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The Ubyssey Mar 27, 1990

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Array the Ubyssey
Founded in 1918
Vancouver, B.C., Tuesday, March 27,1990
|||     Visual
(|| symphony
III        pgs 6-7
III
Vol 72, No 47
Nicaraguan students
continue struggle
by Cathy Richardson
VICTORIA (CUP)— Maria
Ramirez is the president ofthe
National Union of Nicaraguan
Students (UNEN). On March 7,
she was interviewed in Managua
by a member of an international
team of observers during the
February Nicaraguan elections.
THE 14-member coalition of
centre, right and far-left
parties, UNO, defeated the
Sandinista government in the
second fr.ee elections since the
Sandinista revolution in 1979.
The office ofthe National
Union of Nicaraguan students
lies in the barrio Colonia Miguel
Bonilla, on the outskirts of Managua. It is near the National
Nicaraguan Autonomous
University (UNAN).
On the side of the building, a
painted UNEN logo takes the
form of a rifle.
While waiting to meet Maria
Ramirez, UNEN's president, we
help students fold pamphlets
which will be distributed on various campuses.
The pamphlets announce an
emergency meeting of student
councils and declare students
will unite to defend the achievements ofthe revolution. Other
activists are busy counting
thousands of bus tokens, which
look like red poker chips. They
are given free to students—one
ofthe many benefits the Sandinistas brought to student life.
Ramirez finally arrives and
we go into her office. The light is
broken and there are no high-
tech copiers or computers. In
spite of the minimalist infrastructure, the Nicaraguan
Student Union is one of the most
effective and well organized in
the world.
They are capable of mobilizing thousands of students to
demonstrate with a few hours
notice. As well, students are one
ofthe most outspoken groups in
Nicaraguan society.
Ramirez explained she is
busy attending emergency
meetings with faculty members
and administrators. Since the
election results were announced,
there has been concern about the
future of education in Nicaragua.
Nicaraguan students elect
their representatives to UNEN
annually from the classrooms
and from the faculties (equivalent to course unions). Every two
years there are elections for the
national executive. A candidate
cannot seirve more than one term
on national executive and may
run as an independent or as a
member of a party. The last
elections returned all Sandinista
candidates to the union's
executive.
There are no tuition fees for
university students in Nicaragua. This was a major achievement ofthe 1979 Sandinista
revolution. Before that time only
select wealthy citizens had
access to university education.
Nicaragua's constitution
says 'access to education is free
and equal for all Nicaraguans.'
Students pay a nominal registration fee of approximately $2, half
of which goes to UNEN fees.
Student leaders are concerned about the new economic
policy which may come into effect
in May 1990. It is likely the new
government of the United National Opposition (UNO) will reintroduce stiff tuition fees.
Many students may not not
be able to continue their studies.
Students are also afraid the
UNO government will cut
student subsidies for living
expenses and school supplies.
As well, there will likely be
no more free bus tokens. Childcare programs are also on the list
of programs to be axed.
Many students have
made it clear they
will not let the social
conditions be pushed
back to those of the
Somoza era.	
Ramirez said the change in
government will inevitably
strengthen the student movement. Many students voted for
the UNO coalition (formed of 14
parties ranging from the communists to the far right) because
they believed there would be an
end to the war, the draft, and the
US embargo, she said.
To many students the larger
threat, to the entire social
network was unanticipated. The
present generation of students
often come from families historically denied access to any
education.
Ramirez said she believed
some students are "politically
unsophisticated" and far too
trusting of UNO.
"Although many students
voted for the UNO there will be
large demonstrations and joint
student action to defend our education system. This may be a
good political education for many
students who think that the
UNO has good intentions," said
Ramirez.
The first somber indication
of social regression is the return
of landlords from the days of
Somoza, attempting to evict
people from they land they used
to own.
Many campesinos, who. voted
for the UNO because they long
for peace and better economic
conditions, have now realized
their land and homes are in
jeopardy. These same people who
voted for the UNO have vowed to
defend their property with arms.
This may be the case with
the Nicaraguan students as well.
Many students are in the
reserves or the militia and have
made it clear they will not let the
social conditions in their country
be pushed back to those of the
Somoza era.
There are great fears this
may happen if the newly elected
president Violetta Chomorro
succeeds in reducing the army
and reinstating the National
Guard.
The Sandinista Front for
National Liberation (FSLN) was
born out of UNEN in the '70s
when a handful of students took
to the mountains to fight a
guerilla war alongside the
campesinos against Somoza's
national guard.
Today there are Sandinista
youth groups on university campuses. Although Sandinista candidates won the UNEN executive
positions with 64 per cent of the
vote, UNEN is a democratic organization. UNEN leaders fight
for the rights of all students, not
just Sandinistas.
Ramirez said there have
been no incidents of political
sabotage from opposition forces
on campus. "Once elected all
members work together to
advance the platform of the
elected body."
Ramirez said there are many
areas in which UNEN disagrees
with the educational policies of
the Sandinista government. University autonomy has been &
focal issue recently. Through a
long series of discussions with
the Education Minister great
steps were taken towards
granting individual universities
autonomy in the area of academic regulations, exams,
entrance requirements and
policy.
The biggest academic problem facing Nicaraguan universities is the lack of textbooks. In
some faculties there is one textbook for 880 students. The text is
kept by the professor and individual students have to make
copies.
The shortage is mainly a result of the U.S. economic embargo, but Ramirez said groups
such as Tools for Peace have
been helpful in sending supplies.
The federation plans to organize a worldwide drive for
textbooks. They are looking to
Canadian student associations
for help, including the University
of Victoria student council and
the Canadian Federation of
Students.
Maria Ramirez has a
message for Canadian students.
"Sadly we are a country that
must live in many years with a
war, with two U.S. invasions in
our history. And now the United
States government must fight
with us and wants to make the
revolution disappear.
"Canadian students can help
us by helping keep our revolution
alive. Students can do many
things. More concretely you can
help us with our book campaign.
In Nicaragua we make duo-
copies with ink run-offs. I have
confidence that we will have
student solidarity now and in the
future. We think we can have
peace and in this peace we v/ill
fight to have the FSLN in
government." CLASSIFIEDS 228-3977
Classified Advertising
RATES: AMS Card Holden - 3 linet, $3.00, additional lines 60 cents,
commercial -3 lines, $5.00, additional lines 75 cents. (10% Discount on
25 issues or more) Classified ads payable in advance. Deadline 4.-00
p.m,. two days before publication. Room 266, SUB, UBC, Van^ B.C. V6T
2A7, 228-3977.
11-FOR SALE
IBM XT 40MB 360K floppy, monochrome.
$950, 224-5043.
20 - HOUSING
VACANCIES ARE AVAILABLE for the
remainder of the 1989-90 academic year.
For farther information, please contact the
Housing Office, 2071 West Mall or call 228-
2811.
N/S FEMALE TO SHARE WITH one
other, main floor furn. house. 1 bedroom
avail. W/D FP, lge. kit Call Lorea 254-8983.
NEEDED FOR MAY 1ST. lor 2 bedroom
apt. for quiet couple; if you know of one,
please call 734-7460 Brian or Marie.
MA_N/3 3RD, 2 BDR. SUITE in new house.
N/pets, N/S, $660 incl. utilities. Avail. April
1st, 433-6655,590-7462 days.	
MONTREAL, 3 BDR. to sublet May 1 - Aug
31st with option to renew. Close to McGill.
Call (514) 284-6833.
PENTICTON TEACHING COUPLE
SEEKS APT. or house to sublet for UBC
summer session. July/mid-August. Near
Univ. Dates Flexible. References. Call
Duncan Millar H4932731 W4925646.
SHARED ACCOMMODATION, brand
new, 2 bdr. apt. nr. ALRT, 2 bath $400/mo.
incl. utilities, 1 child OK. Call 873-3735 or
432-9330. Adele.
ARTS STUDENT WANTED! Share
friendly 3 bdr. apt. Kerrisdale by beautiful
park. Avail, now. Grand piano, French
Harpsicord. $300 inc.   Eric 263-6314.
UBC AREA, bright 2 bdr. mainfloor, newly
renovated, Cp, solarium, dish washer,
shared w/d. Avail. Apr. 1st $975, ph. 224-
1123.
25 ■ INSTRUCTION
THE PRINCETON REVIEW - LSAT prep
course. Class limited to 10 students. Book
now for May/June course, 261-2470.
STUDENTS INTERESTED IN EARNING LOOTS this summer with our home
Between
Deadline for submissions: for
Tuesday's paper is Friday at
3:30PM, for Friday's paper is
Wednesday at 3:30pm. LATE
SUBMISSIONS WILL NOT BE
TUESDAY, MAR. 27
Narcotics Anonymous. A fellowship of men & women for whom
drugs have become a major problem. Members meet regularly to
help each other stay clean. 12:30
-2:00 p.m. (24 hr. help-line 873-
1018). Room 311 (main floor -
through the lab medicine door).
U.B.C. Hospital (main entrance).
Biological Sciences Society (Bio-
Soc). Presentation by Dr. A.M.
Perles on "Of Fish and Fetuses".
Noon. Biology Building Room
2449.
Lutheran Student Movement.
Co-op Supper. 5:30 p.m., Lutheran Campus Centre.
Food Bank for students in need!
Call 737-10fi9 to reserve a bag of
groceries, or just show up! Sponsored by Intervarsity Christian
Fellowship & Kitsilano Christian
community. 7-9p.m., SUB211.
mailing program. For complete how to instructions, send $10 to Income Options P.O.
Box 48808 Dept. 177 Bentall Ctr. Vancouver, B.C. V7X 1A6.
30 - JOBS
ELEPHANT STUDENT PAINTERS
Now Hiring for Manager positions for summer "90. Top summer earnings $10,000+.
Learn valuable business and management
skills. Phone 685-8066.
TSUGA FORESTRY CONTRACTORS is
looking for healthy, ambitious individuals
for summer treeplanting in N. B.C. and Alta.
In business for 11 years - exclusively planting. Camp facilities & equip. 1st class.
Campfees $17/d. (compare with other companies at $20-25/d.). A company committed
to planters. Don't choose just any company,
come and check us out. Applications available at Can. Employment Centre - Brock
Hall. Experience preferred.	
BOONDOCKS RESTAURANT in Point
Roberts looking for cooks & waiters for now
& summer. Must be U.S. citizen or have a
green card. Phone Moe (206) 945-5422.
DUSSO-S ITALIAN DELI, Granville Island Market F/t & p/t positions open &
summer employment Apply with resume's
or phone 685-5921.
EARL'S IS LOOKING for proud & professional Waiter/Waitresses, Hosts/Hostesses,
Line Cooks, Prep Cooks for full & p/t positions. Exp. is not necessary. Apply between
9-11 a.m. & 2-5 p.m. daily 303 Marine Dr.
North Vancouver, B.C.
EARN $7-10 PER HOUR painting for College Pro Painters this summer - call 879-
4105 or pick up applic. at UBC Employment
Centre.	
SUMMER WORK FOR STUDENTS!
Make $2575/mth & gain mktg/mgmt experience valued by P+G, IBM, Xerox, etc. 70% +
above preferred. For more info, call 433-
1047.
TRIPLE "A" STUDENT PAINTERS now
accepting applications for painters and foremen. Good wages. Roger, 263-8088.
URGENTLY NEEDED 10 P/T, 10 F/T.
Ask for Winn. Call 731-4108.
Inter Varsity Christian Fellowship. Prayer Meeting - come meet
friends and find support and encouragement. Everyone welcome.
Join us for cinnamon buns in the
SUB Cafeteria afterwards. 7:30
a.m., SUB 211.
PRISM International (Creative
Writing Department) Performance by Festival Recorder recording artist Attala the Stockbroker.
$4 at door. Noon, Freddie Wood.
Greater Vancouver Mental
Health. Meetingfordeafandhard
of hearing students, staff, faculty
requesting input on development
of support services. Noon,
Woodward Instructional Resource
Centre, Rm. 414.
Jewish Students' Association/
Hillel. Famous Hot Lunch. Noon,
Hillel House.
New Infl Development Service
Organization organizational
meeting. Everyone welcome, especially members of Amnesty
Int., WUSC, IDC, African Students Assoc., SFSA, and Tools for
Peace. Please see John Lipscomb
SUB 258 if you can't make it.
Noon, SUB 260.
Department of Creative Writing.
Playwright Carol Bolt, author of
"One Night Stand", reading.
Noon, Buchanan Penthouse.
SPORTS STAFF needed to work varsity
football, basketball, & volleyball games
Sept 1/90 - Mar. 15/91. $7/hr. Pick up
applications in Room 208, War Memorial
Gym. App. deadline Apr. 5. Any questions
call Doug at 228-3917.
REQUIRED  EXPTJ  PERSON  for  the
Delly. SUB Lower concourse. Summer-time
to 8tart possibly mid-April.
ARE YOU LOOKING FOR A
PROFESSIONAL JOB?
Here's a wonderful and exciting opportunity to
earn and learn in Japan for one year after graduation. Aeon, with 150 branch schools is looking
for English Conversation Instructors in Japan.
Minimum Ba/Bs degree (all majors considered).
Teaching experience and/or Japanese language
helpful, but not required. Information is available at your Campus Employment Centre.
Please send resume and one page essay, "Why I
Want to Live and Work in Japan" to:
AEON Inter-Cultural Corporation
Suite 1070, 475 W. Georgia Street
Vancouver, B.C. VSB 4M9
(604)684.-000
We also look for STUDENTS interested in:
a. SUMMER STUDY PROGRAM IN JAPAN
with homestay
b. AN OFFICE ASSISTANT position	
PAINTING IS BORING
PLANTING IS TOUGH
We need installers for underground sprinkler systems
this *summer.
Wages: $8.00 Workers
$10.00 Foremen
Jobs available ""throughout the
Lower Mainland, Okanagan,
Prince George.
Car an asset. We train.
Call 681-5664 TODAY
STUDENT SPRINKLER
SERVICES
GRADUATING STUDENT WANTED for
p/t (leading to Ct) estimator for steel manufacturing co. located in Richmond. Wages
negotiable. Call 590-8200.
LAGOON RESTAURANT Richmond is
looking for p/t servers, bartender, exp. an
asset but not essential. Will train. Phone
Joanne or Stanley at 270-9492 after 3pm.
FREE INFORMATION on 17 ways to get
rich! Some can be done from home. Phone
261-8674 or send a self-addressed stamped
envelope to Anderson-Wright Corp. 2942 W.
41st Ave. Vancouver, B.C.   V6N3C7.
SUMMER JOB, student required for ladies
fashion retail store on West 10th Ave. F/T
position from May-end of August Must
have some retail exp. and an interest in
fashion. Apply with resume at Lisa B, 4458
W. 10th Ave.
Intervarsity Christian Fellowship. Food bank for students-call
737-1069 to reserve a bag of groceries or just who up - everybody
welcome! Sponsored by Kitsilano
Community church - Intervarsity
Christian Fellowship! 7:00-9:00.
SUB 211.
WEDNESDAY. MAR. 28
UBC Marxist-Leninist Study
Group. Discussion: Marxism-
Leninism today. 7 p.m., BUCH
D225.
Department of Creative Writing.
Playwright, Paul Ledoux, author
of The Electrical Man", and
"Fire". Reading, noon, Buchanan
Penthouse.
Jewish Students' Association/
Hillel. Torah Study Group. Noon,
Hillel House.
Student Health Outreach. Bicycle
and Motorcycle Safety Awareness.
Reps from the RCMP, West Point
Cycle, Bike Alert, Rhino Enterprise and Rocky Mountain. 11
a.m. - 2 p.m., SUB Concourse.
Student Health Outreach. Bicycle
Trials Demo by Rocky Mountain
rep. sponsored by Student Health
Outreach. ll:30-l:30pm, Outside
SUB - South side.
Women's Studies at U.B.C. Information and advising session.
12:30-2:00pm, Buchanan, D114.
PAINTERS - FOREMAN. Exp. an asset,
$8-14/hr. depending on exp. and position.
Call Maurice 983-2512.
ALUMNI PAINTERS req. Production
Manager. Approx. $3,000/mo. need previous
paint manager exp. Call 983-2512.
50 - RENTALS
TYPEWRITER RENTALS $29/month,
Free delivery and pick up. All recent electric
models. Call 682-1535.
 60 - RIDES	
NEED RIDE TO  TUMBLER  RIDGE,
B.C. late April. Phone 228-9666. Keith.
70 - SERVICES
RESUMES IN ONE HOUR
Expanded Type for Titles
Doreen 683-1335
TYPING 24 HOUR SERVICE. Essays,
papers, tapes-cassettes TRANSCRIBED.
Editing, proofing optional. 224-2310 any
time.
WORD PROCESSING
$2.50/dbl. sp. page. APA, MLA, CMS
COMPUTERSMITHS 3726 West
Broadway (At Alma). 224-5242.
ON CAMPUS WORD PROCESSING
Typeityou__elf...8implifiedin8tr_ctions,
spell check, and laser printer make your
work look topquality. $7/hr. and 15 cents/
page. Friendly help always available.
SUB lower level, across from Tortellini's
Restaurant; 228-5496.
ON CAMPUS LASER PRINTING
Worked hard on your term paper? Why
not give it the professional touch and print
it on a laser printer. Print from a MAC or
PC. Do it yourself and save. $6.00/hr. plus
$.25/page. Top quality bond (thesis) paper; friendly staff. Personal Computing
Production centre, CSCI Rm. 209F; 228-
3050. Monday to Friday 8:30 - 4:30.
ON CAMPUS WORD PROCESSING
Need the professional touch? ... have it
done for you - you can even book ahead.
$27/hr., 6-8 double spaced pages of normal text per hour, laser printer. SUB
lower level, across from Tortellini's Restaurant; 228-5640.
75 - WANTED
VOLUNTEERS - Healthy non-smoking
Caucasian males (19 - 25 yrs.) needed for
antiarrhythmic drug study - mexiletine.
Blood, saliva and urine samples are collected over 72 hrs. $70 honorarium paid.
Info, please call Dr. McErlane 228-4451 or
Mr. Kwok 228-5838 at Pharmacy Faculty,
UBC.	
NEED TRAVELLING COMPANION for
trip to South Asia this summer. If interested
phone Russ at 224-9742.
ARTISTS
Want to display your own works
at popular delly on Denman Street?
Contact Todd at
BIG CITY DELLY
1005 Denman St
682-5788
80 - TUTORING
EXPERIENCED ENGLISH Ph.D. student will edit your MS or thesis for spelling,
grammar and general style, 536-5137.
85 - TYPING
PROFESSIONAL TYPIST, 30 years exp.,
word processing/typing. Student rates.
Dorothy Martinson, 228-8346.
THURSDAY. MAR. 29
U.B.C. Scottish Country Dance
Club. Practice & meeting - all
welcome-note new room. 7:30-9
p.m. SUB 125.
Creative Writing Department.
Author George Szanto, author of
"Not Working" and "The Underside of Stoves", will be reading
and giving informal discussion on
his work. Noon, Creative Writing
Reading Room, BUCH E458.
WORD PROCESSING, laser printer - thesis, reports, manuscripts (WordPerfect,
MSWord). $2/pg ds. Jeeva's Word Processing 876-5333, 201-636 W. Broadway.
TYPING QUICK. Rightby UBC. All kinds,
editing, $1.50 pg. dspc. 228-8989.
QUALITY word processing laser printers,
studentrates. Phone Agnes 734-3928 Linda
736-5010.
WORD WEAVERS/THE TRANSLATION DESK - We are experts in thesis and
essay preparation. Is your resume ready for
a job interview? Good turnaround time,
comp. rates. We are also accredited translators in mostmajorlanguages. Conveniently
located in Kerrisdale, 5660 Yew at 41st Call
us at 266-6814 or 263-7117 Facsimile 266-
6867.
TYPING BLUES? Term papers professionally prepared. Your hard work deserves
to look its best U Need our service. 272-
4995.	
ON CAMPUS, quick, quality word processing. English, French, Spanish, graphs,
Desktop 224-3675.
EXPERIENCE, accurate, fast for essays,
term papers, reports, etc. 943-1582 or 943-
1091.
EXPERIENCED TYPIST - 30 YRS, $1.00
an edited page Mrs. Aeneid M. Tait
732-0204
Jewish Students' Association/
Hillel. Hebrew Classes. Noon,
Hillel House.
U.B.C. Lesbians. Discussion
group. Topic: planning for the
summer. Noon, SUB Rm 130.
History Department Colloquium.
Talk: "The Sex Which Does Prevail: Male Sexual Disguise and
Social Revolution in 18th Century
Britain," Fraser Easton, Killam
Fellow. 1:00-2:15pm, Buchanan
Tower, 1206/1207.
Summer
Employment
Education Students: A challenging, career related
position as a Curriculum Development Officer is available
for a 4th or 5th year student.
We're a Crown Corporation with annual sales of half a
billion dollars and are located in the Richmond area. Your
challenge will be to develop a comprehensive curriculum
for our retailer education program.
You must possess courses in curriculum development,
have excellent writing skills and have Macintosh or MS
Dos experience.
This full time temporary position (May 1 - August 30)
provides excellent salary and working conditions.
Competion #350.608
P.O. Box 94210
Richmond, B.C.
V6Y 2A3
2/THE UBYSSEY
March 27,1990 NEWS
Students
bashed by
brokers
MONTREAL (CUP)—University students were arrested by the
busload at the Montreal Stock
Exchange last Tuesday amid allegations that brokers attacked
them, started fistfights and broke
a chair over one student's head.
Two students were taken to
hospital, bleeding from the nose
and ears.
Montreal constable Jacques
Patenaude said 178 had been
charged with trespassing with intent to cause mischief, failing to cooperate with police, "and possibly
one or two with assault." Patenaude said more students will be
charged.
The students' lawyer says 280
were hauled in. No brokers were
arrested.
"Traders pushed the students
back. They were incredibly violent—I didn't see it, but someone
told me one guy attacked with a
chair. Everybody was eating
knuckle sandwiches," said Montreal radio journalist Philippe
Marquis, who joined the protest
and was arrested.
A group of 350, mostly Universite de Montreal students, went to
the exchange to ask business to
pay a one per cent tax on earnings
to go toward university education.
The action was in response to
Quebec's recent doubling of tuition
fees.
Marquis said the students
climbed up to the fourth floor stock
exchange offices on Rene Levesque
Blvd. just before the 4:30 closing
time.
Fifty students actually made
it onto the trading floor after two
students, disguised in three-piece
suits, opened the doors for the rest.
"It provoked the rage ofthe traders," Marquis said.
The students were pushed
back, joining their colleagues' sit-
in in the lobby. Marquis said police in full riot gear arrived within
ten minutes. A few escaped down
emergency exits, the rest were
arrested.
The students filled paddy
wagons and two city transit
buses. It took an hour to unload
them at the central police station
in Old Montreal.
Marquis said he expects a
municipal court summons in four
months. By 9:30 p.m., 58 students
had been processed and released,
according to the students' lawyer.
"It's fascist," said a shaken
Andre Gagnon, president of the
UQAM arts and literature students association. "It's the first
time in the Quebec student movement that massive arrests were
made.
"The actions are really disturbing the patronat (business
leaders). It's very significant,"
said Gagnon. "It doesn't bother
them when people quit university
but when we put our feet in their
temples, they get mad. For them,
education of the people is not
important, money is everything."
About 1000 students
marched in Montreal March 18th
to protest Quebec education min-
inster Claude Ryan's plan to raise
university tuition fees 130 per
cent over the next two years.
College and university student associations representing
about 90,000 students are on
strike this week to protest the
planned hikes which would take
effect in September.
Cascade of plastic. Bottled water served to Globe '90 delegates with no
plans for recycling the plastic. Many of the companies at the conference
"are the people who will benefit from pollution" said Robin Round from
UBC's Student Environment Centre who collected 250 of the bottles to
create this Installation. Photo essay page 8. rebecca bishop photo
Engineering reps huddle during Student Court.
REBECCA BISHOP PHOTO
Prosecutors want fine
by Nicholas lonides
Prosecution rested Monday
evening at student court during
the case against the Engineering
Undergraduate Society (EUS) for
their March 14 nEUSlettre.
The nEUSlettre has been
charged with containing racist,
sexist, and homophobic material.
Natives Alan Price and Daren
Winegarden, UBC law students
who are prosecutors for the case,
said the publication is discriminatory on the basis of race, gender,
and sexual orientation.
Prosecution has asked the
"EUS be overseen by the AMS
[Alma Mater Society] for one year
and fined $16,000," said Price after court.
The $16,000 fine would be
"spent on programs and actions
that promote tolerance as opposed
to fostering hatred and discrimination," said Price.
"We also asked that the court
amend the EUS constitution to
include a definition and a prohibition of discrimination."
Prosecution also asked court
to recommend the EUS pay the
fine instead of having the $32,000
EUS fund withheld.
But in the President's
(Strangway's) Report to Senate
dated March 21, it is written, I
have "instructed that the collection of fees for EUS shall be
stopped immediately and that
publication of all EUS material be
halted until there is a commit- ,
ment to abide by its own policies."
The President's report said, "I
am directing the student discipline committee to develop recommendations." "In doing so, I am
asking them to consider suspension of those students directly
involved."
Price said they [prosecution]
have recommended that there be
no expulsion but, "we do support
the eight month suspension."
"Right now, we are only dealing with the (EUS)," said Price.
Student court will reconvene
on Thursday at 12:00p.m. to deal
with the EUS.
At 3:30p.m. disciplinary proceedings will be heard against
EUS members Martin J. Sikes,
Heiko Epkens and Eva Marie
Wehrhahn.
Court adjourns for lack of defense
by Franka Cordua-von Specht
An act of generosity by student court yesterday saved the
Engineering Undergraduate Society from testifying in defence of
the nEUSlettre and postponed the
trial until Thursday.
After the prosecution presented their case against the controversial newsletter, the five
judges ofthe court decided to stay
the case when the defense said
they could not proceed without
legal counsel.
B.C. Civil Liberties Association president John Dixon, who
was present at the trial, criticized
the manner in which it has been
handled so far.
"It's a good thing they recessed until defence could contact
legal representation," said Dixon.
"But legal representation should
have been present to hear the case
first hand."
According to the AMS
Constitution, each member of the
society is entitled to be defendedin
court by an active member of the
AMS.
At the outset of the hearing
the three engineers who comprised the defence asked the court
to delay the trial until they could
seek legal advice.
The prosecution and court
initially rejected the request, citing an AMS by-law which states
that any motion to adjourn a trial
must be received by the court 24-
hours in advance.
Clerk of the court Jessica
Mathers said, "Rules provide they
should present their reasons for
not being prepared to proceed a
day before the hearing."
She said the engineers were
informed on Wednesday of their
right and were advised to seek
legal counsel. "They did not call a
lawyer until today (Monday)."
Former EUS president Skott
Kent said he only found out he was
subpoenaed on Friday. He said,
"We contacted our lawyers who
were unavailable on the weekend.
Today was the first day we could
meet with them."
The court's explanation of
their initial decision, however,
found no sympathy with Dixon.
He said, "I was surprised
court was so quick to reject a motion for adjournment since defense
clearly was without representation."
Dixon said he did not understand how court could have proceeded knowing that the defence
had difficulty securing legal counsel.
But according to EUS president Darren Sanders, UBC legal
continued on page 8
Food war rages on
by James Dolan
In a late reaction to a petition
signed by incensed Totem Park
residents, UBC Food Services
decided yesterday evening to pull
their budget proposal from the
agenda for today's board of governors' meeting.
Totem park residents, however, are fed up with UBC Food
Services and will continue to take
action against the proposed $400
price increase for food at Totem
Park residence.
The Totem Park Residence
Association (TPRA) executive
council estimates over 600 residents have signed the petition
opposing the increase. The petition was sent yesterday morning
to the board of governors, demanding action from the board.
"It's a crock," said TPRA
president Justin Meilkem. "Food
Services are trying to ram uneces-
sary 'conveniences' down our
throatsi. I'd rather have the $400 in
my pocket."
Food Services originally
planned to use the extra $400 from
each resident to expand the current meal plan in operation at
Totem.
This expanded plan would
allow the students to use their
meal cards at the SUBWAY cafeteria, Magda's, a small canteen in
Totem, as well as the current Totem Park cafeteria.
TPRA vice-president Sabrina
Gill objects to the lack of student
input on the proposal. "We never
asked for these changes. We're
furious about the complete lack of
student input. Hopefully, well get
enough response to make Food
Services scrap the plan. We're
going to fight this all the way."
TPRA also accuses food services of using "bully tactics" to pressure Cam McNeil into giving token approval to the plan. McNeil
was TPRA President at the time of
the proposal's construction.
"I wouldn't exactly say it was
signed under duress, but there is a
general feeling that Cam was
forced into giving approval to the
proposal," Meilkem said.
continued on page 8
March 27,1990
THE UBYSSEY/3 -<j-tfE -5>.
V^E  \
S3? ANNUAL $2?
GENERAL MEETING
Friday, March 30,1990 - 3:30
Graduate Student Centre
Free Beverage for First 100!
Agenda A
1. Intro of New Executive
2. Financial Statements
3. Report from Council
4. Auditor's Report
5. Replacement of Auditor
6. Constitutional and By-Law Amendments
7. Poetry Recitation
Agenda B
1. Peter Huron Jazz and Blue - 5 pm
2. Hot Food in the Fireside - 6 pm
3. Los Tropicos Reggae and Calypso - 9 pm
Oh, did we mention free beverage,
wink, wink.
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We invite you in to see our fast, efficient crew in action.
Come in and pick up our 8 slice -12" Pepperoni Pizza'
(or any 1 item pizza of your choice) - for only $5.95.
Additional items only $1.00.
No coupon necessary.
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Offer expires 10 June 1990.
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after 9:00 p.m.
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EAST RICHMOND
OPEN FOR LUNCH
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Now Hiring Delivery Drivers and
Management Staff.
Xinhua special
by Hao LI and Joe AKwasser
The Canadian national volleyball team dealt the Chinese
national squad their fourth defeat
in as many matches.
Saturday night at War Memorial Gym, the Canadians won by
scores of 13-1515-1115-615-9 in a
match that took 89 minutes to
play.
In the first match, the Chinese led from start to finish and
never gave the Canadian team an
opportunity to exercise their superior size.
The second match was a seesaw affair with the Canadians
going out to an early 10-3 lead only
to see it swallowed up by a combative Chinese squad who evened the
score at 11. The Chinese comeback was squashed and the Canadians held on to win 15-11.
The match broke the Chinese
team's spirit and the remaining
two matches took just over 30
minutes to complete.
Canadian player, Randy Gingera, was outstanding and delivered a number of deadly serves
and spikes, taking advantage of
the weaker Chinese blocking.
The Canadian coach said his
team played a steady game. The
difference between the two teams
was the Canadian team blocked
better due to their size advantage.
The Chinese coach Yu You
Wei said his team did not play as
well as they could have because
some team members were injured.
The main aim of this tour in Canada was to prepare for the upcoming Asian games this fall.
For the Chinese team, Vancouver is the fourth stop on their
tour and they have played previously in Calgary, Edmonton, and
Victoria, all of which were Canadian victories.
Although the match was publicized very little on campus, there
was a strong contingent of mainland Chinese students in attendance.
At the end of the match trophies for most valuable players
were awarded to Canadian player
Randy Gingera and to Chinese
player Cao Mao Wen.
ONE HOUR
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4/THE UBYSSEY
March 27,1990 Rare glimpse of coke addicts ritually prostrating themselves.
DON MAH PHOTO
Scullers scull skillfully
by Sandra Stephanson
UBC rowers fared well at the
UBC/VRC Spring Invitational
Regatta against formidable competition from the University of
Victoria, Western Washington
University and Simon Fraser
University this past weekend.
The UBC rowing birds pulled
off two first place finishes in the
women's junior varsity/lightweight eight race and the men's
junior varsity/lightweight four
plus coxswain.
In brilliant sunshine and with
a slight afternoon head wind, the
UBC lightweight women's eight
rowed a strong and steady final,
pulling away from WWU in the
last 600m ofthe 2000m race.
Coxswain Sharon Spinder
said, "We really pulled together,
Fm really happy with our performance and that we were able to finally beat these crews."
UBC's winning time of
7:39:08 was a decisive six seconds
before WWU and 11 seconds
ahead ofthe UBC women's junior
varsity crew.
The junior varsity/lightweight men's four plus cox race
was easily won by the UBC crew
over an inexperienced novice crew
from SFU.
Both UBC's men and women
had to contend with the super
rowing power of UVic, who walked
away with victories in the men's
and women's heavy eight races.
The UBC women's heavy
eight settled for second place—ten
seconds out of contention.
"Our goal was to beat U. Vic
and unfortunately it didn't happen. We had a strong start. We're
working on getting faster for next
weekend's race in Victoria," said
varsity rower Suzanne Flemming.
The varsity heavyweight
men's eight finished third, nine
seconds off WWU and 17 seconds
behind the veteran U Vic crew.
The annual pilgrimage to the
San Diego Crew Classic Regatta
has been postponed indefinitely
for UBC rowers.
They will have to settle for
competing in the Oregon State
University and University of Victoria Dual Regatta to be held
March 31st and April 1st in Victoria.
UBC athletes honoured
Capping off her third
straight all-Canadian season,
UBC soccer captain Mitch
Ring was awarded the Marilyn Pomfret trophy as UBC's
most outstanding female athlete and the Kay Brearley
award for exceptional service
to UBC women's athletics.
Ring had another outstanding season as centre
back, leading the tough Canada West conference in scoring for the second year in a
row. She was named a Canada
West All-star for the fourth
time, all-Canadian for the
third, and was selected as a
member of Canada's national team.
In the men's category,
UBC football tight-end Tom
Vlasic has been awarded the
Bobby Gaul trophy as UBC's
most outstanding graduating male athlete. Vlasic
caught 133 passes for 1961
yards and 11 touchdowns
during his five seasons at
UBC.
APPLY NOW!
SUB OFFICE SPACE,
LOCKERS &
PARKING SPACES
All AMS Clubs and Service Organizations
may apply for the above in the Student
Union Building. Application forms and
information available at SUB 238.
Deadline: Friday, March 30, 1990.
Due to limited space,
late applications will
not be accepted.
NEEDED!
Yo   Ubyssey
past   &. present
staffers:
THE   UBYSSEY
YEAR-END  BANQUET
IS  APRIL   6.
(More   details
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INTERPRETING
through part-time evening studies at
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To receive an information guide
call VCC Continuing Education Langara Campus
324-5322
CLOSEST BYCYCLE SHOP TO UBC
RED TAG
SALE DAYS
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WE ALSO HAVE A FULLY STOCKED SERVICE DEPARTMENT.
TIME TO PARTY!
at
Every Wednesday is Student Night
free admission to the club with student ID
Rock with
DAWN PATROL
932 GRANVILLE 684-7699 doors open 7pm, get here early
Make money and have fun. If you want to raise
money for your club, charity or team, the Roxy
has a great idea.
Call Blaine at 684-7699
March 27,1990
THE UBYSSEY/5 AMS
Nominations are now being accepted for the
position of summer project co-ordinator
dealing with issues of discrimination on our
campus. Please submit proposal(s) with the
applications.
Pick up applications in room 238 of the SUB.
For more info call Johanna Wickie at 228-3092
Applications due: Wed. March 28,1990.
ORACE $ PASSION. 1
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7:00 p.m. Eucharistk Celebration
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6/THE UBYSSEY
March 27,1990 THE UBC BOOKSTORE
WILL BE
ANNUAL INVENTORY
a
BOOKSTORE
6200 University Boulevard • 228-4741
ANMVF-.RSARY
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Our Playing Season Runs May to Oct., and with
four seniorteams, two juniorand one over35's
we have something for everyone. We offer
qualified coaching, annual tours and social
events.
Seasonal/Temporary Employment
Opportunities
through Personnel Services Referal
In Edmonton Contact:
KEN EXTON
Druids RFC Recruiting Director
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Ph: 464-1768
FAX: 929-5865
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ARE YOU A BUSINESS MANAGER
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Our Victoria based client is seeking a self-
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This Victoria based position offers a starting salary
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package and has excellent advancement
opportunities. Negotiable starting date.
Respond in confidence to:
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March 27,1990
THE UBYSSEY/7 HERE COMES THE SUN!
a
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7 - PIECE REGGAE,
CALYPSO BAND
FRIDAY, MARCH 30, 9PM
BANQUET ROOM
GRADUATE STUDENT CENTRE
TIX $2.00 ADVANCE
$3.00 DOOR
Some of Canada's best accounting minds
are in the insurance industry.
If vou have an interest in accounting, why not consider
a career with Canada's property/casualty, or general
insurance industry? In fact, the industry offers a wider
variety of career choices than you ever imagined.
Accountants yes, but also systems analysts, lawyers,
managers, loss prevention engineers, investment
specialists, investigators, marine underwriters, aviation
adjusters and many more. The choice is yours.
General insurance is also an industry that encourages
you to acquire its own levels of professionalism.
As a Fellow or Associate of The Insurance Institute of
Canada, you would join an educated, experienced
and ethical group of professionals equipped to pursue
successful careers at the local, provincial, national or
even international level.
Choice, challenge, satisfaction and security. They
are just some ofthe rewards you'll enjoy through a
career in the property/casualty insurance industry.
For more information, contact Les Dandridge,
B.A., AIIC at The Insurance Institute of Canada,
481 University Avenue, 6th floor, Toronto, Ontario
M5G 2E9 (416) 591-1572 Fax: (416) 591-1678.
Canada's Insurance Professionals
The Graduates of The Insurance Institute of Canada.
Robin Round sees plastic world
REBECCA BISHOP PHOTO
No defense
continued from page 3
clinic did not take their case because it presented "a conflict of
interest."
No representatives of the
UBC legal clinic could be reached
for comment.
Dixon said it was outrageous
that the EUS's request to seek
legal counsel from UBC legal clinic
Friday was rejected.
"Everyone has the right to a
fair defence," he said. "Adequate
representation is the bedrock procedural right ofthe system."
Chief justice of student court
John Anderson said court reconsidered their initial decision to
adjourn after the engineers told
court they were not ready to proceed with their defense.
He added that the delay has
given the EUS an advantage in
preparing their defence because of
the decision to let the prosecution
proceed yesterday.
Totem war
continued from page 3
TPRA asked Food Services to
speak to the residents of Totem
Park about the plan, but Food
Services refused, saying written
opposition to the proposal would
be more effective.
Members of Food Services
have been unavailable or have
refused to comment on the student's opposition to the proposal.
According to student BoG
representative Tim Bird, Food
Services will instead present their
budget proposal at the May 25
board meeting after consulting
Totem Park residents.
* * ^   *
8/THE UBYSSEY
March 27,1990 LETffBS
"Could that
someone be
Brecht the red..."
In the past month two plays
of Brecht have been set on stage
at the Vancouver universities:
The Good Woman of Ssu-Chuan
at Simon Fraser University, and
HeiT Puntilla and His Servant
Matti at UBC. What can be the
reasons why Brecht is being
shown at University theaters? Is
Brecht now a "classic" playwright
to be analyzed to death by academics?
Brecht planned and wrote
his short stories, poems, and
plays to let workers know how
power was being wielded and
used by bosses to opress them.
Brecht's theatre does not intend
to pireach about exploitation and
pretends to save the exploited by
making platonic statements, but
makes everyone in the audience
become a critical spectator ofthe
events unfolding on stage.
Brecht's epic theatre is more than
entertainment.
What is Brecht doing at the
University? Have the scholars
taken Brecht out ofthe context of
class struggle and fossilized him
in the academic world where a
few experts will decide what are
the right (socially acceptable)
and wrong (socially deplorable)
ways to interpret Brecht's works?
This could well be the case. Nonetheless this would be the least
dangerous ofthe consequences of
taking Brecht out ofthe popular
theatre and secluding him into
the places where those in power
educate and entertain themselves.
Both The Good Woman of
Ssu-Chuan and Herr Puntilla
and His Servant Matti were presented as entertaiment, Brecht
without the critical edge, without
offending the burgeois. Nice images, no content.
The Good Woman of Ssu-
Chuan emphasized, for reasons
that were never made clear to
anyone, Shan-Te's passion for a
pilot that is after the money her
tobacco shop holds. This obscured
the main message of the play, a
capitalist cannot be a good person
and run a succesful business at
the same time, profit and kindness are mutually exclusive. The
Good Woman of Ssu-Chuan also
presented us with stereotypes of
water sellers, barbers, prostitutes, pilots, servants, mothers.... Isn't there enough imagination left at universities to look
at the world in new and interesting ways, instead of using the
shallow and boring representations that TV provides us?
Herr Puntilla and His Servant Matti was better produced,
and closer to the Brecht spirit
that I enjoy. Nonetheless it was
mostly an entertainment play
where emphasis was in good acting and good music and not in
critical thinking. Both plays
remained somehow critical of
society's afflictions not because of
the directing and acting, but in
spite of it and thanks to Brecht's
extraordinary talent.
Is this the direction in which
North American University theatre is heading in the 1990's? It is
hard to believe that "world class"
universities can't do better at
staging Brecht than presenting
him as pure entertainment.
As an analytical tool Brecht's
theatre makes power and its uses
explicit to its audiences. With
this audiences can understand
power and its manipulations and
break power relationships and
promote equality. Unfortunately
this tool is a two-edged sword.
Those who yield power might be
yielding in unconsciously, without realizing the full implications
March 27,1990
of its reaches. If power wielders
analyze power intimately in the
way that Brecht presents it they
will understand and use it more
fully. I believe that this is the
worst consequence of showing
Brecht in power elite circles as
simple entertainment.
horacio de la cueva
Graduate Studies
Reader disagrees
I am saddened by the heartless attitude reflected in the letter by Jeremy Cooperstock that
appeared in last Friday's Ubyssey. He concludes that the
women who worked together to
produce the Tuesday, March 13
issue of The Ubyssey, which was
dedicated to women's issues and
eloquently succeeded in enlightening many readers about strategies for overcoming the unfortunate barriers that alienate the
two genders from each other,
were merely concocting a "witty
satire."
It is tragic and shameful that
anyone should find funny the oppression and suffering of women.
His suggestion that these
women are not serious demonstrates his hostility towards and
his inability to empathise with a
major group within our society
who suffer undeserved victimisation. The Canadian Charter of
Rights and Freedoms upholds
plain common sense in decreeing
that it is neither fair nor acceptable to discriminate against persons because of their race, religion, colour, or gender. Any notion that women in general in our
society do not face gender discrimination that puts them at a
disadvantage socially, economically, and politically arises from
either profound ignorance or outright falsehood. Often men selfishly deny the existence of injustice and resist reform because the
system errs in their favour.
It can be difficult for a man to
directly perceive that as a result
of the explicit oppression that a
woman faces, her world view and
everyday experience is fundamentally different from his. If we
cite only a few ofthe instances in
which women suffer unjustly as a
result of their gender we see that
in general they are subjected to a
higher occurrence of violent acts
committed against them by men
as opposed to the reverse, that
they have difficulty obtaining
treatment and pay that equals
that of men in many employment
situations, and that they lack
political representation that is
proportionate to their relative
numbers in our population. Obvious conditions such as these must
lead us to see that the feminist
revolt against the institutions
that maintain this imbalance of
power is justified. Even so, Mr.
Cooperstock may cruelly and
smugly deride women who earnestly and sincerely strive to
encourage a new and healthy
mode of interaction between
women and men, but his condescending arrogance serves only to
intensify the harm that he does
not comprehend and that has
already done unspeakable damage within our ailing society.
I do not believe that we men
would perpetrate the injustices
that we do if we truly knew the
pain that we cause in doing so. As
a man now appealing to other
men, I call on us to awaken our
compassion and work together to
bring an end to the victimisation
and oppression of those to whom
we should show respect, gratitude, and love: womankind.
Daniel Fretts
Faculty of Arts
CA$H FORUSED BOOKS
Bring your used books to the Bookstore and get
CA$H BACK. Soft- or hard cover, whether used
on this campus or not we will buy all current
edition titles that have a resale market value.
Good luck on your final exams!
BUY    BACK    DAYS
April 17-27 9 am - 5 pm  Mon to Fri. only
i) l  S      ]  9 t 0
BOOKSTORE
6200 University Boulevard • 228-4741
ANMVKRSARV
You are cordially invited to attend the
 '90 AMS/UBC	
Medical & Scientific Equipment Trade Show
Wednesday, April 4th and
Thursday, April 5th
10:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Ballroom & Partyroom
2nd Floor
Student Union Building
UBC
EXHIBITORS
Bio-Rad Laboratories (Canada) Ltd.
Nalge Company
Canberra Packard Canada Ltd.
Infrascan Inc.
Corning Science Products
Hadley Tekscience
Wild Leitz Canada Ltd.
Barnstead/Thermaline Inc.
Pharmacia (Canada) Inc.
FGR Steinmetz Inc.
Caltec Scientific Ltd.
MilliGen
Waters
Millipore
Hitashi Denshi
Carl Zeiss Canada Ltd.
Culligan Water Conditioning (Vane.)
Ingram & Bell Scientific
Door prizes donated by: Fischer Scientific Limited; Canlab Division of Baxter; AMS/UBC.
Costar Nuclepore
Narco Scientific Ltd.
Brinkman Instruments (Canada) Ltd.
Gelman Sciences Inc.
Bio-Can Scientific Inc.
Orion Research
Precision Scientific and Pandex
CanLab - Division of Baxter
BDH Inc.
Applied Bio Systems
Mandel Scientific Company
Western Scientific Services Ltd.
Hewlett Packard (Canada) Inc.
Beckman Instruments (Canada) Inc.
Fischer Scientific Limited
Carsen Medical and Scientific Co. Ltd.
Media Preparation Services
WE LOOK FORWARD TO SEEING YOU
AT THE SHOW.
THE UBYSSEY/9 And the winners are ...
Welcome to the second annual Ubyssey "Oscars" for
the most interesting events, people, and places on campus
and the world beyond. The envelope please...
Best actor: student representative on the Board of
Governors Mr. Tim Bird who has lent his chameleon-like
support to almost every backward stand the AMS has
proposed this year. Believe us the list is long.
Unfortunately, we cannot give out a best actress award
because there are too few women in high profile positions at
UBC to choose from...
Best supporting actor: BoG chair Peter Brown for his
delightful portrayal as a...uhh...businessman. What range,
what depth, hoorah.
Best supporting actress: former ombudsperson Jessica
Mathers whose integrity kept the AMS more honest by
bringing the AMS backroom politics into the forefront to
students, where it belongs. She would make an excellent
AMS president.
Best special effects: The first of many awards, The
UBC Real Estate Corporation for the spectacular fire and
smoke they put on for the residents of Fairview/Acadia at
their Hampton Place development during the Thanksgiving long weekend. The result was front page coverage in the
weekend edition of The Province and another black-eye for
a corporation turning new ground in development tactics.
Best sleazy political tactic: To president George Bush
for attempting to erase the wimp factor by invading the
Central American powerhouse Panama. Yes, George you
are no longer a wimp.
Honourable mention for best sleazy political tactic:
UBCREC for the delightful job they did in alienating
almost every community group on campus and Point Grey
and for their lack of consultation in the months preceding
the development.
Worst screenplay: The UBC 'Geers for their moronic
publication the nEUSlettre. The only thing funny about the
publication is the miscreants who write it still believe it to
be funny. Actually, it is appalling.
Hypocrites of the year: The UBC administration and
the local media for their reaction to the most recent publication ofthe nEUSlettre. The horror, the horror, what the
hell do you think those yo-yo's have been writing about in
their shit-hole paper for the past 50 fucking years. It hasn't
been intelligent. The horror, the horror. You guys make us
wretch.
Stupidest political move: The new AMS for their purchase of $33,000 computers which have little utility except
for term papers. They should be given to the library.
The most hazardous waste award goes to The Vancouver Stunned's in-house columnist Nicole Parton. Besides
wasting trees this inane strip belongs in the comic section
(right beside The Family Circus) where the audience would
probably be more in tune to the tripe that flows out of her
brain. Please get rid of this person. She does not enhance
the reputation of your paper, our city, or journalism.
Best role model: Premanure Bill Van Der Zalm. His
wholesome good looks, weasely manner, doublespeak, and
car salesperson smile make Mr. Bill a veritable champion
of Socred slime and a great role model for all aspiring young
politicians in B.C.
Best salesperson: President Strangway for selling us
down the river, promoting elitism and inaccessibility of a
university education. This year he sold us on a research
university. Last year he sold us higher tuition without the
anger that has hit Quebec. Think about that one.
Most pretentious award: The Ubyssey. Who else?
sSToR.!^
V)
ALL.
theUbyssey
March 27, 1990
The Ubyssey is published Tuesdays and Fridays throughout the academic year by the Alma Mater Society ofthe University of British Columbia. Editorial opinions are those ofthe
staff and not necessarily those of the university administration, or of the sponsor. The Ubyssey is published with the
proud support of the Alumni Association. The Ubyssey is a
member of Canadian University Press. The editorial office is
Rm. 241k ofthe Student Union Building. Editorial Department,
phone 228-2301; advertising, 228-3977; FAX* 228-6093
Extra! Extral Ubyssey beer garden brings death and destruction! Read all about it in SAC.
Today!
'Eyes melted, skin exploded, everybody's dead," screamed Franka Cordua-von Specht,
running from the flaming SUB building. Surrounded by the SAC security swat team, hordes of
drunken minorsdrank from (SAC-supplied) bottlesand spat from the balconies. Michael Booth
was first to start the riot, throwing arms to all staffers. Tor the tenth time, NO we wonl wipe
the bar!" said Joe Altwasser, making no attempt to stop the foamy flood. Effie Pow and Dale
Fallon cried tearfully, "Luckily SAC security came to save the day." Rebecca Bishop, still
shaking, was relieved to learn most Ubyssey staff had survived." "We almost lost them alfsaid
Martin Chester, sniffling. Keith Leung was shocked. "It was like, wow, total chaos, I mean all
the furniture got smashed to shit, there was this big bonfire in the middle and AMS types kept
gettingchucked in. ff you ask me, disallowing Ubysseybeer garde ns isn't enough! They should
all be shotr Ernie Stelzer and Ted Aussem, rummagged through the charred remains for the
sizing wheel they'd accidently left the night ofthe party. "We knew it," said Aussem. Xanl trust
those journalist types. Get them off the keyboard for a night, and hell breaks loose." The
Ubyssey terrorists, led by Victor Chew Wong, went on a rampage of the SUB, spraying the
walls with beer and refusing to distribute beer tickets, throwing molotov cocktails (open beer
with The Ubyssey aflame inside) at the pacifist SAC security team. Hao Li and Xuan Ngo called
the fire department, as Don Mah and David Loh ran to the balcony, dumping cases and cases
of full beer onto the panicked crowds below. Sandra Stephanson ducked under a desk just as
another bomb exploded, causing major structural damage and killing, oh, hoardes. The Pope
gave an early Saturday morning service for Rick E. Bear, whose body was never recovered,
while a US General surveyed the wild-eyed party-mongers who'd caused the riot, handing out
application forms.
"Wait!" cried Nadene Rehnby, "I was there, it didnt happen that way! We danced, we
sang, we had a few beers."
But we all know, if SAC security says it happened, fT MUST HAVE. All staff rioters and
other hooligans (especially the ones who are a little confused about the SAC security report)
are cordially invited to attend this Wednesday's AMS council meeting.
EDITORS
Joe Altwasser •  Franka Cordua-von Specht
Nadene Rehnby • Chung Wong • Keith Leung
"?*-AV^*uMD    B/   "P-y
Letters
Forgive 'geers!
Dear President Strangway,
The AMS applauds your
strong disapproval of the
March 14th EUS newsletter.
The newsletter's savage
bigotry ignited a deep pool of
pain and anger among targeted groups, especially
among Native students. Students Council showed solidarity with these groups at
the March 21st Special Meeting.
All of us look forward to
a time when prejudice based
on race, sex or sexual orientation, along with the verbal
expression of such prejudice,
no longer infests our society.
We need to be careful, however, that we penalize discriminatory actions rather
than the expression of opinion.
We need to take a sober
look at the measures that
can properly be taken in response to an offensive publication. The right to free
expression, guaranteed in
the Canadian Charter of
Rights and Liberties, surely
does not mean only the right
to non-offensive expression.
Disciplinary action against
the EUS could open the
University to a civil liberties
suit.
Page 20 of the 1989/90
UBC Calendar states:
"Central among these
rights (of members of the
University) is the freedom,
within the law,... to engage
in full and unrestricted consideration of any opinion...
Behaviour which obstructs
free and full discussion, not
only of ideas which are safe
and accepted but of those
which may be unpopular or
even abhorrent, vitally
threatens the integrity ofthe
University's forum."
Neither the UBC Ad-
The Ubyssey welcomes letters on any issue. Letters which are not typed will not be accepted. Letters over 200 words
may be edited for brevity. Please be concise. Content which Is libelous, slanderous, racist, sexist, homophobic or
otherwise unlft for publication will not be published. Please bring letters, with Identification, to our editorial office,
Room 241K, SUB. Letters must include name, faculty or department, year of study and signature.
ministration nor the AMS
would wish to become guilty
of such behaviour. Halting
the collection of EUS fees, as
punishment for the expression of abhorrent ideas, is
contrary to the letter and the
spirit of the statement on
Page 20 ofthe UBC Calendar.
There can be absolutely
no question of banning any
publications, financial penalties, the suspension or expulsion of students from
UBC or any other reprisals.
Punitive measures will create a climate at UBC which
makes the free expression of
highly unpopular views
appear dangerous.
Such measures will have
other negative effects as well,
without really curing the evil
they are meant to address.
They will unjustly punish all
engineering students for the
misjudgment of a few. They
may remove financial support for the many constructive undertakings of the
EUS. And they will come
across as vindictive acts of
repression which won't erase
prejudice from people's
minds and hearts, but intensify antagonisms on campus.
Racist, sexist or homophobic bigotry at UBC must
be countered by the voice of
reason and corrected by helping discriminated groups in
positive ways - not by turning engineering students into
scapegoats. Several representatives of Native students
have stressed the same point.
These thoughts express,
not a consensus within the
AMS, but my own honest
judgment about a difficult
situation. I trust you will
consider them, knowingthat
both of us feel deep responsibility for the good of UBC.
Yours sincerely
Kurt Preinsperg
AMS President
Serves 'em
right
Finally...some disaster
has taken place; the editorial staff of the nEUSletter
must now tiptoe on creaky
floorboards.
I am sympathetic with
the First Nations members.
It's unfortunate that they
were directly insulted.
But, at the same time, I
am glad that the March 14,
1990 issue has made such
publicity. Maybe now there
will be a decrease in disgusting jokes and pictures in our
newspaper.
Roberta Cameron
Bio-Resource
Engineering 2
Read Ayn Rand
I agree with UBYSSEY'S March 20th editorial
that Capitalism and Environmentalism are incompatible, or more fundamentally that the "growth-oriented" mentality is incompatible with "concern for the
environment": the latter is
profoundly evil, the former
uncompromisingly good and
pro-life.
Now let's get straight
what Environmentalism in
its pure form advocates:
Mother nature has value in
and of itself, apart from
human ends and purposes,
and should therefore be
obediently cherished.
I refer you to the title
essay of Ayn Rand's book
"The New Left: The Anti-
Industrial Revolution" for
an analysis ofthe essence of
Environmentalism.
At the root of this philosophy is the profoundly
mystical view that man is a
highly abnormal child of
Mother Nature—ruthlessly
able to permanently conquer his surroundings and
natural evolution. Man is
seen as an unnatural byproduct of nature, intrinsically
at war with it. Human
activities "spoil" the Environment. Who should win
this war given this metaphysics? Like a child should
obey his parents, so man
should submit to nature and
not try to impose his values
on it.
Hence Environmental-
ism's venemous hatred for
Capitalism. Capitalism
values man's life as an end
in itself and as the only
proper standard of value,
and lets man free to discover
the best way to live his life
according to his nature.
Capitalism is intrinsically
selfish, and does not accept
the question: "what is good
for nature, trees, and fish?";
rather, it is the answer to:
"what is good for man as a
rational, natural entity?"
Don't take technology and
material progress for
granted; in reason, an uncompromisingly pro-man
viewpoint dictates that it is
proper to conquer nature, to
produce, to change the
world around us, not mindlessly, but according to the
dictum "Nature to be commanded, must be obeyed."
Stephan Weaver
Engineering IV
"We are, in general,
a left wing paper from a
Canadian perspective,
which in America would
probably be communist."
—Ubyssey editor Joe Altwasser in the Western
Washington University
paper The Western Front
(Feb. 27, 1990).
Smash the bourgeoisie. Join The Ubyssey.
Room 241 K, SUB.
10/THE UBYSSEY
March 27,1990 LETTERS
Trip in poor taste
Dear Mr. Wilson of Travel Cuts:
I am astonished that you
should be advertising China as "an
excellent destination to visit as
well as study in these times of
change." Are you not aware that
only eight months ago thousands
of students were massacred in a
most gruesome manner in Peking?
Since then thousands of students
and other young people have been
herded into prisons and concentration camps, forcefully brainwashed, tortured, executed. If—
as you put it—"China continues to
evolve" it is in a direction opposite
to that ofthe rest ofthe communist
world. Would you have promoted
travel to Ceausescu's Romania?
To invite Canadian students to
travel to China sends the wrong
message to the murderers of
China's students who continue to
hold that country in the grip of
terror, and are bound to soon meet
the fate of their friend Causescu.
Are considerations of academic solidarity and common
morality of no relevance to a travel
agency • purporting to serve the
travel needs of the academic community? Surely you could find
some genuinely "excellent" destinations for student travel in the
Pacific Rim.
Rene Goldman
Assistant Professor
Debate continues
Mr. Ron Norman (March 6)
attempted to equate the activities
of businessmen, specifically employing workers, with the activities of government. Such a dangerous ignorance of the English language and of human relations
cannot be left unchallenged.
In a free society, no one is
forced to deal with any individual
or organization. Parties can only
deal with one another by mutual
consent. The activities of businessmen (employment, purchasing, and selling) involve two or
more parties who exchange values
by mutual voluntary consent for
mutual benefit. These are not activities involving exploitation or
force.
In order to exploit by force,
one requires a gun, a government,
or both.
The distinguishing characteristic of government is the legalized
use or threat of force. Governments levy taxes with involuntary
fines and imprisonment (i.e. force)
as the punishment for non-payment. Governments interfere with
the freedom of men to trade by
controlling ideas, capital, and
products which they arbitrarily
determine to be harmful to the
'public good'. Governments initiated the use offeree in the Tian-
amin Squares, Auchwitchzes,
Soviet prisons, and Latin American dictatorships of the past and
will continue to do so in the future.
The degrees of the violations of
individual rights vary but the distinguishing characteristic remains the same.
Yes Mr. Norman, there is a
difference between managing a
corporation and governing a nation. Words have meanings. They
represent definite concepts. Why
do you wish to avoid definitions?
Mr. Norman's is unwilling to
accept "a language which harbors
such a distinction [governing vs.
employing]..."because itis "alittle
too discreet and circumspect..." It
appears that the evasion, obscuring, and destruction of concepts
are the domains of Mr. Norman. A
world where men communicate in
definite terms does not permit him
to expound opinions which are
nothing more than whims and
wishes with no justification in
reality. Confusion allows him to
Can you believe this? 1
^^"vSr**'          t.
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accidently hand In a
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letter to my grandmother
i— i      yM]
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and my philosophy prof
\.~ y\ _
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gives It a B+.
iw^
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. / -*~- Tfc__*i
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Graphic: The Fulcrum
link the virtures of the free exchange of values with the crimes of
government.
If the reader were to accept
Mr. Norman's view of language, he
has already won the battle. A rational argument cannot succeed
when the issues and language are
sinking in a quagmire of vague
definitions. Such definitions permeate our culture and even dictionaries have become a weakened
defence. This state of affairs suits
the irrational, emotional, catch-
all-phrases of Mr. Norman perfectly.
Kevin Haidl
Science 1
Confront them
The engineering nEUSlettre is
one example of discriminatory
expressions on the UBC Campus.
They must be confronted! As a
member ofthe community at UBC
your voice can be heard. By writing letters to your Faculty Advisor, Advisor, Ombudsperson and
to President Strangway we will be
accepting responsibility for improving our community. Instead of
being part ofthe problem, be part
of the solution.
San Dee Doxtater
Anthropology 2
Daniel Meneley
Law 1
Karen Roblee
Lawl
Suffering is BAD
The "Hate-Hurts" campaign
left out an important issue.
In all the talk about the terrible hate and discrimination that
goes on in human society, in all the
talk about the infringement ofthe
rights of human minorities and
women, never was the most widespread and abhorantly harmful
type of discrimination publicly
spoken (or written) out against:
SPECIESISM. That is, the tyranny of humans over non-humans.
Granted, the types of discrimination between humans are
all terrible. They must be ERADICATED. They are all, however,
PALTRY—utterly insignificant
and trivially mild—IN COMPARISON to the DEGREE and
AMOUNT of suffering that non-
humans are put through by humans.
Women and human minorities all, quite justifiably, complain
because they aren't given EQUAL
rights. In comparison, however,
non-humans aren't given ANY
rights or granted the slightest
degree of consideration: it is considered completely justifiable to—
EAT them—BURN them—lock
them in a box for their entire
lives—BRAND them—TEAR
their beaks off—SEW their eyes
closed—INFECT them with cancer, aids or any other DISEASE
you desire—STARVE them—line
them up and SHOOT them
through the head—ELECTROCUTE them—IRRADIATE
them—POISON them—DROWN
them—FREEZE   them—DRUG
them—HOLD them in HEAD
BRACES for their entire lives—
pour DETERGENT and COSMETICS in their EYES and on
their skin—TRAP them by their
LEGS in steel let-hold traps—
ABDUCT them from their native
habitat. Basically, itis considered
perfectly justifiable to do WHATEVER YOU WANT to them. And
if there should come a time that
the law threatens you with the
charge of 'cruelty to animals',
while then you can just say that
what you're doing is in the interests of science (I guess that's what
the NAZI DOCTORS said in
WW.II when they experimented
on Jews).
What is required is not equal
treatment for non-humans.
Rather, EQUAL CONSIDERATION. Equal consideration for the
well-being of women requires that
they be given an equal opportunity
to achieve and enjoy the same
things that men do. Equal consideration for the well-being of pigs
may require no more than that we
leave them alone with other pigs in
a place where there is enough food
to eat and room to run freely.
Similarly, equal consideration for
apes, monkeys, bears, alone with
members of their own kind in their
native habitat. Considerations
such as these are really all that is
required but if it was granted, it
would bring an end to an abhorent
and unjustified idscrimination
(see: Animal Liberation by Peter
Singer).
When we are considering
whom is to be granted rights to
equal consideration, in the words
of Jeremy Bentham, "the question
is not, Can they reason? nor Can
they talk? but, CAN THEY SUFFER?"
The large majority of humans
either acquiesce or actively partake in all or many of the above
atrocities. Apparently, hoever,
judging from the alck ofthe representation fo thie issue, according
to the "Hate
Hurts" committee, this simply IS
NOT AN IMPORTANT consideration. It is well and fine to campaign aginst inter-human hate
but when }'ou do so under the
banner of a campaign to eradicate
ALL hate and discrimination,
YOU IMPLY THAT IT IS THE
ONLY HATE AND DISCRIMINATION THAT NEEDS TO BE
ERADICATED.
However, not only is inter-
human discrimination NOT the
only kind that needs to be eradicated but it is NOT EVEN the most
harmful and pervasive kind.
It is obvious to anyone who is
not completely dead to all sense of
suffering that THE VAST MAJORITY OF DISCRIMINATORY
ACTS AGAINST NON-HUMANS
ARE UNJUSTIFIABLE and that
this is THE MOST PERVASIVE
AND HARMFUL TYPE OF DISCRIMINATION IN THE WORLD
TODAY.
But perhaps the "Hate Hurts"
committee did not mean to leave
out this issue—perhaps it was just
an oversight;—I hope so.
Leo Paquin
Arts 3
& TH3BC Christian Hesfoente
~FINAI_
EASTER
^sjjpevent
Wt inWte
you to
join its
SUNDAY APRIL 8th 9:30pm - 10:30pm
V.S.T. Chapel of the Epiphany
Organized by the Student Residents of Carey Hall
Worship for students, by students.
AN IMPORTANT NOTICE TO
ALL UBC STUDENTS ENROLLED
IN THE 1989/90 WINTER SESSION
Notice cards concerning the 1990/91 Calendar and
related Telereg publications have been mailed to all
students.
WHEN YOU RECEIVE YOUR CARD, take it to the
General Services Administration Building (GSAB)
lobby between March 27 and April 9 (8:30 a.m. to 4:25
p.m.)* and exchange it for your copies of the Calendar,
Telereg Guide & Course Schedule, Program Planning
& Advising Information booklet and, if you require it, the
Standard Timetables booklet. After April 9, exchange
your card for your copies of these publications at the
Registrar's Office (GSAB - 2nd floor).
These publications are not being mailed to continuing
students due to mailing costs. If you plan to enrol in the
1990/91 Winter Session, make sure you pick up your
copies of these publications as you will need them
when you register. (Telereg opens for 1990/91 Winter
Session registration on June 18, 1990.)
* Open March 28th and 29th from 8:30 a.m. to 7:00 p.m.
Office of the Registrar
P.S. Does the Registrar's Office have your correct
mailing address?
NOTICE TO GRADUATING STUDENTS
TREE PLANTING
CEREMONY
will be held
Friday, March 30th
at 2:00 p.m.
Wine & Cheese to follow
President Strangway will be speaking
All Faculty and Graduating Students are
Invited to attend
Tree Location
March 27,1990
THE UBYSSEY/11 Nightmare vision terminally consuming
by Paul Dayson
THE world of Terminal City
is mad and getting madder.
Sit back. Do what you are
told. Go out and buy something.
It will make you feel better.
Everything will be done for you.
Everything will be thought of for
you. THOSE WHO RESIST WILL
BE SHOT.
FILM
Terminal City Ricochet
Opened Friday
Terminal City Ricochet is
about a world going insane; it is
an apocalyptic vision.
A comedy adventure, in the
sense of black humour, the film is
a nightmare vision of a society on
the brink of self-destruction. Terminal City hacks itself to pieces
much like Lupo the Butcher.
Ecological disaster is evident
throughout as "space junk" rains
down on the city which resembles
a garbage dump wasteland full of
discarded obsolete consumer
products. And people ignore it as
the sky falls on them. They are
told to.
The Terminal Citizens are
told to do a lot of things and to do
nothing. Sit back, take it easy
and everything will be just fine.
Everything will be done for you.
This is the ultimate consumer society.
Ross "The Boss" Glimore is a
modern politician. More style
than substance. He is a talk show
host risen to political office and
corporate control. Glimore's
greatest political weapon is
television. A combination of
Ronald Reagan, Bill Vander Zalm
and Morton Downey Jr., Ross
Glimore is the ultimate "tabloid
politician." His by-word is
POWER, and he sacrifices all to
it.
The Truth, Terminal City's
newspaper, and all the other
media deny the disasters that
befall the city. But then the
media is owned by multi-millionaire and mayor Glimore's Glicorp.
Any other uncontrolled media is
banned as immoral.
Rock'n'roll is illegal. As a
spontaneous rebellious and
imaginative art form it is a
danger to a stable unquestioning
society, Terminal City. Only
underground, rock continues to
be played, constituting the basis
of resistance culture.
That public enemy number
one should be a rock musician, a
rock'n'roll terrorist, and solely a
creation ofthe media is hardly
surprising. Except that he
delivers the paper and couldn't
care less... just like everyone else.)
Until the Biker Cops and
psychotic Bruce Cottle, an agent
of Glimore's special police force
played by Jello Biafra, are after
him. Then, he is forced to pay
attention...
Terminal City Ricochet is not
a high budget smooth film, in the
Hollywood style. It's acting and
special effects frequently left
something to be desired. These
were the obvious effects of a
limited budget. At times it can't
'compete' with the glitz of the
commercial media it attempts to
parody. Despite these faults,
however, the film delivers its
message with powerful effect. The
message, or messages, easily
overshadow and even incorporate
the problems ofthe film.
The movie makes it on its
vitality. The energy of rock music
reaches from the soundtrack to
the visual images on the screen.
"Any similarity between
incidents in this movie and
reality are just the way things
are."
A Short Stroll
From A
**«
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»T*%'#r.»>:
If your travel plans include a trip that will put an ocean
between you and your studies, visit Travel Cuts.
Travel Cuts offers students American Express' Travellers
Cheques COMMISSION FREE.
With American Express Travellers Cheques you need
only make a telephone call to get hand delivered refunds
- virtually anywhere in the world:' Or call the Express
HelpLine® which offers a full range of emergency services
including medical and legal referrals, phone translation
and message relay.
So the next time you plan to travel, visit a participating
Travel Cuts office and get your commission free American
Express Travellers Cheques.
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tan Express Canada, Inc. 1990. All rights reserved. American fcxpi
being used by American Express Canada, Inc. as a re
is the owner of the trade
REACH OUT
This year nearly 200
international
students will come to UBC.
It can be a bewildering
experience.
Or it can be a wonderful one.
It's up to you!
REACH OUT is a program sponsored by
International House in which international
students are linked up with Vancouver
correspondents who will write to them,
providing them with helpful information and
a local contact. It's a great way to make new
friends and to learn about other countries.
FOR MORE INFORMATION, plaase
contact International House as soon as
possible, either in person or by calling
228-5021. Both Canadians and
Internationals welcome.
12/THE UBYSSEY
March 27,1990

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