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The Ubyssey Dec 1, 1972

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Array Profs to hear 6 from arts
Vol. LIV, No. 23        VANCOUVER, B.C., FRIDAY, DECEMBER 1, 1972
228-2301
"IIs
PHANTOM PEEPER Henri LeVoyeur snatches view of comely co-ed
in Brock Hall study and contemplation cubicle. Avid Ubyssey photog
Kini  McDonald took this snap-shot after a woman wrote a  letter
detailing Henri's sordid acts. Her letter, page 18, states that while later
deciding to expose Henri, at first "I held my piece."
New union seeks 350 more
before clerk certification
By DAVID MARS
The Association of University and
College Employees needs about 350
more new members at UBC in order to
gain certification as the bargaining
agent for the university's clerical staff.
AUCE president Jennifer Clemmons
said Thursday approximately 150 of the
1,050 campus clerical workers have
joined the association. The AUCE needs
a majority of non-unionized clerical
workers signed up for certification.
Clemmons said the B.C. based AUCE
is planning to expand to other universities and colleges in B.C. if the UBC
recruiting   drive   is   successful.   The
AUCE is a splinter group from the
American-based Office and Technical
Employees Union which had an unsuccessful recruiting drive for clerical
workers at UBC last spring.
Questionnaires about union priorities
given to members have not yet been
tallied she said, adding she expects the
main priorities will be equal pay for
equal work and a wage level comparable
to that of other clerical workers outside
the university.
Clemmons said she believes for the
first time in more than 20 years full-time
clerical workers have received a wage
By GARY COULL
A general meeting of all students Thursday called by the
arts undergraduate society elected six students to meet with the
arts faculty in a special meeting dealing with recent arts
student demands for representation.
The students, three men and three women, will speak at a
special faculty meeting Dec. 13 called to deal with a resolution
about student representation passed at the recent student-
faculty ad-hoc meeting.
The up-coming meeting was one of two called by arts dean
Doug Kenny to deal with business held over from the faculty
meeting cancelled Nov. 23.
A Dec. 6 meeting will hear a
report on the women's studies
program for next year. This
meeting will also hear notice of
the student motion by anthropology professor Bill
Wilmott.
The motion by Wilmott calls
for student representation at
all levels of the faculty. It also
proposes formation of a
student-faculty committee to
look into the question.
If the Dec. 13 faculty meeting
passes the resolution the six
students present will form the
student portion of the committee.
The six students were
elected by 200 of the original
300 students who came to the
meeting in Buchanan 106.
They are: former AUS
president Colin Portnuff, arts
4; Rob Stevens, grad studies;
Bill Moen arts 3; Val Embree,
arts 3; Vicki Obedkoff arts 4;
and Jeanette Auger.
Much of Thursday's meeting
was taken up with discussion
about student parity.
Experimental college activist Karl Burau, said it was
justified for students to invade
the faculty meeting after
getting the runaround for two
years. However, he cautioned
students not to spoil it by being
unreasonable.
Alma Mater Society
treasurer David Dick,
speaking against parity, urged
students to disassociate power
and parity.
"The faculty won't accept
parity. Let's not cut our
throats."
A large majority of students,
however, demanded the
elected representatives to
press for parity. A vote on the
question passed overwhelmingly.
Student senator Allan
Robbins cautioned the students
to beware of "moderates"
See page 2: SEX
Vile rag
mops up
That's it, folks.
Another term gone by,
another portion of history
recorded in these annals.
You see, The Ubyssey
doesn't publish again until Jan.
5.
Stifle those moans, grit those
teeth, because at that time
we'll be pleased to give you
another peek into the boudoirs
of famed UBCers.
(We hope you're suitably
impressed.)
But for the moment, this
issue of action-packed goodies
open to you at the mere twitch
of a flicking finger.
We have the last of a series
on civic politics with Chris
Krawczyk interviewing COPE
mayoralty candidate Angie
Dennis and sundry aldermanic
hopefuls. Then there's two
pages of sports and a couple of
letters from faithful readers
like yourself.
Flick on, and see.
increase in addition to the annual July
pay raise.
Although the $15 wage hike comes at
the height of the AUCE recruiting drive
Clemmons said the wage increment
possibly was a result of the formation of
the union, but the new provincial
government and minimum wage law
also have been important factors
motivating the Nov. 1 increase.
The AUCE is holding a recruiting and
information meeting 12 to 2 p.m.
Tuesday in the garden room of the
graduate student centre for all clerical
staff. Page 2
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday,   December   1,   1972
Police brutality charged
A Vancouver mayorlty
candidate said Thursday she
will attempt to press charges
against the RCMP for what she
indicated was police brutality
against native Indians.
Angie Dennis, candidate on
the Committee of Progressive
Electors slate, told a
demonstration to mark the
anniversary of Chilcotin Indian
Fred Quilt's death that she will
be approaching the provincial
government soon about
pressing the charges.
Quilt, 55, died in Alexis Creek
amid charges of police
brutality. Two inquests into his
death attached no blame in the
incident.
At an hour-long peaceful
demonstration about 30
members of the Fred Quilt
Committee, an Indian protest
group named for Quilt and the
Committee of Progressive
Klectors placed a wreath
outside the steel fence
surrounding the RCMP
barracks at 33rd and Heather.
Also present at the
demonstration was alderman
Harry Rankin, who spoke
briefly about the Fred Quilt
case.
"This is the first time the
Indian people have been able to
rally around an issue of such
national,  and  international
importance," Rankin said.
The lawyer, who represented
Quilt's family at an inquest this
summer, added the Indian
people had previously thought
sympathetic were proven, in
this incident, to be ineffectual,
if not apathetic.
Reps on all levels
The Alma Mater Society council Thursday called for
student representation at all levels of academic decision
making.
Council also moved to "urge the provincial government to
change the Universities Act to allow student representation and
student voting rights on faculty councils and faculty meetings."
Council members discussed the current arts situation and
most members supported the actions taken by the arts undergraduate society in vying for student parity in decision
making.
Meanwhile, students will vote Jan. 17 in a campus
referendum to decide whether to join in the new national union
of students. Council stipulated that such membership should be
valid only if membership fees do not exceed 30 cents per
student.
Sex equalization sought
be
From page 1
i iuiii   page   j
:>cause students are in for a
bargaining session.
One unidentified student
asked Ihe audience members
Io consider themselves the
legislature.
"Let the faculty of arts do
the paperwork and then bring
their proposals to the student
body to approve," he said.
Representative Portnuff
proposed an amendment to the
original resolution passed at
the ad-hoc meeting to include
stall members. This motion
was also passed by a large
majority.
Another motion from the
floor called for the approval in
principle of equal representation of men and women at all
levels of decision making
bodies. This motion provoked
brief controversy but was later
passed.
Alter the student committee
had been elected the meeting
moved to Bu. 214 where groups
were assigned to study specific
proposals to the faculty.
AUS president Brian Loomes
said the work groups are being
established to prepare practical solutions to the problems
which students experience,
and to submit ideas to the
faculty through the proposed
student reps.
The areas of study and their
chairpersons are: evaluation
of students; hiring, firing and
tenure, Don Hassett (731-8365);
nature of research at UBC, Jim
Cropley (277-3409); classroom
as being oppressive, Roger
Mattiussi (433-1252); new
programs, Scott Watson (733-
3634); work load, Janice
Sandoninsky (733-3927);
Valerie Embreee (228-8143)
and erotic oppression, Brian
Loomes (738-0387).
Loomes said he thought the
meeting   accomplished   some
good work and urged students
to keep struggling against
ideological conditions at the
university.
"It is necessary to keep
challenging the kind of natural
energy which tries to break out
from students," she said.
Loomes also reminded arts
students about Wednesday's
election for an arts undergraduate rep to the AMS
student council.
^6?
arsity Sports
•&
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John Wurflinger would like
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'Department of Theatre'
AUDITIONS FOR
 MACBETH
to be presented Feb. 28 — March 17
will be held on:
Mon. December 4 - 3:30 - 5:30 Thurs. December 7 - 3:30 - 5:30
Tues. December 5 — 3:30 - 5:30 Fri. December 8 — 3:30 - 5:30
Sat. December 9 - 11:00 - 4:00
in
ROOM 112, FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE
Auditions open to all UBC students, faculty and staff
Use your vote on
Dec. 13 to make a
real change at City Hall.
COPE
has new policies.
It puts people first
It is the alternative to the
N.P.A. and T.E.A.M., both
of which are supported
by the developers.
COPE'S Program Includes:
• A 20 year plan far the controlled growth of the city.
Protection of tenant rights; hold down rents.
A ward system to give each area of the city direct
representation on Council.
Immediate expansion of bus system.
Establish   secondary   industries to  process our  resources at home and provide jobs.
New guidelines for development of downtown area
and False Creek.
Strict environmental controls.
Vou can judge COPE's program by the record
of COPE Alderman Harry Rankin.
VOTE FOR THESE COPE
CANDIDATES ON DEC. 13
MAYOR
DENNIS, Agnes                                                |
X
COUNCIL
CHUNN, Margaret
X
COPAN, Les
X
CORK, James
X
JACKSON, Solomon
X
KISCH, Walter
X
KHOURI, Jacques
X
RANKIN, Harry
X
VINT, Sam
X
WORTHINGTON, Cliff
X
YORKE, Bruce
X
SCHOOL BOARD
CROSBY, Claude
X
FOULKS, Irene
X
GREENWELL, Elizabeth
X
KOPPERUD, Aag
X
MORRISON, Dorothy
X
POINT, Nora Rose
X
SMITH, Ruth Breger
X
PARKS BOARD
DUSANG, Ray
X
GREENWELL, Donald
X
HAWKEN, Thomas
X
MARINING, Rod
X
O'SHAUGHNESSY, Helen
X
SHELTON, Sid
X
TAKE THIS LIST TO THE POLLS
WITH YOU OH DEC. 13th
PUBLISHED BY COMMITTEE OF PROGRESSIVE ELECTORS (COPE)
329 West Broadway Phone 873-3501 Friday,  December   1,   1972
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 3
Books move, library opens Jan. 3
BySONDRA
MARSHALL SMITH
Study space for 1,400
students will be available Jan.
3 in the new Sedgewick library.
Head librarian Basil Stuart-
Stubbs said this week that
although a date has not been
set  for  the  official  opening
ceremony the library will be
open for business at the
beginning of second term.
Transfer of books from the
old Sedgewick Library will
begin Dec. 20 and 21, the last
two days of exams. However,
the psychology section will
remain in the stacks until Dec.
22 for psychology 100 and 206
students whose exams are late.
"We went through the exam
schedule and the loans from
last year to gain information
about which books might be
required by psych students,"
said Ture Erikson, head of the
Sedgewick library.
He indicated approximately
160 books in the psychology
section are involved.
For these students and
others requiring week-loan
books during the holidays it is
possible to order specific
volumes in advance. These
books will then be removed
_____^  -glen kerelum photo
NOT ANOTHER LIBRARY PICTURE, moaned the editors, as they     Basil, we sure could use an invitation to a nice wine and cheese party
surveyed this shot of the back of the new Sedgewick library. C'mon     for all the flack we've given you.
AMS supports hot finger prosecution
By DAVID SCHMIDT
The Alma Mater Society
wholeheartedly supports prosecution of
bookstore shoplifters, AMS vice-
president Gordon Blankstein said
Thursday.
Bookstore manager Bob Smith said 15
students have been prosecuted for
shoplifting this term.
"We are continuing this policy.
Students ought to know what they are
getting into," Smith said.
He said his "gut feels bad" when he
has to prosecute a student but added that
they are adults and that you "must
prosecute to be consistent and to be
fair."
He said this policy is designed to deter
shoplifters, 80 per cent of whom are
impulsive and would be discouraged if
faced with a possible criminal record.
"I don't want to impose a price increase due to shoplifting," he said.
When asked if the policy of
prosecuting shoplifters was unnecessarily giving students criminal
records, Blankstein said: "They know
shoplifting is an offence so they should
be prepared for the consequences.
"I don't want to have to force students
to pay for a 10 per cent loss due to
shoplifting. Even if the loss is only as
little as one per cent, I don't think other
students should have to pay for it."
The bookstore layout was recently
changed to deter shoplifters and is one of
the reasons more people have been
caught.
"Our surveillance time is very low,
only about 15 minutes a day, but the
wider aisles makes it easier to spot
shoplifters," Smith said.
from the stacks before the
move. Due dates will be Jan. 3,
4, or 5. Two hours and one day
loan books can not be ordered
in advance.
The old Sedgewick library
will be open until 5 p.m. Dec. 22
for students completing last
minute assignments.
Erikson said study space will
not be disturbed during
removal because the books will
be taken out the back way."
"We'll take one stack shelf
off at a time and load it onto a
book trolley," he said. There
are 130,000 volumes to be
moved.
"Both the circulation and
reference desks will be open
Dec. 20 and 21 but we'd like to
encourage people to order and
get their books before then,"
he said.
Meanwhile, Stuart-Stubbs
said, Brock Hall study space
will be closed after Jan. 3.
"Two temporary services
will use the facilities: a Red
Cross blood clinic and a
Bookstore sale," he said.
There was no indication about
future functions.
Orientation tours and lectures of the new library will be
available during January.
Court ruling
hits patrol
enforcement
By DEBORAH MacNEILL
Pressure of a court case
against the UBC traffic patrol
has resulted in lax enforcement of vehicle impoundment on campus earlier
this year. But the patrol are
back on the job.
Traffic superintendent Hugh
Kelly said Wednesday an
unidentified student's charge
against the patrol for impounding an unregistered car
was thrown out of court on a
technicality.
But, he said, the student
involved had not exhausted all
avenues of appeal before
taking the case to court.
The question about whether
the campus traffic patrol has
legal jurisdiction to impound
cars and exact fines for their
release   remains   unresolved.
Impoundments were halted
while the case was before the
courts but until it is appealed
towings will be resumed.
Kelly and the board of
governors say the power to
impound cars is granted under
the Universities Act and
outlined in the parking
regulations booklet, section 22.
Parlor bans gears for 'flesh, language'
By LINDA HOSSIE
UBC engineers will not be served in the Plaza 500
beer parlor due to their recent demonstration of
flesh and bad language, beer parlor manager Tom
Diguiscini said Thursday.
"The biggest problem this beer parlor has had
since it opened a year and a half ago is UBC
engineers," Diguiscini said. "Two of the three times
we've had to call the police its been for the
engineers."
The incident that finally closed the Jolly Alderman's doors to the engineers took place Nov. 17.
"There were 40 engineers in here," Diguiscini
said. "They were getting out of line — hollering and
everything. They started taking their pants down —
singing some turkey songs.
"They used dirty language, broke glasses and
abused my waiters," he said.
"We gave them three warnings but the engirieers
just ignored them. I tried to ask them to quiet down
and they ignored me just like I was a pipsqueak or a
nobody.
"We called them up to the bar and they
threatened to tear the joint apart.
"Not one of those guys had the guts to go outside
with me," Diguiscini said. "I challenged them all to
go outside I was so mad."
Finally, Diguiscini called the police.
"There is no way I have to serve these kids," he
said.
Diguiscini said he realizes there are "a lot of good
kids" among the engineers but the bad ones spoil it
for everyone.
"I think those kids, the bad ones, are the most
ignorant bunch of punks I've ever seen," he said.
"The good ones should know the ones that cause
the trouble. They should come and tell the
management. Two came over and said thev were
sorry, they knew they were wrong.
"These bad kids have no respect for women, no
respect for law and no respect for management,"
Diguiscini said.
"They're not going to change my way of life. I still
respect these things, and I'm not going tolerate that
kind of behavior," he said.
"If I had to submit to a thing like that (the
behavior of the engineers) I'd quit my job," he said.
"But there's no way I wouldn't co-operate if I could
get co-operation."
Diguiscini said he will refuse to serve engineers
who come in large groups. But the only way he can
tell the engineers from anyone else is by their red
jackets. Page 4
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday,   December   1,   1972
9Tis the season
It's hard to believe it's THAT time of year again. It
doesn't feel like THAT time of year.
Things have just started. The arts faculty representation
hassle was just sprung on us, The Ubyssey is just starting to
dig up some juicy scandals and we're just beginning to
study. Give us another month and we'll be ready for
Christmas.
However, the powers that be — the registrar, the
department stores, the weatherman — tell us it is THAT
time of year.
Which means it's time to spread the Christmas spirit
around (we've been into it since noon so there's plenty to
go around).
In the annual Ubyssey tradition we will make a few
bequests.
Christians (especially those who write letters): a pass to
Rosh Hashona at your local synagogue and a lion's den in
the Los Angeles zoo.
CYVR: a chance on the Nielsen ratings.
Doug Kenny: A one-way ticket to join English head
Robert Jordan on sabbatical.
Robert Jordan: a life-long sabbatical.
Alma Mater Society executive: a washroom complete
with a key and a one way lock.
AMS student council: an executive.
National Union of Students: the definition of national.
Board of governors: a seat for Homer Stevens, president
of the United Fishermen and Allied Workers' Union.
UBC Swimming pool committee: a drought.
Bookstore: a ten-day visit from Fagan.
Brock hall peeper: lessons from Count Henri LeVoyeur.
Wally Gage: his retirement papers.
Bruce Partridge: a reason to sue Fotheringham too.
Allan Fotheringham: a photostat copy of the retraction
printed in The Ubyssey.
Malcolm MacGregor: a life-time of misspelled names.
Basil Stuart-Stubbs: a library that actually opens.
Walter Young: an apathetic student body.
Arts undergraduate society: an unapathetic student
body.
Richard Ouzounian: a traditional three act play.
Art Phillips: Harry Rankin.
Harry Rankin: Art Phillips
Angie Dennis: an interview where she isn't asked if she
is a token candidate.
Bill Street: reality.
Pierre Trudeau: an unfolded universe.
Robert Stanfield: an early election.
Canada: a late election.
David Lewis: no election at all.
Martin Bormman: a holiday in Israel.
UBC: the best twice weekly paper in Canada.
The Ubyssey: a new year in which to hold more wild
orgies, write more hard hitting newstories, scoop more
papers, drink more booze, indulge in more lechery, drop
more courses and hang more b.a.'s.
rm wssey
DECEMBER 1, 1972
Published Tuesdays and Fridays throughout the university year by
the Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C. Editorial
opinions are those of the writer and not of the AMS or the
university administration. Member, Canadian University Press. The
Ubyssey publishes Page Friday, a weekly commentary and review.
The Ubyssey's editorial offices are located in room 241K of the
Student Union Building.
Editorial departments, 228-2307; Sports, 228-2305; advertising,
228-3977.
Co-editors: John Andersen, Jan O'Brien
And the Registrar went up unto the senate, and he came before them,
and he shewed them the holes in his palms and his feet and he said:
"I am the Registrar, I am the resurrection and the light, the great
pass-all fail-all, and I am not boring."
"He is the Registrar," the senate mumbled, "He is the pass-all fail-all,
and he is not boring." ^
And he shewed them his two-tone '59 Pontiac, and his 2.4 kids, and he
said:
"I am the Registrar, speaker of digits, shuffler of papers, writer in
triplicate, and I am not boring."
"He is the Registrar," they said. "He is the accountant of us all, and he
is not boring."
And he took up his typewriter eraser, and he held it over the
multitude, and he said:
"I say unto you: know ye the names of the hosts of Beelzebub, for
under many names do they go; some as students, some as faculty, some as
workers; but the worst of these three are Ubyssey reporters— flunked they
are, and flunked are their seed for generations to come. Listen unto me, for
their names shall be pulled from my files and laid before you."
(Henceforth, for the benefit of those with a formal education, the
Registrar's remarks are translated into English.)
Heading the staff this year is John Andersen, the sleeping giant. John
occasionally wakes up and writes a hard hitting editorial which inevitably
begins with "Goodness gracious, what's this world coming to?" and ends
with "Right on, right on, right on."
John is the number one half of this year's ruling duet until after
Christmas when Jan O'Brien takes over.
Known for her hard hitting style and frequent flogging of new
reporters, Jan can be heard around the office telling John to wake up and
agree with her decisions.
See page 8
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Political hay makes split
By CHRISTINE KRAWCZYK
There has been a lot of talk about the so called
split of the left brought about by the New
Democratic Party's insistence to run a full slate of
candidates in the upcoming civic election.
The split did not, however, arise this year. In
fact it dates back to 1969 when the NDP's
provincial executive passed a motion prohibiting
party members trom seeking ottice under any
banner but that of the NDP.
Such behavior on the part of the provincial
council shows the NDP to be like all other political
parties, more interested in making political mileage
than in the needs of people.
Had the provincial council in 1969 encouraged
NDP members to run joint slate with COPE, the
Vancouver area council might not have decided to
run a full slate of candidates in this civic election.
Under the circumstances the Vancouver area
council was justified in nominating a full slate if
they wanted to present the NDP as a credible civic
force.
What is important is not so much the history of
the split but its consequences. Voters in Vancouver
particularly those who are sympathetic to leftist
parties are left to chose between the NDP and
COPE.
The difference between the two parties are
difficult to determine even for analysts of the left
no more for the average voter. Candidates running
for both parties want to make civic politics "more
human" they are both opposed to the money
interest that run city hall presently, they want to
see more social services, more people oriented
planning.
So what are the differences, well in order to
• legitimize their position both parties have found
something "fundamentally different" in the other
parties platform.
Unfortunately this kind of behavior is not
limited to these two civic parties. It is characteristic
of the left in general. One that in this case has
ensured that civic government will essentially
remain in the same hands.
Campus atheist crusade
By GEORGE ABBOTT
The^Gospel according to me.
This column is sponsored by,
but does not necessarily reflect
the views of, the Paradise Lost
and Found Service.
In the beginning God created
UBC and the endowment lands.
And UBC was without form
and void; and darkness was upon
the face of the deep.
And God said, Let there be a
faculty; and there was a faculty.
And God saw the faculty, that
it was good.
And God created/ for the faculty, in the image of Heaven, a
palace; and he called it the faculty
club.
But, lo, the faculty did defecate beyond expectation. And
God saw that the sewage system
was sore inadequate, for it smelled
not so good.
And God created the engineers
to improve it. And God created
the aggies to have dominion over
the flocks and commerce students
to count the change from the
cigarette machines.
And God saw them, and He
was greatly bored.
And God created the arts students, in hopes of raising the
general IQ level.
And God saw the arts students,
and that it was good.
The offertory hymn will be
number 109, Onward Christian
Scientists. Paper money or beer
tokens only please.
Next meeting I will describe
how the arts students, tempted by
the Rubinesque serpent, ate of the
forbidden fruit of activism and
entered the faculty club.
Fate off B.C. education on trial
Comment by education student Sandy Kass.
The fate of B.C.'s school system rests with a
decision to be made soon by two lawyers and a
teacher.
The decision to be made by lawyers Bernard
Morahan of Victoria and Gait Wilson of Prince
George and Lake Cowichan teacher Robert Wilson is
about whether suspended Campbell River
Secondary principal John Young should be
reinstated.
But the three-member board of reference will
determine in the next few days far more than
whether the school trustees of school district 72
were justified in dismissing the controversial principal last August.
On trial in the event, officially described as a
quasi-judicial hearing, is the future direction of
education in B.C.
To be judged are the principles of progressive
education, upon which Young, 50, is basing his
defence for running a school without straight rows
of desks or compulsory attendance. They are:
That if teachers respect the rights of students
they in turn will respect teachers;
That if a school operates on a basis of trust it is
more likely to get trustful behavior from the
students;
That if students are allowed to make decisions
about their own education they are likely to have
more of a committment to those decisons;
That if a school is democratically run it will
provide an ideal environment for students to learn
about democracy; and
That the best way to learn to be responsible
citizens is to be given responsibility in school.
Young, suspended for refusing to institute rules
he felt were unnecessary, is not only defending
himself at the Campbell River hearing, but the
future of progressive education in B.C.
If the board of reference decides, for example,
that compulsory attendance for senior secondary
students is not compulsory because education is not
compulsory for anyone over the age of 15, the
precedent could revolutionize the school system.
Class attendance would be voluntary — students
would come because they want to.
Young is also arguing that individual teachers
and principals must be free from the dictates of
school boards to administer a situation as they see
it.
He is opposed to the hierarchical structure of
the school system.
And through that opposition Young is calling
for £ lew direction in education.
It is up to two lawyers and a teacher to answer
that call. Friday,  December  1,  1972
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 5
Letters
Undecided
An open response to Persky
and Loomes:
The events of the last week in
the    faculty   of   arts   and   the
• subsequent letter in The Ubyssey
by Stan Persky and Brian Loomes
prompt this letter.
I wish at the outset to state
that I am in favour of student
participation in planning and
decision-making at least in the
faculty of arts. What form this
participation should take remains
to be clarified and agreed upon. I
view with favour the suggestion
that this could be accomplished
through student representation
(with vote) on faculty committees
and general meetings. I find
myself, however, still undecided
between those who support the
concept of such representation on
all levels of decision-making and
those who favour limitations.
These views, as well as those
opposing student representation,
or those supporting a limited
student representation but
without vote, etc. must all be
properly heard and debated
before a policy is established.
I call into question, however,
the methods employed so far in
this matter. The issue of the
democratization of all our
institutions is of such importance
that those expousing such an ideal
should do so with the utmost
responsibility. Extraordinary as it
may seem, the onus for pursuing a
responsible and patient course of
action in this matter is on you.
You naturally have to address
yourselves to those who oppose
your views (students and faculty).
You do not want to lose, as a
result of mishandling, the backing
of those faculty members and
students who support your cause
or who have not as yet made up
their minds one way or the other.
At the Wednesday rally one young
man cautioned those attending
against actions of intimidation
and disruption. He is correct. '
Your joint letter unfortunately
expresses anger which, if you
maintain it, could be detrimental
to your ideal. A World War II
story tells of a fish in a pond,
which had to be caught without
using either net or line. While one
man threatened to blow up the
pond, another planned to dive
into the water in an attempt to
catch the fish with his bare hands.
A third (Churchill, the story
asserts) emptied the pond with
the only tool at his disposal: a
teaspoon. It was a tedious
procedure but only he got the
fish!
H.E. Kassis
religious studies associate prof
Slavery
I think it important to give my
views on the recent events
occurring within the faculty of
arts. By my actions and by my
underlying principles I could be
said to support the current
movement. The students' actions
by which they hope to gain a
share of the decision making
process are necessarily seen to be
good, and leading to the desired
goaL I do however experience,
intellectually, at least, some
qualms about the involvement of
students in deciding their own
fate. The basis of this could be
expressed as a fear that students
may embark upon actions not
fully considered in their true
meaning. The democratization of
the university worries me on such
a level because the structure of
such learning institutions such as
this have many powerful and
complex implications. Not the
least of which are: What are some
of its concrete results? How does
the student remain a student, and
the teacher remain a teacher in
such an institution? Does the
university recognize its changed
position in relation to the society?
and vice versa? How do these
changes affect our personal
relations with each other?
It would be necessary to
consider these types of questions
and their multitudes of possible
answers to give a justification for
my somewhat hazy questioning of
the democratization process in
which I find myself. The
opponents of this process would
state that the student has not
reached the point where he is
capable of giving the fullest
consideration to these questions
and all the others. It has been
pointed out many times that this
response just \ will not do in any
manner. For such a response rests
upon the present state in which
students find themselves, and
which this movement is clearly
trying to change.
The clearest danger I see that is
threatening this movement is that
we will allow ourselves to be
conned by this argument, along
with the actual necessity of having
to live with it while fighting it.
The awareness of this problem is
most certainly not limited to
myself, but is widespread. But
wish to raise the central point to
this confusion in my mind as to
the right thing to do, which is our
method of dealing with it.
Clearly at some point we all
have to make a choice between
our priorities. The response I fear
the most will be one that deals
with the situation in an
emotional, irrational manner. This
typ; of argument I fear, is most
commonly expressed as cliches,
and the proposed solutions are
invariably determined by the
constrained or restricted meaning
which is attached to it. This type
of response to me is most clearly
inadequate to deal with our
present problem. I see this type of
sloganeering and use of cliches as
leading to precisely the type of
situation in which we find
ourselves now, and that is, instead
of being slaves to the cliches of
Profs vote at meeting
those who presently run the
university, we shall become slaves
to a world of our own making,
where we shall be put in a
straitjacket and become sheep
again blindly following a few
around. The situation in which we
find ourselves should not be made
into our own public hell.
This can be avoided I think by
placing the environment we
surround ourselves with into an
atmosphere where learning
becomes possible. How does one
do this? I would suggest that
instead of making blind demands
for parity and for open meetings
of all kinds, and without due
consideration these demands
would be blind, and from where I
stand ill considered, that together
we place ourselves open to all
possible considerations talk about
the topics of discussion on both a
logical and personal level. These
are my own thoughts on the
matter, and do not speak for
anyone else, and I am only one
and could well be walking into a
straitjacket myself, but do
consider. I can do no more.
David Fiddler
arts rep
Unreality
I walked out of the recent
faculty of arts meeting as soon as
it formally adjourned because of
the total unreality of the so-called
confrontation between students
and faculty. As you have already
pointed out not everyone who
walked out is unsympathetic to
the students' cause. But if I am to
share with the students the very
small amount of power I possess
as a member of the faculty of arts,
I want to do so because the
students are ready to act as adults
in sharing with us the responsibility for guiding the part of the
university in which we function to
a more effective service to scholarship, to the students and to the
community. I couldn't see any
signs of this in the noisy and
disruptive presence of the students who invaded our last meeting. What I did see was an angry
demand for power, apparently for
its own sake. Do the students who
want power realize what its exercise is actually like? It means
occupation with reams of boring
paperwork and equally boring
committees, never having enough
money to do what you know
ought to be done, and receiving
the hostility of those you have to
say  NO   to.   It   does   not mean
making exciting speeches about
repression and liberation and receiving the applause of one's
peers.
I did not feel intimidated by the
presence of the students, and I
have nothing against confrontation, encounter and the strong
expression of feelings. But I prefer
to have it eyeball to eyeball or in
small groups, when there is some
chance of noticing that one is
talking to a person and that one's
own hostility possibly originated
in some former bad relationship.
Talking to a crowd leads to depersonalized bullshit, like we had
last Thursday.
It ought to be obvious to
everyone that the students have a
proper and important part to play
in decision-making in the university. But they won't play it effectively by getting into the large
impersonal elements in the struc-
ure, like the faculty of arts, but
by talking to their own departments about where the shoe
pinches. This is where you can
actually influence curriculum and
other decisions in which you have
a legitimate concern. If you find
the attempt frustrating there,
you'll find it 50 time's worse at
the level of faculty or senate.
The university is in enough of a
mess that we need dialogue with
anyone with creative ideas to help
put it right. Power-tripping isn't
dialogue,  and it  isn't  any more
sacred in a student than in an
administrator or faculty member.
William Nicholls
- religious studies head
Doubts
Despite an almost euphoric
sense of optimism which overcame me following Thursday's
faculty of arts non-meeting cum
common front, I am still possessed by two lingering doubts. I
wonder whether it is necessary for
us students to present ourselves to
the faculty as a monolithic and
united group. Consciously or not,
this was the impression generated
by several student speakers. If an
unwritten rule is in force that we
not show too much division within our own ranks for fear of
faculty exploiting our disagreements, then I question how creative or flexible we can be in
reaching a solution. Faculty credibility was in fact strengthened
precisely because they were obviously not bound by such a
restriction.
Related  to  this problem was
what I saw as a possible beginning
of a student elite which perceives
their opinions and priorities as
representative of the student
body — one student speaker at the
meeting, for example, prefaced his
comments: "Speaking for myself,
we feel that..." Two or three
hundred students may be a better
turn-out than we have had for
years in this faculty, but we .;ft
still a very small minority and
allowing a few individuals to
dominate   the  movement is not
conducive to increased participation. A similar situation exists
here in the political science
department, where the continuing
disregard by grad students for
undergrad participation (all letters
to your paper aside) will also lead
to a big zero when they eventually
request our support for their
position.
I also felt uncomfortable over
the insistence at the meeting
(spearheaded coincidentally by
poli sci grad students and even
more coincidentally opposed by
p.s. head Walter Young) that the
resolution advocating student representation apply to individual
departments as well as to the
whole faculty. It was crude power
politics where students, of those
departments which to date have
frustrated their attempts at representation latched onto a simplistic
short-cut. If departments were
merely administrative levels in the
university hierarchy, I would have
few qualms about a higher level
imposing rules of operation on
them. But is not one of the
fundamental student complaints
about this university that it offers
us no sense of community? Since
the department, on the basis of
size and relative unity of interest,
is the most likely place at which
to begin community-building, it
cannot be viewed as only an
administrative level in the university. We must look to the departments as the communities on
which a sense of university-wide
togetherness can later be built.
Since a high degree of independence from external decisionmaking bodies is a pre-requisite to
the growth of such a community,
I think that making a resolution
of the faculty of arts apply to its
departments was short-sighted. No
less than in the question of relation between the federal government and the provinces,
autonomy from central control
must be maintained in the university.
These   reservations   aside,   the
movement    in   the   past   week
towards student representation is
great. Why not 2,000 of you at
the    next    arts    undergraduate
meeting?
Fred Rumsey
arts 4
Apathetic
I am one of the 19,800
students who decided not to
waste my time at the arts faculty
meeting. You seem to feel that
since I did not attend the meeting,
I must be apathetic. Did you ever
stop to think that there might be
people on this campus who do not
agree with your views on student
representation and who feel that
they are here (at UBC) to learn
and not to engage in campus
politics?
see page 18 Page 6
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday,   December   1,   1972
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People develc
By CHRISTINE KRAWCZYK
and GORDON MULLIN
Forty-five aldermanic candidates
are running for office in the up-coming
Vancouver civic election.
The following interviews represent
only the opinions of one candidate from
each one of the party slates.
The candidates were chosen more or
less randomly, with the only consideration being that they not be sure
winners. That is why we did not do an
interview either with Harry Rankin,
Walter Hardwick or other well known
candidates.
THE UBYSSEY: Why are you running
for council and why have you chosen to
run under the banner of one of the civic
parties?
GRAEME WAYMARK: I am running
as a Non-Partisan Association candidate because I believe in the principle of having independent people on
council.
I think the voters should have a
choice as to whether or not they want
party politics in civic politics.
JOHN STANTON: I am running for the
New Democrats because I think we can
create a more human city.
People are at present alienated from
the civic government. They don't think
they can have any effect on policy
decisions. We propose to alieviate this
by creating neighborhood governments.
MIKE HARCOURT: I joined The
Electors Action Movement to fight the
NPA.
TEAM is a broadly based citizens
movement and I think that this will
make it an effective force on council.
BRUCE YORKE: I am running
because I think I can make a contribution. I don't like the physical
transformation, nor the direction in
which the city has been going.
I chose The Committee of
Progressive Electors because I believe
in the coalition of people that make up
COPE.
QUESTION: There has been a great
deal of controversy surrounding two of
the civic parties, the NPA and the
NDP. What are your views on this
controvery?
WAYMARK: I think the NPA
executive has become complacent.
Rather than having to work with them
in the future I would like to see a new
executive.
STANTON: I have opposed the NDP
entrance into civic politics on its own
rather than co-operating with COPE. I
think it unrealistic.
QUESTION:     What    would     your
priorities be on council?
YORKE: I would like to see a complete
assessment of the city's finances, both
WAYMARK
wants new NPA
the income and the expenditures; we
must have control of these areas.
Another priority would be tax
reform. We ''would introduce a
graduated business tax starting at six
per cent and going to 20 per cent, based
upon the ability to pay.
HARCOURT: I would like to see more
planned development in Vancouver
with a greater emphasis on social
services.
STANTON: We must have a people
oriented city administration, rather
than the fast buck policies of the past.
WAYMARK: Taxation would be my
priority as well. I think we should get
away from land taxes as a source of
income for the city.
The senior government should funnel
a portion of the income and industry
taxes to the city. This would allow the
city to equalize the level of services in
the different areas.
QUESTION: Planned development is a
slogan that has been thrown around a
lot in this campaign. What exactly do
vou mean when you use the phrase?
HARCOURT: I would like to see more
people oriented development. Things
such as a farmers' market on the
waterfront, sidewalk cafes, mini parks.
I would also like to see False Creek
made into a mixed housing area and it
should also include light industry.
STANTON: I would like to see an end to
the towers of darkness and other
monstrosities of the Los Angeles jail
architecture style.
If the trend could be reversed I would
certainly push for it. The people who
put up the tower of darkness (Toronto
Dominion) should be made to pay for
its removal.
YORKE: I am against underground
development such as the Pacific
Centre.
Development has gone almost too far
in Vancouver already. Only a major
change on council can stop it.
I am not in favor of a freeze in
development. We need a more
equitable form of development.
WAYMARK: I would like to see a
freeze put on hi-rises in the West End. I
like the idea of turning the old blocks
into condominiums.
We must consider the ecology of the
city before we approve any more
development.
QUESTION: How would you like to see
city council organized?
WAYMARK:    I   think   we   have   to
strengthen   the   Vancouver   regional
district.
I would also like to see the Planning
Board strengthened. Where we could
have a representation by ward.
Each area could elect a member of
the board and this member would have
the power to veto any plans dealing
with his or her area.
STANTON: The NDP has proposed the
concept of the neighbourhood government. The nice part of this concept is
that it would give people the power to
make decisions affecting their own
area.
These decisions would be made
within certain guidelines that would be
decided by city council as a whole.
HARCOURT: I would like to
restructure council in such a way that
aldermen could be elected from
specific areas.
As it is I am forced to run a contest
designed to get me on the top ten in the
aldermanic hit parade.
I would however urge that the concept of a ward system be put to a
plebiscite before it is finally approved.
YORKE: I too am in favor of a ward
system. At present most of the
aldermen come from one area of the
city and as result they are ignorant of
the problems faced in the rest of the
city.
QUESTION: Why should anyone vote
for you?
STANTON: I think the voter should
vote for the candidate who offers the
best alternatives. I think I am one of
those candidates. Friday,  December   1,   1972
THE       UBYSSEY
Page  7
)ment civic election priority
DENNIS . . . opening
HARCOURT: Because I'd be an honest
approachable alderman. I want to try
and prevent Vancouver from becoming
another urban catastrophe, and made
into a more liveable exciting place.
WAYMARK: I think it is necessary to
have   an   accountant   on   council,
someone    who    is    familiar    with
municipal accounting affairs. I am.
YORKE: Because I don't waffle — I do
what I say. I have no personal axe to
grind on council, I just want to see all
citizens of Vancouver get that which is
their right.
7'his interview with Angle Dennis,
Committee of Progressive Electors
mayoralty candidate in the Dec. 13
civic election is the fourth of a series
begun by Christine Krawczyk.
THE UBYSSEY: I'm sure you've read
about the boy that was shot by the
police on Tuesday, would you tell us
your views about it?
DENNIS: I think a properly run police
department would not allow this type of
thing to occur. I really think we've
come to a police state in Vancouver
where the police have absolutely no
restraints or control over their activities.
One of COPE's programs is to instill
a police or citizens' grievance board
where complaints such as this can be
handled by citizens and the police.
the way for the people
If we had a properly run city hall in
which the city fathers can say, look,
you are only there to protect the
citizens. If we had a proper city
government this situation would be far
less likely to occur.
Unfortunately this only happens to a
kid from the east end of the city.
QUESTION: Do you think that more
recreation   facilities,   if   created   in
places like the east end would help
alleviate these situations?
DENNIS: Yes, certainly.
A great number of kids who we had a
problem with last summer came from
the east end where there is the least
number of facilities available.
COPE would make available more
free ice skating rinks, playing fields,
and recreation centres for families. I
think the province should aid the city
on a cost share basis to provide places.
QUESTION: What are your priorities if
elected?
DENNIS: Low cost housing and the
social needs of people. Also the social
welfare department needs to be
completely revamped.
Presently all the men on social
welfare must go to the Alpine Cafe for
all three meals.
QUESTION: COPE has been noted for
its fighting the system and working for
poor people's rights; what would you as
STANTON . . . Black Tower developers should pay
mayor have to offer the middle class?
DENNIS: A cut in taxes. We would
have a graduated tax scale from four
or six per cent to twenty per cent instead of the fixed eight and one half per
cent.
These people also need extra
recreational areas.
QUESTION: What would you do for the
tenants?
DENNIS: We will revamp the landlord
and tenant act. The rental grievance
board would be made representative of
the whole public,  not just the  land
owners.
The present board are just flunkies of
the city council.
We would have inspectors going out
to inspect all grievances given to the
board.
QUESTION: Would you give the board
control over rents?
DENNIS: It's a hard question for me to
answer. Looking at it from the
viewpoint of a landlord, it would be
hard to determine how much one
apartment should rent for.
Certainly I would check into all
outrageous sums that were being asked
for. I would check into any complaints
of old age pensioners who have had
their rents raised because they are
receiving more money.
QUESTION: A number of old apartments are being turned into condominiums and the renters are being
forced into buying or moving. Would
you do anything about this?
DENNIS: I certainly would. I don't
think this practice is fair and COPE
will, if we get in rezone these properties
so that this cannot happen.
QUESTION: Pigeon Park is being torn
down now. How do you feel about this?
DENNIS: I don't think this should be
done. I don't think a few people sitting
around on the park benches affect the
business, business still goes on around
these people and they're not hurting
anyone.
Instead of tearing down one of the
few places left to sit in the downtown
just to get rid of the people there, why
don't we look into the reasons and
causes of the social ills and try to
correct them.
QUESTION: Some of the worst housing
that I have ever seen is down below
East Hastings. Would a COPE city
council do anything about this?
DENNIS: I see that area would be
redeveloped in time. I think that the
present administration is waiting for
these areas to be run down so that it
can buy them at low cost.
QUESTION: How would you insure
that the people who are vacated by
redevelopment are able to find places
in the new apartments?
DENNIS: In any contract with a
developer, a clause should be included
to ensure that the new structures would
be for a collective group of people.
Also our plan would disperse all low
income housing throughout the city
because many people do not like to live
close to downtown and some do.
Far too often the lack of planning
causes situations like Raymur. There
are no facilities for the children and the
older people to get together.
All apartment blocks which allow
children should set aside space for play
areas and group activities.
QUESTION: What would a COPE
administration at city hall do to improve day care facilities in- Vancouver?
DENNIS: We don't only need full time
day care facilities but also some
arrangements for mothers who would
like to leave their children someplace
for a few hours.
We would encourage the creation of
co-operative day care centres run in
neighborhoods, where this would be
possible.
QUESTION: How would such facilities
be funded?
DENNIS: On a cost share basis with
the province.
Particularly in the area of low income  housing  I  think  more  money
should come from the federal government .
QUESTION: What kind of development
would you like to see take place in the
downtown peninsula and in the west
end of the city?
DENNIS: I would not like to see any
more skyscrapers. I would like to see
more blocks such as the Birks building.
Old buildings should remain to give
some variety to the city.
I would like to encourage the
development of sidewalk cafes, walks
and other people-oriented facilities in
downtown.
I would also like to see a decentralization of facilities, more job opportunities created in outlying
districts, so that people don't have to
travel so far to go to work.
Many-of the shopping facilities could
also be taken out of the downtown area
into the suburbs.
Before we moved on any of these
concepts we should take them .to the
people living in the areas affected. This
way we would avoid such things as the
Four Season and Strathcona controversy.
QUESTION: Where would put industry?
DENNIS: Industry would stay where it
is now as a rule. New light industry
would be dispersed close to the various
residential areas.
QUESTION: How would you go about
ensuring that people contributed their
ideas and made decisions on policy?
DENNIS: We would ask people to tell
us what kind of facilities would best
suit their needs. For instance we would
ask the old age pensioners or people on
welfare what kind of facilities they
would like to live in.
QUESTION: Your candidacy has been
surrounded by controversy involving
the COPE-NDP split. How do you view
that issue?
ANSWER: I found that I was able to
relate to the people in COPE better
than to the academics that are running
on the NDP civic slate.
I want to make clear that we are not
dealing with all of the NDP when we
talk about the civic candidates. I am a
member of the NDP.
It is only a small group within the
NDP area council who have chosen to
run for civic office.
QUESTION: You are the only woman
running for mayor as well as the only
Indian. Do you think this has an effect
on the kind of campaign you are running?
DENNIS: I think that the fact that I am
a member of a minority group makes
me credible to a large number of
voters.
Whether I win or not is not really that
important. The fact that I am running
will open the door to many more ordinary people in the next election.
HARCOURT
wants waterfront farmers' market Page 8
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday,   December   1,   1972
UBC
Xmas
blah
To any students who will be
spending the Christmas
holidays on campus we can
only say "tough luck."
There is next to nothing
happening in this tired old
place. The Pit will be closed.
Cinema 1(> and the Film
Society have no films
scheduled. Frederick Wood
theatre is not doing anything
over Christmas.
The Thunderbird sports
arena will be open as usual for
public skating except for
Christmas eve, Christmas day
and New Year's eve.
The current multi-media
show at the SUB art gallery
will continue to Dec. 30, but the
line arts gallery has nothing
until the middle of January.
Cafeteria hours will be
posted in the next two weeks.
The library's Christmas
hours haven't been posted yet,
but they are normally shortened.
For graduate students there
will be a Christmas dinner and
dance Dec. 9.
The dinner will begin at 7
p.m. Reservations can be
made through the grad centre
office.
Books,
binders,
and chains
Books, folders, binders,
clothing, bike chains, purses
and umbrellas were among the
many items sold at a two-hour
lost and found sale Thursday
noon.
The sale, sponsored by
Phrateres, was held to raise
funds for the care and support
of 14-year-old Apolonio L.
Sarte, a Filipino boy the
student club has adopted.
Receipts from the sale were
estimated at more than $100.
The merchandise consisted
of articles turned into the SUB
lost and found.
From page 4
Second banana on the paper this year is Mike (I can so count to ten)
Sasges, news editor, and office doorstop. Mike's contributions to the paper
have included subtracting from the total sum of journalistic knowledge.
Then there's the managing editor, Berton Woodward or as he has been
known since a recent Maclean's article: "The Nephew."
Berton, the ghost of Christmas present, has been conspicuous by his
absence this year, a fact much lamented by reporters looking for paper
clips, pencils and boredom.
Cub reporters Lesley Krueger and Sandi Shreve share city desk
duties with Sandy Kass, the old pro. By the way congratulations to
Krueger, who two days ago celebrated the fact she is no longer jail
bait. Lesley, Sandi and Sandy have all worked for the big city press, as is
well known by bewildered reporters who have heard them use complicated
journalistic terms like "reaction, folio, lead, stringer, copy, story,
interview, newspaper and typewriter."
Ubyssey feature writers, whose contributions to nebulousness are
unmatched by anyone but Marshall McLuhan, are Christine Krawczyk and
Linda Hossie.
Christine, an old confidant of several Argentinians with strange
accents, has dined with and interviewed every important politician in
Vancouver, and she has the Ronald McDonald piggy banks and gastric
ulcers to prove it.
Linda Hossie's social consciousness articles have been a big hit with the
people down at party headquarters, and it is said they helped the lot of
migrant radish farmers as well.
- Next the reporters, whose great search for bylines and front page space
are the rocks upon which The Ubyssey is founded. Gary Coull, Ken Dodd,
Sondra Marshall Smith, Lorri Rudland, Josie Bannerman, Steve Brown,
Laurence Leader, David Schmidt and David Mars can all be seen hiding
behind typewriters, skipping classes and avoiding assignments on oress day.
Just kidding people, you're loved. Andersen's threats to trade the lot of
you in for a Ouija board and subscription to the National Geographic were
just talk.
The jockstrap journalists are 'coached' by Kent (the big shutout)
Spencer. The success of Kent's team (goalie Doug Higgins, center Roger
McNeill, scum half Peter MacQueen, halfwit Brian Murphy, catcher Simon
Truelove and dealer George Richey) can be compared to that of the
Vancouver Canucks, the B.C. Lions and the Nehru jacket.
Page Friday is directed by Clive Bird, the fifties kid, and Steve
(artsy-fartsy) Morris. Their many efforts include an in-depth analysis of
Love Is, a series on the films of Fess Parker and reprints of Reader's Digest
articles like "I am Joe's foreskin."
B.T.P. Paul Knox, the ghost of Christmas past, has made a major
contribution to the style and content of Page Friday this year, and by the
way Paul the staff will be returning your copy of Roget's Thesams next
week.
Page Friday's feelies (we got culture) are Jennifer Alley, Robert Perry,
Barry Edwards, Baroness Katrina Von Flotow, Rey Weyler, Jim Fowler,
Bob Mitchinson, Bernie Bischoff and David McKinlay.
The photogs are led by Kmi McDonald, whose shots of Howard
Hughes would have won her a Pulitzer Prize if Art Smolensky paid her
enough to put film in the camera.
Other little Brownies are Dirk Visser, Ed Dubois, Glen Kerelun, Darryj
Tan, Barry Ferguson and Sucha Singh, all known around the office for
frequent cries of "pictures, what pictures?"
Art Smolensky, the ghost of Chanukah yet to come, is often seen
reading old collections of Pierre Berton's work and it is said he is taking
more than a casual interest in Alan Fotheringham's health.
Last, and unquestionably least, are the authors of this turkey, The
Ubyssey's answer to Amos and Andy; Vaughn (he's the fat one) Palmer,
and Ryon (the one with the cigar) Guedes. Vaughn is actually rumored to
work for the paper when not doing imitations of the Graf Zepplin, though
his work so far has been limited to misspelling tween classes notices to
make bad puns.
Ryon, on the other hand has no pretences to anything but standing in
for the busy signal on the office phone.
"And so my bretheren," said the Registrar, closing his files, "A merry
Christmas to all, and to all a good night."
BUYING OR SELLING
REAL ESTATE?
Ph. Mrs. Joan Bentley
224-0255
RUTHERFORD-McRAE
733-8181
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BEWARE!
Wednesday, November 29, 1972: In provincial court today,
appearing before Judge M. E. Ferguson were five separate cases of
"theft under $200" from the U.B.C. Bookstore. The persons
charged were students. The items stolen ranged from a 98c pen to
a $4.25 book.
Shoplifting is an indicatable offense, the students now have a
criminal record which could seriously impair future employment.
WAS   IT   WORTH   IT   ?   ?
the bookstore
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FACT
OR
FICTION?
You should avoid exercise
during your period.
Fiction! The simple rules of
good health are always important, especially during
your period. Exercise, a
proper diet and a good night's
sleep go a long way toward
relieving menstrual cramps
or preventing them altogether. And remember,
you're not "sick." So there's
no reason not to follow your
normal routine.
There's no odor when you use
Tampax tampons.
Fact. With Tampax tampons,
odor can't form. Odor is noticeable only when the fluid
is exposed to air. With
Tampax tampons, fluid is absorbed before it comes in
contact with air; therefore,
odor cannot form.
You should not bathe during
your period.
Fiction! Contrary to superstition, water can't hurt you.
Daily baths or showers are a
must throughout your period.
Shampoo your hair, too. And
don't deny yourself the
chance to go swimming.
Tampax tampons are worn
internally, so you can swim
anytime.
4
Single girls can use Tampax
tampons.
Fact. Any girl of menstrual
age who can insert them
easily and without discomfort, can use Tampax
tampons with complete confidence. Follow the easy directions in every package.
Our only interest is protecting you.
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Books
Hero bores in 'odyssey9
David   Evanier,   The
Swinging   Headhunter,
November       House,
Vancouver, $2.95. I
A strange mixture of
story and stream of
consciousness, David
Evanier's novella, The
Swinging Headhunter is,
if nothing else, an interesting night's reading.
The book follows Bruce
Orav   from   his   eighth
grade classroom, where
e has a poignant
relationship with a
teacher; to his sad first
love;       through       his
rootless, arty New York
life, where he learns his
craft and stumbles upon
curious people.
Orav drifts to Vancouver where, isolated
from his familiar milieu,
his perennial problems
intensify. Back in New
York, Bruce experiences
a coming-to-terms with
himself. Thus the
Eriksonian saga ends.
The most satisfying
part of the book concerns
Bruce's dealings with
Lieber, a guidance
counsellor. Bruce uses
and is used by Lieber;
their relationship ends
with the realization of
their disparate purposes.
This chapteris countered
by some unsatisfactory,
hurried descriptions of
psychologists and
analysts, whose weird
activities and ideas are
unfortunately but vapid
caricature. Good
caricature would have
been appreciated.
The cumulative effect
of the work as a whole is
very much like that
horrid aspect of
television — the constantly shallow and
erratic    portrayal    of
people or ideas. If this
effect was intended,
Evanier masterfully
mirrors the medium and
its offspring.
However, if the book's
structure is intended to
provide a forum for a
coherent flow of ideas or
events, then the reader is
not satisfied or
illuminated.
Evanier fails to convincingly develop his
characters or adequately
render his desired effects. In short, he does
not satisfactorily practice his craft.
—Barry Ferguson
Records
Books
'Lions share9
Hero lands
of Savoy Brown  in Vancouver
Share/Savoy
Parrot   XPAS
Lion's
Brown,
71057.
With the big Christmas
and New Year's party
scene almost here, there
is one newly released
album which must not be
missed under any circumstances.
Savoy Brown has put
together, without a doubt,
a lion's share of solid
rockin' blues music to
which it is impossible not
to move. Performance
is tight and fluent
throughout and every
track really counts.
Shot in the Head
features some fine slide
guitar work, and introduces the fast
thumping beat with a
strong crisp opening solo.
Similarly, on the slightly
slower Second Try, Kim
Simmonds on lead guitar
does some more fine
work, blending well with
Dave   Walker's   vocals.
The slowest number on
Side 1, The Saddest
Feeling, is perhaps the
best of the first five. A
fantastic piano opening
gets it off the ground, and
it continues with an excellent balance between
the   pounding   drums,
piano, vocals and fill-in
guitar. That piano and
guitar duo is 'owtta
sight!"
I Can't Find You takes
off with a whining harp
and follows a traditional
medium-paced blues
rhythm. Once again that
delicious piano features
prominently. Connoisseurs will dig this
one. Side 1 ends with the
faster Howling for my
Darling, and howling is
what it does.
The thumping war-
drum flavour of So Tired
creates a driving,
repetitive mid-tempo
beat which is impossible
to remain indifferent to,
and Denim Demon is a
rock and blues number of
the old Chuck Berry
style. Love Me Please is a
slow, cryin' "woman
messin' around" blues
number and features a
sympathetic piano attempting to comfort a
heartbroken vocalist.
Rounding things off is a
Howlin' Wolf-style
rockin' blues, Hate To
See You Go.
Verdict: It is not only
tremendous for dancing
to but also makes for 39
minutes of real fine
listening.
David   Evanier   The   Swinging   Headhunter,
[November House, Vancouver, 1972, $2.95].
David Evanier's slim novella is odd and forgettable. Claiming to be the story of one Bruce Orav's
"Odyssey through Times Square, the Bronx, Greenwich Village, Israel, Vancouver and back again", The
Swinging Headhunter is the odyssey of a lonely little
boy from girl to girl, most of whom seem to tire of him
fairly quickly.
This seems to be what the book is all about—Bruce's
girls. A large part of the work consists of a series of
usually lugubrious scenes between Bruce and girls he's
trying to get to mother him (his parents divorced early
and Bruce missed out on growing up with mama).
These scenes are filled with strange characters and are
strung together in a disjointed fashion.
This Bruce Orav is a bore, the only people he attracts being unhappy oddballs and weird psychiatrists,
the latter of whose services he avails himself as
casually as going to a poetry reading.
One would guess that author Evanier borrows
heavily from his own life story to write his fiction; the
similiarities are quite marked. Bruce's odyssey to
Vancouver doesn't satisfy him so he trips back to the
Bronx where he 'finds himself and presumably
achieves satori down in the Bowery looking up at the
gold Cooper Union clock while reminiscing about the
white laundry Jewish immigrants used to hang out to
dry.
The only important issues the book raises are how
can Americans afford their many psychiatrists (for it is
an integral part of the American scene as presented by
Evanier), and why would anybody want to live in New
York if we can take Bruce Orav as a product of that
womb.
All in all, one is reminded of Jack Kerouac at his
early worst and of Richard Brautigan at his dismal
best. Not to discourage Evanier, one might hope that in
future he would pay a little more attention to stylistic
coherence and develop his themes a little more fully.
Ed Cepka
Books
Pastiche and panache
The Second Magenta Frog — Am
Saba and Gordon Fidler, College
Printers 1972. $3.00.
Remember those frenetic zany
cartoons in the Ubyssey? And those
equally inane captions? That was the
work of Arn Saba and Gordon Fidler a
few years back. Since leaving UBC
they have been able to make it on their
own publishing their own material.
You'll find Arn's cartoons, and several
others by Elaine Blesi, and lots more in
The Second Magenta Frog.
Its cover says it's for "boys and
girls." The book is put together in a
fashion which is quite similar to the old
"Jumbo" series of children's stories:
each page is crammed with drawings,
cartoons, poems and illustrated short
stories.
The stories are highly imaginative
and genuinely humourous. Terry the
Toilet is a mad concoction of adventure
for two children named Edweard and
McCormick. It begins with:
"Now this story concerns two young
children, who were very good. Note
that I say they were good — they are
dead now. And despite the fact that
they were so good, this is a really
horrible story."
The story, like so many others, is
slightly skewed, slightly tilted in a
direction you won't find in straight
children's literature. Nothing is what it
appears to be. Although the stories
may be satiric, mocking or ridiculing,
they are always children-soft and
children-gentle in tone.
You catch more bees with honey, the
saying goes, and by refusing to assault
the reader with tedious political
dogma, the authors' point is not only
more entertaining, t>ut more effective.
Edweard and McCormick "lived in
Westmount, which is almost not the
same thing as living in Montreal. For
one thing, there are no Frogs there,
just the same as there are no Negroes
either. There is nobody there at all, in
fact, except the well-bred and the rich,
in that order."
The major literary work is Go to the
Rainmaker, a misanthropist's fairy
tale. This story is not as subtle, and the
anti-humanity soliloquies from deer,
trees and trolls do become wearisome
and undercut the lyricism and
imagination the work contains.
In the last section, Songs of the City,
photographs, diaries and poetry are
used to reflect the authors' thoughts in
a more direct and subjective manner.
The entire book is subjective, after
all, most books are. But now the
authors are speaking for themselves,
not through characters or
magniloquent sentences. The
imaginative, lyrical style is strained at
times, overdone at others, and tends to
mask the message instead of enhancing it. The personal accounts in Songs
of the City present Arn and Gordon in
real, three-dimensional "human"
form. For there is a hazard in using a
children's book approach: to be readily
understood by children, one must be
superficial. ' Steve Morris
Page Friday, 2
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday,  December   1,  1972 Art
Gallery gallivanting
Fireside Crafts
A huge marmalade cat lazily and luxuriously
sprawls on brightly-colored woven goods in one
corner. An original Doukhobor wooden loom,
draped with all sorts of interesting handicrafts,
stands in the centre of the brightly-lit front room.
Hand-spun wools of many delicious colors hang in
the front window. Petroglyphs decorate one shelf.
Fireside Crafts is a gallery cum handicraft store
cum art school, teaching the skills of spinning,
dyeing, batik, off-loom weaving and stitchery. The
place just opened on Nov. 1.
The current gallery exhibition, which ends today,
features some urban and architectural studies by
Trevor Larden. Particularly striking are his prints
called 'West Ham, London, 1970' (hand-worked
pastels on linocut block on pastel and printer's
inked stencils) and his studies of English
cathedrals (hand-worked pastels on wood-cut
blocks on pastel stencils). The organic development
of Larden's particular works is highlighted, as part
of the exhibition, through the juxtaposition of
preliminary and finished prints.
The next exhibition, running from Dec. 1 to Dec.
23, features the work of Hele Kowallek,. a very
promising 21-year-old local artist currently at The
Vancouver School of Art, who won first place in the
United Nations Creative Arts Competition (1971).
Self-searching and self-revealing pen-and-ink
portraits a la Rembrandt and landscapes are her
specialties.
In charge of Fireside Crafts are two enthusiastic
local teachers, Valerie Wilson and Florence McDonald. The basic purpose of their gallery, claims
Valerie, is not money-making. How admirable!
Their dream for the future is to give, hopefully with
the permission of the School Board, public exposure
to good art being produced in local secondary
schools.
A reservoir of young talent is not now being
tapped, says Valerie, because many students are
afraid, and are not encouraged to cross the line
between amateur and professional. On graduation
many of these students drift into boring jobs
because they are unaware, insists Valerie, of a
whole spectrum of fulfilling careers and fields of
work drawing upon, and relating to, artistic talent.
Dream aside, the managers are always willing
to consider any artist's work for possible exhibition
in their gallery. Fireside Crafts, at 5585 Dunbar
Street, is a colorful and aesthetically congenial
addition to an otherwise rather typical and boring,
bourgeois, commercial district.
—Robert Perry
Galleries West
Galleries West, at 2952 West Fourth, is a quite
small and relatively unsophisticated gallery, though
it has a comfortable "come-as-you-are" atmosphere.
It combines its duties as a gallery with that of a
picture framing workshop, and specializes mainly in
aluminum frames. The centre of the display room is
dominated by three tables which are covered with
pictures in the process of being framed.
The atmosphere is created by a background of
quietly gentle classical music, and most of the work
on the walls is contemporary. It includes silk screen,
oils, water colors, pen and ink drawings, pastels,
some Eskimo sketches, a few prints and a number
of black and white photographs. There are also a few
woven tapestries.
Scattered around the gallery are several wooden
barrels, and there is also a very large wooden
weaving loom conspicuously stored at the back of the
gallery, which is to be put into use hopefully in New
Year. Perhaps the most interesting curiosity is a
beautiful old wooden rocking horse standing
patiently in the window, which must be at least 50
years old.
There is also an extension to the gallery, in the
form of a small back room, where are exhibited,
among other things, a couple of figure studies and a
series of beautifully simple pen an ink erotic
drawings.
Danish Galleries
Danish Art Galleries, at 3757 W. 10th Avenue had
a very different atmosphere. The first thing one
stumbles over on walking through the door is the
beam of a magic eye, which produces a loud buzzing
sound when obstructed. Other than that, there is
dead silence, but for the continuous hum of a
fluorescent light.
Tibetan woodblock prints
Pastel drawing ... Terry Prescott
Art from Performance magazine
This one is a larger gallery than Galleries West,
having three exhibit rooms, and there is a cooler,
more sophisticated atmosphere. But despite this,
many of the exhibits are very appealing. Included
are water colors, pens and ink drawings and oils.
There is a very appealing sepia drawing of
Gastown and also a colored skyline of Paris. A large
number of impressionistic still life paintings by Else
Zeidler, being mainly flowers and scenes, take up the
display room on the left.
In the display room on the right are a number of
B.C. scenes in oils and acrylics, such as fishing
boats, logging and some Indian totem poles. Other
exhibits include ceramics, wood carvings, a case of
silver jewellery, metal sculptures, and many boxes
of UNICEF Christmas cards.
—Robert Mitchinson
Gallery
Phenomena
Gallery Phenomena is a new and beautiful
addition to SUB. The gallery is run, organized and
created by Rory Ralston, 'chief curator', also a
student in the fine arts department. The present
exhibition is the work of Rev. Dunstan Massey, of
the St. Benedictine Order. Ralston met Rev.
Mass"ey several years ago while on a student visit to
Westminster Abbey, Mission City. Since then they
have become friends and the show is their first joint
product.
Rev. Massey is an amazing man and creative
artist, who works in many mediums. He writes both
poetry and dramatic work, and with the cooperation of Ralston wrote the music and lyrics for
one of the chants. His major work and interest is in
the visual arts, and his talent is impressive. The
medium he uses is tempora and chalk, though his
permanent work in the monastery is done in fresco.
The work is also highly symbolic and strongly
dependent on some knowledge of traditional
Christian symbolism. It is helpful to know the
history of St. Bendict's life as man and saint. The
largest mural depicts St. Benedict simultaneously
as young man and enlightened saint in an almost
surrealistic background of receding squares. The
broken chalice tells of the failed attempt at
poisoning him; the story goes that the chalice
sprung apart as he was about to put it to his lips.
The tree of life grows at his side, the thorns of his
previous life are at his feet.
Rev. Massey works from preparatory sketches,
though without live models, and the many sketches
preceding the final work are also on display. The
path leading to the large mural is dark and winding,
becoming lighter and wider as it approaches. In
this path are interspersed the stages of the completed work symbolic of the final culminating
events in the life of St. Benedict. This is one of the
many combinations of the technical and the artistic, necessary in good gallery work.
Another smaller mural, on the right of the large
one, is also worth taking a longer look at, particularly for its technical skill. It has a final coating
of bees wax which deepens the colors and glosses
the surface giving it a glaze known largely in
Renaissance work.
The work is very dependent on traditional skills
and methods, and they are skilfully applied.
Rev. Massey may be an anachronism in our
time of artistic-pseudo-avant-gardists. He works as
an artist within a small, closed, self-supporting
society. His work has never yet been exhibited and
he does not join the mad personality cult so
necessary to those who sell to survive.
His work is not a new form. It will certainly not
cause a great furor or attract the (cash) interest of
any of the major "dealers" and art critics, but it is
significant as a living alternative.
Rev. Dunstan Massey works because he must.
His art is for his soul, his faith and his God. Even
though   the   work   may   not   be   intellectually
stimulating, it is touchingly beautiful. Could this be
the real purpose of art?
Each in the heavens
Differs contends
In beauty sun
With moon, and star with light of star.
The gallery will be open until Dec. 30, with
possible extensions due to local interest. Every
evening, starting at 7 p.m., a multimedia show on
the exhibition will be shown. The show runs every
half hour. Try to see it.
—Katrina Von Flotow
Friday,  December   1,   1972
THE       UBYSSEY
Page Friday, 3 mBOOKFINDER
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Flicks on view
Since this is the last issue of pf before
Christinas, we here present you with an
extravaganza of film reviews. Christmas is
a big time for move theatres, so they often
store up good shows.
Lady   Sings   the   Blues   Directed   by
Sidney J. Furie, screenplay by Terence
McCoy, Chris Clark and Suzanne de
Passe,   music   by   Michel   Legrand,
starring   Dianna   Ross,   Bill   Dee
Williams and Richard Pryor.
Lady Sings the Blues is a powerful film.
Only the hard-hearted will fail to become
deeply involved in the misery ridden career
of Billie Holliday, the great jazz singer of
the 30's. The film concentrates on her best
years, from her arrival in New York, to her
smash concert in Carnegie Hall.
But if these were her best years, I'd hate
to see a film of her worst. The story in the
film consists of a continual series of ups
and downs, with the downs predominating.
Billie's inability to prevent a continual
onslaught of disaster and despair forms the
major theme.
The film portrays her life as an
exaggerated public example of what it is to
be black in America. Raised by relatives
because her father is gone and her mother
works for rich whites, she is raped at 14.
She goes to New York where she soon
becomes a Harlem whore. She becomes a
successful Harlem club singer, and goes on
the road to build up her name.
On the road she sees first-hand the most
blatent forms of race prejudice: Jim Crow,
lynchings and Ku Klux Klan parades. The
strains and frustrations of performing,
coupled with the ever-present trials of
being black, make her turn to heroin.
From this point on her life is a miserable,
losing battle with the drug. We are spared
some of this misery because her last years
are briefly summed up in a college of
headlines. But we definitely pay our dues
for this respite by sitting through the
tension of ever-present tragedy in the rest
of the movie.
All this sounds heavy and depressing,
and believe me it is. But it is made bearable
by two things:
The first is that the movie is a first-rate
production. The directing, photography,
editing and acting are all very good.
The lead role demands-an inspired
performance. Dianna Ross is certainly
inspired, perhaps a little too inspired. But
she takes a courageous bash at the role,
and by and large, brings it off very well.
Billy Dee Williams is adequate as Louis,
her gangster lover, and Richard Pryor
plays Richard Pryor in the role of Piano
Man. Fortunately it fits.
The second thing that makes the film
entertaining is the musical score. Dianna
Ross does a great job singing slightly updated stylings of many old Billie Holliday
numbers including "Strange Fruit," "God
Bless the Child," and "My Man." She does
at least a dozen songs, but they are integrated into the action so well they they
never intrude.
The film does not try to be accurate or
realistic. It is a stylized biography that
attempts to present Billie's life as symbolic
and representative. Thus Billie and the
characters around her are presented larger
than life. For example, Louis is the kindest,
understandingest, moralest Harlem
gangster you'll ever see.
Despite its shortcomings, Lady Sings the
Blues is a high-quality film that many will
find moving. It's well worth seeing.
—David MacKinlay
The Assassination of Trotsky directed
by Joseph Losey, written by Nicholas
Mosely, photographed by Pasqualino
de Santi. At the Varsity.
The. Assassination   of   Trotsky   is   a
baffling film. One wonders why it was
ever made. Director Joseph Losey has
made some excellent films [The Servant,
King and Country, The Go-Between], and
he has made some mistakes   [Boom!,
Secret Ceremony]. Assassination easily
ranks as his biggest mistake to date.
DIANA ROSS .. . sings the blues
His other failures have shown signs that
he was attempting to do something which
somehow didn't work. His latest film
cannot even be granted the dignity of this
category. If Losey had some idea in mind
which might form the basis for a film, it is
certainly not evident in this tour de force
of pointlessness.
One has a faint suspicion that the film
might be attempting to explore the
dynamics of political assassination. It
traces the events leading up to the murder
of Trotsky (Richard Burton) in his
heavily-guarded Mexican villa by a pickaxe weilding manic-depressive (Alain
Delon). But Losey fails to interpret these
events on any level and the results are
both dull and confusing.
In addition to a complete absence of
plot, character development,
psychological exploration, social
significance and political implications,
the film also lacks drama and suspense.
And there's not even any sex! There is
some explicit and gruesome violence in
the actual assassination scene, but it is too
late to waken audiences lulled to sleep by
Nicholas Mosely's thin screenplay and
Losey's limp direction.
One squirms in embarrassment for the
competent cast who come across as stiff
and slightly ridiculous caricatures.
Burton (looking suspiciously like Peter,
O'Toole in Man of LaMancha) wanders
about his villa dictating his memoirs and
musing on possible assassination by
Stalinists. Instead of music, he is accompanied by his own voice chanting the
sayings of (ex) chairman Trotsky. These
quotes, which are probably quite
profound, are rendered totally forgettable
in the context of the film.
Delon attempts to inject some depth
into the assassin's enigmatic character
but with no motivation or development
written into his part, he fails miserably.
Romy Schneider, Trotsky's secretary and
Delon's girlfriend, gives a passionate
performance which holds our interest for
a while, but also succumbs to the film's
overwhelming aimlessness.
There are just two points in favour of
seeing The Assassination of Trotsky. The
first is the photography of Pasqualino de -
Santi. It is both innovative and compelling
and provides a rich veneer to an otherwise
substanceless work.
Page Friday, 4
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday,   December   1,   1972 Liver holidays
The second reason is a fabulous short
called "At Home", written and directed
by Martin La vat for the CBC. It has got to
be one of the weirdest and funniest short
films to be seen in a long while.
However, neither of these good points is
enough to make up for the 90 minutes of
aoredom from which we expect so much
more.
—Adrienne     Glen
Sunday, Bloody Sunday Directed by
John Schlesinger, starring Glenda
Jackson, Peter Finch, and Murray
Head. At SUB auditorium this
weekend.
John Schlesinger is a very skillful
rector. He has proved in such films as
[idnight Cowboy and Darling that he can
jrtray the quality of a given life style with
recision, depth and force.
Sunday, Bloody Sunday is no exception,
lenda Jackson, an indepedent career
oman, and Peter Finch, a London
lysician, share the same answering
;rvice. They also share the same lover —
shallow, insensitive young artist. Their
ssperate struggle with this impossible
tuation is thoroughly explored by
chlesinger. We see them gradually
ragged down by their own inability to
lake a courageous decision that will hurt,
aunds like life, doesn't it?
The acting, especially Glenda Jackson's
excellent. In fact, the whole film, is very
ell done. It recreates the often miserable
orld of urban love affairs sensitively and
icurately. Perhaps too accurately.
The quality of Bloody Sunday matches
iat of Midnight Cowboy and Darling. But
3 appeal is much more limited. Many
ewers have found it dull and depressing
because it is so real. It hits us so close to
here we live that we would just as soon
)t recognize its validity. DM
Medium Cool Starring Robert Forester
and Vera Bloom. Next week at SUB
auditorium.
Medium Cool depicts "America" in the
;e of McLuhan and Chicago riots. It is a
)cumentary style feature about a
levision camera-man who is covering the
emocratic convention in Chicago 1968. He
eets an uneducated young appalacian
aman and her fatherless son.
The most original aspects of the film is its
ming techniques.  It has none of  the
SCOTT ANTHONY . . . meditating
normal trappings of fiction: character
development, coherent plot, suspence. It is
shot in a deliberately disjointed way so that
it will seem as real as possible. The action
(one cannot say "plot") takes place in a
haphazard, seemingly random sequence.
And no tricks of the cinematographer's
trade are used to make the transitions
between scenes smoother. This lack of
technique is so successful that it is almost
impossible to shake the feeling that we are
watching real people in real life.
This is one kind of older film that SUB
should be bringing in. We may find that it is
dated and stale, or we may be pleased to
find that it is enough of a work of art to
transcend its material. dm
Savage   Messiah   Directed   by   Ken
Russell with Dorothy Tutin and Scott
Antony. At the Lougheed Mall, Cinema
2.
Sophie Brzeska is a middle-aged Polish
woman who lives in a garret and is trying to
write a novel. Henri Daudier is a 23-year-
.©Id French art student who is hyperactive
and wants to sculpt. The two move in
together, and after Henri's parents disown
him, the two make their way to London,
where they live in a hovel underneath a
railway trestle, exchange surnames, and
maintain a frenetic platonic relationship.
Savage Messiah is the closest Ken
Russell has come, so far, to directing an
accurate biographical film. Using a great
deal more restraint than in his previous
films, Russell gives us a surprisingly
congruent, even credible, study of an artist
and his work.
Ken Russell buffs, especially those who
gauge his appeal by his films' perversities,
might very well be disappointed by his
latest work.
Yet although hardly along the same lines
as The Devils or The Music Lovers,
Russell's personal style is not absent from
the film.
As always, he displays a genuine flair for
sets and locations that exude the proper
atmosphere for his subject matter: the
alleys and gutters of London, the interior
decor of avant-garde dinner parties, the
gaudy night-clubs of pre-war London are
all sensual and vivid. And the bizarre
figures Russell injects into his scenario:
the bomb-throwing suffragette, the
voluptuary art-dealer, the bitchy im-
pressario, help to give several scenes of the
picture a surrealistic nature.
Dorothy Tutin is beautifully dowdy and
fastidious as Sophie Daudier-Brezeska, a
perfect foil for newcomer Scott Antony's
extroverted Henri, literally an irresistable
force against an immovable object.
In a recent press release, Antony made
some observations regarding Henri, who
was killed at the age of 23 in the early part
of the Great War.
"Gaudier-Brzeska was . . . very sensitive, but he could be very insensitive to
others. His behaviour, especially to those
who treated him well, was frequently
inexcusable. With this incredible energy
and driving force of his, one can imagine
that his rudeness was almost as much as a
form of self-expression as his recurring
niceness. His friends just had to be
tolerant."
Regarding Henri's relationship with
Sophie, Antony says: "She needed him as
much as he needed her. She was a middle-
aged woman who had pretty well had it as
far as finding a soul-mate was concerned.
Most of her life had been total
disillusionment in one way or another.
Meeting this young, fresh, vital man must
have meant so much to her."
This is perhaps an adequate summary of
Sophie's needs. But in Antony's Henri,
there is one weakness: How could Henri's
active, volatile nature have tolerated the
almost manic-depressive personality of
Sophie?
In any instance when an irresistable
force is confronted with an immovable
object, one of the two must concede to the
other.
—Ryon Guedes
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Friday,  December  1,   1972
THE       UBYSSEY
Page Friday, 5 WAYNE ROBSON . . . Which way did he go
Moon stumbles to the chair and desperately clings
to it. His strength failing him, he sinks to the floor,
groans "Puckeridge you bastard," then falls — dead.
It could be a Greek tragedy. Four characters meet
a violent bloody fate in the play. Only it isn't. The Real
Inspector Hound is a comedy; witty and satirical, it
barely pauses enough to let you catch your breath.
Critics are a sorry bunch. Wrapped up in their
personal affairs, concerned only with their own self-
interests and motivated by greed, ambition or lechery,
they have no place in the theatre. Stoppard certainly
thinks so, and he rids the theatre of them by the best
means he knows. Murder.
Moon (Frank Maraden) and Birdboot (Des Smiley)
are two critics sent to review a play. Moon and Birdboot
sit front stage right with the"audience"while the play
they (and we) are watching occupies most of the stage.
Our attention shifts from critics to "play" and back
again with the sequences of dialogue. Millerd does not
use the freeze approach, and. we can observe the
reactions the critics display as they watch the play.
The play the critics watch is a hilarious murder-
mystery. It involves every cliche, stereotype and stock
situation imaginable. It's a parody, and done excellently. Cameron Porteous's set is a masterful
recreation of a Victorian English manor's parlour.
The Real Inspector Hound & After Magritte, by
Tom Stoppard. Directed by Bill Millerd at the
Arts Club Theatre.
Heather Robinson is a fine grouchy, grumbling
housekeeper, Wayne Robson handles the muttering,
senile Magnus well, and Duncan Regehr's role as Inspector Hound is the epitome of an indefatiguable fop.
Maraden and Smiley are effective critics. Smiley is
outrageously costumed in flamboyant, conspicuous
theatre garb. He is transparent and phoney, and conveys, the declining frustrated man well. Maraden is a
superb intellectual — a magniloquent, ambitious critic,
who obtusely contemplates his navel.
After Margritte is the curtain-raiser, and is another
comic mystery tale.
Three characters bitch and argue about the actual
description of a man each of them saw. "White beard,
white cane, striped pyjamas with a turtle under his arm
and hopping on one foot" is the general consensus, but
the variations are even funnier. This man is their only
alibi against Inspector Foot's (Wayne Robson) accusation of a crime he's sure they committed. It's a
play of misconnections and misunderstandings, and
generally inane behaviour.
Both plays are typically Stoppard. They are
examples of self-conscious writing, every word and
every line is carefully measured and placed. The
humour is derived from word games: double entendres,
puns, and cross-over conversations. Millerd's split-
second timing and brisk pacing makes you hold your
breath and check your laughter for fear of missing
another joke. Both are a race from start to finish, and
demand enormous concentration to keep up with
everything.
Comedies which are easily understandable are
more palatable to audiences, but Stoppard's humour is
demanding at times. Don't try to absorb everything you
see and hear; it's too exhausting. You'll miss a few
things, but you'll get most of it. Besides, there's enough
in the pie to please the most fastidious critic regardless
of the slice he gets.
—Steve Morris
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Page Friday, 6
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday,   December   1,   1972 Poetry
'Bad boy9 poet tells all
There's no doubt Irving Layton has
presence. It's when he curls his thirsty
fingers around the glass and says to the
waiting passive audience below, "If
you're wondering whether this is wine,
it is!"
An aging Bacchanalian god. But he
toasted us with the wine and the poem.
He picked them out for us, he was a
prophet, a revolutionary, a mind
changer. He sent them out to guide us.
But when he wasn't trying to guide us
he was talking about himself. The
poems were not his best-crafted, not
unique or complex, unifying opposites.
They were simple statements of the
man, what he liked, hated, what moved
him. You could believe him when he
wasn't the Bacchanalian god.
In an interview with Page Friday
afterward we asked him: In 1964 you
said poetry was apolitical act, what did
you mean by that?
Layton: You have to shock established
society. Society is frozen into attitudes,
like the work ethic or materialism. You
have to keep shocking and stirring up
things.
pf: Was it easier to be a poet now in
Canada than it was when you started to
write?
Layton: Yes, it's easier to get your
work published now than it was 20 or 30
years ago. The publishers are more
hospitable. But you still can't make a
living at it.
pf: What do you think of the nationalist
movement among Canadian writers
today?
Layton: When writing for a cause a
poet ceases to be a poet and becomes a
propagandist. When the cause is attained    the    poetry    is    no    longer
LAYTON
—donovan photo
an aging Bacchanalian god
memorable. Things human endure. If
the poet is inspired by patriotism to
write memorable language, fine, but if
he sinks into something doctrinaire he
loses himself. A poet should be able to
fly on two wings and be able to talk to
everyone in all ages. I'm not that excited about nationalism. The beauty of
the Canadians that I have met excites
me.
The secret of all poetry is con-
cretism, and particularly it lies in the
human particular and this is what
excites me. The fact that I was born
circumcized, in some way special, here
to celebrate the world of beautiful
women and the subtle faces of men so
much to be enjoyed and marvelled at.
pf: What do you mean when you say
inspiration?
Layton: The poet is impelled by a
demon, the only way he can get relief is
by utterance. The poet constructs his
life on this need to liberate himself to
liberate energy. In the process he may
say something men need. Most people
allow themselves to be robbed of joy
and energy, by the church, the family,
and education-loyalty.
When this happens people miss out on
joy, sex love, beauty, art.
pf: What did you mean when you said
that poetry is the terror and ecstasy of
living beyond ones psychic means?
Layton: The poet must seek out the
extremes of every situation so as to
keep himself alive. Only the mediocre
go to the centre.
pf: You once said that culture is the
underarm perspiration of impotent old
men. But what is poetry but part of
culture. Who reads poetry but the
children of the middle class who can
afford to go to university? How do you
get around that?
Layton: I don't see my poetry as being
written for anyone, of course I'd like to
see it reach as many people as possible.
It's true that it is the middle class who
read poetry. What you hope is that the
more sensitive of them will come out
for joy.
pf: What are you planning next?
Layton: I'm working on a series of
short stories. I'm planning to write my
memoirs if I can find enough scandalous things about the women I have
known.
pf: In 1964, you said that the would-be
poet shouldn't let himself be trapped
into university, do you have any
suggestions as to what he should do?
Layton: Have a rich father ... or
marry a rich wife.
—Jennifer Alley
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Friday,  December  1,  1972
THE       UBYSSEY
Page Friday, 7 ■■-   Music
Vintage Beethoven
Israeli violinist Pinchas Zukerman captured
completely the capacity audience at the Queen
Elizabeth Theatre last Monday night with a
devastatingly inspired performance of the popular
Beethoven Violin Concerto in D Major.
In complete control from the first note, the rich
burgundy-wine tone of his violin was crisp, clean and
positive without the slightest trace of hesitancy, and
his precision was flawless throughout.
The timpani open the long orchestral introduction
to the brisk first movement. The main theme which is
introduced by the orchestra is then taken up by the
soloist, who proceeds to expand and elaborate on it.
Progressing in waves of rising and falling crescendoes,
the notes slid smoothly and forcefully from Zukerman's
bow, and his control of the flitting "butterfly" passages
was flawlessly consistent throughout.
Zukerman proved his talent in the extremely difficult and complicated cadenza, which he came through
trimphantly. It still amazes me how two themes can be
played on one violin simultaneously, and watching
Zukerman do it left me breathless!
The slower second movement is tranquil and tender
and very short, leading without a pause into the very
lively third movement. Here, a new theme is introduced
by the soloist, who then takes it on through numerous
variations and restatements. Once again, in the
cadenza, the soloist is given ample opportunity to show
his paces, and Zukerman took full advantage of it.
The audience responded enthusiastically to the 24
year old violinist, many people rising from their seats
to applaud him.
—Robert Mitchinson
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> >**ph t»nni #*.*.fc... John Sihle»iitK«r> Filnr.' 0-    *^
Nl    jW Sun'
.r"1   y7BloodySunday» . SUB
Glenda Jackson ftterRnch AUD.
MurrayHead 50c
Fresh as a Flower - in Just 1 Hour
"your university area
 dry cleaners;; __
Wish to convey to their customers & friends
BEST WISHES FOR A HAPPY CHRISTMAS
and a PROSPEROUS NEW YEAR
ONE HOUR
UN/VERS/TYl MMtvmiNG
the most in dry cleaning
2146 Western Parkway
Mon. - Fri. — 8-6
(in the Village - Near the Chevron Station)
228-9414 Sat. 9-5:30
$132 Million
This is the annual
budget of the City of
Vancouver. Most of this
money comes from
your taxes.
City Council presently has no accountant
to offer professional advice on money
matters . . . your money.
On Dec. 13 elect a man with 6 years municipal
accounting experience
ut a
CHARTERED ACCOUNTANT
WAYMARK X
FOR ALDERMAN
Page Friday, 8
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday,  December   1,   1972 Page  24
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday,   December   1,   1972
the destruction of the expensive stereo myth -
the introduction of a quality stereo package
under $235
7   ;*•
If™.
;^i
,x^"<
The myth about expensive stereos being the only good stereos is now an
old wives tale.
Electra is a major manufacturer of a wide range of quality stereo components. This package is their model SS-7. It has an AM/FM receiver with
calibrated volume, balance, bass and treble controls. The SS-7 also has a
built-in cassette tape player and recorder, and a built-in digital clock and
timer.
The walnut veneer cabinets have an extended range speaker for accurate
sound. The BSR 4-speed turntable will let you play your favorite records
without snaps, crackles or pops. We even give you two microphones for
live recording.
Our price of $234.88 for this 12 item package
make it an unbeatable value.
Come in and enjoy it today.
ONLY
*234
.88
financing available
KELL Y'S
STEREO MARTS
( ll\R(.h\
• 540 GRANVILLE • 2714 W. BROADWAY
• 648 YATES ST., VICTORIA
611 COLUMBIA, N. WEST. • PARK ROYAL, W.VAN.
• 22 VICTORIA CR., NANAIMO
Write for details about opening your own Kelly's Stereo Mart Friday,   December   1,   1972
THE       UBYSSEY
Page  23
flHB&^ ****** ^ov*/
kim mi idiiLilr1 pliotn1
SEEMS LIKE a waste, doesn't it? At present, under Rec. Rip-off UBC's plans, the War Memorial gym. Armories, UBC fields and SUB a.m. bowling will be out-of-bounds for
all but the 700 jocks who were stupid enough to sign up.
Rip-off UBC-who needs it?
RICHARD LONGPRE
solid
BRIAN DE BIASIO
... 34 goals last year
GOALIE FRED MASUCH
. . . weak spot?
Hockey conquerors off
to prairie battleground
By DOUG HIGGINS
Despite rumours to the
contrary UBC still has a
hockey team. Although no
evidence of their existence in
the form of hockey games has
been seen on this campus, a
group of dedicated athletes
have been seen practising at
Thunderbird Arena throughout
the past week.
The 'Birds last played a
home game Nov. 11, a thrilling
5-4 win over the University of
Calgary Dinosaurs. Since then
the hockey team has been on
the road for five consecutive
games.
Because of a lopsided
schedule the 'Birds play .only
two of their first 10 games at
home. In the new year the
'Birds will play 10 of their 14
remaining games at home.
If the team can survive the
first half of their schedule they
will be in an excellent position
to take the league title. To date
the 'Birds, thanks to two
games last weekend with the
University of Victoria are in
first place in the Canada West
Conference with a record of
five wins and two losses.
UBC's string of road games
will continue this weekend with
Jumpers form win monopoly
UBC jumpers led by Rick Cuttel captured the first four
places of the Gondolla Classic held Wednesday in Winnipeg.
Cuttel won the event with a jump of seven feet three-eigths
inches followed by John Hawkins and John Beers at 6-10.
Dean Bauch, the youngest of the group, took fourth,
clearing 6-6.
An ecstatic Lionel Pugh, coach of track and field at UBC,
predicted that all four would clear seven feet very soon.
The University of Manitoba hosted the Invitational meet.
games Friday and Saturday
against Calgary and Sunday at
the University of Alberta
(Edmonton).
This is the 'Birds' second
journey over the Rockies. In
their first trip the 'Birds split a
pair of games with the
University of Saskatchewan
and were shut out by Calgary,
6-0.
The 'Birds must win at least
two of their three games this
weekend to maintain a comfortable lead over the rest of
the league. The key game will
be the Sunday contest in Edmonton against the Golden
Bears. The 'Birds have yet to
play the Bears in league action.
In a pre-season game UBC
and Alberta tied 6-6 at UBC.
The University of Alberta is
presently in second place, two
points behind UBC.
The 'Birds' next home games
will not be until after Christmas. They host Alberta
January 5.
Recreation UBC does not appear to be serving its purpose at
the university.
To date about 700 people have signed up out of over 20,000
students and faculty. These members can take advantage of the
services provided by Recreation UBC which include supervision, instruction, first aid and use of gym space and apparatus.
The rest of the students, population and faculty are denied
all access to gym space and equipment use unless they participate in intramurals or extramural sports.
In order to take advantage of the services provided by
Recreation UBC, you must pay a $3 fee at their office in War
Memorial gymnasium.
However many students who have not paid are still using
tbe gym. As a result most ot tbe supervisors employed by
Recreation UBC spend most of their time clearing the gyms of
"unauthorized" casual athletes.
For this service the supervisors receive a salary of $1.88 per
hour.
Many of the benefits provided by Recreation UBC were
actually available before its establishment. Any students could
use gym space when it was free, and often times borrowed
equipment with a deposit.
The large apparatus gym at the Physical Education
Complex was available for practice on the rings, parallel bars,
vaulting horses and trampoline.
This equipment is still set up most evenings and is unused
for a good part of the time but if you do not belong to Recreation
UBC you cannot use it.
Recreation UBC allows its members to reserve gym space
in advance which assures a group of people they will have the
space when they planned. However, any campus group or club
could have reserved the space before Recreation UBC was
organized.
Free instruction to Recreation UBC members is a definite
benefit formerly unavailable to students. As for the free
supervision it is doubtful whether university students and
faculty require it for most gym activities.
Recreation UBC aims to provide a better allocation of the
gym space and equipment it controls. The organization
presently controls all recreational use of the Armouries, the PE
complex and War Memorial gym.However, the specific times
allocated for recreational use of this space has changed very
little.
For example, in War Memorial gym, intramurals take
place at noon, recreational people use the floor for a few hours
in the afternoon and most of the extramural teams practice
after classes. Intramurals are scheduled, as always, for a good
part of the night.
Recreational UBC members are generally assured of gym
time and use of equipment. Recreational leagues (whose
members also belong to Recreation UBC) can thus operate
more easily with less difficulties than formerly. Recreational
volleyball on Wednesday nights has been a successful operation
in this regard and usually draws about 40 participants.
In summary, Recreation UBC has provided the following
benefits for its members:
1. Better hours for recreational users of gyms and equipment
— but these hours are the same as last year;
2. Use of more equipment — but equipment could be used
before Recreation UBC;
3. Better organization — but who needs it?
What does Recreation UBC do for the 20,000 students who
don't want to pay the fee but who might want to use the gym
once or twice a year? Page  22
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday,  December   1,   1972
WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 6
12:30  p.m.
SUB  AUDITORIUM
Canadian
JAQUES   ROY
Will speak and show films on:
The   POPULAR  MOVEMENT
for  the
LIBERATION   OF   ANGOLA
Sponsored by Speakers — Education Committee   '
IT IS A MISSING CHAPTER FROM
THE GRAPES OF WRATH'
AND OF EQUAL STATURE:
— Judith Crist, New York Magazine
-^Radnitz / MATTEL Productions
"SOUKDEir
A Robert B. Radnitz/Martin Ritt Film
starring CICELY TYSON • PAUL WINFIELD ■ KEVIN HOOKS co-starring TAJ MAHAL
JANET MACLACHLAN • procuced by ROBERT B. RADNITZ • directed by MARTIN RITT
screenplay byLONNE ELDER, III   based on the Newbery Award winning Novel by
WILLIAM H.ARMSTRONG songs and music by TAJ MAHAL panavision*
COLOR BY DELUXE*
STARTS DECEMBER 22nd
GENERAL
Odeon
S81   GRANVILLE
682-7468
TWENTIETH
CENTUFTV-FOX
MATURE
Parents,  could be
disturbing for
children.
— R. W. MacDonald
B.C. Director
Coronet
>5I  GRANVILLE i
683-6828
LEE VANCLEEF
THE COMMANDOS"
Warning—Violent
scenes of battle.
-R. W. MacDonald
B.C. Director
Continuous from
12:00 Noon
The Valachi Papers
Vogue
Job Valachi told it all...across the headlines
of America.
MATURE:
12:05, 2:15,
Coarse   language,   swearing  and   brutality.        4:35, 6:55,
685-3434 R.W. McDONALD, B.C. Director 9:10
"HICKEY&
MW\rmlf\riy     ShowTimes
12:00, 1:50
3:45, 5:45
881   GRANVILLE 7:4S. 9:45
682-746* MATURE
Odeon
THE ASSASSINATION OF TROTSKY
Richard Burton — Alain Delon —  Romy Schmeider
Mature — Warning: Scenes of excessive brutality.
Varsitu
224-3730"
4375 W. 10th
— R. W. McDonald, B.C. Director
SHOWS AT
7:30, 9:30
ROBERT SHAW - ANNE BANCROFT
and
SIMON
WARD
CARl FORFMANanjRICHARO ATTENBOROUGH
YOUNG WINSTON
Hyland
i GENERAL COLOR
ALL SEATS RESERVED
Tickets on sale at Box Office Odeon
ICIMGJ-Y .» KNIGHT Theatre,   881   Granville   St.,   or   call
8763045 688-2308. ^
SPOS TS
UBC women clobber Vic
The UBC Thunderettes opened their
basketball season last week with two wins over
the University of Victoria Vickettes.
Victoria, who were the only team to beat the
UBC girls last year, was supposed to offer the
toughest competition.
But, in view of the wins, the Thunderettes
need have no worry as vetern Wendy Grant
lead UBC to victories of 53-40 and 49-25, helped
by Liz Silcott's 20 point effort in the second
game.
A fast Thunderette two-person press was
almost unbreakable.
Elsewhere in women's basketball action, the
jayvees succumbed 55-34 to the Seattle Sandpipers and the Senior B team edged out Vancouver City College 40-38 as Brenda Stinson
recorded 13 points.
In field hockey the j.v.'s defeated the Jokers
3-1 in league play despite poor weather and
field conditions.
UBC had three curling rinks active over the
weekend in the Calgary Invitational Bonspiel.
The Chamberlain rink won two out of the
three games; winning 12-3 against Calgary
High School and 12-7 against the University of
Alberta, and losing 9-8 against the University of
Saskatchewan.
Exciting volleyball competition, in the form
of the South Korean Olympic team is coming to
UBC to face the Thunderettes Dec. 19.
The match, to be held at 1 p.m. in War
Memorial Gym, puts the 14th place Olympic
EVERYTHING
FOR THE SKIER
SKIS -HARNESS - POLES
STRETCH PANTS,
SOCKS, GLOVES,
PARKAS, GOGGLES,
BOOTS, ETC.
FULL LINE OF SKATING
AND HOCKEY EQUIPMENT
SPECIAL OFFER
SKI OUTFIT
JET SKIS—Step-in Harness
Steel Poles - Complete
Pedigree Parkas - "Ski" Ski Parkas
Pioneer Down-Filled Parkas
Warm-Up Pants — Gloves — Mitts — Sox
VAL D'OR BOOTS- TYROL BOOTS
ELAN and GRAVES SKI'S
Northwestern Sporting Goods
10th & ALMA (open Fri. 'til 9 p.m.     224-b040
team against a strong UBC side, perhaps
stronger than ever before.
Betty Baxter and Sandy Vosburgh of the
Canadian National Team will play for UBC.
Also up-coming for the Thunderettes is the
annual Thunderette Invitational tournament to
be held Jan. 13 with teams competing from
Washington, Oregon, Alberta, Idaho and
Montana — 24 teams in all.
In gymnastics UBC will host a dual meet
with the University of Alberta Jan. 21.. The
University of Calgary will compete Jan. 27 in
the new gymnastics gym in Unit II of the
Physical Education Complex.
United on tab
UBC faces a tough opponent at Thunderbird
Stadium 2 p.m. Saturday when they brush with
North Shore United who presently hold third
slot in Pacific Coast League standings.
Two players who will be closely watched by
the North Shore defenders are Ed Sotysik, who
with four goals in three games is the leading
goal scorer for the 'Birds and Wayne Larson,
captain of the team, who has yet to score in
league play.
Coach Joe Johnson will be using the same
line-up that defeated Pauls Canadians 4-0
Saturday.
The 'Birds presently hold fifth place in the
PCL.
Wrestlers
look to
victory
The UBC wrestling team is
favored to win the Calgary
Invitational.
The team will be travelling
to Calgary this weekend and
UBC is expected to dominate
the higher and middle weight
classes. Co-captains Taras
Hryb and Bob Ormond and
veterans George and Mike
Richey will be pacing a young
team of freshmen in the lighter
weight classes.
This meet is important
because many of the universities in the Canada West
Conference will also be
competing. An early season
victory would give a decided
edge to the team.
UBC has an added advantage of previous competition over the other
Canadian teams. In the UBC
Invitational held Nov. 18,
George and Mike Richey
placed 2nd and 3rd respectively. Bob Ormond, Vic
Tyson, Bill Henderson, and
Jake Scudamore reached the
top fourth and fifth positions in
their weight classes despite
still competition from the
States.
Jake Scudamore did exceptionally well considering
this is his first year in
wrestling.
Two games
for 'Birds
The cold frozen wasteland of
the Alberta prairie will greet
the basketball team this
weekend as they journey to
Edmonton for a pair of games
in Canada West Conference
play.
The Bears gave the
Canadian Intercollegiate
Champion 'Birds a real run for
their money in the playoffs last
year and should do so again
Friday and Saturday night.
48
.50 Frfday,  December   1,   1972
THE       UBYSSEY
Page  21
Hot flashes
Wisenthal
wants dope
Arts faculty members and students are asked to submit views
about future curriculum needs in
their faculty to professor J.L
Wisenthal, English department.
Arctic whales
A petition campaign to stop
the hunting of Arctic whales is
being organized at UBC.
Interested persons are asked to
contact Paul Spong at 731-5611
or P.O. Box 183, North Vancouver.
Lasf bus
The UBC parking lot commuter bus will make its last run
for the fall term 7:30 to 9:30 a.m.
Dec. 15.
It will begin operations again
7:30 a.m. Jan. 3.
Rock mass
Christ Church Cathedral, Burrard and Georgia, is holding a rock
mass 7:30 p.m. Sunday.
The mass, entitled Peace, will
feature the band Sunshyne.
for applications is Dec. 15.
Meanwhile, the student christian movement here is holding a
conference in Winnipeg Dec 27 to
31. Some transportation funds are
available for UBC students wanting to attend. Call Doug Hodgkin-
son at 228-0049 or Joy Turpin at
224-9616.
The movement will also sponsor an advent celebration at noon
Dec. 7 featuring Sunshyne, the
University Choral Union and
Magee Singers.
Change
VAC meet
The Vietnam action committee
is sponsoring a seminar Tuesday
about a recent provincial New
Democratic Party resolution
opposing the use of Canadian
peace-keeping troops in Vietnam.
The 8 p.m. seminar will be held
at 117 Water in Gastown.
Cuba
Students interested in a work-
study project next August with
members of the Cuban Student
Christian Movement are asked to
contact George Hermanson or
Don Johnson at 224-1614 or the
Lutheran campus centre. Deadline
The civic election is the topic
of a public meeting tonight sponsored by the Young Socialists.
Admission is free at 8 p.m., 1208
Granville.
Bangladesh
The World University Service is
sponsoring a summer seminar in
Bangladesh for 50 Canadian students and faculty.
Two UBC students returning to
campus next year are eligible to
attend. Applications are available
from the International House
main office.
A symposium about dialectics
of change will be held Jan. 5 to 8
featuring author Rosemary Rue-
ther. It is sponsored by women's
studies, speakers and education
committee and the campus ministry.
For more information call
224-1614.
Open house
Open House needs staff. On
March 2 and 3, UBC opens its
doors to the public for its triennial orgy of exposure.
People are needed now to organize the event, plan faculty
displays and clubs displays; and
hundreds will be needed on Open
House weekend to man information booths and be tour guides.
If you can help, call 228-4183,
or visit the Open House offfte,
SUB 230A.
Bach choir
The Bach Choir of the Vancouver Symphony Orchestra will
perform the first Bach B minor
mass to be heard in Vancouver, 8
p.m. Dec. 8 at the Queen-Elizabeth Theatre.
Boys musU
Tickets for the fifth annual
B.C. Boys Choir Christmas of
Music are now available at the
Vancouver ticket centre, Eatons,
Union Jacks and Jeans and the
Planetarium.
Tween classes
7:30  p.m.   2480
TODAY
GAY PEOPLE OF UBC
Social  evening, 8 p.m.,  arts 1  blue
room.
GRAD CLASS COUNCIL
Meeting noon SUB 212A.
PRE-SOCIAL WORK CLUB
Guest speaker, noon SUB 105B.
EXPERIMENTAL COLLEGE
McGregor    and    Todd    with    Karl,
noon SUB 111.     _
WOMEN'S ACTION GROUP
Meeting, noon Ed. 1211.
ALLIANCE FRANCAISE
General   meeting,   noon   IH   upper
lounge.
FRIDAY
VARSITY DEMOLAY
Meeting, noon SUB 224.
SATURDAY
VOC and AQUA SOC
Skating and broomball party, 8 p.m.
— 9:30 p.m. main arena.
SUNDAY
RUS
Executive  meeting,
West    First,    bsmt.
MONDAY
EL CIRCULO
Last meeting 1972, noon IH.
USEFUL
— CARS —
WE ARE CLEARING
ALLOFOUR
USED INVENTORY
FOR YEAR END
DEPENDABLE
AUTOMOBILES
PRICED FROM $150.00
SOUTHSIDE
DATSUN
290 S.W. Marine Dr.
(Near Cambie)
324-4644
PC CLUB
Meeting,   election  of officers,  noon
SUB 211.
TUESDAY
EC KAN KA Ft
Free public lecture, 7:30 p.m. SUB
211.
WEDNESDAY
CHRISTIAN SCIENCE
Testimony meeting, noon SUB 224.
voc
Voting  on   new   constitution,   noon
Angus 104.
LCM
Eucharist, noon campus centre.
NEXT   WEEK   AT   HILLEL
MON—WED   12:30   BET   CAFE
TUESDAY,   DECEMBER   5th,   1972
12:30   p.m.
Jewish   Mysticism   and   the   Jewish   Spirit
SEYMOUR   LEVITIAN
Translator,   Writer   and   Critic
CLASSIFIED
Rates: Campus - 3 tines, 1 day $1.00; additional lines, 25c;
Commercial - 3 lines, 1 day $1.50; additional lines
35c; additional days $1.25 & 30c.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone and are payable in
advance. Deadline is 11:30 a.m., the day before publication.
PublicationsQffke, Room 241S.U.B., UBC, Van. 8, B.C.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Dances
11
DANCE TO THE "ISLACKSHEEP",
Graduate Centre Ballroom, Friday.
December 1,  9:00 p.m.-1:00 a.m.
13
Lost & Found
LOST: LARGE MAROON HAND-
bag. Reward (or return of papers,
cards.   228-0675.
Rides & Car Pools
14
RIDE WANTED FROM WEST END
near Stanley Park. Share Expenses.
Phone 688-0777 eves.,
Special Notices
15
-IAIR SHAPING PROFESSIONALLY
done at UBC Beauty Salon, 5736
University   Blvd.,   Tel.   228-8942.
UBC BARBER SHOP (NEAR CAM-
pus). Open. Mon. to Sat. 5736 University Boulevard.
KITTENS AND CATS NEED HOME.
FREE.  Phone Nick, 434-1119.
RENT WHISTLER SKI CABIN
near gondola—Day/Wk. Ph. 224-
0657 before 8 a.m.  weekdays.
GIANT PIZZA SALE IN S.U.B.,
Wed., Thurs., Fri.: 11:30-2:30. 26«!
a slice (by Phraterers).
VCF, CCF
The    Centurions,    noon   SUB    balh
room.
SEC
Jacques   Roy   on  the  liberation  of
Angola, noon SUB auditorium.
THURSDAY
ALLIANCE FRANCAISE
Le Joueur, noon Buch. 102.
POTTERY CLUB
Organizational  meeting,  noon SUB
251.
STUDENT LOSERS
Pat McGeer speaks, noon SUB clubs
lounge.
FREE
DR. BUNDOLO'S PANDEMONIUM
MEDICINE  SHOW
Last 3 Shows of the Year
"LIVE RADIO COMEDY"
S.U.B.   MOVIE   THEATRE
Thursday, December 7 — 12.30
$75 FOR 75<
40 Bonus Coupons In This
Year's Bird Calls
AVAILABLE   NOW
BUY   YOURS  TODAY!
Bookstore and SUB
Travel Opportunities
16
ASSOCIATION     OF     STUDENT
Councils     Travel     Service,     Room
100-B,   SUB,  224-0111.
Wanted—Information
17
Wanted—Miscellaneous
18
AUTOMOTIVE
Autos For Sale
21
'62     ENVOY      STATION      WAGON,
needs some trans,  work,  otherwise
good cond., $275. Phone 738-1646.
Automobiles—Parts
23
Motorcycles
25
BUSINESS  SERVICES
Photography
35
Scandals
37
WE SELL ANSWER MANUALS
for texts used in CHEM: 103, 110,
120. 230; PHYSICS: 105, 110, 115,
219, 220, 251, 300, 301. Limited supply. Phone now! EASY TUTORING
732-0659.
DOCTOR BUNDOLO WOULD LIKE
to thank his fans: both of them,
with a special 3 show Christmas-
New Year's extravaganza, Thursday, Dec. 7, 12:30 in the SUB movie
theatre.  IT'S FREE! !
Y.A.C. (YOUNG ALUMNI CLUB).
Dec. 15th!'Christmas Party, Cecil
Green Park, 4 p.m.-l a.m. Mbs.
open to Alumni & graduating students. Last Day for 1972.
Typing
40
TVPING — FAST, EFFICIENT —
Fssays, Papers, Theses. 41st and
Marine  Drive.   266-5053.
ESSAYS, THESES, ETC. EXPERI-
rneed. Elec. typewriter, carbon
ribbon.   Reasonable  rates.   738-8848.
KFFICIENT ELECTRIC TYPING,
my home. Essays, theses, etc. Neat
accurate work. Reasonable rates.
263-5317.
ESSAYS     AND     THESES     TYPED
Experienced Typist
Mrs. Freeman — 731-8096
YR. ROUND ACC. TYPING FROM
legible drafts. Phone 738-68211 from
ten a.m. to nine p.m. Quick service
on  short  essays.
TYPING OF ESSAYS. ETC. DONE
quickly and efficiently, 35£ a page.
Phone 224-0385 after 5:30 p.m.
TOP   TYPIST   —   35 (    PER   PAGE.
Phone Lindsay, 434-5843.
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted
Work Wanted
51
52
INSTRUCTION & SCHOOLS
Tutoring Service 63
Tutoring 64
DUTCH CONVERSATION — WHO
can tutor me and my kids? Phone
Doug,   228-4182.
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
QUAD USED PRE-AMP - PRE-
Tuner $375. Complete Turntables
Pioneer, Miracord 50H $140. New
speakers, Boses $540, Quads $500.
Phone nights,  weekends,  228-8875.
ELECTRONIC CALCULATOR C-108
Commodore (desk model), $85, or
swap for camera. Phon 87:1-7997
after 6 p.m.
SKIS: MAN'S HEAD 6% FT. PLAS-
tic buckle boots size 10 $65. Phone
Ken,   228-2181   (days).
RENTALS & REAL ESTATE
81
Rooms
CAMPUS. DOUBLE ROOMS IN
former frat. house. Beautiful place
—only $00'month. Phone Frank—
224-9549.
2 FURN. ROOMS AVAIL. IMMEDI-
ately. Priv. entrance, Sep. washrm/
shower & common rm. Nr. 13th &
Sasamat.   224-0763.
82
Room & Board
ROOM AND BOARD AVAILABLE
after Christmas at ;j765 Agronomy
Rd.   Ph.   224-9691   after. 5:30.
Unf. Apts.
Communal Housing
84
85
CO-OP   HOUSE   CLEAN   2   ROOMS
available   now   or  Jan.   1.   3873   W.
22nd.   228-0764.
86
Houses—Furn. & Unfurn.
Merry Xmas
from the
Publications
Office Page  20
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday,  December  1,  1972
Land developers control
city future—Campbell
By FORREST NELSON
Pressures from land
developers control city
development plans, Brian
Campbell New Democratic
Party mayoralty candidate,
told a UBC urban geography
class Wednesday.
Aid. Art Phillips, The
Electors Action Movement
mayoralty candidate, added:
"Council has intervened only
to increase development."
Incumbent aldermanic
candidate Harry Rankin of the
Committee Of Progressive
Electors said: "The council's
policy has been to turn
development over to the civil
servants."
Campbell told about 40
students he favored forming
neighborhood councils.
"They would deal with such
questions as growth, housing,
and open space. The city
council would integrate the
neighborhood plans into a city
plan," he said.
Rankin said: "I'm not as
optimistic about the city's
future as the other two candidates. What they're saying is
not about to be implemented at
Ihe council level."
Phillips said he favors
decentralizing work opportunities. This is in line, he
said, with the "principle of
making it possible for people to
live closer to where they work
— of minimizing the need to
transport people."
The audience listened attentively as Campbell said he
favored the elimination of
downtown traffic and the introduction of free public
transportation. He added the
city should promote public
housing given the chronic
housing shortage.
Rankin retorted: "You can't
have free enterprise operating
in one centre and free transportation in another. I'm all
for free transportation as long
as you have someone to foot the
bill. The tax base in the city is
property."
"The guy you probably call
your old man, the guy who
works and probably put you
here, he's the one who'd have
to pay."
Rankin said planning is a
question of: "Who owns land,
what rights are in the land, and
what can you do about it. I'm
not a pessimist but a realist."
"It's an adversary system
and it remains so. We always
knew where our enemy was. It
was at 12th and Cambie."
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Course introduced
to teach teachers
A new course is being introduced at UBC next year to instruct teachers in teaching.
Stephen Foster, the UBC education professor who has
developed the idea here said Thursday the course is aimed at
graduate students in all faculties.
Foster said he believes graduate students from all faculties
should be given credit for the course but the final decision about
accreditation rests with the students, faculty or school.
"1 think there is a crisis in higher education today partly
caused because many teachers with advanced degrees are
assumed to know how to teach, but are actually unable to
communicate effectively," he said.
A version of Foster's new course is being offered at Douglas
College in January and the UBC faculty of education will offer
the course next fall as education 506.
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Alumni, parks want $250,000
The UBC alumni association
and the Vancouver park board
are sending delegates to
Victoria to ask for 8250,000 to
stop the erosion of the Point
Grey cliffs.
Alumni spokesman Clive
Cocking said this week
resources minister Bob
Williams will meet the
delegates Tuesday to hear
I heir requests for funds to fill
the base of the Point Grey cliffs
with a new beach above the
high tide mark.
The proposed beach would
range from 30 to 85 feet in
width, made of a bottom layer
of sand topped by three feet of
gravel. The action of the waves
should carry sand and drift
wood onto the beach and
restore the natural appearance
to it, said Cocking.
Earlier plans included a
walkway or a roadway between 10 and 200 feet in width
but were dropped after
meeting with strong opposition.
The sand and gravel fill
proposal was made this year in
the Swan Wooster Point Grey
erosion control study. The
provincial funds would provide
for filling 3,700 feet of the
beach between the west end of
Spanish Banks and the tip of
Point Grey.
Cocking said the cliff erosion
threatens about $3 million
worth of university buildings
near the cliffs, including the
headquarters of the alumni
association in Cecil Green
Park.
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THE       UBYSSEY
Page   19
from page 18
Him
I would like to reply to the
comments made by Ziff House
about Christianity or "religion" as
he called it. He said in so many
words that Christianity was
"delusion", "ignorance" factual
or rational basis. Please let me
strongly disagree. There is no lack
of evidence for Christian belief if
you are open-mindedly seeking
for the truth. Christianity is not
just another religion but it is a
personal relationship with Jesus
Christ. It stands or falls on the
claims, person, cruxifiction and
especially the resurrection of its
founder. Christianity is not based
on logic it is based on facts. It is
logical nonetheless.
Besides the documents of the
New Testament which have been
shown to be both reliable and
historical, (Luke, the writer of
one of the Gospels and Acts is
especially known for his minute
accuracy as an historian,) we have
quite a few other manuscripts
from pagan and Jewish sources,
some of them quite negative, that
state in a summed up form that
there was a man called Jesus who
had an unusual birth in
Bethlehem, performed miracles,
taught and had disciples, claimed
to be God, Messiah, and who
claimed to be coming again at the
End. They also verify that Jesus
was crucified on the eve of
Passover and that his disciples
claimed that he had risen from the
dead. These documents, many of
them which try to refute Jesus'
claims (but not his historical
existance or that he made those
claims), prove that Jesus and his
claims are no illusion or myth.
Letters
You have to decide who he
was, he was everything he claimed
to be, and he claimed to be God
and Savior of mankind, or he was
one the -most blasphemous liars
that ever walked the earth, which
automatically rules out the
impossible idea that he was simply
a 'great moral teacher', 'a great
prophet' or 'a great man', since a
man who would tell such lies
about himself would be neither. A
moral defect of that nature would
show up in his teachings and
behavior. Since recent historical
and archeological finds are
refuting the idea that Christs'
teachings and claims were
distorted by his followers, thus
disposing of the legend theory,
the only other alternative that the
thinking person has left is that
Jesus was deluded. Again
delusions of such severity would
show up in highly abnormal
behavior of which there is not a
trace of the Gospels or anywhere
else for that matter.
No alternate theory that hasn't
been shown to be full of holes has
ever been put forward. There have
been judges who have become
Christians when they realized that
they were sentencing men to
death on less evidence from a legal
point of view that the amount of
evidence for the resurrection.
The evidence has been strong
enough to convince people who
tried to destroy the resurrection
by doing research into it. The
resurrection has more validity
than any other historical event
and is probably the greatest
reinforcement for Jesus' claim to
be the Son of God.
Jesus said 'I am the way, the
truth, and the life, and no one
comes to the Father but by me',
he also said that 'you shall know
the truth and the truth shall set
you free; and 'you must be born
again' (experience a spiritual
rebirth) or you would not enter
the kingdom of Heaven. Those
who know Jesus personally. Those
who as a deliberate act of the will
have received him as Lord and
Savior by saying something like
this, Lord Jesus, forgive my sins
and come into my heart and life
and make me the kind of person
you want me to be', have indeed
found God's promises to be true.
We have indeed found that we
have become new persons, that
our characters, attitudes and
outlook on life has undergone a
radical change.
Britton Brock
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Offer ends Dec. 8th, 1972 687-5225
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COR. CAMBIE       THEATRE ROW       NEW WEST. VICTORIA
A DIVISION OF MURRAY GOLDMAN
CANADA'S LARGEST SELECTION OF SEAFARERS
ACTUARIAL
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CONTACT THE STUDENT SERVICES
OFFICE REGARDING INTERVIEWS
FRIDAY, DECEMBER 8
THE CANADIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION
PRESENTS: The  taping   of  the   LAST
THREE   shows   of  the   year   of
DR. BUNDOLO'S
PANDEMONIUM
MEDICINE   SHOW
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FREE
Back   in the   SUB   MOVIE   THEATRE
Thursday   Dec.   7   at   noon
Show  begins  at   12:30 Page   18
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday,   Decemb-r   1,   1972
Letters
From page 5
In closing, I will state that you
may look forward to not seeing
me again at the next meeting — I
will be doing something
important.
Mike Fleming
CBSC 3
Peeper
1 have become aware, in recent
weeks, of a phenomenon most
threatening to the sanctity of one
of the traditionally most personal,
most sacred rituals in human daily
life. Since the first lev/ times, 1
alone was exposed to this
blasphemy, I held my piece,
thinking I was going insane.
However, another recent
occurrence, of a similar nature,
has led me to write this letter,
warning Brock hall's Mr. Peeper
of the perils of delving into that
which is clothed in secrecy. My
first exposure to Ihe sacreligious
Mr. Peeper was brief. 1 was pulling
up my pants after making use of
that blessed instrument, the toilet,
when ! happened to glance up
there witli an expression of
feverish delight, were the eyes of a
madman. On realizing I was aware
of his presence he fled. The
second lime I knew he had
entered the sacred shrine.
However, I was not in a position
to do anything but await his
devilish eyes and then send him
scurrying by saying something to
him. By his behaviour, it is clear
he knows the profane nature of
his exploits, but, in his madness,
he becomes bolder! He was found,
just last night, lying on the floor,
peering upwards into the holy of
holies, while it was occupied. That
a man should prostrate himself at
the spectacle of this most sacred
ritual is not, indeed, surprising.
However, there are dangers in
venturing into that which is
sacred, and meant to be kept from
the eyes of man.
Be warned, then, Mr. Peepers,
lest you should expose yourself to
dangers beyond your diseased
comprehension. Remember those,
who, in the past, have suffered
mightily for less daring a deed.
Rosemary Nowicki
arts 3
Rip-off
Open letter to UBC
department of finance.
I have a complaint which 1
believe comes under your
authority. Signs have been posted
in Walter Gage informing residents
that second term housing fees
must be paid or deferred before
the   first   of December.  When   I
arrived at the finance office to
obtain this deferment, I was told
that I must pay SI00 now, in
order to receive my deferment. I
am on an NRC scholarship and get
paid quarterly, which means that I
cannot pay five months advance
rent. The people at the counters
in the finance office were neither
helpful nor polite, and treated me
and others in my predicament as
though we were trying to steal a
month's rent. When I told them
that I would be very short for
food money, not to mention
Christmas expenses, they asked if
1 could not take out a loan
somewhere. Why in the name of
reason, should I have to take out a
loan to cover your paranoia? I am
a graduate student in good
standing and NRC very rarely
writes NSF cheques. The conduct
of your department leads me to
believe that you are a bunch of
mindlessly bureaucratic,
unemployable, union-protected
parasites, working for a university
which h the last word in setting up
obstacles to research, teaching or
learning.
Sincerly yours,
Janice LeDuc
grad studies 7
Foolish
I have not read all the motions
made to senate by senators this
year, but I would like to nominate
student senator Allan Robbins'
proposed motion to the Dec. 13
senate meeting (that all UBC
graduate students should be required to demonstrate some
knowledge of Canadian history
and politics) for the "Most Stupid
Motion 1972-73" Award. That
senate — which should now manage to stoop to this low is quite
disappointing.
Naturally, it would be nice if
every undergraduate left this university with a good understanding
of the Canadian state and system
. . . but wouldn't it also be nice if
all students knew English literature/French/music? And since we
live in a sexist society, shouldn't
everybody be required to take the
proposed women's studies course?
And since we all have bodies and
are alive, shouldn't we be required
to take some biology and
medicine? And, dear God, the
university   should   be   producing
S
City Nights Theatre
1!30 E. Hastings- 685-5831
99i - TONIGHT and SATURDAY only - 99tf
the 1933 classic
"KING   KONG"    7:30
Fay Wray
Franz Kafka's
"THE   TRIAL"      9:15
Dir. Orson Welles- Jeanne Moreau, Anthony Perkins
99tf MIDNIGHT SHOW FRIDAY, SATURDAY and SUNDAY 99</
The Beatles "YELLOW SUBMARINE"
99rf - STARTS SUNDAY FOR ONE WEEK - 99d
Booth Tarkington's
"THE MAGNIFICENT AMBERSONS" (1942) 7:30p.m.
Dir. Orson Welles — Jos' jh Cotton, Agnes Moorhead
"ROOM  SERVICE"   (1938)   9:00   p.m.
Marx Brothers, Lucille Ball
ecologically-minded graduates:
three units ecology, compulsory!
And most important since we are
part of the real world, all students
should be forced to take at least
four years of physics and
chemistry ... the list is endless.
Clearly Canadian history and
politics does not have a monopoly
on relevance within the university
— no academic subject does. The
solution is for students to teach
all these essentials to themselves;
and if this is not what is
happening, then it is time to
inquire why students arc not
motivated to do this. Perhaps we
should investigate the
over-structured and impersonal
nature of this university.
Robbins' motion will be
defeated not because
empire-encrusted faculty will feel
threatened but because it is an
example of charlatanism at its
worst — degenerated into
stupidity.
Piers Bursill-Hall
science 3
Parchesi?
May I draw your attention to
the article entitled "JayVees tune
up" on page 15 of the Nov. 17
Ubyssey and ask a simple
question: Which sport is being
reported here? Six-day
tiddlywinks, gurning, choral
belching, marathon parchesi or
perhaps BASKETBALL? One who
doesn't know the names of the
players or teams mentioned would
have to think hard to guess which
sport the scores in the last
paragraph would fit.
Such faith in the cleverness of
Ubyssey readers is surely
flattering, but come to think of it,
it isn't often your public receives
any credit for intelligence.
David R. Chamberlin
library 1
Sorry
There was a misprint in our
letter last week: read "men"
instead of "women". We were
saying that "women students"
should take part in implementing
programs like the women's studies
course proposal coming before the
arts faculty.
Brian Loomes
Stan Persky
See page 19
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THE       UBYSSEY
Page   17
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