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The Ubyssey Mar 9, 1971

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Array Page 3: TA's seek pay raise
Page 3: Education students back BCTF
Page 7: Hockey team advances to Canadian finals
Page 8: Page Tuesday strikes again
SMALL FRACAS resulted in Buchanan 106 Saturday night when suspended SFU prof
Mordecai Briemberg was hit from behind by an irate audience member at Vancouver
—dave bowerman photo
Institute meeting.  Other audience members got a few   licks in before they were
restrained. Federal justice minister John Turner was to have spoken on law and order.
'No free speech for John'
By JAN O'BRIEN
Demonstrators protesting the War Measures Act and
Public Order (Temporary Measures) Act prevented federal
justice minister John Turner from speaking on campus
Saturday night.
As the Vancouver Institute-sponsored meeting started
and Turner was introduced, a core group of about 30
protesters drowned out institute chairman P. N.
Thorsteinson with a steady chant of: "No free speech for
the Quebecois, no free speech for Turner."
The Free Canada-Free Quebec Committee — which
formed the organized portion of the protest - was joined
by Yippies and street people in heckling Turner and
Thorsteinson with shouts and chants of "Free Quebec,"
Parks board refers Jericho
to federal defence
By SANDY KASS
The fate of the proposed Jericho Road now lies in
federal hands.
The Vancouver parks board decided Monday night to
confer with federal defence minister Donald MacDonald
as to reconsideration of the entire road scheme before
board members will make any recommendations to city
council concerning the site of the road and development
of the old national defence site.
At the board's meeting, members were expected to
approve the final city engineer's report on road
specifications and authorize the city to destroy Locarno
Park Extension for construction of the road.
The motion followed statements of spokesmen from
the West Point Grey Local Area Council, Northwest Point
Grey Homeowners' Association, and families of the area.
Dorothy Gillis, speaking for families residing near
Locarno Park Extension, said the park's acreage is six, and
not 3.8 as board chairman Sandy Robertson stated last
week.
"Robertson called the trade of Locarno Park
Extension for the beach parkland pretty sound
mathematics," she said.
"Well, I guess that all depends on who's keeping
score."
NPGHA spokesman Lorna Warren said a beach park
would fall under the same restrictions as a normal beach.
"And how can we send our children to a park where
they can't play ball or take their dogs for walks," she
asked.
WPGLAC past chairman C. S. White called for a
public hearing, but was interrupted by people locked out
of the meeting who were banging on the windows of the
board room.
voted
ension and
At the insistence
requested they be let:
Gillis added that 1
unanimously Friday to retain :
will voice its recommendations to city council.
As city traffic engineer Bob Boyse explained the
present road proposals to the board, commissioner Joseph
Malkin questioned the necessity of the road at all.
The public applauded Malkin and those sitting at the
back of the board room raised posters made in protest of
the road scheme.
Commissioner George Wainborn suggested redesigning
the road to run along Discovery Street to Belmont and
to page 5: see 200
and "Fuddle-duddle-fuddle" whenever they tried to speak
into the microphone.
Violence broke out when a youth punched suspended
Simon Fraser University prof Mordecai Briemberg from
behind as Briemberg was asking Turner if he had the
courage of his convictions to appear on a platform with
the Quebec Five — Michel Chartrand, Charles Gagnon,
Pierre Vallieres, Jacques Larue-Langlois and Theo Gagne.
Several other members of the audience jumped into
the melee and Briemberg and an unidentified Turner
supporter suffered bloody mouths and noses. No-one was
seriously hurt.
A few minutes later, two older men threw punches at
dissidents but effected little damage.
B.C. Hydro chairman Gordon Shrum who was in the
crowd of 350 said, "Give these people (the protestors)
five minutes on the microphone."
The crowd replied with a chorus of "Shrum sucks."
Turner, whose prepared speech was on law and order
in Canada said he hoped to have some kind of dialogue
with the crowd.
He got a dialogue but probably not the kind he had in
mind.
He asked the demonstrators, "Are you really
Canadians?"
Someone in the crowd replied, "Are you really an
American?"
When Turner asked, "Am I going to get a hearing
here?" and "Are we living in a free society?", the crowd
responded with a loud "No."
to page 2: see WE'LL
CUPE senate reps negotiable
By MIKE SASGES
A proposal to include non-academic staff on
UBC senate, if accepted, will make the campus more
democratic said the Canadian Union of Public
Employees' busines's representative.
In a brief to the university's negotiating
committee, CUPE states: "In a senate of 102, we
would expect at least five staff representatives."
"This proposal will go to making the campus a
more democratic place," Mike Kramer, business
representative of local 116, CUPE said Monday.
"We've been relegated to a bottom position on
the campus," he said. "Some students and faculty
have tried to establish a master-servant relation."
Kramer said that representation on senate was
not a grass-roots movement from the membership,
but was presented to the union to vote on as a point
of negotiation.
"Most members don't realize the existence of the
seriate," he said. 'They only see the university
administration as the big boss."
At present, the union represents 1800
non-academic staff on campus.
"My private opinion is that the employer takes
to page 2: see UNION Page 2
THE       UBYSSEY
Tuesday, March 9, 1971
'We'll get good press,'
says Turner assistant
from page One
"Have you got the courage and convictions to
listen to me? Then I'll listen to you," said Turner.
Turner supporters clapped and cheered while the
dissenters booed.
He continued saying, "We are seeing what
happens when free speech is denied."
An audience member asked, "Why should we
listen to you?"
Turner said he had been elected by the people
of Canada. "They didn't elect you," he said.
Later he told reporters that this was the first
time in his political career that he hadn't been able
to start a speech let alone finish one.
He said, "They (the protestors) have harmed
their cause and shown the intellectual weakness of
it.
"1 think the people of Canada believe in
dissent, but I don't think they will stand for
demolition politics with the substitution of slogans
and chants and group chaos for dialogue."
When asked if he had been defeated by the
protestors, he replied: "They didn't defeat me, they
just interfered with free speech in this country."
After the meeting broke up a number of
questioners surrounded Turner, whose executive
Mike Hunter was heard saying, "No, leave him there:
for a few more minutes. We'll get some good press
out of this."
Free Quebec, Free Canada Committee member
Dick Betts said Monday, "Turner and the federal
cabinet committed a monstrous violation of free
speech by imprisoning over 500 people in Quebec in
October, people who's only crime was to speak out
against the political and economic system in
Quebec.
"It's blatant hypocrisy for Turner to appeal to
free speech when his bill (Public Order Act) denies
free speech on a massive basis to those who would
oppose the system," said Betts.
Turner said violence at public meetings is one
of the necessary risks taken in a democracy.
"I'm willing to run that risk," he said.
Mark Warrior, former UBC classics student
attempted to lay an assault charge against Shrum.
A campus RCMP officer advised him to come
back on Wednesday and fill out a charge sheet when
a provincial court judge is on campus.
Shrum said Monday he was not involved in any
violence at the meeting.
Vancouver Sun reporter Alex Volkoff was hit
with a hard tomato as the meeting ended.
Said Vancouver-Centre MLA Herb Capozzi: "I
saw the guy who threw it up there and I just about
beat the hell out of him but I don't know if it did
any good."
After the meeting, the unidentified youth who
threw the tomato said Capozzi grabbed him by the
lapels for a moment and then let him go.
"I'm really sorry that I missed Turner but
sorrier that I hit someone else," he said.
'Union brief will go to Gage;
Senate will have to act on it'
from page One
advantage of labor legislation to
circumvent our work," he said.
"I think that all the staff want
to be unionized," he said. "It is
extremely difficult to organize
people due to the anti-union
sentiment of the administration."
Kramer has presented a brief in
support of unionization to the
university negotiation committee.
John McLean, chairman of the
university negotiating committee,
said that senate representation
was outside his committee's
jurisdiction.
"The union's brief will be sent
to the chairman of the senate
(administration president Walter
Gage) and the senate will then
have to act on it," Mclean said
Monday.
"We take a neutral stand on
total unionization on campus.
"If    the     majority    of    a
Course on role of religion
The UBC Centre for Continuing Education is holding a course on
the role that religions have played in defining the relationship of man to
his natural environment.
The five-session course begins tonight at 8 p.m. in the Lutheran
Campus Centre. Fees for the course are students, $7.50; individual,
$11; husband and wife, $18.
Weekly topics will be Man, Religion and Nature; the Biblical View
of Nature; the Muslim Point of View; the Canadian Indian and Nature;
Contemporary Christian Views of Nature.
The lecturers include various profs from UBC as well as Rev.
Ernest Willie, a native Indian priest from Hatzic.
department on campus wishes to
unionize, we agree," he said. "If
the union wishes to unionize a
segment of a department, we're
against it."
Kramer hopes that Gage will
also take the brief to the Board of
Governors.
"The reaction there will not be
good, due to the lack of labor
representation on the BoG, but
they will be familiar with our
wishes," he said.
One student senator feels that
senate representation for CUPE is
a good idea.
'They will sit on senate,
however, and end up being
intimidated by the 12 to 15
people who always speak," said
Art Smolensky.
"The union could be
conservative and throw votes
against the students.
"If they get representation,
thee students should get more
people to counter their votes," he
said.
New York
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RENTALS
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Up-to-Date Accessories
SPECIAL  STUDENT  RATES
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CHINESE FOODS
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WE SERVE AUTHENTIC
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SIERRA CLUB
Of B.C. - U.B.C. Section
OPEN MEETING
MARCH 11th—12:30
SUB 205
To Decide on a
Programme For The
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Everyone Welcome
Charter Flight
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Drop in at the new travel office and
ask about our other student travel
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Learn French Where
French is at Home
UNIVERSITE DE MONTREAL
ECOLE FRAN9AISE D' ETE 1971
JULY 2nd - AUGUST 13th , 1971
The latest audio-visual methods are used with beginners;
advanced students work in seminars.
A special attention is given to English-speaking French
teachers; to students of French literature and to people
wishing to know more about Quebec.
The social activities give opportunities to discover
French-Canadian life through folksinging evenings; theatre
visits, excursions into the typical Quebec countryside and
sightseeing walks through historic old Montreal. Also
facilities for sports activities.
Scholarships available.
Booklet on request at:
Ecole francaise d'ete,
Universite de Montreal,
Service d'education permanente,
C.P. 6128, Montreal 101, P.Q., Canada.
WE CAN PROVIDE YOU
WITH ENVIRONMENTAL
STEREO!
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Bring your Students's Card
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tfeieo-iiiart-
613 GRANVILLE
681-1825 Tuesday, March 9/1971
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 3
—dave enns photo
LACK OF BICYCLE PATHS on campus brings cyclist perilously close to student pedestrians in
last-minute dash to classes.
EdUS contests provincial bill
By KATHY STEWART
The Education Undergraduate Society passed a
motion condemning the provincial government's
recent action on B.C. Teachers' Federation
membership and teachers' pensions.
At a special meeting Sunday, EdUS passed a
three     part     motion     dealing    with    provincial
government's Bill 47 and the Teachers' Pension Act.
The text of the motion was sent to premier W. A. C.
Bennett and other cabinet ministers.
Bill 47 states that no employee of a school
board can serve as a trustee on a school board and
that membership in the BCTF is no longer
compulsory. to page 5: see EdUS
»£*«^$-*^ ^%<>-s^ ,>&■ <&■ ^w» - * *■ t&s *t: Pi *
t <*£S HH'H's*   "^HMtti'TH^V.     8n,,«&%<:
NFTU ask for
rise in wages
By DICK BETTS
The Non-Faculty Teachers Union of UBC has started negotiations
with the administration on working conditions for teaching assistants
and university researchers.
The issues are wages and uniforms guide-lines in the form of
negotiable contracts with the administration.
"We are arguing from a position of necessity," said Gerry Hivon,
NFTU secretary. "People on the non-faculty staff cannot live on
Vancouver on the wages they now rec«ive."
Non-faculty staff includes teaching assistants, researchers,
assistants researchers and other hired by the university to do academic
work but not included in the ranks of faculty professors.
The NFTU is demanding a basic wage rate of $3200 from the
university. This demand was made in a letter to administration
president Walter Gage after its adoption at a general meeting of the
NFTU Thursday.
In addition, the letter calls for "the adoption of a contract
between the university and all non-faculty teachers, assistants and
researchers, and that this contract spell out the exact nature of the
appointment..."
The wage demand in the letter is a basic demand irrespective of
hours of the faculty in which the non-faculty worker operates.
"Hours are irrelevant," Hivon pointed out. 'Time spent marking
papers, interviewing students, and preparing for classes is impossible to
measure."
Hivon went on to say that non-faculty staff are presently in no
way compensated for their work or expenses incurred in the cost of
living.
"We sent the letter to Gage since the issue of wages and
conditions for T.A.'s is a university-wide issue," he said.
Science department
heads resign
Three department heads in UBC's science faculty have resigned,
effective June 30, but will continue as full professors in their
departments.
The three professors are G. H. Neil Towers of the department of
botany, W. H. Mathews of the department of geology and W. S. Hoar
of the department of zoology.
Professor R. F. Scagel a Canadian-born UBC graduate (currently
on leave of absence) will relinquish his appointment as associate dean of
the faculty of science to succeed Towers as head of Botany.
In an open letter, Hoar said his decision to resign as head wasn't
based on a sense of frustration and no one should attempt to give it
mysterious or devious interpretations.
Hoar, who has been at UBC for 25 years said: "I believe that the
university's period of expansion is essentially finished and that the next
period - one of consolidation - will require a new and different type
of decision-making which should be faced with the fresh ideas of a
younger man."
Mathews, a member of the UBC faculty since 1952, has been
head of the geology department since 1964. He plans a year's leave of
absence in 1971-1972 to undertake an air photo study of two major ice
sheets in northeastern B.C. and the Northwest Territories. Mathews will
return to UBC the following year as a full professor.
Towers, joined the faculty in 1964 as head of the Botany
department and is currently on leave of absence doing research at
University of East Anglia in Norwich, England.
>' <-?-„*x--
t *~
Toronto conference proposes Nov. moratorium
The writer is Alma Mater Society external affairs
officer-elect Sharon Boylan who was a delegate at the
Canadianization Conference in Toronto over the weekend.
A proposal for a national student moratorium in
November was made at the conference for
Canadianization of Post-Secondary Education held in
Toronto Friday and Saturday.
The conference, sponsored by the Committee for an
Independent Canada and the Graduate Students'
Association of the Ontario Institute for Studies in
Education, spent two days discussing control of
post-secondary education in Canada.
The proposal for the moratorium came from a special
meeting organized to enable the students at the
conference to discuss actions on campuses across the
country. The moratorium must still be endorsed by
student councils across Canada.
But most of the conference has the same restrained
and elegant manner as the rarely-utilized OISE building it
was held in.
The first session dealt with the national content of
education in Canada. (Discussion tended to centre around
Ontario, because heaviest representation was from there.)
No common agreement was reached about the nature
of post-secondary institutions. Douglas Wright from the
Ontario Commission on Post-Secondary Education gave a
technocratic analysis of the functions of education in
Ontario.
Neglecting the central problem of Canadian control
with a statement that Canadian structures (like the B.C.
community colleges which are based on similar California
institutions) were formed independently of U.S. example,
he went on to a discussion of the workings of Ontario
edcuation.
George Martell, editor of This Magazine is About
Schools, analyzed post-secondary schools in terms of a
class bias inherent in their structure.
The initial meeting set the basis for the schism in
understanding at the conference.
The central disagreement about how completely
Canadian higher education is dominated by Americans ran
throughout the conference.
Saturday's morning meeting on staff composition at
universities had the same dichotomy.
Robin Mathews from Carleton emphasized the
necessity for greater Canadian control while Jim Prentice,
a physicist from the University of Toronto, felt the
problem didn't really occur in the sciences.
He felt the nationality of science professors was
largely irrelevant to their understanding of science.
An earlier session on course content was the only
instance where all the speakers felt the necessity for
greater Canadian content.
Alec Lucas from the English department at McGill
University, Mel Watkins from the political economy dept.
at U of T and Denis Smith from the political science dept.
at Trent University all stressed the need for emphasis on
Canadian content.
Mathews, Watkins, Smith and Danny Drache from
York University stood out once more from the other
speakers because they raised the practical question of
implementation of Canadianization demands.
Drache spoke in a session on hiring practices, and
recommended quota systems.
One of the clearest conclusions which emerged from
the conference was the need for national student
organizations to promote communications between
campuses.
It also became clear that such an organization was
necessary for students to organize in a consistent way
around national issues, such as Canadianization and
unemployment. Page 4
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, March 9, 1971
THE UBYSSEY
Published Tuesdays and Fridays throughout the university
year by the Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C.
Editorial opinions are those of the writer and not of the AMS or
the university administration. Member, Canadian University Press.
Founding member. Pacific Student Press. The Ubyssey publishes
Page Friday, a weekly commentary and review. The Ubyssey's
editorial offices are located in room 241K of the Student Union
Building. Editor, 228-2301; city editor, 228-2305; news editor,
228-2307; Page Friday, 228-2309; sports, 228-2308; advertising,
228-3977.
MARCH 9, 1971
Ask us if we care
Enough, goddamn it, we've had enough.
We're sick of hearing every trivial detail of Pierre
Trudeau's wedding. We're sick of on-the-scene reports
from Whistler and play by play commentary on the
honeymoon.
In a few weeks, we will be just as sick of gushing
feature stories about "Canada's First Lady".
Alright, so Trudeau got married, we all know that
by now. How much more of it do we have to put up
with?
The worst part of it all is that simply by getting
married, something thousands of people do every day,
Trudeau has managed once again to place his personality
above the important issues facing the country.
In 1968, he managed to create a "swinger" image
and avoided having to tell anyone what he planned to
do as prime minister.
Now, he's managed to get the whole country
talking about "what a lovely couple they are."
Suddenly, the rising unemployment rate no longer
exists; the repression of Quebec never happened; the
man who has demonstrated supreme contempt and
arrogance toward almost everyone is now once again,
with the help of the press, the nation's idol.
Trudeau has given the public another soother to
get off on, diverting attention from Canada's problems.
Okay, Pierre, you got married, congratulations.
Now, if you're not too busy, about that unemployment
Workers on senate?
The upcoming contract negotiations between the
university administration and the Canadian Union of
Public Employees promise to be the most interesting in
a long time.
CUPE, which represents 1,200 university
employees, is asking for five seats on the UBC senate.
It is probably the first time a B.C. union had
demanded a voice in the operation of its employer,
although five workers won't mean any more on senate
than the present token delegation of 12 students.
CUPE representatives on senate would be
important for another reason.
For the first time, B.C.'s workers would have some
voice in the operation of the university.
The people who pay taxes so the sons and
daughters of the middle class can be "educated" would
finally get a foot in the door.
If CUPE is successful, they would be taking a first
step toward true community control of the university.
Unfortunately, we don't like their chances. UBC is
notorious for its unwillingness to soil its phoney
academic world with any kind of reality.
Editor: Nate Smith Ken   Lassesen   dribbled   all   over   the
News Maurice Bridge court. Josephine Margolis pulled off a
citv cinm, Gait great    save   on    Mike    Sasges,    while
*      i,In*Dj.. Jennifer  sent   a   gutter   ball   down   the
Jan o Brien Alley.
wire     Jor"> Andersen David    Schmidt    and   Sandy    Kass
Sports Keith Dunbar played rugby in the corner, while Jinny
Ass't News     Jennifer Jordan Ladner stole the chesterfield to make
■ adia Dinmmor another goal.
dho*o                                         i?.«ih^«»I Dave  Enns took a 9reat Picture of
pno,°   • .. David Enns David Bowerman, who let a hard one
David Bowerman go from  the  point.   Unfortunately,   it
Page Friday Tim Wilson couldn't    be    printed,    but    Nathalie
Apouchtine    saved    us    overtime    by
The Jocks have taken over with the making the last score,
meathead list for today's rag. Spurred John Gibbs will be holding a team
on by Krazylegs Dunbar, Steve "Puck practice     this     Saturday      night     in
Off"     Millard     assigned     the     team preparation for the big spectacle to be
positions. held  the following  weekend.  Rookies
Jan    O'Brien    and   Sharon   Boylan will   be   allowed   their   first   taste  of
played centre, flanked by wings Kathy bench    warming,   while   all   first   and
Carney    and    Dick    Betts.   Screaming second stringers will be allowed extra
down left wing came the  Bobby Hull game time with the coach,
of the jet set, Michael Finley. Guarding Speaking     of     fruits,     whatever
the hoop was John Twigg, while Shane happened  to  star  ball   handler,  Bruce
McCune just plain hooped. Curtis?    He   was    last   reported   stick
Kingsley    Artifact    checked    Kathy handling his way down the Californian
Stewart,  but  the  head  referee,  Leslie coast, but most informers agree that he
Plommer ruled that it was no contest, was a lonq way from being selected as
Tim  Wilson   brought   in Heide, but All Amerikan.
LETTERS
Thanks
The Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
We prevail upon you to express
our gratitude to your staff and the
students of UBC who supported
us faithfully in our recent strike
against B.C. Hydro.
It is most gratifying to know
that our younger generation and
our leaders of tomorrow are very
much concerned and interested in
the welfare of labour.
We took a stand for a principle
and we feel we have maintained
our principle and right to
continue as a responsible trade
union. Our officers and members
extend to you our sincere thanks
for the manner in which you
supported us.
We trust you will endeavour to
convey our appreciation to the
parties and persons concerned.
In closing, may we say once
again, thank you.
F. C. COLLINS
Business Agent
Amalgamated Transit Union
900,000,000
Alaska
TV*. CWistanScienctJ'lonitir
'What pollution?'
Nonsense
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
The motion to fire Nate Smith
failed simply because it didn't
make any sense.
Now the accusation is that
running Art Smolensky's article
the day before the election
influenced the results of it. In
fact, Nate Smith admitted his
partiality to the point of saying
that he had considered running on
the Human Government slate.
This amounts to a confession
of guilt, in purely formalistic
terms (i.e. breach of contract
wording, etc.)
But let's try examining this
change from a more realistic point
of view: Nate Smith allegedly
tried to influence the election
results by running an article that
generally created the impression
that Garrod was a better
candidate than either Lau or
Mitchell. But Garrod didn't win,
Lau did.
So it turns out that the
Right-Wing Opposition to the new
Human Government has based its
charge on sheer nonsense,
amounting to a claim that Smith
did something which he in fact
failed to do.
Motions like that are in the
ho-hum category and are the
main cause for the recent alarming
surge in alcoholism and other
forms of depravity among student
council members.
If you want to fire somebody,
you should accuse him of
something that he is guilty of.
Smith's main crime is not that he
influenced the elections, but that
he didn't influence them enough.
PETER HLOOKOFF
AMS Bureaucratic Hack
(in absentia)
McCUNE'S MUSINGS
BY SHANE McCUNE
If you can't beat #em
As I promised about a month ago, I'm going to
tell you about my new home.
The house, not far from the university, is
located in a largely middle-class neighbourhood.
There is, however, a strange atmosphere of
wall-to-wall freaks about the place. It would be
interesting to conduct a survey on the difference in
lifestyles between the upper and lower floors of the
houses on our block.
Take, for example, the former residents of our
place. From what they left lying about the house
after they left, I would guess they were very
absent-minded chemistry students.
They were in such a hurry to leave that they
forgot most of their furniture. And judging from the
backlog of correspondence with the telephone,
Hydro, and sundry other companies, I daresay they
forgot to pay for most of their furniture. And
somehow they even forgot to tell us their names or
leave a forwarding address.
The bills were no help in deciphering their
identity either, as they were addressed to Major A.
Hoople, J. Farnsworth Wallaby, Carl LaFong, and at
least a dozen other people.
But they certainly were studious. The entire
basement is cluttered with old chemistry texts, jars
and tubes of various liquids and powders and a
funny Xeroxed copy of a 1937 U.S. Patent Office
sheet on the manufacture of LSD which said at the
top in boldface "NOT TO BE REMOVED FROM
FILES". For one reason and another we felt
compelled to dispose of these items.
The degree of perseverance they possessed is
clearly shown by several blackened walls downstairs,
where their experiments were apparently less than
fruitful.
Faced with a choice between the middle-class
and the freaky, we opted for the upper-floor motif
in our re-decoration of the place. (This decision was
partly prompted by two kindly offers from our
landlady: the first, to reimburse us for the cost of
'painting the place; and the second, to kick us out if
we didn't.)
Actually, we settled for a compromise. We
carried out the middle-class decor upstairs and left
the basement alone. We never go down there
anyway — all the windows are boarded up and we
don't want to know any more about it.
We were unpleasantly surprised to find how
quickly and easily we made the house a cheaper
version of our parents' homes. Despite the
occasional poster and the fire hydrant-red can, our
abode reeks of early Sears-Roebuck with a touch of
roccoco. In the living room, for example, our
battered coffee table is covered by a Che flag on
which stands a chipped marble lamp (circa 1920).
We have a TV now, along with a stereo, a
subscription to the Sun and — gawd! — a liquor
cabinet. How suburban can you get.
We used to sit around reading Ramparts, G.S.,
Tom Wolfe, poetry by Mike Finlay, or listening to
LG—FM or Vanilla Fudge records and generally
doing groovy things. When we weren't doing up,
that is.
Now we read Time, Psychology Today,
Saturday Night, even — gawd — The Ubyssey,
poetry by Leonard Cohen and Rod McKuen, or
listen to CBC FM-1, or Fats Domino records and
generally doing greasy things. When we aren't
drinking beer, that is.
Clare does her shopping in Gastown and buys
more skirts and dresses than sweaters and jeans.
Everybody else is wearing V-neck sweaters
and/or tweed sports jackets. We've even got haircuts
and heavy plastic-rimmed glasses.
In short, we have everything a good middle
class household should have, except a good credit
rating. Tuesday, March 9, 1971
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 5
200 protest beach road
from page One
along Fourth Avenue, thereby eliminating the
necessity of destroying Locarno Park Extension.
"However," said commissioner George Puil,
"no matter where the road goes the townhouses will
still have to be built.
"If we plan the road along Fourth Avenue, then
for sure it won't be a scenic drive as the townhouses
will block out the waterfront from Fourth."
Wainborn then explained the board's plans for
housing developments which centre on townhouses
and garden apartments with single family dwellings
on either side.
Commissioner Art Cowie said there is a definite
need for a wider diversification of housing and said
Jericho Beach is the prime area for such
diversification.
Warren said mayor Tom Campbell told the
NPGHA he would be going to Ottawa this week to
discuss the road with federal officials and board
members added that until he returns city council
will take no further action.
Council is today expected to set a date for a
public hearing into the proposals.
The meeting followed a demonstration at
Jericho Beach Sunday by Vancouver residents
protesting construction of the road.
As over 200 people wandered through the
beach, protesters played tapes simulating the noise
of traffic along the proposed road, simulated oil
slicks at the beach by floating black stryofoam
along the water's edge and urged that "parks are for
people".
Former parks board candidate Steve Brown
called the present proposals a "recreation business
just out to make money".
Spanish Banks Property Owners Association
spokesman Betty Delmonico said that unless people
speak up now, the only parks left in the city will be
concrete and blacktop.
EdUS wants act amendment
from page One
The first point states that the EdUS condemns
the B.C. government for not consulting the BCTF,
the official teacher's representative organization in
dealing with Bill 47.
The second point objects to the government's
action which prevents anyone employed by a school
board, like all teachers, from taking a position on a
school board.
"This is a violation of the rights of Canadian
citizens," the EdUS motion said.
Thirdly, the EdUS of UBC, SFU and UVic will
support any actions taken by the BCTF as a result
of Bill 47 and the Teachers' Pensions Act.
BCTF is probably the teachers' only way of
improving wages and working conditions, and with
non-compulsory membership, BCTF will lose much
of its effectiveness, said James Killeen, president of
the BCTF.
There is now a recruiting process going on to
get teachers to reaffirm their membership in BCTF,
he said.
"They (the government) wanted to police our
ranks; now they won't tell us who our ranks are."
The Teachers' Pensions Act, which was
mentioned in points one and three of the EdUS
motion, is about to receive second reading in the
B.C. legislature.
It, however, only concerns teachers who are
presently working, and virtually ignores retired
teachers who have a very small pension.
At present, retired teachers are only receiving a
pension of 1.6 per cent of the amount they received
for each year of service previous to 1961.
BCTF is asking that these teachers receive $17
for each year previous to 1961, as well as a certain
percentage.
Until 1960 teachers paid into the" pension fund
an extra one per cent, to stabilize the fund, and the
BCTF thinks that teachers, especially retired
teachers, should receive this percentage back.
Chartrand to speak
Quebec labor leader Michel Chartrand will speak at
a public meeting Saturday at 8 p.m. in Kitsilano
Secondary School.
Chartrand faces the charge of being an alleged
member of the front de Liberation du Quebec
(FLQ).
Admission is free. The meeting is being held
under the auspices of the Vancouver Committtee to
Defend Political Prisoners in Quebec.
SPAGHETTI HOUSE LTD:
Hot Delicious Tasty Pizzas
- 22 DIFFERENT FLAVORS -
FREE DELIVERY - Right to Your Door
Phone 224-1720 ,- 224-6336
HOURS: 4 p.m. to 3 a.m. - Weekends 4 p.m. to 4 a.m.
4450 West 10th Ave. - Just outside the Gates
LOW FARE FLIGHT
TO LONDON, ' ENGLAND
Departing Vancouver June 26, 1971
Returning Vancouver August 13,1971
S A LIMITED NUMBER OF SEATS AVAILABLE   j§
FOR UBC FACULTY AND STUDENTS
:)•: (and immediate family) :ji|
Cost:'$306.00 return
IF INTERESTED CONTACT:
Education-Extension Programs,
UBC Center for Continuing Education,
Chancellor Boulevard, Campus. 228-2181
or
Worldwide International Travel,
University Boulevard. 224-4391
*Air Canada flight has been arranged in conjunction with several
credit courses to be located in England and on the Continent,
Summer, 1971.
APPLY RIGHT AWAY
fixin'   to
By THOM WESCOTT
PART SEVENTEEN
It was only a couple weeks after the battle of
Que Son that I got my week of R and R, rest and
recreation.
At least once during their year in Viet Nam all
American servicemen get a weeks leave in one of a
half dozen cities in southeast Asia.
I spent my R and R in Sydney. It's a beautiful
city, with all the good things I remembered from
Vancouver, and as far as I could tell, a very
innocuous mayor.
It was a very strange week, coming from the
dirt and fear of Viet Nam to a city, totally strange
but so much like home, in less than two days.
With time to think in quiet, real people to talk
to, and being able to walk alone without the weight
of a rifle, I began to realize all the really shitty,
vicious things that were being done in Viet Nam.
I saw "Hair" twice that week. "Hair" gives an ugly
picture of Amerika and the Amerikan presence in
Viet Nam. I imagine a lot of people would say that
it's an exaggeration, that it's unfair - but it couldn't
have made me sick if I hadn't known it to be true.
Sending men to prison for not fighting a war
they know is wrong; from the minute they enter the
forces telling them they won't be killing people,
they'll be killing gooks; throwing cigarette butts
into the incredibly beautiful mineral pools of
Yellowstone Park; kill a Commie for Christ and
niggers to the back of the bus — turn south and we
are facing a dying nation.
I don't know how I managed to report back to
the plane that took us back to Viet Nam. I guess it
was by consoling myself with dreams of screaming
"Fuck you!" in the face of the first American
officer I met.
By the time I got back to Da Nang however, my
cowardly nature had decided that discretion was the
better part of valor, or some other lie to the same
effect, and I had decided to water down the
language and send it in a letter.
And so for the next month I spent all my spare
time composing and sending letters to the secretary
of state and president and anyone else I could think
of, telling them what they could do with their war.
I eventually heard a rumor that persons who
were not Amerikan citizens could get a discharge
any time they wanted one simply by renouncing
any chance of becoming Amerikan. Since I felt
then, and still do, that you're better dead than red,
white and blue, I decided the best think to do was
apply for a discharge.
I went down to visit my friends in the
personnel office and got the proper forms. When I
took them back completed, they looked them over
and said they hoped it would work.
Two days after I turned in the request for a
discharge the company commander called me down
to his office. He had talked it over with the legal
officer and they both decided it wouldn't work. But
if I was a good boy and kept my mouth shut they'd
forget the incident.
The next day they decided that having me
around typewriters wasn't a good idea, and so they
sent me out to a little place called Mike Six where I
lived for the next two months with twenty other
Marines and about 60 Vietnamese amateur soldiers.
I guess they hoped I wouldn't have any time to
write letters from there.
I didn't get any letters written, but it wasn't
because I didn't have any spare time.
Meet the zaniest characters
ever gathered under one bed!
DAVID NIVEN • PETER SELLERS
ROBERT WAGNER • CAPUCINE
a SUB FILM SOC
presentation —
THE PINK PANTHER; I
<*.___—__  __•
CLAUDIA CARDINALE
As The Princess
FRIDAY 12 & SATURDAY 13
7:00 & 9:30
SUNDAY 14-7:00
SUB THEATRE
AMS Students-50c
General Public—75c Page 6
THE       UBYSSEY
Tuesday, March 9, 1971
Free Women's Lib lectures
prepare for April conference
A special women's liberation series will begin at
UBC on Thursday, as a prelude to the Indo-Chinese
women's conference for SUB from April 1 to 6.
. The first program in the series includes a look
at women's liberation in other countries and will
feature a film from North Vietnam entitled "Sister
Tham's Pine Wood".
The Thursday kick-off program will take place
in SUB 125. Subsequent programs will take place on
the three following Thursdays and are planned for
SUB 207-209.
Topics include: women in revolutions, mothers
and children and women's liberation in Canada. All
programs in the series are free.
A benefit dance is slated for March 19 in the
Pender Auditorium to raise money for women's
liberation groups in the city.
Anyone wanting further information or able to
assist in the series can call Margaret Benson at
298-8430 or Women's Caucus at 684-0523.
TUESDAY
CANOE  CLUB
Meeting in SUB 119 at noon
UBC  ANTI WAR  COMMITTEE
Meeting to build Anti War Movement
at  noon  in  SUB  215.
CAMPUS   CRUSADE   FOR   CHRIST
Meeting at 8 p.m. in Buch. Lounge.
PRE-MED   SOCIETY
Field   trip   meets   in   front   of   Wesb.
100 at noon.
WEDNESDAY
T-BIRD   MOTORCYCLE   CLUB
Meeting in SUB  105A  at noon.
ONTOLOGICAL   SOCIETY
Meeting in  Bu.  232 at noon.
ucc
Demonstration of free yoga lessons in
SUB 30 at noon.
PRE-MED  SOCIETY
Meeting in Clubs' Lounge at 8 p.m.
LUTHERAN   CAMPUS  CENTRE
"Gee-Sus Key-Reist" by Pastor Bob at
noon in  Centre,  Eucharist.
PRE-SOCIAL  WORK  CLUB
Meeting to hear social worker in SUB
105B at noon.
THURSDAY
UBC   CYCLIST  CLUB
Meeting in SUB 215 at noon
VCF
Bible-study  and candidate meeting in
SUB 117 at noon.
FILMSOC
Meeting in old Aud. at    12:50 p.m.
UBC CONSERVATIVE CLUB
Meeting to hear Rev. MacDonald. MP,
at noon in SUB 111.
° PlZtt
PATH!
EAT IN -TAKEOUT. DELIVERY
3261 W. Broadway   736-7788
Weekdays to 1 a.m.
Fri. & Sat. 3 a.m.
SALE     OF     LOST    &
FOUND GOODS. TO BE
HELD  ON
18th  &   19th
OF MARCH.
Check   before   the  sale   for
articles you may have lost.
UBC SKYDIVING CLUB
Meeting  for elections in  SUB   111   at
? p.m.
CLASSICS CLUB
Meeting at 3869 West 15th Ave.  at 8
p.m.
'tween
classes
^ $*^
DEBATING SOCIETY
Meeting in SUB 207-209 at noon.
T-BIRD WARGAMERS
Meeting in SUB 119 at ? p.m.
FREESEE
Film   "Occupation"   at   noon   in   SUB
Aud.
FRIDAY
FOLKSOC
Meeting and fun in SUB Party Room
at 8 p.m
VCF
Meeting in Clubs Lounge at noon.
MISCELLANEOUS
FILM SOCIETY
"Pink Panther" film in SUB Aud.,
7, 9:30 p.m.. Friday. Saturday; 7 p.m.,
Sunday.
LEGAL AID
SUB 228 and 232.
NATIONAL   ASSOC.   OF
PARLIAMENTARIANS
Seminar and luncheon Saturday at
9:30 p.m. at 3484 Kingsway.
LUTHERAN   CAMPUS   CENTRE
Final banquet at 7 p.m., Saturday, at
Centre; must know by Thursday, contact Bob at 224-1614
International Ball
Pacific Ballroom—Hotel Vancouver
FRIDAY - MAR. 12
Dinner at 7:30 P.M. - Dancing 9 P.M.
Moonlighter's Steel Band
Tickets available in advance from International House Office
Student $5.50 dinner/dance - $2.50 Dance Only	
Tansar Crafte
we sell
handmade things
by local craftsmen.
2002 w. 4th. avenue
COME IN TODAY!
TIRED
OF   THE
MUM BO
JUMBO
ON YOUR
INCOME TAX
Taxes ore complicated.
Why brew up o storm?
Take your return to H & R
Block. They've developed
the magic formula: Fast
service guaranteed accurate by trained tax preparers. You'll agree — it's
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We guaranty* accurate preparation of Mvety lax. return. If
we make any errori that cost you on/ penalty. or interest,
we »ill pay the penalty or interest. ^ "_
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With Over 5000 Offices in North America
3171 WEST BROADWAY
3716 OAK ST
3519 E HASTINGS
6395 FRASER
1685 DAVIE ST
3397 KINGSWAY
~~J	
WEEKDAYS-9 A.M.-9 P.M. SAT. 9 A.M.-5 P.M.-327-0461
NO APPOINTMENT* NECESSAR Y\
Anglican United Campus Ministry
Simulation Game in Urban Politics
STORY TELLING   REVISITED
Celebrate - Unwind
Friday Eve. through Sunday noon
March 12-14
Camp Capilano (in Capilano Canyon Park)
contact Peter Fribley - 224-4193 or
Lutheran Centre - 224-1614
CLASSIFIED
Rates: Campus — 3 lines, 1 day $1.00; 2 days $1.75.
Commercial ~ 3 lines, 1 day $1.25; additional
lines 30c; 4 days price of 3. '
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone and ate payable
in advance.
Publications Otiice, STUDENT UNION BLDG., Umv. of B.C.,
Vancouver 8, B.C. Closing Deadline is 11:30, the day before
publication.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Dances
11
SWEET BEAVER WITH CARL,
Graves, March 12, Sub Ballroom,
8:30-12:30. Don't miss this fantas-
tic dance!	
LORD FOPPINGTON'S ROUT 18TH
Century dinner dance entertain-
ment.  Tickets $3.50 English  Dept.
DANCE TO SONGBIRD. TOTEM
Park,  March  12,   9:00-1:00.
Lost & Found
13
Special Notices
15
STUDENT CHRISTIAN MOVE-
ment planning meeting, Tuesday,
March 9, 8:00 p.m., room No. 1,
Union College (basement, east
wing).  All  interested are  invited.
SPRING RETREAT. MARCH 12-14.
Simulation Game in Urban Politics
—Storytelling Revisited — Experimental Liturgy, Anglican United
Campus Ministry. Call 224-1614,
224-4193 or 738-9646. •
CONSIDERING ALASKA? ACCUR-
ate, comprehensive brochure about
opportunities in construction, oil,
fishing and canneries, others.
Send $2.00 cash or money order.
JOBS IN ALASKA, P.O. Box 1565,
Anchorage,  Alaska 99501.	
FLEAMARKET RUMMAGE SALE,
Prince of Wales School, one block
west of Arbutus north of 33rd,
Friday, March 12th, 1:30-9:30.
"THE PINK PANTHER", STAR-
ring: David Niven, Peter Sellers,
Robert Wagner and Claudia Car-
dinale. SUB Aud. Fri and Sat.,
7:00 & 9:30; Sun., 7:00. AMS cardholders  50c.
INTELLIGENT RELIABLE BA
needs work, e.g., research assistant, telephone answering, some
typing.   Sue   433-5487.
LORD FOPPINGTON'S ROUT.
Thurs., March 11. Dinner and entertainment. Tickets English Dept.
DON'T MISS.APPLE AND STONE
Folk and Blues Festival this Friday, March 12, in SUB Party
Room, starting at 8:00 p.m. One
dollar  at   the   door.
Travel Opportunities
16
INTERNATIONAL   CHARTERS
687-2855 224-0087 687-1244
List of 1971 return 1-way & relative flights U.K., Continent, India,
Africa, Hong Kong.
106—709 Dunsmuir St.,  Van.   1,  B.C.
Wanted—Miscellaneous
18
CASH FOR TOUR WEIGHTS.
Must be in good condition, 733-
8976 evenings, 228-3865 days.
AUTOMOTIVE
Automobiles For Sale
21
1969 MGBGT WIRE WHEELS
overdrive, immaculate condition.
Must sell. Best offer buys. Ring
684-0988  to midnight.
BUSINESS SERVICES
Scandali
37
18TH CENTURY DINNER AND
Rout. Tickets $3.50 (At English
Dept.) Thurs. 6:30 at Cecil Green
Park.
"THE PINK PANTHER". Meet the
zaniest characters ever gathered
under one bed! SUB Auditorium
Fri. and Sat., 7:00 & 9:30; Sun.,
7:00.  AMS  card  holders 50e.
Typing
40
RETIRED PUBLISHER WILL
edit and correct manuscripts, essays, etc. Reasonable rate, 228-
8259.
— AMS TYPING SERVICE —
30c  per   page   with   1   day   service.
12:30   -   1:30  in   SUB  Co-ordinator's
office weekdays,  879-0095.  Evenings
and weekends.
— SEE US FIRST! —
Typing
40
TEDIOUS TASKS — PROFESSION-
al Typing Service. IBM Selectric
— Days, Evenings, Weekends.
Phone 228-9304 — 30c per page.
STUDENTS: WILL TYPE TERM
papers, etc., fast service and reasonable rates. Call Yvonne, 738-
6874.
EXPERIENCED TYPIST, FOR ES-
says, term papers, .etc., reasonable rates, in my home, North
Vancouver,   988-7228.
EXPERT ELECTRIC TYPING.
Theses, essays, term papers. Fast,
accurate. Reasonable Rates. Call
Mrs.  Duncan,  228-9597.
YR. ROUND ACC. TYPING FROM
legible drafts. Reas. rates. 10:00
a.m. to 9:00 p.m, phone 738-6829.
Quick service on short essays.
TYPING DONE AT MY HOME.
Neat and careful work. Essays,
Thesis. Reasonable rates. North
Van.  985-0154.
EFFICIENT ELECTRIC TYPING,
my home. Essays, Thesis, etc.
Neat, accurate work. Reasonable
Rates. Phone 263-5317.
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted
51
! !GO FISHING THIS SPRING!! GET
"How to get jobs on Fishing Boats
and Deep-sea Freighters in B.C."
Send $2 to Ken Erickson, 1053-A
Barclay St., Van. 5. Satisfaction
or money back.
EXPERIENCED PART-TIME SER-
vice station man required for
weekends and evening work, Varsity Esso. G.  Burnside, 224-7424.
CLEANING LADY WANTED, MR.
Norton, 684-1181, 9-5, 263-5079, evs.
INSTRUCTION & SCHOOLS
Tutoring
64
WILL TUTOR MATH 100 & 101,
day, evening, or Sat. Reasonable
rates. Phone 733-3544—10 a.m. to
3 p.m.
AVOID PRE-EXAM PANIC. GET
help now. UBC Tutoring Centre
has qualified tutors in over 50
subject areas. Register at SUB
100B, 228-4583, 12-2 p.m. daily.
$3.00 /hour.
NEED HELP IN FRENCH CON-
versation? I also do bilingual typing (French) and translations.
Contact: Danielle Schmid. Tel. 253-
8075.
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
SZ 11%M KOFLACH BUCKLES
$50.00. New Winchester 30-30, 2
sights & sling $80.00. Phone Kim
731-1302 evenings.
BIRD CALLS
Your Student Telephone Directory
NOW HALF PRICE - 50c
at the Bookstore, Thunderbird Shop
and AMS Publications Office
RENTALS & REAL ESTATE
Rooms
81
Room 8c Board
12
FREE BOARD / LODGING Exchange for help with children 3
hours evenings, near UBC Gates.
224-6192.
Furnished Apts.
83
Houses—Furn. & Unfurn.      86 Tuesday, March 9, 1971
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 7
iiiiiiiiniiiiHiiiiiiuiiiiiiiHHiiiiiiiiniiHniii
IIIIIIIIIIUIHHHIIIIIIIIIIIIIimg
Birds sweep)	
I West find IS I    Wonderland over as All loses
I WINNIPEG - Two come-from-behind wins have put the |
| University of B.C. Thunderbirds in the Canadian Collegiate |
| hockey finals starting Thursday in Sudbury, Ont. §
§ Thunderbirds edged the University of Manitoba Bisons 5-3 |
| Friday and 7-6 Saturday to take the best-of-three Western Canada §
= Intercollegiate Athletic Association final in straight games. Both s
= games needed overtime. §
| Norm Park was the hero Saturday scoring with 15 seconds §
§ left in the 10-minute overtime session to cap the 'Birds big 1
§ comeback. 5
I UBC trailed 4-1 after the first period. §
| "We were shaky in the first period," 'Bird coach Bob |
I Hindmarch said, "But we started skating in the second period and §
§ were flying by the third." |
1 Thunderbirds cut the margin to 6-4 after the second and §
| finally pulled even with 2:07 left in the third. 1
§j Barry Wilcox, with two, Doug Buchanan, Bob McAneely, =
§ Rich Longpre and Roy Sakaki bagged the other 'Birds goals. §
§ Two goals by Rod Lindquist and Andy Miles and singles by =
| Jim Trosky and Garry Hammerback accounted for the Manitoba §
3 goals. 5
| 'Birds ran into a series of penalties in the second period that I
= almost cost them the game. But Sakaki, who hasn't played too 3
3 much lately, scored while killing one of the Manitoba powerplays. 3
5 His goal made the score 5-4 — a big play as the Bisons scored §.
I seconds later. "That goal kept us in the game," said Hindmarch. §
§ Wilcox managed the tying goal on a set-up from Doug §
= Buchanan. Buchanan carried the puck over the blue-line, faded §
§ one defenceman, drew the other Bison defender over and dumped §
I a pass in front to Wilcox. =
j§ Ian Wilkie was outstanding in the UBC nets stopping 47 I
§ shots. Wilkie came up with a great save, when he robbed a Bison §
1 who was unchecked in front of the UBC goal. Seconds later 'Birds §
5 scored the winner. §
3 McAneely fed the puck to Laurie Vanzella in the corner, §
5 Vanzella hit Park standing in front, and Thunderbirds were in the =.
3 Canadian finals for the first time since 1963. 5
5 Friday   night,   UBC   trailed   3-2   until   Longpre   forced 5
3 overtime with 3:32 left. Longpre also picked up the winner in s
1 overtime, with Wayne Hunter adding the insurance goal while 5
j| killing a penalty. I
3 Longpre's winner was the prettiest goal of the series. He =
I picked up a board pass from Jack Moores at centre turned on the 5
H speed to beat the Bison defence and faked the goalie to the ice to s
= score. 1
5 Park, on a perfect pass from McAneely, and Wilcox, on 3
= McAneely's rebound, managed UBC's other goals. =
1 Hindmarch cited the game's turning point: "We were two =
I men short for a minute and 40 seconds in the third period, and §
5 they couldn't score." Duane Biagoni, Steve Fera, Laurie Vanzella =.
5 and Ian Wilkie were great during this time "That was the lift we |
I needed to win," said Hindmarch. The score was 3-2 for Manitoba |
I at the time. §
§ Wilkie was particularly great. He made 47 saves to Bisons' g
= Grant Clay who stopped 25. =
5 "I've said all season that we were the best team in the 1
§. league," said Hindmarch. "But I'm just thrilled that we won." =
I Last time UBC made it to the Canadian finals they won the |
I championship. That squad formed the nucleus of Canada's 1964 |
= Olympic team. §
I Thunderbirds will be the underdogs at the Nationals this =
I time around, but that's the way Hindmarch would like it. "We |
I seem to play better when we have our backs to the wall." 5
iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuuiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiyiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiwwiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiR
Graduate Student Association
Elections For GSA Executive
Nominations Are Invited For
The Following Positions
. PRESIDENT
. SECRETARY
. INTERNAL AFFAIRS OFFICER
. EXTERNAL AFFAIRS OFFICER
. 2 AMS REPRESENTATIVES
Nomination forms and procedures are available at the
Graduate Student Centre. Nominations close March 12,
1971,5:00 p.m.
By STEVE MILLARD
I was among the 5,400 people
in the cold Forum Monday who
paid 10 bucks each to watch the
"Fight of the Century."
And 10 bucks was cheap for
some. "You got a ticket." "Yep."
"I'll give you 40 bucks for it."
'Try twice as much." Scalpers
had a field day.
The local showing grossed
between   50   and   60   thousand
bucks. Peanuts compared to Jerry
Perenchio and Jack Kent Cooke
who ran the whole shot.
They expect to net 10 million
from a gross of 30 million dollars.
An estimated 300 million people
watched the fight over the world.
The fight was a sure sell-out.
The recognized champion Joe
Frazier against Muhammed Ali.
Politics accentuated the
interest. Frazier the good-citizen
Girls help WCIAA to title
Last weekend, Ontario was the
scene of national swimming and
gymnastic championships.
The winner of the swimming
championships, held at the
University of Waterloo, was the
UBC's Sue Cronk placed first
with a pool record in the 50-yard
butterfly, while Shirley Cazalet
obtained two firsts, one in the
100-yard backstroke and the
other in the 100-yard butterfly.
against Ali the draft-evader.
Still most of the people at the
Forum were pro-Ali. Even in New
York, the crowd wanted Ali to
win.
Did he have the old magic left?
Unfortunately, no. He showed
only flashes of his old brilliance.
But with each flash of the old
form, the crowd rallied with him.
The end result wasn't a draft
dodger getting his... but the end
of a legend. Sure he talked like
the old Ali; mimiced the opponent
like the old Ali; but he didn't
dance like the old Ali and so was
mugged in the ring.
The incurable romantic, Ali,
will never regain the old mystic.
Let the government put him in jail
now, they've got their 10-plus
million in taxes from the fight.
'The "Fight of the Century" is
over. The boxing world's
Woodstock is finished. Boxing will
only suffer by Ali's loss.
SUE CRONK ... set record in 50-yard butterfly
Western Intercollegiate Athletic
Association.
The WCIAA piled up a total of
633 points to outscore the
Women's Intercollegiate of
Ontario, who obtained a 406
point total.
The WCIAA was aided by the
UBC girls team who fared
favorably in the final overall
standings by placing second only
to the University of Alberta. They
won with a 252 point total while
UBC had a close 238. If UBC had
a diving team, they could have
conceivably won the title.
Eighteen teams took part in the
championships.
Intramurals
Awards Banquet—This year in SUB,
Monday. March 15, with Frank Gnup
and the presentations.
Snooker—Individual winner was Joe
Kaufman, of Science. The team standings are: Commerce, 185; Fort Camp,
185; Science, 130; Dekes, 135; Beta's,
110; and Delta Upsilon, 90.
Bowling —. Playoffs now underway,
check the schedules to see when you
play.
Ice Hockey—Commerce and PE play
in the Division I final to be held this
Thursday.
Arfs 20 Road Race—Thursday, March
11; starts at 12:45 in front of Vancouver
General Hospital. Seven exchanges of
the baton will be made at the prescribed points. The last lap will finish on
the East MaU in front of SUB. The
relay teams will be shooting for the 7.5-
mile record of 34 min. 7 sec. This was
set back in February 17, 1934. Relay cup
presented  at  Awards  Banquet.
At York, University, the
WCIAA Women Gymnasts
captured the silver medal, beaten
only by the Ontario Quebec
Conference.
Janet Terry of UBC was third
all-round, winning the national
bronze medal. She was a finalist in
floor exercise, balance beam, and
uneven bars. UBC's Eleanor Spain
was also a strong contender for
the WCIAA.
UBC was unable to defend its
title as top team in Canada since
university teams were replaced by
representatives of the conference
teams.
PREGNANCY
LAB. TEST
PORTE'S
UPTOWN PHARMACY
Granville at 14th Tel.: 738-3107
PIZZA
PATIO.
• EAT IN .TAKEOUT* DELIVERY
3261 W. Broadway   736-7788
Weekdays to 1 a.m.
Fri. & Sat. 3 a.m.
PIMPLES
Ugly skin blemishes on face or body.
Eczema. Pimples. Red Scaly Itching
Skin and Athlete's Foot are quickly
relieved by NIXODERM. Antiseptic
action heals, helps make skin softer,
smoother, clearer. Ask your druggist
for NIXODERM ointment and soap.
Help clean, clear and revitalize your
skin. Look better fast.
rf
The University of  British Columbia
FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE
OEDIPUS THE KING
BY SOPHOCLES
Adapted and Directed by Donald Soule
MARCH 15-27
SPECIAL STUDENT PERFORMANCES
Thursday, March 18 - Matinee 12:30 p.m.
Monday, March 22 - 7:30 p.m.
Thursday, March 25 — Matinee 12:30 p.m.
STUDENT TICKETS - $1.00 (available for all performances)
Tickets: Frederic Wood Theatre, Room 207
SUPPORT YOUR CAMPUS THEATRE
V
f Page 8
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, March 9, 1971
PAGE TUESDAY
FROM HOBSON'S CHOICE
Anne Wakefield as Maggie Hobson
and William Christopher, as Will Mossop.
Hobson's Choice
by Pat Aufderheide
The Performance of Hobson's Choice in the Playhouse by the
visiting Manitoba Theatre Company is sophisticated, but
unfortunately, the play itself is not; and not even the expert efforts
of director Malcolm Black can save it from pointlessness.
It's a peculiarly irrelevant play in some ways,
and particularly irritating in others. Set in
industrially-exploitative Manchester in the
1880's, the play is a naive celebration of the
shopkeepers' myths.
Willy, the dumb but pleasant bootmaker in
Hobson's bootshop, is bullied into marriage by
Hobson's old maid daughter. She "schools" him
in the proper virtues, to make him a Man —
ambition, cruelty, the "poor but proud"
mentality. Finally proud shopowner Hobson
must submit to his daughter's care and to his
son-in-law' ambition; but at least he submits to a
younger version of himself and all he respects.
In the end, everyone has what he wants,
relatively speaking, and we can only ask, so
what? It wasn't terribly funny, or very
appropriate, or pleasantly fantastic; it was
written in and about a world that is today at
worst offensive and at best uninteresting. It is
most reminiscent of the kind of light novel one
finds in hardbound editions at rummage sales.
Amusing in their day, but now barely quaint.
The production is incongruously superb.
Tony van Bridge as Hobson and Anne Wakefield
as his bossy daughter Maggie are both strident
and sharp. Their briskly defined characterizations
are both individual and reciprocal, as intransigent
father and dominant daughters should be. Van
Bridge's speech denouncing marriage, climaxing
in a majestic "You poor poor wretches!"
deserves the ovations it gets. Their energy is more
than enough to cover minor lapses like the
moments, of staginess in Kathleen Flaherty's
interpretation of the giddy sister; or flat bluff
accents like that of Alexander Reed as the
doctor.
The accoutrements are so well done that one
grants the context reality-rights; and this all the
more amazing for having been imported
complete from Winnipeg. The shop sets, the
costuming, the slightest technical ramifications
to the production were all as highly polished, as
accurate, and as evocative as the usual Playhouse
production.
The production in all its sophistication
resembles the Playhouse style so closely, in fact,
that one wonders why the theatre companies
bothered with the expensive and complicated
exchange of productions. The quality and level
of performance between the two companies is
indistinguishable; and the aims, of entertainment
over enlightenment, seem to be the same. The
need to compare and learn remains unserved.
Hobson's Choice is a mildly amusing diddle
of a play, produced with all the sophistication
and tact of a metropolitan theatre company. It
smacks, somehow, of theatrical overkill.
The Price, An Unwarranted Flop
Vancouver's newest theatre company,
Actors Contemporary, must have hit an all time
audience attendance low at last Friday's performance of Arthur Miller's play The Price. About
thirty people showed up to watch this emotional
play at The Magic Theatre on Granville.
The acting is excellent, especially Joseph
Golland as the eighty-nine year old Solomon, and
John Mayes as the aging cop Victor. Walter.
Victor's brother, is played by Robert Graham.
His performance is passable, but it lacks the
strength of the other actors, including Rae
Brown as Victor's wife Esther, a middle aged
whiner who wants to forget her impoverishment.
The play centres around the sale of the
symbols of former grandeur, the furniture of a
once prominent family. Four people are gathered
for the sale. Victor, his wife Esther, his surgeon
brother Walter, whom he has not seen for
seventeen years and an old furniture dealer
named Solomon.
Complications arise because Victor hates his
rich brother for running out on their father.
Victor remained with his once rich father after
the crash of 1929 instead of going to university
to study medicine as his brother had done.
Victor's consolation is that his father never had
to sleep in the park.
Unfortunately for Victor, he finds that he
has sold his future for nothing when Walter
informs him that their father still had enough
money to live and to send Victor to university,
even after the crash.
The use of the fallen family and the financial
aspects of human relations to present universal
human problems is the Miller style. We see both
of these in another of Miller's plays, Death of a
Salesman, where salesman Willy Loman finds
that he is a failure because he is not sold on
himself, the prime prerequisite for successful
selling. Another financial influence in The Price,
is Joseph Golland as the eighty-nine year old
furniture dealer Solomon. Golland is both
credible and humourous in his portrayal of the
ancient and successful dealer.
Solomon will probably live to be a hundred
and eighty-nine years, because he perceives that
life is an act, a pretense of personal affection and
sentiment towards others for one's own gain.
Because of his amorality and his knowledge,
Solomon commands a very high price for his
service, unlike the cop Victor, who will always be
shortchanged, because he fails to see the financial
price principles that govern human relationships.
The five characters, the aging cop, his
whining wife, the rich surgeon, the ancient
Solomon and the unseen ghost of the dead father
are bonded by financial concerns, only Victor
hopes for more. The former glory of the family is
now in ruins, it is not the death of a dynasty, but
the death of mundane things, like the love
between the brothers, and their parents, loves
that prove to be false in retrospect.
In The Price, the four actors work together
to create a powerful, emotional drama, it hits
home, as Miller's plays very often do, it is an
excellent play, excellently performed, and it
deserves much more attention. It isn't pretty,
like the affected powder puffs that the Playhouse
seems to enamoured of, but it is moving, and it's
only fifty cents more than most of the films
playing downtown.
-TIM WILSON
Pete Seeger
an aging
Pete Seeger has been called a period piece -
radical standing firmly on yesterday's barricades.
But you couldn't have told that to anyone in the near
capacity Queen Elizbeth Theatre audience Sunday night.
If anyone in the theatre wasn't a Seeger fan before he
walked on stage, the man's gentle intensity and sincerity
won them over in short order.
There are thousands of good performers, but few with
Seeger's unique gift of drawing an audience into the
performance and breaking down the invisible barrier that is
usually placed in front of a stage.
It is an ability that doesn't stem from any show-biz
"charisma". It comes simply from the fact Seeger obviously
believes every word he sings, whether the song was written
yesterday or 300 years ago.
He didn't sing "Last Train to Nuremberg" because it's
fashionable to oppose the Vietnam war - no one could ever
affect the bitterness that was in his voice when he sang the
song.
And when he sang ordinary songs of love, he almost
made up for all of the music industry's mass-produced crap.
After hearing Seeger in concert for two hours, it's easy
to understand the effect he had in rallying striking
Kentucky coal miners in 1942 or Alabama civil rights
marchers in 1963.
It's also easy to understand why, until recently, he was
blacklisted from American T.V. Any man so effective in
singing about freedom can't be tolerated by those in power.
Pete Seeger is one performer who doesn't let the
meaning of his songs stay in the theatre. Unlike his former
partner, Woody Guthrie, Seeger will never have to see his
songs of the people being corrupted into patriotic
standards.
He believes in his songs off-stage and convinces his
audience to do the same when they leave the concert. In
Seeger's own words: "If music could only bring peace, I'd
only be a musician." -SANDY KASS
-NATE SMITH
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Tel: 879-7236
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TYPEWRITERS
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Expert Repairs
Trades Welcome
STUDENT RENTALS
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Open Daily inc. Saturday-9-6
Friday 9-9
Lots of Free Parking
FREESEE!
Film "Occupation"-Thurs., Mar. 11, 12:30 p.m.
On-the-spot coverage of the McGill students SIT-IN (1969) to
establish their right to have a say in who teaches them!
SUB AUDITORIUM
FREE!
BOB DYLAN'S
DONT LOOK BACK
"i
a
Huu  tl       ± 11 n /-     (across the mall
ebb Theatre, U.B.C.  westof s.u.b.)
Friday, March 12 - 7:30 and 9:30 P.M.
Saturday, March 13 - 7:30 and 9:30 P.M.
Admission—50f
OFFICIAL NOTICE
Alma Mater Society
ELECTIONS
Nominations are now open to all students for:
The position of AMS President
Three (student-at-large) positions
as Student Senator
The nomination period closes WEDNESDAY, MARCH 10th at
noon and the election will be held the following WEDNESDAY,
MARCH 17th.
Anyone wishing to run for a position should pick up a
nomination form from the AMS Business Office, the AMS
Executive Office, or from AMS Secretary, Anne Clarkson in SUB
248.

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