being
on-campus. The way it stands
now, CUS makes ten to twenty
thousand dollars profit on its
travel operations.
(2) Life Insurance — Carey
Linde in Friday's UBC talked
about the life insurance firms
being against CUS because of
its life plan. As per usual,
Linde is guilty of fuzzy thinking, the fact being that the
CUS Life Plan is run by Canadian Premier Life — a firm
owned by American banking
interests. The Canadian Union
of Students is merely a front
for   CPL  efforts   to  build   up
future clientele by selling term
insurance on campus. The
AMS has had several inquiries
from Canadian-owned firms as
to the possibilities of life insurance sales on campus.
The irony of the life insurance game is that CUS, the
defender of Canadian virtue,
in the face of rape by the foreign ogre, turns out to be a
supporter of "American imperialism".
(3) Lobby — the CUS lobby
has been for the last several
years a farce. Last year, for example, Hugh Armstrong, then
President of CUS went to see
Finance Minister Benson about
the Carter Commission on Taxation.   Armstrong   figured   he
could "freak out" the good
minister from Kingston and
arrived at Benson's office wearing a sweatshirt and Bermuda
shorts. I will leave it to the
reader to imagine how credible
our Carter Commission lobby
was. The lobby victories CUS
is taking credit for go back
four to six years, proof of the
bankruptcy of the present
leadership.
Martin Loney claims that
CUS is lobbying Trudeau and
Standfield on the issue of student unemployment. The essence of the brief is that students demand full employment, but the means to this end
are not made clear.  Again, it
seems that the wanted CUS
lobby will be unmasked as ineffectual.
(4) Co-operative Fieldworker
—CUS is in the midst of firing
their do-nothing co-operative
fieldworker. Little to nil has
been done by the national
union in the co-operative housing field this year and, in fact,
the UBC co-op housing group
is flourishing in spite of CUS.
(5) Inter-regional Student Exchange Program (ISEP)—Here
is one CUS program which was
of direct benefit to students on
all member campuses. Unfortunately ISEP has been scrapped because people like
Daphne Kelgard, CUS Associate Secretary in 1967-68, felt
that  it  was  too bureaucratic.
—the "get out of CUS" people have been
charged with not offering anything positive. In
fact we have positive policy and organization.
—if CUS is worthy of faith, the pro-CUS
faction ought to be willing to fight to get in
CUS in September on the basis of policies formulated at the August Congress.
—we are not being isolationist but are indicating our judgment as to the ineffectiveness
of CUS mobilizing collective student action.
—CUS as it exists needs to be shaken at
its very roots. UBC's pulling out will do that.
DAVE ZIRNHELT
AMS President
COMMENT:
ANTI-CUS
Strike   one   more   against   the
sudent.
It seems very clear to me
that Martin Loney's bread si
stale and his butter is rancid.
'CUS do-nothing organization'—Sullivan
By SHAUN SULLIVAN
AMS President. 1967-68
B.C. Member, CUS Board of Officers, 1967-68
Again this year UBC students are being asked to
vote on their continued membership in the Canadian
Union of Students. And again this year, the pro-CUS
arguments are centering on services, past performances, and "potential". As AMS president last
year, I campaigned in favor of CUS because a national union of students had great potential for collectively attacking problems which students see in
society, and particularly in their education.
What has CUS done since UBC students reaffirmed their membership last year? In my opinion,
nothing concrete. What they have done is alienate
many people in this country by the unnecessary
use of revolutionary jargon.
The fact that nothing has been done is not sur
prising. The CUS bureaucracy is appallingly inefficient. As an example, while I was on the CUS
board of officers last year, the financial statements
presented to the board for approval were so poorly
done that the board refused to approve them, and
in fact disclaimed any financial responsibility for
the union. Now, I don't mean to suggest that an
efficient bureaucracy should be the goal of CUS.
But without some efficiency of organization, direction of personnel, and allocation of resources, there
can be no hope of achieving the goals of the union,
whatever they may be.
We hear about the great CUS Ottawa lobby and
what it can do for us. The fact is that CUS is the
laughing stock of Ottawa. Their sporadic lobbying
attempts have not accomplished anything in at least
two years because their feeling that lobbying is
irrelevant   has   permeated   their   preparations   and
presentations. We're told that we may not get summer jobs this year if we don't have CUS working
for us. But many students didn't have jobs last
summer. What has CUS done about it since then?
Nothing. Except, of course, to use the possibility of
doing something now, when it's too late, as a referendum issue.
The position has been put that we need a national
student union because it can help us. But potential
without results is useless. Our $13,500 fees in CUS
this year could have been put to much better use
here, on our own campus.
After having seen CUS in operation last year as
a council president and as a member of its board
of officers, I have been convinced that the union is
achieving little, if anything, for Canadian students.
I strongly recommend that UBC students vote
"NO" in the referendum, against continued CUS
membership.
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THE      UBYSSEY
Page 7
* '
'AMS ENGAGING IN RHETORIC
CUS can tackle our problems
Why should you vote YES to CUS?
1969-70 president Martin Loney, elected last
August by delegations from more than 40 campuses,
explains below the union's potential,
the problems it has faced at UBC this year,
and the proposals now being discussed for
next year.
He is interviewed by former AMS vice-president
Carey Linde.
Linde: Do you think it is correct
in this referendum to make the issue
of CUS one of services like charter
flights, booklets, insurance, etc., or is
there not something deeper, more basic
to the point ?
Loney:  Yes,  I  think there  is.   The
COMMENT:
PRO-CUS
issue is basically a political one. Canadian students face a number of problems within both the university and
the larger society. The question is, do
they need to organize nationally to
formulate and attempt to apply policies
to tackle these problems ? CUS provides a forum for debate on solutions.
Linde: Those advocating withdrawal
basically agree with that position.
Where do you see the basic disagreement between student councillors and
the other side ?
Loney: The AMS is basically engaging in rhetoric. They are promising
a Utopian national organization without having organized students even
at a local level. The only people that
they ever organize are student councillors, past and present. They have created a paper organization in the B.C.
Union of Students and seem intent on
doing the same at the national level.
Linde: How do you interpret the
fact that for the first time in the history
of the union on many campuses the
students, and not the councils, are being
asked to determine this issue ?
Loney: At one level this indicates
that OUS has been successful in taking
its case to the students. Having finally
involved themselves in something more
relevant than the publication of song
books, CUS has stirred up a good deal
of needed controversy. As a result,
some campuses have withdrawn, but
others are now much more meaningful participants than before.
Linde: What are your fears of the
outcome if UBC withdraws ?
Loney: If a national union continued
to exist in Canada, it would certainly
be much weaker than the one we have
"The AMS is equally responsible for CUS. They have not
even distributed material sent
to UBC"
now. We might see the development of
two unions, one conservative and one
radical. This would not only prevent
rational debate among students but
would result in the organizations devoting their resources to attacking one
another rather than dealing with the
problems.
Line: Do you think that the student
council at UBC can, as they claim,
rapidly rebuild the organization ?
Loney: No. The University of Edmonton student council has been promising
to do that for three years. The conference that meets at Waterloo Lutheran University in December to consider this proposal was then described
by Fraser Hodge, next year's AMS
president, as "a crock of shit". It seems
now he is proposing to refill the crock.
Dave Zirnhelt at first speaks in favor
"We have presented extensive
brieis to Trudeau and Stan-
Held about student unemploy
ment.
of remaining in CUS, then changes his
mind the next day, then says that there
will be no attempt to form an alternative union, but to change CUS from
within, having first put UBC on the
outside.
Linde: How do you respond to Tobin
Robbins' charge of inefficiency?
Loney: To a certain extent the charge
is justified. Field work in B.C. has been
poor, and the national office has often
sent material out late. On the other
hand, the union has probably made
ness about CUS and student involvement. Many student councils, for example, those in Edmonton, Calgary,
Victoria, will probably move to rejoin.
The press scare should have declined,
leaving the union free to tackle the
real problems by focusing on major
themes such as student employment,
both in the summer and at the graduate level, and the larger question of the
growing gap between the third -world
and the richer nations. We should be
able to have a far more dynamic union.
Of course, in order, for CUS to do
anything, students must have faith in
the concept of a national union working toward a just society.
more attempt to get down to the average student this year than ever before.
One is inclined to add that people in
glass houses shouldn't throw stones.
Tobin Robbins, the first student to hold
the newly created position of External
Affairs Officer, sits on the national
council of CUS, and is therefore equally responsible for what happens in the
organization. In fact, Tobin seems to
have made no effort to inform students
at UBC about CUS, and has not even
distributed material sent to the campus.
One would have thought that he would
have raised his criticisms of CUS with
the National Council. In fact, he never
did so. And from; what I can gather,
nobody has ever seen him do anything
about CUS on this campus.
Linde: What is CUS doing now?
Loney: They are trying to mobilize
student councils to attack the problem
of student unemployment this summer
which the UBC AMS has never even
discussed. And at a national level we
have presented extensive briefs to
Trudeau and Stanfield on the subject.
We have also had talks with Canada
Manpower officials which should result
in steps being taken this summer to extend the summer employment services
available to students. In the last analysis, however, attempts to tackle major
problems, whether it be university finance, student loans or unemployment,
can only be successful when student
councils are prepared to mobilize students to act on these issues.
Linde: If UBC stays in CUS, what
direction do you see the national union
taking?
Loney:  I thing we will  enter  next
"CUS can only be successful
when councils are prepared to
mobilize students."
year in a much stronger position. The
referendums, if they have done nothing else, have increased student aware-
SUPPORT CUS: VOTE YES ON WEDNESDAY
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SUPPORT YOUR  CAMPUS  THEATRE Page 8
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, March 11, 1969
THIS WEEKEND
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Students really   screened'
By JOHN GIBBS
"So you want to be a sanitation engineer with Dow Chemical, eh boy," drawled the placement officer in a tone reminiscent
of early Daryl Zanuck. "What can you do . . . sing, dance, imitations maybe ?"
"But sir," I said in an eager tone, reminiscent of eary
Mickey Mouse, "All I want in life is to be able to sweep."
"Not good enough boy. When you get in front of that
camera you gotta DO something . . . Damnation, that's an ugly
schmozzle — don't get your hopes up boy."
"But sir, I have talent and the university training to be a
sanitation engineer; if I could only get an interview with somebody and show them I have what it takes."
"Interview ! (snort) That went out with placement officers.
They do it all on film now; you make your pitch and the film
is sent to the company . . . and quite frankly son, you just
don't PROJECT like any sanitation engineer worth his broom
should."
Interviewing by film. It's still in the experimental stage but
the ultimate effect could render the traditional campus interview
obsolete.
The idea is to film applicants expounding their virtues and
then screen the results for campany representatives.
According to J. C. Craik, a UBC placement officer, the
system would allow the student to expose his application to a
wider selection of prospective employers as well as saving the
companies expensive recruiting trips.
Such a film was made recently in Toronto and met with
favourable reaction among industrial and college recruiters.
Craik is bringing the film to UBC and a local commerce
researcher is going to do a scientific study of student reactions.
It will be shown March 1.9 at noon in the Education auditorium.
Britain is much more than splendour.
and pomp, stone and pewter.It's a fun country.
A young, involving, irreverent festival.
A celebration of life itself.
Come and feel it, join it, live it, remember it.
Come. This year. ■        «•«*._.
Great Britain
vl *. d'»•»*■
■BiSi
Britain.
"~l
iwo rree cooks on
One, special for students: accommodation,
low rates, useful facts. Two, 48 pages
about Britain. Send to British Travel, PO Box 320,
Terminal A, Toronto, Ontario,
EDITORS:
Co-ordinating       Al   Birnie
City    Alex Volkoff,  Peter  Ladner
Associate   Paul  Knox
Managing       Bruce   Curtis
Wire       Irene   Wasitewski
Page  Friday    Andrew Horvat
Sports   Jim Maddin
Photo    Fred   Cawsey
Ass't  News   John Gibbs
*Fascist-pig-dog-editors' shrieked a
dwindling staff as newly-elected boss-
man, Finballs, whipped a little "law and
order" into the production. Nader Mir-
hady and Elaine Tarswell cringed in
terror whil Frank Flynn proposed a
liberal compromise. Nate Smith threatened military retaliation while Jack
Curried his copy in protest. Norm Gidney and Maurice Bridge capitulated
while Rik Nyland endorsed the whole
affair from a jock viewpoint. Dick Button and Gordie Tong did their best to
protect the dark room receiving a censure in the les for their efforts.
Knoxious CUSsed all over pages 6&7
and Alex declared a desire to be absent.
But Finballs didn't hear. The AMS layed
on a free dinner for all staffers around
at 6 hosted by Fraser Hodge..
Two in jail
as bail stops
MONTREAL (CUP) — Seven
more people charged in connection with disturbances at Sir
George Williams University
have been granted bail, leaving only two persons still in
jail.
Six of seven juveniles
charged in the incident were
found guilty on charges of mischief and remanded one week
for sentencing. The seventh is
being held for psychiatric examination.
In remanding the six for one
week, Judge John Long ordered their parents to appear
in court next Wednesday to
"show cause why they should
not pay" for damages to university property. The juveniles, who were originally
charged with conspiracy to
commit arson and damage
property, had the charges reduced to mischief a few days
after their arrest.
At Waterloo, a general meeting of 500 University of Waterloo students voted Monday to
stop a student council move to
send $110,000 in bail money to
students arrested at Sir George
Williams University.
The students halted the
action after $5,000 had already
gone to Sir George. The student council decided that evening to send no further funds
unless a referendum was held.
BUSY "B"
BOOKS
Used  University Texts
Bought and Sold
146 W HASTINGS
Opposite Woodwards
681-4931
Province
II—
FLOWERS
"Originality in Flowers
Fo*- All Occasions"
20% OFF CORSAGES
ORDER   EARLY
Phone 736-7344
2197 West Broadway Tuesday, March  11,  1969
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 9
From Page 4
standing of the problems and
frustrations facing our university and the whole education
system which result in various
forms of "student unrest", as
I have been doing already in
several speaking engagements.
In view of this I sincerely
hope that the various elements
of the entire university community can overcome their internal bickering at each other
and work together in a commitment to a common goal
which will better us all.
Your truly,
FRASER  D.  HODGE
Ruff stuff
Editor,  The Ubyssey, Sir:
I would like to know what
other students think of the hiring and firing practices of
UBC. What are the criteria
used in deciding to get rid of
a professor and how is his replacement chosen? Should the
views of the students who have
followed a professor's courses,
and are therefore the only ones
with a first-hand practical experience of his teaching ability
and acedemic competence, be
given any consideration?
For example, in the department of political science, professor Ruff, who had a one
year appointment, has been
kicked out. Why? We heard
that the department wanted a
person qualified in the behavioural approach to Canadian government. The person
who has been given professor
Ruff's job, however, has no
qualifications in behavioural-
ism, has just this year returned to UBC to start on a Ph.D.,
and is an old friend of some
in the department.
As a student taking one of
professor Ruff's courses, I have
found him a first-rate prof and
this seems to be the general
opinion of the class. Why then
is he being kicked out? It is
obviously not on account of
qualifications or competence.
It is necessary to have a
fairy  godmother  out there in
LETTERS TO THE  EDITOR
order to be a prof at UBC? Is
the old-buddy network in practice at UBC? Should we as
students take an interest, and
have some say in these matters,
as it is after all supposedly
partly on our behalf that a
professor is hired or fired?
Yours sincerely,
B.D.
Milk
murmer
Editor,  The  Ubyssey,  Sir:
It is with heavy heart that
we issue a warning to our fellow students. Their health is
in danger! Steer away from
the Ponderosa on Monday
mornings.
For some strange reason the
milk is of an inferior quality..
To be exact, it tastes like cardboard.
Lacking the scientific background to analyze the cause of
such a vile fluid we dare not
put forward any reasons for its
taste. Perhaps the can is defective or perhaps (and this is
not likely) the crackerjack employees of the Ponderosa fail to
replace the milk on Friday.
Is this biological warfare? Is
this a plot to corrupt our precious bodily fluids? Is this an
attempt to liquidate the cream
of B.C.'s youth? Fellow students beware!
In the interests of better
health we call on UBC's efficient police to conduct a
thorough investigation with the
aid of the crack food science
students from the faculty of
agriculture, of course. God
willing, we will prevail.
GLEN REID
PATRICK FORRER
arts II
Book bumph
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
Each   year   instructors   are
THE  PIT
TWO  GREAT   NIGHTS   PLANNED  FOR
THE LAST TWO NIGHTS THE PIT
WILL BE OPEN THIS YEAR
April   2 - FOLK NIGHT
(12 Different Acts)
April  3 - BAND NIGHT
(Featuring a Top Musical Group)
BOTH IN SUB BALLROOM
Don't Miss Either — Members and Their Guests Only
DEFFNER
Ofl
MASS MEDIA
B B^^^^^^^^^E-i     *jj^^8r**^^^BBto^ ^^H
and
■VE-^ftl
SEX
1 ^k ^^^P^^HSu
w» "^^Mmmmmmmmmmmm
IH^k. ^^^^^HB
THURS., FRI. NOON
I-H^hAHB
MARCH 13,14
II         Dr. Donald L. Deffner
mmmmmwmmmmmmmmmmmmmm
B.A., B.D., M.A., M.Th., Ph.C
>.       Henry Angus 110
increasing the use of multiple
textbooks for their courses.
The paper - back editions of
texts makes this use possible
and extremely advantageous.
A problem arises, however,
when instructors do not make
explicit to students and to the
Bookstore which texts are essential for classroom procedures and which texts are
recommended for supplementary reading. When no distinction is made, the Bookstore
usually orders an equal number of copies of the essential
and recommended texts.
Sometimes the students who
buy all these books, as requested, resent paying for books
not used in the course, partic
ularly if funds are limited.
Other students wait to see
which books are actually used
in the classroom, and then do
their supplementary reading in
the library, leaving the unpurchased books on the Bookstore shelves.
For these reasons, at a recent meeting, both the student
representatives on the Student-
Faculty Advisory Committee
on the University Bookstore,
and the Bookstore manage
ment, complained about the
multiple textbooks. The students -wished to have a clearer
indication of the texts essential for the course.
The Bookstore management
stated  that is has  the  annual
problem of attempting to return to publishers large consignments of textbooks which
were not purchased. The freight
charges alone inflict great financial losses on a non-profit
organization attempting to
operate as efficiently and effectively as possible.
Because of this situation, I
am writing this letter to all
teaching members of the university with the request that
they take the problem into
consideration when ordering
books in the coming year. I
urge you to please:
• make clear to students
which books they should buy,
• give to the Bookstore the
number of copies of recommen-
ed texts which you estimate
students will actually buy.
J. F. McLean — Chairman.
Student-Faculty   Advisory
Committee on ihe Bookstore
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THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, March 11, 1969
TOUR COORDINATOR HOSTESS
Public Relations Tow and Travel Business
Single, attractive young lady with exceptional personality. Public speaking
ability and some typing required. Flexible part time hours during spring;
fuH-time  during  summer.
Make appointments now at the STUDENT PLACEMENT
OFFICE for interviews on THURSDAY, MARCH 13.
The last collosal CONCERT... DANCE
with the
POPPY
FAMILY
AND THE
WIGGY  SYMPHONY
MARCH 14-9-1
SUB BLRM
Advance Tickets $2.00 at A.M.S. and Information Desk SUB
PAPA BEARS
IN CONCERT
Monday, March 17th
at 111 Dunsmuir, 8:30 p.m.
TICKETS FREE with every purchase of PAPA BEARS new
release "TWO'S A PAIR" . . . available only at KELLY'S.
—records will be sold at the door. See the Papa Bears-
equipped by DEYONG SOUND—the experts who take care
of   all   the   leading   bands.
Two's  a  Pair by the  Papa Bears, their first  release  under the
Sixth   Ave.   label.   Recorded  at  Aragon   Studios.   Agents*.   MCM
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OFFICIAL  NOTICES
Alma  Mater Society
COMMITTEE APPOINTMENTS
The following committees require chairmen and interested individuals to participate as working members.
Chairman for:
1. Frosh Orientation
2. Academic Activities
3. Speakers Committee
4. Performing Arts
5. C. U. S. O.
6. Intramurals
7. World University Service
Two co-chairmen for Homecoming and Open House.
Two students to sit on Management Committee of Winter Sports Centre.
One male student to sit on Men's Athletic Committee and
one female to sit on Women's Athletic Committee
Four Students for the Discipline Committee.
Student  Court — Judges (5) — 2 from Law and two
alternate judges.
SUB Management Committee — 5 students.
Clerk of the Court.
If descriptions of these positions are desired please contact AMS Vice-President Room 258 SUB or AMS Secretary Room 248 SUB. Application letters should be
handed into AMS secretary before 4:30 Wednesday,
March 19th and should contain qualifications and reasons for interest in a position. Applicants will be notified as to when they will appear before a selection committee.
CUS REFERENDUM
A referendum will be held on the question of UBC's
membership in CUS on March 11th and 12th.
"Are you in favor of UBC's continued membership in
the Canadian Union of Students?"     Yes        No	
Vic over   Birds for title
It was a disastrous weekend for UBC's
rugby teams as all four teams dropped their
games. For two of the teams it was their first
loss of the season.
The big defeat was that suffered by the
Thunderbirds at the hands of the University
of Victoria Vikings, by a score of 17-3.
This was the big game of the season as
both teams had unbeaten records prior to this
game, in their quest for the Pacific Northwest
Intercollegiate Rugby Conference title.
The win left Victoria with a 5-0 record in
the round robin tournament and the Conference   title.
UBC's Coach Don Spence stated "Victoria
was definitely up for the game as they have
been for all their home games. We may have
underrated them but I feel that we have a
better team than they do."
Spence did not want to blame the referee-
ing but there were seven penalties called
against UBC inside their own 20 yard line
and no team makes that many tragic mistakes.
The Birds had two scores called back in
the first half as Victoria lead 5-0.
Although the Birds dominated the first half,
they were unable to sustain a continued drive
in the second half as the Vikings blocked every
move.
The Thunderbirds have an opportunity to
redeem themselves as they play the Victoria
All-Stars this Saturday. Some of the Vikings'
better players will make this team to provide
a much stronger Victoria team.
The frosh playing above their regular calibre of play, suffered their first loss of the season
at the hands of Victoria JV's 23-6. The Braves
also lost 6-0 as the Trojans handed them their
first loss.
Sports center grows
Sports facilities at UBC are expanding as
the Board of Governors awarded Doyle Construction Co. Ltd. a contract to build two full-
size ice rinks, two handball and four squash
courts and additional dressing room facilities.
UBC's administration made an outright
contribution of $115,829.75 to kick-off the project leaving a total of $997,364 to be paid.
This balance will be provided from past
and future operating revenues of the Sports
Centre.
The additional ice areas are designed as
twin rinks with removable divider boards
which allow the ice surfaces to be used as one
for some events, such as public skating, as an
indoor speed skating oval and for convention
and trade shows.
The new ice surface will measure 162 feet
by 185 feet.
Electrical under-slab heating will prevent
permafrost buildup and allow the ice sheet to
be used on a year round basis if required.
Normally, arenas require a three to four
month period for permafrost to melt naturally.
Use of the brine heater and a double refrigeration system will allow the ice to be taken
out and put back in at very short notice.
The Sports Centre is operated jointly by the
AMS and UBC.
SPEAKERS' COMMITTEE Presents -
TODAY-NOON
Allen
Ginsberg
■READS HIS POETRY
SUB BALLROOM - 50c
TOMORROW NOON
Professor Graham Clark
Archaeologist from Berkeley
Follower of Gordon Childe
ANGUS 110-MAR. 12
25c
MARCH 27
PAUL
KRASSNER
—editor ot Realist
HEBB THEATRE Noon 35c Tuesday, March  11,  1969
THE     UBYSSEY
Page  11
— dick button photo
SFU  GOALIE PAT CORBETT slides to block angle shot but UBC's Gerry Sarich is ready to pop
in the rebound as 'Birds romped to a  6-0 wi n Saturday.
Clan pucksters put on ice
At least UBC has one team that has very
little trouble in beating SFU.
The ice hockey Braves defeated SFU 6-0
in an exhibition game at the Winter Sport
Centre Saturday.
Had it not been for the brilliant goaltending by the Clan's Pat Corbett the score might
have been double.
The Braves played exceptional hockey for
the whole game but it was not until the final
frame that they finally started to break the
Clan defense.
After almost two scoreless periodls Ithe
Braves went ahead on a deflected goal by Ken
Lemmen.
But the Braves erupted for five unanswered
foals starting at the 17 second mark of the final
frame when Larry Watts let go a driving slap-
shot splitting Corbett's pads.
From this moment on the Braves had little
trouble as Ken Lemmen with two, Gerry Sar-
Football needs help
UBC's ailing football team is calling for
help.
The Thunderbirds, who suffered their worst
season ever this year, will be helding spring
football practice starting Monday, March 10,
at 5:00 p.m. at Wolfson field. Anybody interested in playing can pick up their strip from
1:00 today atj the stadium.
ich and Bill Cartwright all found the mark.
Fred Masuch played his usual good game as
he came up with three excellent labelled shots
thereby earning  a  well-deserved shut-out.
Meanwhile the Braves get back in their
quest for the play-off title, after defeating the
Richmond Rockets in two straight games in
he   semi-finals.
In the best out of five finals, starting on
Wednesday, the Braves will be meeting the
Hornets.
UBC girls
Canada's best
The UBC girls gymnastics team is now the
top collegiate team in Canada, after winning
the National Collegiate Gymnastic Championships  in Hamilton  over  the  weekend.
The three member team composed of Leslie Bird, Terry Cotton and Sandy Hartley
easily defeated their nearest opponents, U. of
Alberta in eight-college meet.
Not only was the first place team trophy
captured by the UBC girls, but first place in
the individual all-round events was awarded to
Sandy Hartley while Leslie Bird placed third
in this section. Both of these gymnasts were
also named to Canada's World Student Games
team.
Both Coca-Cola and Coke are registered trade marks which identify only the product of Coca-Cola Ltd.
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 1818 CORNWALL,  VANCOUVER	
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Intramural posts open
Applications are now being accepted for the following
positions within the administrative structure of the men's and
women's intramural program:
Director — men's and women's.
Assistant Director — men's and women's.
Referee-in-chief — men's and women's.
Assistant referee — men's and women's.
Co-rec Director — men's and women's.
Publicity Director — men's and women's.
Preference for these positions will be awarded to first and
second year students with:
a) an interest in the intramural program;
b) some administrative experience, not necessarily in
the area of athletics;
c) good academic standing.
These positions involve a commitment of some 10-15 hours
per week with a salary range of $150-$1,000 per academic year
depending upon position, qualifications and available budget
allocation.
Interested students are asked to apply in writing before
March 18 stating position applied for, qualifications and experience to:
Office of the Director,
School of Physical Education and Recreation,
Memorial Gymnasium, Campus.
For further information regarding the various positions call
in person to the men's intramural office, Room 308, Memorial
Gymnasium, Monday through Friday, 12:30-1:30.
MULTI MEDIA
ENCOUNTER
A Kaleidescopic, Psychedelic,
McLuhanistic Mosaic of the City
(in slides, films, tapes, artefacts and discussions.)
EMPHASIS ON   PERSONAL  INVOLVEMENT
March 11 th to 15th, 7:30 p.m.     Fee: $1.00
At University Hill United Church
5744 University Boulevard
For Information Contact The Inner-City Service Project
(874-8021)
Education Students
are invited to attend
SCHOOL DISTRICT
ORIENTATION DAY
At University of B.C.
ON MARCH 21
TO MEET REPRESENTATIVES OF
SCHOOL BOARDS OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
Watch Your Bulletin Boards For
Times And Places Of Meetings Page   12
THE     UBYSSEY
Tuesday, March 11, 1969
TODAY
NDP
Student activist, leadership candidate
John Conway, noon, SUB party room.
GERMAN   CLUB
Free film on world gymnastic championships, noon. Int. House.
THE   PIT
Open tonight 4:30 to 11:30 and Friday
4:30 to 12.
PRE-SOCIAL  WORK
Oakalla   trip  is  on,   those   going  will
be contacted.
CIASP
Spanish  conversation,  noon, SUB  117
(Room D).
CIASP
Meeting   7:30  p.m.,   SUB   105B.
PRE-SOCIAL   WORK
Organizational meeting noon, SUB
105A.
WEDNESDAY
CHORSOC
Practice     cancelled     today.     Regular
singing  March  19.  Those  with  music
but no longer singing please return it.
ARTS  II
Invisopolis, noon-4:30 and 7:30 to 11.
Blue Room, Arts I bldg.
ARTS  US
All arts students interested in discussing plans for new Arts building
and choosing student members of
clients committee. Noon AUS office
(across from Bu.  104).
LEGAL ADVICE
Free   advice   noon   Monday,   Wednesday, Friday in vice-president's office,
SUB.
POLLUTION   CONTROL
Committee meeting 8 p.m., L and M
rooms, SUB.
ONTOLOGICAL   SOCIETY
Ron Polack speaks on "You are the
Answer",  noon,  S*UB   115.
DEFFNER ON
MEDIA & SEX
THURS.,  FRI.
MARCH 13, 14
Noon H.A. 110
**ir*^"^m*™mr**m
nxvx/i
.rj-Z-Ifl
•EAT IN .TAKE OUT* DELIVERY*
PRE-LIBRARIANSHIP
Tour of library automation procedures. Meet main catalogue noon.
VIETNAM   MOBILIZATION
Film about Vietnam—'Voyage of the
Phoenix', admission 25 cents, noon,
Bu. 100.
PSYCHOLOGY   CLUB
Film on 'shyness,' election of next
year's exec, noon, Angus 24.
FRONTIER COLLEGE
FC needs laborer-teachers for summer. Film and interviews, noon Bu.
106.
CIASP
Meeting to discuss dance plans, noon,
SUB   105B.
PREMED SOCIETY
Dr. B. Maxwell on medical sociology:
"Health Care System—Prospects for
Future".   Noon, Wesbrook 201.
'tween
classes
THURSDAY
UBCSCC
Rallyette, start front of Brock, noon.
PERFORMING ARTS
Big   Miller   Blues   show,   noon,   SUB
ballroom.
HISPANIC   AND   ITALIAN   STUDIES
Prof. Edward Wilson of Cambridge
speaks on Literature and the Spanish
Inquisition,  noon,  Bu.   102.
FLYING  CLUB
Movie 'High Powered Flight*, executive elections, noon, Geol. 101.
CAMPUS   CAVALIERS
Elections noon,  SUB N (211).
HAMSOC
General meeting and elections, noon,
SUB  111.
WANTED
MUSICAL GROUPS
For Steady Weekend
Engagements
in
Downtown Night Club
Apply
Penthouse - 1019 Seymour
ANNUAL STORE-WIDE SALE
Friday, March  14—Saturday 22
CO-OP   BOOKSTORE
341 West Pender Street 685-5836
Entire Stock discounted 20%   80%
Store   hours   9:00   a.m.   -   5:30   p.m.   Monday  -   Saturday
Except 9:00 a.m.  - 9:00  p.m.  on  Fridays
set   $515
Uu?eet // OMtwAa^t
lutuu
with an infinite amount of charm - and wide enough
to look impressive on the finger. In Florentine-
finished fourteen karat yellow gold, small diamonds,
top and bottom, frame the center stone brilliantly.
The rings illustrated are exclusive Grassie
designs and must be handcrafted
Special Discount Available to Students and Faculty
&3A44&'
566 Seymour
Victoria Store
685-2271
1209 Douglas, Tel. 385-4431
3 DAYS ONLY
THURS., FRI., and SAT.
MAR. 13, 14, 15
THURS. & FRI.
12:30, 3:30, 6:00, 8:15, 10:30
SAT. 6:00, 8:15, 10:30
SUB THEATRE
They put together the strangest damned gang you ever heard of.
CLASSIFIED
RATES:  Students, Faculty & Clubs—3 lines, 1 day 750, 3 days $2.00.
Commercial—3 lines, 1 day $1.00, 3 days $2.50.
Rates for larger ads on request.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone and
are payable in advance.
Closing Deadline is 11:30 a.m. the day before publication.
Publication Office: 241 STUDENT UNION BUILDING,
UNIVERSITY OF B.C., Vancouver 8, B.C.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Dances
11
U.B.C.'s LAST COLOSSAL, CONCERT
- Dance with Poppy Family and
Wiggy Symphony, S.U.B. Ballroom,
Mar. 14, $2.00. 9 p.m.  - 1 a.m.
BTG SOUL DANCE: KING BLUE
and the Epics, Place Vanier, Pri-
day,    MarchU,9-1241.35.
IDES OF MARCH, FRI. 14-15 ALL
night dance. Floor show starts at 10
p.m. Friday. Dance starts at 11:30
p.m. Breakfast at 4:00 a.m. Saturday. Admission $1.00. At International House.  Drinks served.
Lost   &   Found
13
LOST: MEN'S PRESCR. SUNGLAS-
ses. Fri. between Chem. and Educ.
Bldgs. Phone 321-2715 after 6 or return   to  Room 1  Educ.   Bldg.
Rides  &  Car Pools
14
Special Notices
15
WHY PAY HIGH AUTO INSURANCE
Premiums? If you are age 20 or
over you may qualify. Phone Ted
Elliott   299-9422.
THE GOOD THE BAD AND THE
Ugly return Tues., Mar. 11. Advance
tickets on sale.
TRAVEL OVERSEAS ON 75c A DAY.
If you want to learn how to travel
abroad on a shoestring budget, or
need help planning your trip, make
sure you visit the Youth Hostels
Information Desk. Date: Every
Wednesday. Where: Opposite Information Desk in S.U.B. Time: 12:30-
1:30 p.m. With the Youth Hostels,
1406 West Broadway, Vancouver 9,
B.C.   Tel.:   738-9838.
MULTI MEDIA ENCOUNTER WITH
the City in slides, films, tapes, artefacts and discussions. Emphasis on
Personal Involvement. March 11th
to 15th. 7:30 p.m. Fee: $1.00, University Hill United Church, 5744 University Boulevard. 874-8021.
BIG     MILLER     BLUES      SHOW.
Thurs.    12:30    SUB   Ballroom.    50c.
THE PIT, TWO GREAT NIGHTS
planned April 2—Folk Night, April
3—Band   Night.   Don't  miss   either.
MANDALA SOUL CRUSADE — FRI-
day in SUB Ballroom — 50c — direct
from  Toronto.
Travel Opportunities
16
FLY HALF FARE WITH A YOUTH
Fare card. Good for travel on most
airlines in N. America. Valid until
your 22nd B'day. $3 a phone' call
will get you yours call Deldre Swing
Air Rep.  738-1678  evenings.
Information Wanted
17
Wanted Misc.
18
AUTOMOTIVE
Automobiles For Sale
21
1966 SUNBEAM 1725 4-DOOR SEDAN
17,800 miles one owner. Excellent
condition. Contact Geoff Matthews.
228-2181,   596-7860.
1965 VIVA EXCEL. CONDITION.
$850. Radio, 23,000 miles. Phone
Dawne 325-1494.
'61 FORD. EXCELLENT RUNNING
condition. Great for summer travel.
60,000  miles,   best  offer.   733-7452.
1963 TRIUMPH TR4. NEW TON-
ueau, new brakes. Top condition.
736-6840.
Automobiles For Sale (Cont.)    21
MERCEDES 180, 1959, WELL CARED
for, '69 plates, extra tires, $529,
876-5077 after 6 p.m.
1962 CORVAIR 6-CTL. AUTOMATIC
radio, twin carbs, low mileage, runs
well. $450. O.N.O. Ph. 224-4228.
VOLVO 142 S, 2 DR. 14,000 MI. NO
exhaust emission control, 736-7064.
Eves,   private.        	
1959     CONSUL    EXCELL.     COND.
Phone 683-6042.  Only 48,000 mi.
Automobile—Parts
23
2   W.W.    8.25-14   O.K.    TIRES    NEAR
new  first  line.   Phone  733-0062.
Motorcycles
26
100%   FINANCING
(OAC)
LOW COST  INSURANCE
NO PAYMENTS 'TIL?
SALES
SERVICE
PARTS
H
*       PERFORMANCE
I   HONDA
3712 W.  10 @ Alma
228-9077
'65 SUZUKI 80CC 5,500 MI. 150 M.P.G.
helmet included $135.00 full price.
Phone 681-2016 eves.
Photography
34
FINNEGANS WAKE—FIRST SHOW-
ing in B.C. Produced in Dublin.—
Shown March 19, SUB Aud. 12:30,
3:30, 7:00 and 9:30. Admission 75c.
Sponsored by Performing Arts Committee.
Scandals
37
BONNIE & CLYDE IS COMING. AD-
vance Tickets on sale. Don't miss it.
Adm.  50c.
MULTI MEDIA ENCOUNTERED
with the City in slides, films, tapes,
artefacts and discussions. Emphasis
on Personal Involvement. March
11th to 15th, 7:30 p.m. Fee $1.00
University Hill United Church, 5744
University   Boulevard.   874-8021.
GRADUATING SCIENCEMAN QUES-
tions his education. Wishes copy of
"Naked Poems" by Phyllis Webb.
Phone Fred   988-8532.	
SEE BIG MILLER LIVE A BIG
Blues Sound Thurs., 12:30 SUB Ballroom.   50c.
Typing (Cont.)
40
TYPIST AVAILABLE FOR EFFICI-
ent essays, reports etc., in my
home,    North   Vancouver.   988-7228.
EXPERIENCED ELECTRIC HOME
typing. Correspondence, essays, etc.
321-2102.
EXP. TYPING, REASONABLE
rates, quick service from legible
drafts. Call 738-6829 after 10:00 a.m.
to   9:00  p.m.
Help  Wanted—Female
51
Help Wanted—Male
52
FRONTIER COLLEGE NEEDS LA-
borer teachers for summer employment. Film and interviews Wednesday,  Bu.  106 noon.
Help Wanted—
Male or Female
53
Work Wanted
54
TYPIST   5   BLOCKS   FROM   GATES.
Call Mrs.  Woodward  228-8536.
INSTRUCTION
Special Classes
63
Tutoring
64
FIRST AND SECOND YEAR Science old final exams on sale. Hennings lobby, noon all this week.
M.A.    IN    ENGLISH    WILL    TUTOR
English  100.  Phone Cathy,  224-9249.
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR  SALE
71
FOR SALE BRISCOE COMBO OR-
gan, $250 or best offer. Phone
Andrzej  224-9744  room  188.	
SANSUI    STEREO   TUNER   AMPLI-
fier  must   sell.   732-5642.
VIKING AM - FM - MB RADIO 13
Trans. $85 in Oct. '68, sell for $50.
Leather case, earph.  988-5405.
RENTALS 8c REAL ESTATE
Rooms
81
LARGE FIRST FLOOR ROOM FOR
female student, beside The Village.
Come  see:   2086 Allison  Road.
Sewing &  Alterations
38
Typewriters-Rental & Rep.       39
Typing
40
'67 EPIC TAKE OVER PAYMENTS
$73/mo. 11,000 mi. Excellent shape.
$250.00.   929-1635.
EXPERT   IBM   SELECTRIC   TYPIST
Experienced essay and thesis typist.
Reasonable   Rates —  TR  4-9253
TYPING — PHONE 731-7511 — 9:00-
5:00 after 6:00 — 266-6662.	
SCIENTIFIC GRAPHICS, HIGH
calibre typing, graphs, illustrations,
and formulations. Special student
rates.   Phone   733-4506   (evenings).
Room & Board
82
ROOM AND BOARD ON CAMPUS
$85.00 a month at D.U. Fraternity
House: good food, short walk to
classes, quiet hours for study; phone
228-9389,   224-9841.
Furn.  Houses   &   Apts.
83
BACHELORETTE PAD: PRIVATE
rooms, Sauna, T.V., Stereo, Washer-
Dryer. $45.00 per month. Apply 1824
W.  16th after 6 p.m.
GRADUATE STUDENT TO SHARE
house with 3 of same. Dunbar area.
Bob   or  Ken   228-3089.
Unfurn. House & Apts.
84
WANTED: MAY 1st, 1 BR. APT.
unfurn. S.C. Kits area. Respons.
young couple. Phone 874-6678 after
5  p.m.
BUY — SELL — RENT
WITH UBYSSEY
CLASSIFIED

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