UBC Publications

UBC Publications

UBC Publications

The Ubyssey Feb 25, 1998

Item Metadata

Download

Media
ubysseynews-1.0128077.pdf
Metadata
JSON: ubysseynews-1.0128077.json
JSON-LD: ubysseynews-1.0128077-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): ubysseynews-1.0128077-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: ubysseynews-1.0128077-rdf.json
Turtle: ubysseynews-1.0128077-turtle.txt
N-Triples: ubysseynews-1.0128077-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: ubysseynews-1.0128077-source.json
Full Text
ubysseynews-1.0128077-fulltext.txt
Citation
ubysseynews-1.0128077.ris

Full Text

Array Finally
Men's hockey team
makes the playoffs for
first time since 89-90
Fbmicating
Mrs. Warren's profession
does not stand
ie test of time
ip
Fines
So, why aiplhose
library fines-?o
fuckin^-exp^Hsive?
v
well written fluff since 1918
www.ubyssey.bc.ca
VOLUME.7-9 ISSUE 35
[TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 1998
Double championships
for Aqua Birds
by Bruce Arthur
and Wolf Depner
Call UBCs performance at the CIAU
national swimming championships
strokes of brilliance.
The Birds won both the women's
and men's title for the first time in
UBC swiinining history.
UBC won 18 gold (eight by the
women, ten by the men), ten silver,
and six bronze medals over the two-
day competition held in Sherbrooke,
Quebec.
UBC head coach Tom Johnson also
won Coach ofthe Year awards for both
men's and women's swimming.
While the women won their fourth
title in five years, out-scoring Toronto
488 to 417.5, the men won for the
first time in 33 years.
"We used that history in our
cheers," said Johnson
Mark Versfeld, two-time world
medalist paced the men with five
golds and one silver and was named
male swimmer ofthe meet
Versfeld may be the new darling of
Canadian men's swimming but he
was not the only one to impress at
nationals.
"The most encouraging part was
the fact lhe results didn't just come
from highend swimmers. That bodes
well for the future," Johnson said.
Olympian Sarah Evanetz, named
female swimmer of the meet led the
women with five gold medals and one
silver.
"We were just on a roll,' said four-
time CIAU champion Sarah Evanetz.
UBC pulled off the double championship tiianks in part to the positive
attitude they've had all year.
"We had so much more energy
than other teams. Everyone is so supportive, and we have so much fun,"
Evanetz said.
She also credited the gung-ho
enthusiasm ofthe younger swimmers.
"We had so much young blood,
and they were so keen to just go and
get a titte," she said, adding the kids
also fallowed the veterans' example.
Glencora Maughn, who set a CIAU
record in the 50 metre backstroke,
remarked Evanetz never let a close
race slip away and Kelly Doody, a
rookie, remembered Maughn's comment as she pulled out a close race.
With this superb mix of youth and
experience—Bambi Roy and Ed Ng
are the only seniors leaving—Johnson
has this program primed for years to
come. His swimmers know it
"Before meets, and in practices,
our chant was Title'/ laughed
Evanetz. "After winning, it was
TJynasry."*?-
j>» v j ' ■' '-ca":'' w j*.1'"«.—f \rr,' "■
i
ft
«9
r .
J."3K*.-\ ~   ft}
dub^-.&jK     mi.    jn    ->T
m*$f&s
**
P     4
* A &■ i»
*■       "■■""Sfl
WOMEN OPPOSE POLITICAL INTIMIDATION GROUP   held at rally this last Saturday at Oppenheimer Park. The group
grew out of complaints about police treatment of female anti-APEC protestors after the leaders' retreat at UBC last November
25. Organisers say the RCMP strip-searched women arrested during UBC APEC protests. (SEE PACE 3 FOR FULL STORY.)
RICHARD LAM PHOTO
McGill students lose differential fee court battle
by Sonia Verma
The McGill Daily
MONTREAL (CUP)-Out of province students in
Quebec will hive to pay about $ 1000 a year more
in tuition after a legal challenge was rejected by
the province's Superior Court
McGill University's student union launched
lhe court challenge against Quebec's controversial new differential fee structure last September.
The student union and the case's plaintiff, Paul
Ruel, a third-year political science student, argued
that differenlial tuition fees contravened the
Charter of Rights by hindering the mobility of
Canadian students pursuing post-secondary education and also that the fees contravened the
Quebec Education Act, which prohibits discrimination
They also <*harged that Minister of Education
Pauline Marois acted outside of her authority in
announcing the new policy without an official
mandate from her constituents or other members ofthe Parti Quebecois government
hi the Februaury 11 decision. Judge Claude
Tellier ruled fiirmJy in favour of the rninister and
categorically dismissed each argument presented
by the plaintiffs. Tellier stated that an increase in
tuition for out-of-province students did not pose a
significant barrier to Canadian students' mobility.
He also ruled that differential tuition fees are not
discriminatory under the Charter of Rights which
prohibits disaimination on the basis of nationality or ethnicity, but not on the basis of provincial
origin.
The plaintiffs are confounding two notions
which are very different the notion of residence
with ethnicity or
nationality. We don't
see how the policy of
the minister could constitute dismmination
based on ethnic or
national origin,' said
Tellier in reading the
judgment
The minister has
the authority from the
National Assembly to
impose conditions [on]
universities and this
authority includes the
possibility of creating a
tuition category based
on residence,' he said.
Andre Durocher,
the lawyer who represented the plaintiffs in
the   case,   says   the
court's affirmation of Marois' authority to implement differential fees allows the minister a dangerous amount of unchecked freedom to draft
educational policy.
The judge has essentially ruled that the minister does what the minister wants and that is a
very dangerous precedent'
Durocher says the Quebec decision will have a
'The judge has
essentially ruled
that tli© minister
does what the
minister Wants
and that is a
very dangerous
precedent"
-Andre durocher
The students' lawyer
serious impact outside the province. Differential
tuition fee policies are being weighed by provincial governments in British Columbia and Alberta
and as federal transfer payments drop,
Tellier predicts more provinces will
follow suit to compensate for lost revenue for post-secondary education
The student union is currently seeking legal advice on the feasibility of
launching an appeal. If approved, the
appeal could cost as much as $25,000
and take up to a year-and-a-half to pursue.
Although differential tuition fees
have raised an additional $9-million
dollars for university coffers, a report
just released by McGill University
reveals that contributions of out-of-
province students to the Quebec economy stand at $ 170-million dollars.
Plaintiff Paul Ruel says this revenue
could be lost unless the differential
tuition scheme is abandoned.
'It's absolute bullshit that out of
province students are costing the
Quebec government,' he said. It's a political
question and maybe it's time for the federal government to step in and do something about it'
One in four McGill students is from outside
the province. The university has sustained a five
per cent loss in out-of-province student enrollment since differential fees were introduced last
year.»> 2 THE WYSSiEY • TUESDA*, FEWHJARY 24,1998
SJSlS2UUUli££
j TRAVEL - teadi Engfab: 5 days/40 hrs
1 (Mar 11-15) TESOL teacher certification
j course ( or by correspondence). 1,000 's j
of jobs available NOW. Free information j
package, toll free 1-888-2 70-2941 j
Need eztra income? Earn up to $1500/ j
j Month selling subscriptions for new j
I Vancouver fashion magazine. Position
I limited. Call 528-9714
i '
j T.poking for CA and lawyers to form a |
i limited partnership for shares and cred- s
i it in company 258-5347 I
! 650 JOBS from over 120 of BC's leading !
; technology companies. T-NET British j
j Columbia, www.bctechnology.com \
Emm
S BK*U*nrjus? Bi? Gax? Club Vancouver Spa j
! For Men. No I.D. or Membership j
I Required. Open 24 hours every day. \
|Students 1/2 price anytime.339 West!
i Pender St 681-5719
il
j VaMifag Toronto Clean & very affordable !
| rooms for rentdaily, weekly or monthly. |
j Individual and group rates availabe. Call >
| now to reserve a room. Bronte College is \
; a private boarding highschool that oners I
j quality education for grade 9 to OAC level i
j students. International and local students
I welcome. Phone 1-905-270-7788
| fax: 1-905-2 70-782 8. email:,
i http://www.brontecollege.com j
[NewYadcB&B $22.50 per person d/b j
occupancy. Hostel $ 14/night Phone 212-
I 666-0559 or lax 663-50007 I
i 1989 Pantiac Firefly Rebuilt motor, new
jrad and more. Auto, 2 dr, sunrf AM/FM
j,cass,2nd owner n/s $3650 250 -2694
j NEW VW Golf/Beefle. Buy or Lease.
| Check it out! Call Jonas 273-3922
HO]
i looking RS talia. She studies english lit-j
i erature and i need to find her. If anyone j
! knows her get her to contact Michael \
j 899-0625 I
I Mom looking for e*c**i-j«*ienced help with!
I new baby to TODDLiatShaiighnessy. June- j
! SepL Inclusive. Hours negotiable. I
l 604-929-6226 >
| Does your term paper need a sprace-jp?]
i Let me proofread for grammar accuracy'
1 Call Dulcie Baxter at 92 5-213 8 |
To run your
own ads or
classifieds
call our
advertising
department
at
822
8221654
8221654
8221654
The Ubyssey 3rd Anuual General Meeting
Wednesday, February 25
SPEAKERS: DR HERBERT GRUBEL, SENIOR FELLOW AT THE FRASER INSTITUTE
JO HlNGECLIFF, OXFAM CANADA
JAGGI SINGH, MEMBER OF APEC-ALERT
CHINH VU, FORMERLY WITH THE WORLD BANK, NOOW W/CIBC-WOOD GUNDY
THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 26 FROM 12:30 - 2:00 PM, BUCHANAN A202
STUDENT SOCIETY OF UBC
AMS
UPDATE
student input makes  it happen
Do "You \/\4nt  to have
If you do, we need a few great people for the following positions:
Elections Administrator: gets to run the
whole show.   The Administrator is responsible
for conducting a referendum to be held in March.
And you will even get compensated for your
work, an honorarium will be granted.
Elections Committee: gets to be part of the
show. It is responsible for conducting a
referenudm to be held in March.
Student Administrative Commission:
enusres that the SUB is a safe, interesting and
useful place for students. SAC regulates
bookings and security in the SUB and oversees
the 200+ AMS clubs and constituencies.
University Commission. Do you want to play
an active role in the issues which shape this
campus? Join the University Commission, the
AMS' task force in university-wide issues like
academic policy, safety and student housing.
External Commission: there's a big world
beyond the UBC gates. UBC students have an
active role to play in post-secondary issues,
student loan programs and alumni relations.
Help to carry the voice of the students to the
outer limits.
Finance Commission: Finance is more than
just keeping the books in order. It's about helping
student groups prepare budgets, assessing grant
and loan applications, fundraising, ensuring
students' awareness of financial issues effecting
them... Interested?
Communications Team: We gather all sorts of
information on how the student body wants stuff
done. Lets dig up some dirt and find out what we
need to change.
Tell us what you are looking for:   We are
continually looking for students to participate on
AMS and UBC committees. Frequency of meetings
ranges from weekly to semi-annually. Extensive
knowledge is not required, the majority of committees are seeking the 'average' student who has a
willingness and interest in the topic at hand. An
example of some of the issues discussed are:
transportation, safety, technology at UBC,
community planning & housing, academics, quality
of education, etc. Please submit your resume c/o
SUB 238 to the Vice-President.
Detailed descriptions of all above positions are
available, along with application forms, from AMS
Volunteer Services and the AMS Executive Offices,
SUB 238.
DEADLINE: FRIDAY MARCH 6, 1998
TH 11M
mem
If
Friday, February 27,1998
12:39 pm
SUB Room 296-Council Chambers
ALL STUDENTS ARE WELCOME
AGENDA:
Student Council to receive the following
reports:
• AMS Financial Statements as of Dec 31,
1997
• Audtior's Report Financial Statements as of
April 30, 1997
• Presidents Annual Report
• General Managers Annual Report- Review
of Business Operations 1 997
• Statement by the new AMS President
Please direct all inquiries and applications to:
Phil Ledwith
Chair, Nominating Committee
Room 238, Student Union Building
Email: ledwith@physics.ubc.ca THE UBYSSEY • TlJKDAY, tG&rflMei$.24, fi
AMS considers Thunderbird buyout, compensation
by Douglas Quan
After the Thunderbird Shop came 73 votes short this month of winning another five year lease in the SUB, the AMS could buy out or
compensate the shop instead of simply not renewing the privately-
owned retail store's lease.
'It's not just about the right business decision, but
the right moral decision," president-elect Vivian
Hoffmann told the Ubyssey. "We'd like to see us part
on friendly terms."
Neither she nor the AMS general manager, Bernie
Peets, would provide details, but both said there is a
possibility the AMS could buy out some of the shop's
fixtures and inventory. Peets said there will be discussions later this week between the store and the
AMS.
Hoffmann said she doesn't expect council will
drop its support to replace the Thunderbird Shop
with an AMS operated retail outlet despite this
month's referendum results. "I'd be surprised if they
[council] retracted it."
The Thunderbird Shop narrowly missed the
required Yes votes to reach quorum: ofthe votes cast,
3037 voted in favour of renewing the lease, 932
voted against.
"It is important to take into consideration student
perception and mood," added Hoffmann. "However,
[AMS decisions] can't be ruled by that. Quorum is there for a reason."
But Scott Morishita, newly elected AMS director of administration, said he will forward a motion at this Wednesday's council
BOB CRAY only 73 votes short.
RICHARD LAM PHOTO
meeting to rescind the decision not to renew the Thunderbird's
lease.
"You can't ignore that so many students supported the shop," he
said.
He added that the AMS is becoming "too focused on business,"
and warned that if it generates too much revenue,
the society could lose its non-profit designation.
However, in order to lose non-profit status the
society would have to make more than it could possibly spend. Not a likely scenario for the AMS—an
organisation that is perpetually cash strapped.
The AMS business office projects the new store
would generate at least twice the $63,000 the
Thunderbird Shop brings to the AMS.
Thunderbird Shop manager Bob Gray was
guarded about the discussion of a buyout. "There
has been no negotiation. I have no idea what
they're thinking of."
But he said he's hopeful that a mutual agreement can be reached, especially with a new council moving in soon. "I've been fighting for 18
months. I have no alternate plans."
The failed referendum was not the Thunderbird
Shop's first setback in its 18 month-long battle with
the AMS to stay alive. Last year, the AMS executive
voted not to renew the lease, but the decision was
overturned after council members complained they
weren't consulted.
On January 7 of this year, a council motion to renew the lease
failed in an 18-14 decision.**
Women oppose intimidation
 by Cynthia Lee
A handful of protesters marched through the
Downtown Eastside Saturday to the
Vancouver pre- trial centre in protest of what
they say is the political intimidation of
women.
The rally was organised by the Women
Oppose Political Intimidation Group
(WOIPIG)—a group of some 15 women that
formed in December after women anti-APEC
protesters at UBC were arrested, jailed and
strip-searched November 25. None of the
men arrested were strip-searched.
But while WOIPIG formed from the events
at UBC during APEC, group members insist
their main message is not only about their
treatment during APEC.
"It's about everything, just encompassing
the whole sphere of global political intimidation," said Elise f horburn, a Simon Fraser
University student who alleges she was strip
searched after the APEC protest.
"We view what happened to us and to all
the women everywhere in the world as being
an unlawful act by the lawmaking people of
society and that should not be allowed....[The
police] are supposed to be protecting us,"
said Thorburn.
She also stated that the rally was held in
tlie downtown east side
since that area is the sight
of frequent political intimidation. "It's the most
prevalently frequented by
cops," Thorburn charged.
The rally began with a
street theatre re-enactment of the November
APEC protest, arrest and
sliip-search.
With noisemakers and
chants of "WOIPIG,
WOIPIG, we say NO PIG"
tlie 50 protesters marched
from Oppenheimer Park
to a Vancouver Police pretrial centre located on
East Cordova Street for a
symbolic locking of the
building's front doors to
end the rally.
Sergeant Willie Laurie
of the RCMP Richmond
Detachment said in an
interview last month that political intimidation was not at all the reason why RCMP
strip searched female APEC protesters who
were arrested November 25.
Laurie said strip searches are performed
Stand and be counted three women protest political intimidation.
RICHARD LAM PHOTOHOTOG PHOTOG PHOTO
at the discretion ofthe officers in charge and
that the officers need to ensure the people
detained carry no harmful objects. Standard
searches range from peering into pockets to
searching body cavities.♦
Tibet flag vote fizzles for GSS council
by Todd Silver
A referendum asking whether the Graduate
Student Society (GSS) was right to raise a
Tibetan flag atop the Graduate Student Centre
last November during the APEC leaders'
retreat fizzled when the GSS vote fell short of
quorum. Voting was done over Telereg
between Feburary 4-11.
Of the 557 votes cast, 294 students supported the GSS' controversial decision to fly
the flag. The result means the student society,
which represents over 6000 UBC graduate students, won't likely apologise to students who
complained about the flag.
Voting was done over Telereg between
Feburary 4-11.
The flag was at the centre of protest from
people sympathetic to Chinese sovereignty and
China's occupation of Tibet, and several protesters sent angry e-mails and telephone calls
to UBC administrators and student representatives demanding that the flag be removed.
RCMP temporarily lowered the flag
November 25 after threats of a protest from
China supporters.
Jessica Escribano, a GSS councilor opposed
to apologising for raising the flag, said the
unclear referendum result demonstrates the
split among GSS members over the issue.
• "To me it indicates that the membership is
aware of the issue, and is quite torn on how it
feels about this, the votes were really close. At
a council meeting that we had council itself
was very undecided...So clearly, it's a difficult
issue."
Escribano said that most students understood the flag was raised to call attention to the
well documented and widespread human
rights abuses against Tibetans by the Chinese
government and army.
Escribano also stated that the fallout over
the Tibetan flag may result in more detailed
study in any future GSS protest.
"[The GSS] will continue to advocate for its
students on rights issues and social justice and
academic issues and will be vocal about it, but
[the GSS] will perhaps conduct more research
as to how its membership would like to see
that advocacy take place."
Dan Zhang, a graduate student who did not
support the raising of the Tibetan flag, believes
that the GSS, which represents all graduate students, should not be making specific political
stances.
"We are all GSS members, anything that is
sensitive to any national or international issue
should be consulted with the members
first...Because the GSS represents all of us, we
all pay the fee."
The issue for Zhang is not what comes out of
the referendum in way of an appology but that
all of the voices in the GSS were heard. ♦
. by Sarah Sthmtdt
j The varsity
[OTTAWA   (CUP)-The   economy j
j must be put to work for Canadians j
j not bankers, say tbe authors of mis '
;j*ear'SaAJte*mtiveFeder>aIB-ju3geL   '
The alternative budget now in '
! its fourth year, relies on the participation of dozens of groups and
i economists throughout the country
*who contribute their expertise to
'• various working groups ranging
'. ham fiscal and monetaiy policy to i
! industrial strategy* to social policy.
The budget starts with the
| premise that the liberal govern-;
, ment has misdiagnosed the cause
! of Canada's deficit, says economist
; Bruce  Campbell,  head  of the ]
'• Canadian   Centre    for   Policy i
; .Alteaaatives which along with the ''
\ social justice coalition Choices 1
, coordinates the annual national;
(project
; . "It is quite a stunning feat to i
'have convinced so many people ]
I lhat our fiscal woes were out of'
c^rar^spending,* he said.
> Rather, says Campbell, two poli-
' ties in particular are the culprits.
, While high interest rate policies"
have made the cost of psrying the
! interest on the debt unnecessaBrSy j
, expensive and kept unemployment.
■ levels elevated, tax cuts to high j
j income earners and corporations [
{have eroded the revenue base.. t
For starters, say the alternative [
> budgeters, beep a low-interest poll- ;
, cy and reinvest budgetary surplus .-
on the reconstruction of social and .
; public programs.
• Last year, the Bank of Canada i
: raised interest rates four times J
j because it thought the economy '
was growing too quickly. And ever
, since former prime minister Brian
Mulroney restructured the tax sys-,
tem'm 1984, lightening the load on j
the highest wage earners while i
increasing the tax burden on tower, j
and    middle    wage    earners,
Campbell says if s been hard to t
!fifhlthe deficit !
Tbe alternative budget calls for
!tax relief for low and middle <
. income Canadians making less j
than $60,000 and the addition of ;
; new tax brackets Jor very high ■
< incDines, modeled on the UJS. tax j
system. |
i     The' budget also points out mat •
even the International Monetary ;
1 Fund cites the country's tax-dehv-,
; ered subsidies to corporations as i
I excessively generous. i
|" ■ Jennifer Story, national deputy ;
Ichairpei'son   of  the   Canadian!
'Federation of Students, satys the ;
. economic forecasts underlying the *
alternative budget provide the co:a-'
', text for the federation's lobby strat-1
'm- * |
, This government has con-:
vinced Canadians that there are no i
, choices —that we harve to eliminate '
• the deficit and we have to do it this .
• way, by cutting,* said Story. *[I5ut
referring to the alternative budget] j
', is exactly how we can justify to the j
federal government what we've ,
been calling for." j
TJte alternative budget calls for j
a restoration in fimdhig transfers^ I
a national sj-stem of grants, a post- j
secondary education act and a]
rompreheriijive employment pr^H
gram for students. <!
Last year's alternative 'ta|ge£j
was endorsed by over 140 emh&it wMJWJUwr. m&*> ■*»
You can pick up your pass for the February 25th preview of KISSING A FOOL, at Oakridge cinemas, by simply dropping by SUB
241K and telling us about your first kiss. Subject to classification.
Winners from the last 40 days ineligible.
IN  THEATRES  FEBRUARY   27
Presented by
libvsse
WEST 10TH OPTOMETRY CLINIC
Dr. Patricia Rupnow, Optometrist
Dr. Stephanie Brooks, Optometrist
~ ,r 4320 W.1 Oth Ave.
General Eve Vancouver, BC
and Vision Care (604) 224 2322
4
COPIES
Featuring easy to use High Quality Xerox Copiers.
=&   Automatic Feeder, Auto Double Siding, Reduce/Enlarge!
sin's'.eWded     Also available 8'<i x 14 and 11 x 17 at extra cost
Discover the Friendly Competition!
Mon to Fri 8am-9pm •!""'"     "* """
CLUTCH PROBLEMS ?
TRANSMISSION PROBLEMS ?
10% STUDENT DISCOUNT
VALID WITH STUDENT ID
"DRIVELINE SPECIALISTS"
SINCE 1963
AUTOMATICS'STANDARDS
CLUTCHES'DIFFERENTIALS
CV AXLES'U-JOINTS
"PRICE ASSURANCE GUARANTEED"
FREE ESTIMATES
AAMCO TRANSMISSIONS
2750 ARBUTUS ST. AT 12TH AVE.
Birds make playoffs
Jby Wolf Depner
The last time UBC's men's
hockey team made the
playoffs, Saddam Hussein
was still an American ally,
happily sitting in his presidential basement trying
to learn everything about
a\nthrax ( not the 80s hair-
band).
My, how things have
changed.
Last weekend, the
Birds made the playoffs
for the first time since the
1989/90 season. They will
face the Calgary Dinos in
the best of three Canada
West semi-final set to start
Friday night
'We had a goal this
year to make the playoffs
and everybody believed in
it," said Loui Mellios, a
fifth-year veteran who
spent his entire university
career with the Birds. "It is
quite satisfying," he
added.
"We think we belong in  Andv Clark. The winger (here seen against Calgary, UBC's playoff opponent),
the group that we are with  scored two big goals vs Brandon to get UBC into the playoffs, richard lam photo
now at this stage," said
Birds head coach Mike Coflin, who will coach his first
playoff series since taking over coaching duties in
1990/91.
"Playoffs mean respect within the univer
sity, from our fans and within the hock
ey  community  too,"   he   added
"Playoffs mean that you have
done something over a six
month period and then you
go into a short term period
and see what you can do."
The Birds head into
the playoffs with a 1-4-1
record in their last six
games. The Dinos also
struggled recently before
sweeping the
Pronghorns. More importantly,   UBC   played   well
against the Dinos this year.
Including the preseason and
the Father Bauer tournament, the Birds
are 3-2-1 against the Dinos and all games were decided by one goal.
Both teams are a contrast in style. Calgary's offense
is more prolific than UBC's as the Dinos boast the
league's best powerplay and top scorer, Jason
Krywulak. The Birds, on the other hand, have a definite
advantage on the blueline and in net
Strong goaltending, combined with timely goals,
gave UBC three out of four possible points on their last
road trip to Calgary. They'll need to come up with a
similar effort this weekend if UBC hopes to win a playoff series for the first time since the 1970/71 season—
which is also the last time UBC won the Canada West
title.
I happen to think that our
team is pretty well suited to
playing in the playoffs,"
said Coflin. "We don't
have to make that
many adjustments
between the way
we have played all
year and the way
you need to play
once you get into
playoff       hockey
which is disciplined
and tighter checking -
keep your goals-against
down and wait for breaks.
That's exactly how we have
played for 28 games, or tried to."
The Birds made the playoffs on
the final day of the regular season with a 3-
3 tie in Brandon. Lethbridge, the other team himting
for third place, lost 54 against Calgary the same
night—meaning UBC finished one point ahead of the
Horns who needed a win over Calgary and hope for a
UBC loss as the Birds held the tie breaker, having
won three of four games against the Horns.
The Birds found out they made the playoffs while
having dinner at a fast-food restaurant in Brandon.
Mellios said players greeted the announcement with
a huge roar. "I knew we would make it in," said
Mellios. "Because we're a better team than
Lethbridge. "♦
"We had a goal this
year to make the
playoffs and
everybody
believed in it."
—LOUI MELLIOS,
FIFTH-YEAR VETERAN
731-8166
Bird Droppings
Basketball;
The women's and men's basketball team finished the
regular season with identical 9-11 record and both
teams will travel to first-placed Victoria for first-
round playoff action. But the similarities between
these two teams stop there. The men did better than
expected this season as they tripled their predicted
win total of three. The Buds also placed three players—Nino Sose 118.7), Gerald Cole (15.9) and John
Dykstra (15.4)—amongst the top six league scorers.
Dvkstra also finished first in three point percentage
(47.3)
As far as the women go, well, let's just say, it has
been a disappointing year. The only saving grace has
been the play of centre Jessica Mills. She finished
fourth in league scoring (15 1 points), third in field-
goal percentage (58.2; and second in free-tlirow per- THEUB'
Women's v-ball team best in Canada West
by Wolf Depner
The women's volleyball team had every reason to take it
easy as they traveled to Edmonton to face the -Mberta
Pandas in the Canada West final last weekend.
By virtue of playing in the Canada West final iigainst
the team hosting the national championship tournament,
ERMINIA RUSSO coached the Birds to their first Canada
West championship in 20 years, richard lam photo
the Birds are guaranteed a spot for the eight-team tournament set for next week.
But still they were motivated...motivated by history.
The Pandas, three time defending national champions,
had beaten the Birds in three straight Canada West finals.
And if you believed what was being said leading up to
the best of the three game series, it would be four.
But there was little truth coming from the grapevine
and the Birds beat the Pandas in two games to wm their
first Canada West championship since 1978 which also
happens to be the year UBC won its last national women's
volleyball championship.
Can lightning strike twice? Maybe. But one thing was
for sure, UBC players, especially those who have been
around for the past failures, savored every moment.
'Personally I have just one statement to make: it is
about time,* said fifth-year veteran Izabela Rudol, who
along with middle Jo-Ann Ross, played in all of the past
four finals. 'We didn't want to talk about it anymore. Less
words, more action we said,' she added.
Birds head coach, Errninia Russo, said the team had a
'let's play' mentality. And did they ever. Serving well and
playing inspired defense both upfront and in the backrow,
the Birds dominated Game One Thursday night, whining
in four sets.
'We came out on fire. We really didn't let Alberta in the
game,* said Russo. 'They won the third game, but we're
pretty much in control.'
Barb Bellini (14 kills, 20 digs), Sarah Maxwell (16 kills,
24 digs) and Ross (16 kills, six solo blocks) led the Birds in
Game One.
Friday night the Birds rallied from a 2-1 set deficit to
win Game Two in five sets. 'Everybody just stepped up a
notch and we took more chances. We didn't hold back. We
just went for it,' said Rudol, one of four UBC players to
post double figures in kills and digs with 12 and 17
respectively. So did Ross, Maxwell and Bellini. 'It was a
really good effort by everybody,' said Russo.
'You couldn't say this person won the match for us.
There were key moments for everybody. Everybody was
fairly consistent throughout.'
'I think [this weekend] gave us a lot of confidence,'
said Maxwell. 'This weekend showed what we could
accomplish,* added Rudol. "This weekend made us a little
bit more hungry for nationals.'
.Anybody interested in another serving of history? ♦
JULIE DOUGLAS reaches out and tries to smoother the puck as the New Westminster Lighting swarm around her net.
Douglas had a solid game, but it wasn't good enough as the Birds lost Game Five of their playoff semi-final 5-0 to the
New Westminster Lightning Sunday morning. With the loss, UBC is finished for the season, richard lam photo
PIa» Cricket?
The UBC Cricket Club
is welcoming new players
for the 1998 season.
For more info call Paul
?34~2¥59
Sumn
Bridges Restaur
people
Hosts, bussers, expe
are required to s
Apply in person only
#5- 1
G
Marc
1:01
Please ~ I"
ier in the
ant needs ene
on deck for s
rienced wait
taff our busy
to Bridges' <
551 Johnston
ranville Islan
h 4th, 5tl
9 - 4:30 1
■lo phone call
City...
rgetic, outgoing
Limmer.
staff and bartenders
outdoor 'dock'.
administration office.
Street
d.
i, 6th
>M.
s or faxes.
Touch
LEJk
REGISTRATION
Burnaby Lake Sports Complex
March 5, 1998 @ 6:30 PM
Individuals / New Teams Invited
Rec, Intermediate, Elite
Seven-a-side, Non-contact
Novice & Experienced Players Welcome
For More Information Call
The Touchline 444-8223 Imaqine UBC
Thanks to 1997 Group Leaders
Imagine returns September 8,1998
Join the Team - Imagine@unixg.ubc.ca
Hani
Abdalla
Lisa
Dominato
Peter
Kai Yue Yap
Susan
Martyn
Navi
Sandhu
Tim
Ambler
Katie
Doyle
Alexandra
Kaiser
Robert
Matiru
Brian
Scott
Erin J.
Anderson
Shelley
Doylend
Jean
Kang
Chris
Matisz
Clare
Scott
Lindsay
Anderson
Denise
Dunbar
Anita
Kanwal
Sandra
Matsuyama
Meredith
Serota
Silver
Anderson
Denise
Dunbar
Kiran
Kanwai
William
Mbaho
Michael
Shackleford
Katrina
Ao
Nicola
Duquesnay
Nadim
Kara
Lindsay
McAneetey
Zahra
Shajani
Janelle
Aquing
Sarah
Dyck
Alana
Kaukas
Kera
McArthur
Jonathan
Shapiro
Megan
Arnold
Maxwell
Ebbghie
Jennifer
Kebe
J. Heather
McColl
Dawn
Shmyr
Roya
Azanchi
Sharon
Eblaghie
Cheryl
Kelly
Marcia
McCoy
Michelle
Shomura
Michael
Bain
Liz
Edwards
Heather
Kerr
Kerry
McDowall
Jennifer
Shrubsole
Chris
Baker
Ben
Ellison
Lena
Kian
Carly
McKay
Amy
Siebert
Duda
Barac
Selene
Etches
Sharlon
Kildaw
Catriana
McKie
Sara
Siebert
Martin
Baur
Irina
Fainberg
Edward
Kim
Sylvia
Merletti
Steve
Silva
Dale
Beard
James
Fam
Natalie
King
Laura
Middleton
HS Shon
Sim
Zoe
Bennett
Christine
Fernandes
Sarah
King
Mark
Milberg
Diane
Sithoo
Gilda
Bernath
Mike
Florendo
Jennifer
Kirkland
Yvette
Miller
Erica
Slack
Maria
Boetzkes
Kathyrn
Fowles
Ruby
Klein
Jennie
Milligan
Nicola
Smith
Tim
Bohlmann
Sherry
Franzen
Lisa
Koo
Susanne
Milner
Ana
Soares
Tyler
Borges
Alison
Fraser
Vesna
Kovacevic
Oded
Mizrahi
Karen
Sonik
Julie-Ann
Bouchard
Martin
Froehling
Allison
Kozdron
Chris
Mogg
Neena
Sonik
Jason
Boyce
Tanya
Futa
Paul
Kundarewich
Hee Joo
Moon
Joanna
Stencel
Megan
Brady
Anne
Gan
Jordan
Kuo
Scott
Morgan
Zach
Stevens
Jennette
Brandner
Marnie
Gartrell
Harley
Kurata
Laurie
Mossop
Colleen
Stewart
Lindsay
Brownlee
Julia
Gaudette
Eugenia
Kwok
Talitha
Motola
Susan
Stigant
Rozlyn
Bubela
Andrea
Geiger
Gina
Kwon
Chris
Mott
Monica
Strimbold
Kate
Butkus
Emma
Gelok
Hee-Jin
Kwon
Angela
Mudge
Jason
Sullivan
Kathryn
Butler
Marcia
George
Annie
Kwong
Karl
Mueller
Jessica
Sullivan
Ron
Byrre
Ramandeep
Gill
Kimberly
La
Arif
Mulji
Andrea
Sum
Karla
Camac
Jen
Goepel
Raphaelle
Labman
Shannon
Mulvihill
Laura
Sware
Devon
Cameron
Ee Leen
Goh
Robb
Laird
Karen
Munnis
Kelly
Symonds
Alice-Marie
Campbell
Aaron
Goldberg
Dawn
Lam
Alex
Murdoch
Desmond
Talento
Chani
Campbell
Christopher
Gorman
Miranda
Lam
Brian
Murphy
Elisse
Tan
Margaret
Campbell
Kristen
Gould
Vanessa
Lam
Marta
Musa
Kennard
Tan
Amanda
Carmichael
Meghan
Graham
Cindy
Lau
Mohammad
Namazi
Tracy
Tang
Claire
Carter
Sean
Grant
Ka-Kei
Law
Don
Nash
Sarah
Tarry
Geoff
Cattrall
Andrea
Gray
Ryan
LeBlank
Jolene
Nash
Sheldon
Tay
Stephen
Cawood
Sarah
G reeves
Anna
Lee
Meryl
Nelson
Amy
Tiessen
Charlene
Chan
Sonia
Grewal
Ginny
Lee
Rudelle J.
Ng
Danika
Tonn
Clara
Chan
Holly
Grinvalds
Jeong
Lee
Ken
Ngui
Kavinder
Toor
Katherine
Chan
Alphil
Guilaran
Karen
Lee
Jesse
Nbbbs-Thiessen
Anna
Tosso
Felicia
Chang
Ronette
Haboosheh
Lloyd
Lee
Niveria
Oliveira
Magali
Touchette
Sara
Chapman
Rachelle
Haddock
Louisa
Lee
Cari Lee
Olsen
Jenn
Toussant
Lilian
Chau
Merran
Hague
Miyoung
Lee
Elizabeth
Ong
Lienchi
Tran
Kiersten
Check
Jacqueline
Hall
Nancy
Lee
Jeff
Oriecuia
Robyn
Trask
Jennie
Chen
Elsa
Hansen
Sharon
Lee
Gerardine
Palfy
Phoi
Truong
Rosemary
Chen
Jachi
Harlow
Vivien
Lee
Chana
Palmer
Michael
Tsang
Colleen
Cheng
Kristy
Harrison
Elizabeth
Legge
Emmy
Pang
Shauna
Turner
Derek
Cheng
Andrew
Hausot
Cecilia
Lei
Darcy
Parker
Michael
Tyne
Karen
Cheng
Catherine
Haw
Tanya
Lentz
Ashka
Patel
Amelia
Ufford
Grace
Cheong
Michelle
Henderson
Penny
Leong
Jessica
Paterson
Teo
Ugaban Jr.
Winson
Cheung
Natasha
Himer
Julie
Leslie
Gina
Peragallo
Linda
VanBarneveld
Jennifer
Childerhose
Dorothy
Hoan Tran
Geoff
Lester
Allison
Perreault
Michael
Verde
Christina
Choi
Shaun
Hodgin
Bonnie
Leung
Jinny
Peters
Karina
Verhoeven
Amanda
Chow
Ryan
Hoffman
Jonathan
Lim
Carly
Peterson
Lindsay
Waite
Michelle
Chow
Vivian
Hoffman
Ben
Liu
Tabitha
Poehnell
Jennifer
Walker
Hoi Kin
Chui
Marie
Holm
Kathy
Lo
Sarah
Pokorny
Kory
Walsh
Michelle
Chung
Steven
Holmes
Terri
Lockwood
Megan
Quek
Mark
Walsh
Randy
Chung
Kelly
Hon
Sarah
Londry
Scott
Ramsay
Nathan
Waters
Michael
Cichy
Dana
Hooker
Charlie
Loo
Shayna
Rector
Kristy
Watson
Paul
Clement
Jenn
Hough
Rick
Lopez
Sharon
Relova
Adrienne
Weeks
Gina
Cockayne
Alan
Howarth
Stephen
Lowry
Jamie
Rempel
Carleigh
Whitman
Beth
Collison
Kim
Howe
Trina
Lu
Jenny
Retallack
Shannon
Wiebe
Alison
Cox
Wei-Hsi
Hu
Shannon
Luttin
Joze
Reverente
Jaimie
Willems
Sarah
Creechan
Brendan
Huang
Allison
Lytle
Victoria
Richards
Sarah
Wilson
Megan
Cross
Sundeep
Hundal
Henry
Ma
Samantha
Richer
Jamie
Withers
Rebecca
Cunningham
Sam
Hung
Tina
Ma
Hayley
Riesterer
Clarence
Wong
Alana
Dale-Johnson
Melissa
Hungerford
Frances
Macapagal
Michael
Roberts
Edward
Wong
Nerida
Davis
Kristen
Huskins
Neil
MacGuigan
Jeff
Rogers
Joseph
Wong
Tim
Davis
Rhonda
Hyslop
Megan
MacKinnon
Sean
Rollo
Amy
Wright
Amy
Davison
Sibel
llsever
Sharon
MacMillan
Arlene
Rolston
Sophie
Wright
Elizabeth
Davy
Michael
In wood
Cheryl
Maitland
Elizabeth
Ross
Leslie
Yasul
Caroline
Delany
Stephen
Ip
Emily
Mak
Mira
Rozenberg
Jing
Yeo
Christina
Demco
Christina
James
Erin
Malley
Anu
Saini
Amy
Yeung
Cecilia
Denegri
Cherie
Jarpck
Ann
Mamon
Ernest
Salcedo
Ed
Yeung
Mary
DeVera
Susie
Joe
Doug
Manarin
Shannon
Salvador
Annie
Yim
Jad
Dhesi
Lisa
Johnson
Florencia
Marghetti
Pooja
Samtani
Michael;
Young
Jennifer
Dick
Nicole
Johnson
Andrea
Mark
Ingrid
Sander
Arthur  ,
Yu
Jennifer
Dicus
Wendy
Johnson
Brooke
Marokus
Monique    i
Sanders
Warrtek|
vYu
Tim;
Dinsdale
Arash
Kaboli    ••
Karyn
Martin
Jatinder '•'•/-
Sandhtt '■'
Mtchefe
Yuen
Angela-'
DobsoW -■'■■*■-
Ruby     ■"J-:"
Ka-dey
Rerree **
*-' Martin
Manpreet
Sandhu
Brian
Zeiler THE UBYSSEY • TUKSOfiC F*WKJ/*rW*24; "19
Online courses at UBC offer students global appeal
by Ian Sonshine
At a time of government cutbacks, overcrowded classrooms and seemingly
boundless technological progress, on-line
learning is finding its place at UBC. And
students from around the world can take
courses at UBC without ever setting foot
on campus thanks to a new online program offered by the department of
Continuing Studies.
Developed in partnership with the   -.t..^.
Monterey Institute of Technology (HESM)   jl^^S?
in Mexico, the courses, offered in graduate '*■' ■^■V**-*
level Education, can be taken individually
or as part of a UBC masters degree or PhD,
or an ITESM masters degree. Because the
courses are unique in their technical-
modem content, they are taken by both
resident UBC students and students
abroad.
The flexibility of online courses has
drawn students from around the world. Nearly 300 students
from 13 countries are currently enrolled.
"We have a very high level of online interaction between students,' says Tony Bates, director ofthe program." Group assignments are taken on by teams of 3 students including a student
from Canada and Mexico in each group. We also hire interna
tional guest tutors for one week each—usually an author of one of
the required textbooks."'
Because of its focus and delivery, the program has been aimed
at mature students and has offered many a solution to a Catch-2 2.
Their jobs demand they continue learning to stay employed but
because of their jobs they do not have the time to become frill or
part-time students.
"I work all day so I could not study
in a normal class because I have no
time to move from my office to the
school. Now I have the opportunity to
study in my house or in my office,"
said Monica Servano, a student from
Mexico.
But flexibility is not enough to replace
traditional education, says Robert Blake,
president of the Faculty .Association.
"There is no substitute for a classroom
setting. The university in its broader
sense is as valuable as any specific undergraduate course".
The series of five graduate level courses explore different technologies and
examines how they can best be applied to
different teaching and learning styles.
Course texts, reading packages and a CD-
ROM substitute for lectures, and a central
web page replaces tutorials, providing
students with a weekly outline, a commentary on topics and a
forum to hold discussions. TA's are available via e-mail or telephone.
"I don't feel I missed anything by not being in a normal class."
said Natasha Bosik, who took the course from her home in
Yugoslavia, "I accepted this as something new and different and
it has worked out wefl»
girl
boy
TREK
"Leading''tfie.WW"':-
*"'Siri'
DAViD JASDN Mili,
SCHWiMMER  LEE AViTAL
DUG. ELLIN F
!    Ki55iNB
-"^ AFDaL
March Forth!
th
-yRiWiMrfiiESpifiws;
on Wednesday March 4
Trek to UBC/Go Green Day
Raise Awareness
(Failing Air Quality/Increasing Traffic Accidents/Need for Better Transit)
Hit Our 20% Target
(Reducing Driving Alone)
Lead the Region
(Solve our Health & Safety Poblems)
Sign up for the Contest & We All Win!
Coffee/Cinnamon bun coupons will be given to morning commuters
using environmentally friendly commute modes as a 'pat on the back",
at the bus loop, car pool lot, and bike lockers.
Come out at Noon to the SUB for Speeches
and a TREK around the Campus!
■   AlAGMENOILLO/AIBBEWFOeM-PBa C
■KlSgnMG-AfOOr-MlU.AVITAL- VA14fSSA-ltl46El..KARI-WUHRER.-and BON'IHE'-HUNT.■
■-■""BPE-RNECASSELa
rSsiiyftsiEi:
mm]m
SlilfllllEl^lSGiKeii:
-"BB?JAMESFREY. -"""""S? JAMESFREYahd DOUB ELLIN
StlSfLa,! «s| ii «™ OOUG ELLIN ■ k UNIVERSAL RELEASE --S™
www.universalpictures.com
SUBJECT TO CLASSIFICATION
OPENS THIS FRIDAY
AT THEATRES EVERYWHERE!
wm:\WMWIklWi
8:00-9*.00a.m.
Noon
12:30p.m.
1:00p.m.
1:30-2:30p.m.
Schedule of Events
"Pats on the Back" at the Bus Loop, Car/VanPool Lots, Bike Lockers
Coffee/Cinnamon Bun coupons handed out to non-SOV's "Tickets" at B-
Lots to SOV'ers
Display at the Goddess of Democracy- Sustainable Transportation
Options Hand in Participation Contest Sheets
Speeches
TREK Around Campus- marchers, bicyclists
Route: SUB, University Boulevard, Wesbrook, Agronomy, Main Mall,
University Boulevard, Goddess of Democracy
Display at the Goddess of Democracy- Sustainable Transportation
Options Hand in Participation Contest Sheets
Contest Winners will be announced on March 5th in SUB
Conversation Pit at 12:30 p.m.
Guest Speakers:
Dr. Bill Rees on Sustainability Issue &
Gord Lovegrove on TREK Program Status Update
To Volunteer or for more information:
Student Environment Centre 822-8676 or TREK program Centre 822-1304
www.trek.ubc.ca 8
THE UBYSSEY •> TUESDAY; FEBRUARY 24, 1998
THE USYSSEY » TUESDAY, f tBRUARY 24, 1998 !
ALL YOU CAN EAT
Monday Night 4 - 9pm
only $7.99
including NoOStop Pop,
Pizza, Pasta, Breadsticks
& Dessert
At Oak & Broadway-
only 10 minutes away.
For a limited time only.
650 Jobs from
over 120 of BC's leading
technology companies.
T-NET BRITISH COLUMBIA
www. bctechnoiogy.com
MAJOR IN CANADIAN STUDIES
-choose from 100 courses in 12 departments
-take specialized courses (CDST 350 & 450)
-be eligible for incoming scholarships of $1500
-active student association
MORE INFORMATION-& APPLICATIONS
can be obtained anytime from Program Office, Buchanan
Tower 506, or you can call 822-2147,
or email rcavell@unbcg.ubc.ca
NEW COURSE: CDST 350 (3 CREDIT)
taught in 4 modules by Profs, from HIST, FINA, ENGL and
ANSO, the focus will be on "The Sixties in Canada: The
Age of McLuhan"
A MINOR IN CANADIAN STUDIES IS NOW
AVAILABLE.contact the Program Chair,
Dr. Richard Cavell, Buchanan towers 506
822-2147; rcavell@unrxg.ubc.ca
OUR   DRIVING   FORCE   IS
FO
*Info°"»
OW   TO   APPLY,
Palmetto
At theatres everywhere
by Alec MacEsSeill-RicharaJson
It is very difficult to review a movie which you've had to forcibly restrain yourself from walking out on. Do not get the wrong impression. It was not due to
revulsion, distaste, or any fundamental philosophical disagreement with the
director. When you check your watch for ihe third time, five minutes into the
film, you know the next two hours are going to be painful. In short, Palmetto
failed to deliver a single ounce of entertainment For a detailed list of faults, see
below:
1. Pace: akin to a slug navigating a salted sidewalk, the inexhaustable supply of pauses in action and dialogue, lengthy character reflections and a almost
non-existent and unmemorable soundtrack make you realize how quickly your
ass becomes numb in those uncomfortable seats.
2. Script Woody Harrelson stars as the lead loser who is predictably suck-
ered into becoming the patsy for a kidnapping murder. Elizabeth Shue, Gina
Gershon and Michael Rappaport round out the supporting cast in a movie
which becomes caught in an unholy amalgamation of genres. What director
Schlondorff calls "noir" can be translated in a myriad of fashions. "Noir" as in
what colour you'd like the screen to become so as to stop the incessant nonsense. "Noir" meaning fashionably obscure, Fargo as written by Hollywood
producers. In fact a "noir" which is in no way connected with Uie original genre
in which satire, irony and dark visions feature largely.
3. Setting: Palmetto, Florida. Even the main character has to be seduced in
order to return to this paltry town. The sumrner heat may have contributed
heavily to the often awkward and slow moving fashion in which the lines were
delivered.
4.Characters: Three days later, and I can't remember a single character's
name. That should be a telltale hint
5. Marketing: It's a story about a loser and whoa! look at the size of Elizabeth
Shue's...talents.
With the talents ofthe people involved, director Volker Schlondorff of Tin
Drum, Harrelson of Larry Flint, Shue oi Leaving Las Vegas, one might expect
a half-decent film. Instead, Palmetto is boring and could serve
only as a cure for insomnia.^
g
-<■ ■ ■ £    ■ - * ■" •'
«*^.H4-*j^*"^-"J?T!E*sto,^*l*'.'
Mrs. Warrens Profession
At the Vancouver Playhouse
until March 7.
by Michael Lang
Once ensconced in tlie comfortable and ranvivial
PlayHouse seats there is still a Utile time to contemplate the set before Bernard Shaw's Mrs.
Warren's Profession begins. A pleasant suburban
yard, ringed by a flower draped fence, contains
what appears at first glance to be a giant floral handkerchief suspended from the ceiling.
Soon the play begins, a door opens in the handkerchief, and flie heroine Vivie Warren, played by
the beautifulJennifer Clement, bounds out barefoot
to swing lustily in the rnoniing breeze. Do not be
deceived. Vivie turns out to be quite a sinister cigar
smoking character-study in her own right—a conspicuously masculine feminist, certainly in Shaw's
time.
.As the morriing and the plot wear on, Vivie's
mother, the glamorous Mrs. Warren arrives,
played by Goldie Semple, accompanied by the
licentious Sir George Crofts, a splendid villain
impersonated rather blandly by Larry Yachimic,
and the artistic Praed, played convindngiy by Allan
Gray.
After much ado, the music swells (conveniently
highlighting the climax), Mrs. Warren's prostitution
is revealed, and the audience is shocked to the very
marrow of their bones. Alas no, they remained
quite unruffled. I felt cheated out of both the shock-
value and the social resonance which the title
theme enjoyed in an era where,
as tlie program points out, "there
were approximately 80,000
prostitutes in London, or 3% of
the population." My, that's a lot
There is still the wit of the
writing and the confrontational
drama between mother and daughter to Jail back
on. And here this production, directed by Glynis
Leyshon, puts in a lair effort, though the ensemble
isrertainJynotvituoso.        ■**
Most enjoyable is the comic duo of Vivie's
cheeky boyfriend Frank Gardener, portrayed vivaciously by John Ullyat, and his harassed father, the
Reverend Samuel Gardener, played by William
Webster, who turns out to be one of Mrs. Warren's
old clients.
Things get more turbulent in the second act Sir
George Crofts, rebuffed by Vivie, reveals her
Mother is still running brothels, and (casting incestuous ripples over preceding romps) that Frank
may well be her half brother, whereupon he is
chased off by a Winchester-wielding, ever wisecracking Frank. The set too, has become more
oppressive, the giant handkerchief having yielded
its place (symbolically not geometrically) to a
severe, black, cast-iron fence, which, by the addition
of ever more black layers, serves as the backdrop to
several locales.
After Vivie's melodramatic renouncement of
romance, art, and her mother, the play ends and a
"further section of black grating, which has thrown
tendrils onto most of the stage by now, descends
from the heavens obscuring Vivie at her desk.
This last bit of symbolism is entirely too pedantic in a play already burdened with dated, didactic
diatribes. In general the predominance of large
ugly fences complicates the""ctoreogiraplry/ and
obscures the bucolic setting implied by lhe text
It was entertaining, but I wouldn't go if I had to
pay.*
■f; v^ten
'meets luesclay
V@'2:00    ' ;;C
You have great ideas about public transit.
We want to hear them.
BC Transit is establishing a President's Youth Advisory
Council — young people in the Lower Mainland who want
to make a difference. Fifteen students, nominated by student
councils and student unions, will help shape the future of
public transit.
CONTACT   YOUR   POST-SECONDARY   STUDENT   UNION   OR   HIGH   SCHOOL    COUNCIL   AFTER   /MARCH    I,    1998.
Honourable Joy MacPhail, minister responsible
OU«    DRfVfNO    FORCE    IS
you i'
7
BC Transit^
Vancouver Regional
Transit System
The shade
DJ Shadow
Preemptive Strike
Mo Wax Records
It's something of a strange irony that the name for the British "Trip-Hop"
scene should have originated from a review of an American artist—but, hey
no one ever accused music critics of obsessive accuracy. The term first
popped in a review of DJ Shadow's 1993 single "In/Flux" and from then on
it's been used to describe eveiything from Tricky and Portishead to (gasp)
the Sneaker Pimps.
But whatever the label, DJ Shadow's music is a world removed from
almost anything that's been labelled trip-hop. Shadow has said that he'd like
to be known as "the Hendrix of the sampler" and most fans would already
give him that crown. It's quite a difficult task to explain accurately why DJ
Shadow's music is markedly different but a simple explanation of his actual technique for making music should give a slight glimmer of the range it
encompasses. What Shadow simply* does is make his music by using samples. Taking a bass-line from a 1970s jazz song, a vocal from a gospel record,
and a drum beat from a obscure soundtrack, he crafts it all together into a
new sound, a new song.
His debut, Endtroduang... DJ Shadow, stood for many as the premier
record ofthe year, and since then his fans have been damouring for more.
Preemptive Strike, his latest is a collection of bsides and earlier, out of print
releases. "In/Flux,* that label-creating 12 minute long masterpiece, is here,
along with his latest single, "High Noon,* the four part "What Does Your Soul
Look like," a remix ("Organ Donor") and another new track ("Hindsight").
And although it's not exactly new stuff (four tracks are, contrary to Mo' Wax's
statements, previously available here in North America), the album is still a
beautiful collage of songs. The "What Does Your Soul Look Like" series is a
strangely compelling collection of abstracted rifls, beats and vocal melodies,
while "In/Flux", though now nearly five-years old, still beats 95% ofthe "trip-
hop" music being produced today.
For DJ Shadow hns,Preemptive Strike is a wonderful treat that merely
sates the appetite for more, while for those new to Shadow's music, this
should open their ears to a new way of hearing music. Whatever's next for
DJ Shadow, most other musicians can't help but follow.*?'
-John Zaozirny
$R.tW
At theatres e¥®n»vh»sre
oy Per.-y Choi-nond-*!-?*/
Wilh just lhe riglil ratio of sail to ■r*;ir-
{iaritu:. tlit: popcorn was perf<*i*l But ths:
.Smar'Jes ran out a iiltli: soom-r than
expected.
Oh yeah, then I guess then* was lh<!
movie. Wr.ll. you'vf: gol a hijih U-cli
research 'station,' :i military cover up, a
team of srii'iitisls, an unidentified nioii-
slf*r and an overly si-nsi.ivi- rompi-tr.**
fiorif! haywire. C'ji.you name thr;movitV
Ariualiy. why not give it your own
iiarrii"? it rni{*ht aiiit wi/no entertain
mpci'i lo an otherwise dull trvi-uiTig. Like,
take all the little tangents from the
script that have absolutely iu'tiling lo do
wilh 'lie aciioii of .Jin story and inaki* a
title. In the case of Sphere, it mi^lit !■<*
somethin-' like "How Como the Mini-
Sub Creaks, But The Divers Don't
Implode Under AH That Water?" It's a
good way lo pass Uie time.
On !• positive note. Sharon Stone
does a decimt imprcsi-ion of a pill pop
ping,, therapists wet drnain. .Mot. surprisingly, her role as a biologist lakes a
lot more imagination. She's doomed to
play toe cliche underrated crew mem
her whose emotional stability is questioned by her 'team.' As Ihe only ieiitr.il
female rtiarartpr, it was bound to be her
job to crack uorler tlie pressure.
Bill, really, if you're albrkc.! by <:
squid that lays fgpp ihe size of your
head, isn't that reason enough to be
emotionally, shall we say. fucked upV
And believing a babe like Sharon St-.me,
no matter liow depressed, ever hail Ihe
hols for Ouslin Huffman is another
game altogether. It's plausible that hi;
was cute and fiu!Yy m 77w Graduate, but
come on! Thai was the sixties!
Whal Samuel L Jackson is doing in
this rnovie is ev:n more unclear.
Indirectly responsible, a ad somehow
oblivious lo the misery ul his companions, his character does .*.n unexplained
about face at tlie end oi the movie. His
whoa! we'd better get out of here!'
change of heart doesn't quite cut il. A
more fil.Uiig end would have been for
iaim to be devoured b*. ihe niimt sqiud
his subconscious manifests Uirou-'Ji the
poiv**T of the (.'olden 'sphere.'
Wi; won L even i^et into what the
sphere is supposed to be Lots of spooky
time-travel li.uml.o jumbo with no substance is spewed out rion-seiLsically to
slide over lhe issue. Let's face it. Cven
the semi-comatose nineties viewer
needs a more explanation than 'just
because.'
There is jusl no excuse for the ending
uf this movie, (live the script to a class of
first graders and they'll come up with
something more tangible Youve just
destroyed millions of dollars of equipment lor an, as of yet unexplained, rea
son, and the military leaves you and
your cohorts alone in a room lo get your
story straight? Hardly. And why is it that
tlie all powerful orb responsible for the
death of a number of crew members
and the psychological torture of a fairly
benign bunch suddenly becomes a
'good' power that humans just aren't
'ready for.' Where Sphere differs from
all tlie sci-li monster movies it borrows
irom is in the number of crew members
lefi. al the end. Three survivors is two
more than usual. And mat's about the
biggest thrill you'll get.***
:«EiiSlliEi03ii^SS"
Suggestions for gifts to be offered by this year's graudaring
class to the university are now being accepted. Gift
reccomendations must be delivered to Grad Ciass Council
by Friday February 27th. To be considered the following
criteria should be considered for the gifts:
j. universality
I longevity (min of 10years)
| pei-rnancl-ility & she abiiiry to be visibly displayed
| cobi. may not exceed $3000.00
All suggesrions will be voted on by the Grad Council at the
Annual General meeting.
Applications must include:
$ name of the group requesting funds
| name ofthe project
| funding required (to a max of $3000.00)
| a 100 word description ofthe proposed project
j. including a summary allocating the funds
Rl e ase ;s uh nt It:' ag |d( tf'vti o rii. fa' Rift a
^xgold,* c/o: Sfcj !!# 21S, fl-piderttS
of"the Gracj 0AsyCom\C#tyrF$2J,
Grad Class Council
NEW-AGE   PSYCHOBABBLE
PUBLIC     SPEAKING
SAGGING    BREASTS
THE    BOGEYMAN
C H1 H UAH U AS
COMMITMENT
REJECTION
MIMES
SANTA
SEX
r                   -                                1
>            BRING YOUR FEARS TO            j
jFELSINA THE SELF-HELP QUEEN?!
L                            „ . 1
A   ONE, (WO)MAN'  IMPRpy.'-XOME'DY   STARRING   SHAWN   MACDONALD
'■ ",".v '"■• WITH   BRIAN-  TATE  -'
FIARKNOT
•^B,Y;",iG,ARY- ,J/0 N ES;- A.N.D ;;S,H A W N  .Jvf-A C.D ffjvl ft'L D;. ;-:^ ;    ; '
.^„....   ^ebruapy 2Q .March 2B,V99S^s ^
v-'V ;:■■ :■■;■ ■•■*;'■ -'p*-?:,.■■:*■■■ \zufe\
Arts^Club Nevv'Revue Stage. Granville Island  ..AJfeA^"
; Box Office - 687-1644 ^^
.. tfV/     TicketMaster-280-3311 straight
Leave a
Lasting
Impression
at UBC.
There's still time
to make a contribution
to your class gift.
Look for your Class Act Rep.
Clas^Act
Act on it!
Preventing Economic Espionage and
Protecting Trade Secrets
A free seminar presented by PATSCAN and the
Canadian Intellectual Property Office.
Date: Thurs. Feb. 26th.
Time: 6:30 to 8:30
Place: Woodward Instructional Resource Centre
Theatre No. 3
University of BC (adjacent to UBC Hospital)
Three speakers will present an overview of the
physical and legal protection of trade secrets and
other sensitive corporate and research
information.
Representatives of the Canadian Security
Intelligence Service will offer a presentation on
current clandestine methods used in economic
espionage and ways to deter them. CSIS staff
advise Canadian corporations on the real
dangers of foreign agents infilitrating the high
technology industry in Canada, and outline an
active awareness program against this threat.
Herbert Regehr of Bull, Housser & Tupper will
offer a presentation on his experience as an
intellectual property lawyer in the field of trade
secret protection. He will outline the practices a
company must employ to enforce confidentiality
of sensitive information among employees,
consultants, licensees, and vendors.
Phone PATSCAN at 822-5404, fax 822-9532, or
e-mail rsimmer@unixg.ubc.ca
Subjects for a Naming Study
Criteria:
■18-45 years old
•English as a primary language
•no speech/language problems
•no loss of consciousness
•not using recreational drugs
Call 682-2344, ext 3172 - $30.00 stipend We're not brinein? hone the baco
irieidicu^
Maple Leaf Foods is a huge Canadian corporate
success, with big-time global aspirations. Its meat
slaughtering and processing operations have earned
it so much money, it has spun off into all kinds of other
food production: bakeries, pasta-making, frozen foods,
and even coffee and doughnut shops.
But in the quest for ever-higher profits, Maple Leaf
President Michael McCain is offering his workforce only
the scraps. In August 1997, Maple Leaf locked out workers
at its North Battleford, Sask. bacon plant because employees wanted to improve on their industry-low base rate of
$9.88 per hour. The same thing happened in October to
Hamilton, Ont. workers, whose base rate was just $10.90,
bringing to nearly 500 the number of workers locked out
of their jobs. Then about 900 pork production workers in
Burlington, Ont. — faced with company demands for
rollbacks from $6.00 to $9.00 per hour — were forced to
strike in November. They were followed just days later by
another 750 workers in Edmonton, Alta., who are threatened with permanent plant closure and loss of their jobs.
These workers are all members of the United Food and
Commercial Workers, or UFCW. We don't think it's right
that Canadian workers should have their wages and
benefits reduced to rock-bottom levels just because that's
someone's idea of a "competitive reality" — especially
when the company continues to not only grow and profit,
but to try and swallow up the competition. Canadian
workers should be paid what's fair and equitable in
Canada — period. After all, Michael McCain is still
"bringing home the bacon".
If you care about what', fair, please join us in boycotting these Maple Leaf product!:
MEATIROM
Maple Leaf » Burns •Overly
'-'Swift..Prc^^
Campfire • Shopasy's • Goorsh
Clover • Bittners • Devon • Parma
Hygrade • Mary Miles • York
;*!«fB*i?i!
■Wi®0$i$^
OTHER:
Country Style Doughnuts • Olivieri Pasta & Sauces
Shur-Gain Pet Food & Livestock Feeds
Issued by the UFCW National Defence Fund, November 1997 • For more information, contact the UFCW National Office:
300-61 International Boulevard, Rexdale ON M9W 6K4 • 416.675.1104 • fax: 416.675.6919
"•^Cr Hie urge towards chaos
FAMILY PLANNING
Tim Parks
Vintage
by Andy Barham
Family Planning, Tim Parks' novel could have as ecisily been tided
"Murphy's Law," were it
not   for   the
inconvenient
fact that aforesaid title is an
abused cliche.
The novel presents   a   wry
chronicle    of
dysfunctional
family     relationships that,
by virtue of a
chilling familiarity,    can    either
amuse    or    disturb—giving    us
an      unfettered
glimpse into the
universal     urge
towards     chaos
which lies at the
heart of all existence. That
unbearable
"fucked-upedness
of being" which
seems to dictate
that    all     good
intentions   shall
end in failure.
We, the readers can laugh at the cra2y letters insane brother Raymond sends to his siblings letters filled with vitriol so preposterous as to be rendered ludicrous. A stealthy unease broods quietly beneath the laughter, however,
when we realize that Raymond's letters are designed to pierce the carefully constructed armour of their recipients in those places where that
armour is most vulnerable. The truth is, were it us, instead of the characters in a novel receiving them, we probably wouldn't be laughing.
It is even more unsettling when we begin to realise that, beneath the
vitriol and profanity lurks the hidden dynamics of current as well as past
dysfunction. It is Raymond who not only sees the truth about his family
and its inter-relationships with itself and others, but openly expresses this
hidden reahty to his siblings as well. Ultimately, it is Raymond who moves
the family dynamic forward against the inclinations of Ids brothers and
sister.
The novel is short, only 285 pages, but Parks manages to bring his
characters vividly to life, imbuing them with a credibility lhat is all too frequently lacking in contemporary novels. I have only one quibble with
Family Planning, namely, Parks' tendency to use the technique of letter
writing between characters (the epistolary novel) as a means of getting
inside their heads. It's an old, if not particularly venerable technique,
harking back to the birth of the novel as an art form late in the seventeenth and early eighteenth centuries.
It's a method I personally find irksome and more than a littie
tedious, even in an historical setting. Parks sets his novel in modern
England at the tail end ofthe 80s. As a result, I find the use of letter writing between characters who are not geographically separated by large
distances a tad incredible.
So far as Brother Raymond is concerned, the letter writing schtick
works, because Raymond is a more nebulous figure. We can accept
Raymond's letter writing simply because Raymond is insane, and his
letters demonstrate this. Raymond's letters serve a similar function to
that of the chorus in classical tragedy. In this context, tlie letter writing
works. It ceases to work, at least for me, when the other characters
engage in letter writing as a means of communicating to each other.
As a case in point, the novel opens with Mr. Baldwin, father of them
all, sending letters back to Lorna which were written to him by her when
she was a little girl. Lorna responds by writing long letters back, giving
us a quick glimpse into the dysfunctional relationships of the Baldwin
family. It's not particularly plausible, under the circumstances, and I
would have preferred a more subtle approach. Frantiy, long letters
between the characters in a novel or short story bore the hell out of me,
and I generally find myself skiinming them with mounting impatience.
Otherwise, this novel is well worth reading. The characters, situations, and events are entirely believable. Dysfunction is normally a grim
and rather foreboding topic for reader and novelist alike. Tim Parks has
handled the subject insightfully without making it so dismal that only
psychologists would want to read it. In part, he has done this through a
wry understanding ofthe potential humour latent within one's own dysfunctions—a kind of gallows humour, true—which saves this novel from
wallowing in the sort of maudlin maunderings that have come to dominate so much of the writing of our Fin de siecle.*
so-*-*
•*3S&-*
'ttti
Financial Awareness
Week
2Ar,
gf Budgeting
8f Financial Planning
(jf Managing Your Money
March 2 & 3
SUB Concourse
TAKE CONTROL OF YOUR FINANCES!
Qi" #%,i,irf*ii*i.*,i n if
^vUll-UOGiniv
Scotia Student Link
ATTENTION ALL ARTS UNDERGRADUATES
Arts Undergraduate Society Elections
are coming up
Positions available:
President
Vice-President (Internal)
Vice-President (External)
Vice-President (Rnance)
Academic Co-ordinator
Promotions Co-ordinator
Sports Co-ordinator
Social Co-ordinator
AMS Representatives (5)
General Officers (6)
•Pick up your elections packages today at the AUS Office (Buch A207)
•Nominations are due in Buch   A207 by 4:00, Friday, Feb. 27th.
•Voting takes place in Koerner Library, the SUB and Buchanan A from
Monday, March 9th to Friday, March 13th.
•Any questions, contact Jason Murray, AUS President, at 822-4403 or drop
by Buch A207.
THE WEDNESDAY FEBRUARY 26TH STAFF MEETING
WILL BE HELD IN COUNCIL CHAMBERS NOT IN THE OFFICE
ON THE AGENDA WILL BE ELECTIONS, WRCUP, POLICE REQUESTS,
COLOURS ISSUE, MUSIC ISSUE, WOMEN'S ISSUE, OTHER ISSUES *1997
■w ■ wnHiM *■.
King Mahal Restaurant
Traditional Indian Cuisine . Iky our
specialties: malai chicken tikka,
tandoori dishes, vegetarian, meat,
lunch and dinner menus.
Dine in or take out
Open 7 days a week.
Mon-Sat, llam-3pm, 5pm-U pm.
Sun. 5-10pm
4448 W. 10th Ave. Tel/Fax 222-2253
10".> Spt'i'iiil Discount lor Sludcnb,
Dine in or lake out
by Michael Dobie
Another Part ofthe House Thursday
by Migdalia Cruz is inspired by to Sunday at 8:00 p.m.
The House o/Bentarda Alba Adults S10
by Federico Garcia Lorca Seniors & Students S8*
* contains suggestive scenes
Jericho Arts Centre, 1675 Discovery & N.VV. Marine Dr. call 224-8007
The Faculty of Science Presents
A lecture Series
for All Science
Undergraduates
It's new and it's for you!
Degenerative Disease:
Unravelling the Unravelling Brain
A Science First! Lecture
Dr. Lynn Raymond **.
and f*z
Dr. Peter Reiner w"~
Psychiatry Department
Thursday, 26 February 1998
12:30 - 1:30 pm, Room 100,
Wesbrook Building, UBC
PHRTICIPRTE
QUESTIONS?   CALL 822-9876
PARA
EG ID
We don t fool around! \ V
3 blocks south of the village in
the heart of Fairview Residence
■ &    Mon. - Ft;..       7:30 am -11 pm
**        Sat. - Sun.        9 am -11 pm
P/tone.* 224-2326
The Link
MONTREAL (CUP)-Students, watch out. That open book
prominently displayed on the crest of many Canadian universities could snap shut on your pocketbook if you're not
paying attention.
University libraries are adopting an attitude of caveat
emptor—buyer beware, for those of you who flunked Latin
101. If you're like most students, you use the campus library,
and maybe even borrow books on occasion. But be sure to
get those books back on time and make sure your borrower
record has been cleared. Because if don't, you'll most likely
incur the wrath of the library and have hell—or rather fines—
to pay.
"It was a harrowing experience," Concordia journalism
\Lets make a deal
student Shaun Finn admitted,
recently paid $100 in overdue
fines  for  hanging  on   to  f-
some books past their
due date.
"I  totally for- /"
got,"    Shaun
said,
took out
He
Bucks
large
n u m -
ber of
books,    they
got lost in my
room under some
clothes  and  I  forgot   *
until I got a late notice. I
got a bill for lost charges-
over $500. I
was    totally
freaked out.
I     was     in
dread of my
life."
Drama
aside, Shaun is just one of many university students
across Canada who "forget" to return their books
on time. But some don't even forget—they keep
their books on purpose.
"Some students prefer to pay fines rather
than bring the books back," explained Irene
Sendek,    who   works    for   Concordia
University library services.  She  says
students essentially buy books for the
term by hanging on to them and
paying the maximum fine when
the course is over.
According to Sendek, fine
structures at some universities place a cap on fines
usually between $20 and
$30-that   are   often
lower      than      the
replacement   cost
of the book. For
expensive engineering texts,
this   can   be
quite a bargain.
The     daily
charge  on an
university     library
varies   from   coast
late
overdue
book
to   coast.
Schools in Atlantic Canada tend to
have the lowest late charges. Dalhousie
University in Halifax, for example, charges
2 5 cents a day per late item.
This amount, which may seem paltry to students
from other parts of the county, still manages to do the
job and encourage the return of books on time, says
Dalhousie librarian Sandra Dwyer.
Since the university started charging late fines seven
years ago, Dwyer says there's been a better return rate and
things are more available. Her testimony supports the popular "fines-as-deterrent-to-late-returns" theory.
The library at the University of British Columbia also
holds to this theory, stating that "fines are charged for overdue materials to encourage borrowers to return items on
time so others can use them."
And in the west, the stick the librarians walk softly with
tends to be quite big. At UBC and Simon Fraser University,
for example, students are charged a dollar a day for overdue
books.
Is the west so flush with cash that students can afford
such fines? It seemed so at first. According to Rufus Poison,
who's been a clerk at the SFU library for the last nine years,
the amount collected in fines took a sudden jump after SFU
upped its fines to a loonie a few years ago.
This indicates an (initial) willingness to pay the higher
amount, a condition economists call price elasticity.
Or is it demand inelasticity?
"There used
to be fewer students and bigger
budgets. We
could get away
with [late
returns]," Poison says. "[Then] budgets were
cut, and enrollment went up. V/e
had an availability problem."
But it's a problem  that the
high fines now seem to be solv-
*. ing. Over time, after the introduc-
f tion of the increased fine, the num-
t» ber of late returns diminished at
SFU.
But there are some who are skeptical about the "fines-as-deterrent-to-
■"■"-i-returns"       theory,       such       as
f oncordia's Sendek.
"Students, in spite of information to
uie contrary, have money to pay fines,"
shis argues. "They prefer to pay fines
rather than bring books back."
University libraries
can provide big bucks
in over due revenue-
depending on
where you go
to school
There is, of course,
another side to the
world of
library fines
beyond     the
return slots and
the cash register.
After all, just what
happens      to      the
money that is collected? At about half-a-dozen
universities unscientifically polled by the Link, a clear
answer emerged—maintaining
collections.
Acquisition budgets at many
libraries have not kept pace with
rising  costs,  especially for periodicals, and the money brought in by fines
goes to mending old tomes and buying
replacement copies of books that have been
permanently borrowed."
But don't kid yourself that you're doing the
library a favour by keeping your books past the
due date.
"It's most important that we get material back,"
says Suzy Slavin, a librarian at McGill University.
In the meantime, if you do happen to forget those
books under that pile of laundry in the corner, you can
always try negotiating with your friendly librarian. They're
human, after all.
Finn offered to wash the librarian's car to avoid paying
his $100 fine, but to no avail.
"I realised it was futile to resist," Finn says. In order
to graduate, he had to pony up the dough.* "Dare to know the truth"
Options to abortion
available to women
I am writing in response to the article "Women choose abortions for
many reasons," written by Joyelle
Brandt in the February 10 issue of
The Ubyssey. Thank you very much
for addressing this issue.
The reason I title this article
"Dare to know the truth" is because
the truth is not in any way a subjective matter. "Whose truth?"-The
Medical Truth. I am unsure why this
issue is always avoided in pro-
choice opinions. It has
been proven by medical
professionals that the life
within the womb is fully
developed at twelve
weeks after conception
and needs only to grow.
The infant at this stage
feels every human sensation. "The baby feels it
when its limbs are torn from its
body in a D & E abortion; it feels it
when it is crushed in a vacuum suction abortion and it feels it when it is
burned alive by saline solution
injected into the mother's womb.
There's worse to telL Consider this:
today it is possible to perform
surgery on the unborn baby. These
babies are afforded the luxury of
anesthetic but the unwanted babies
are still called a mass of tissues and
given no human consideration or
rights. Have you ever seen a garbage
can full of fully formed aborted
babies? I have. This is the immorality of abortion referred to in my first
article. Have you ever watched a
video that shows an abortion? Why
is it so offensive if it only reveals the
truth? If someone can say that they
fully support abortions, why can't
they watch, understand and accept
the procedures? I believe that this
truth is so often avoided because it
is very painful to watch, and niins
the concept of "My body, My
choice." There are two heart beats,
not one. The simple fact of the matter is that while a women nourishes
the unborn child within her own
body during pregnancy, the baby is
a complete and separate human
ljeing... someone else's body!
The issue of the child in the
womb is very important but the
harm that abortion inflicts on
women is equally horrific. We
legalise abortion to 'protect
women.' Let me name a few of the
physical risks of abortion procedures: 1) Hemorrhage. 2) Infectiou
'rhe uterus is susceptible to infection following abortion. If untreated,
a serious infection could develop
and result in infertihty. 3)
Perforation of the uterus. 4)
Retained fetal parts, emergency ser-
by Erica Heathe vice required. 5) Higher rate of miscarriage in subsequent pregnancies.
6) Teenagers who have abortions
are 800 percent more likely to contract breast cancer by the age of 45.
I apologise for the lack of details, I
encourage you to look into these
complications if you have any
doubts about my credibility. To
answer a very important question-
no, I wouldn't prefer that women
revert to a coat-hangar method. That
is exactly why we now have many
help centres for women in crisis
pregnancies and for
women experiencing
the trauma of an abor-
Perspective
tion. It is imperative
that we recognise the
fact that there are alternatives to abortion: 1) Coquitlam
Pregnancy Concern Center (also
located in Burnaby, Hope, Langley,
Richmond, Surrey, Vancouver). 2)
Birthright 3) Shelters for Expectant
& New Mothers (Moffatt House,
MayWood Home, Mom's Place,
Burnaby Safe House.) 4) Rape Victims'
Safe House. 5) ^option/Private
Adoption. 6) Abortion Recovery
Canada. I could continue. Our concern
for a woman should not mean contempt for the life of her unborn child.
Instead we must have compassion for
them both and help them both in positive, constructive ways.
In 1993, the last year that abortion statistics were done in Canada,
72,530 babies were aborted.
Furthermore, most people believe
that the vast majority of abortions
are done because of the "hard
cases." Planned Parenthood's own
study found 93 percent of all abortions are done strictly for convenience. The most common reason
found was, "having a baby would
interfere with work, school, or other
responsibilities." Are any of these
acceptable grounds for murder?
The fetus (Latin for Tittle one') is
a separate life force, true, not self-
sustaining. Is a new born baby or
toddler self-sustauung? We are not
free to murder these babies simply
because they are born. Birth is an
event in life, NOT the beginning of
life.
I'm not here to condemn anyone; that is not my place or intention. I'm here because the truth has
a right to be heard. I am simply a
voice for the silent victims of abortion; both mother and child.*
Erica Heathe is a member of
IJMne, UBCs ProLifs Club
ooitiion
£!? UBC FilmSoc
Feb 25-26, Norm Theatre, SUB
24 hrs. 812-3687
Enter The Dragon
Goldfinger
WANT
the ubyssey
OPE
/■^ake yoi/K first rtop...
"*■-? TRAVEL CUTS
LLOHUG
Student Class'airfare ♦ maximum savings & flexibility.
Railpass • choose from a wide selection, issue to you on
the spot.
ISIC (International Student Identity Card) • even
more savings once you're on the road.
by March 31, 1998
822 .6890
103-5718
DNMERSITY JJ
221 . 6221
A let's 6o F^Kope 1118 book,
Izo^'r Backpacker Jov-.-k-.aL, a
Travel CUTS claypack a*-.d voater j
bottle, ar.d o«e free •m^M" at tKe
Pi*k Palace, tUe ^oHd'; larc-ert
yo»tr> KeJoKt, Located i* Corfu.
$80  value  •  free
*ii TRAVEL GUTS
Certain restrictions may apply. Not valid in conjunction with any other offer. Offer available while supplies last
Tau Kappa Epsilon
Committed to Excellence
THE WORLD'S LARGEST FRATERNITY IS STARTING A NEW CHAPTER
herIut ..
<->«.,.„,      ..„*"" ,«'■,'";: j" 4      '■-.-.-..      ■■■■<•■•„.
University of British Columbia,
f Jl | H Vancouver
'V
i '" * i ..
■-It
* It-ill
INTMteTiMM STAB^C-v' \
•".. yo W @^frMeknity??
BECOME ACTIVE IMMEDIATELY!!
NO PLEDGING!!
SCHOLARSHIP ASSISTANCE
300 CHAPTERS IN US. & CANADA!!
For More Information, Please Call:
BRETT AKS
Vancouver Conference Center,
(Hotel #) (604) 822-1005-73013 oir 1800624-3765 (Vm) THE UBV.SHY. TUESDAY,
2% 1997
11 »lWkTO
FEBRUARY 10, 1998 • VOIUME 79 ISSUE 35
Editorial Board
Coordinating Editor
Joe Clark
News
Sarah Galashan and Chris Nuttall-Smith
Culture
Richelle Rae
Sports
Wolf Depner
National/Features
Jamie Woods
Photo
Richard Lam
Production
Federico Barahona
The Ubyssey is the official student newspaper of the University of British Columbia. It
is published every Tuesday and Friday by
The Ubyssey Publications Society.
We are an autonomous, democratically run
student organisation, and all students are
encouraged to participate.
Editorials are chosen and written by the
Ubyssey staff. They are the expressed opinion of the staff, and do not necessarily
reflect the views of The Ubyssey
Publications Society or the University of
British Columbia.
The Ubyssey is a founding member of
Canadian University Press (CUP) and firmly
adheres to CUP's guiding principles.
All editorial content appearing in The
Ubyssey is the property of The Ubyssey
Publications Society. Stories, opinions, photographs and artwork contained herein
cannot be reproduced without the
expressed, written permission of The
Ubyssey Publications Society.
Letters to the editor must be under
300 words. Please include your phone
number, student number and signature
(not for publication) as well as your year
and faculty with all submissions. ID will be
checked when submissions are dropped off
at the editorial office of The Ubyssey, otherwise verification will be done by phone.
"Perspectives" are opinion pieces over 300
words but under 750 words and are run
according to space.
"Freestyles" are opinion pieces written by
Ubyssey staff members. Priority will be given
to letters and perspectives over freestyles
unless the latter is time senstitive. Opinion
pieces will not be run until the identity of the
writer has been verified.
Editorial Office
Room 241K, Student Union Building,
6138 Student Union Boulevard,
Vancouver, BC. V6T 1Z1
tel: (604) 822-2301 fax: (604) 822-9279
Business Office
Room 245, Student Union Building
advertising: (604) 822-1654
business office: (604) 822-6681
fax: (604) 822-1658
Business Manager
Fernie Pereira
Ad Sales
Stephanie Keane
Ad Design
Afshin Mehin
*You missed the truck crossing uimofT again?!" boomed
Federico Barahona at rogue driver Bruce Arthur as they
slowed to a crawl near the Peace Arch. The unlucky duo
were trapped in the line of border Nazi Ronald Nuriwisah
as he ruthlessly questioned Holly Kim. Alex Bustos. and
Douglas Quan about the contents of their luggage: 3 bags
of golf clubs and one suitcase con taining Sarah Galashan.
It was an arduous job, Ron knew, but as his mentor
Richard Lam once told him, "We're America's only
defense against those igloo inhabiting, beer drinking
Canucks like Joe Clark and Wolf Depner. we must protect
our Empire!* Next in line were Richelle Rae and Jamie
Woods, nervously getting their stories straight about the
apples they were most certainly not taking into the country. In the other line, border patrolman Chris NuttaL
Smith forgot what he was supposed to ask Lisa Shannon
Johnson as she pulled up, so he let the alien in without her
green card. Foolishly trying to cross the line unshaven
and rumpled in a VW bus, Cynthia Lee, Mike Lang, and
Andy Barham were taken aside for a thourough search by
Todd Silver as supervisor Penny Cholmondeley tried not
to watch Todd Silver, John Zaozirny and Alec Macneill
Richardson were turned away from the country of their
dreams, but Ian Sonshine wisely advised them that they
"wouldn't like them hicks down there anyhow!'*
1
V
UBC athletes deserve your support
This has been a tremendous year for UBC
Athletics. The Thunderbirds have had one of their
best years on record, to little applause. UBC teams
have won three national riiampionships—the
Vanier Cup is ours, while the swimming program
steamrolled the rest of the country to take both
national crowns. It could have been four titles, had
it not been for some bad luck in the men's soccer
final, which UBC lost on penally kicks.
And there could be more to come. The
women's volleyball team is a favorite to win it all
this year after last season's second-place finish.
UBC varsity teams have also taken five Canada
West titles and every major varsity team has made
the playoffs. We have also seen several great outstanding individual feats this season. Like NFL-
prospect back Mark Nohra wmning the Hec
Crighton trophy as the country's best university
football player and then leading his team to the
national title on a shaky knee.
like Olympic swimmer Sarah Evanetz coming
back from a year's hiatus to lead her team to its
fourth national championship in five years. Or
how about Mark Versfeld winning two medals at
this past World Swimniing Championships? Not
bad for somebody who has to take a full course
load. Simply put this has been a banner year for
UBC teams and athletes.
The general campus public, however, has
largely ignored their exploits. Yes, attendance at
varsity games is up this year, thanks to more visible advertisements. But compare the tepid atmosphere at UBC games to hotspots like the
Universities of Alberta or Calgary, and it just doesn't compare.
Why? Apathy is still a problem on this campus
and the Birds fly up against a wide range of other
entertainment choices in town—choices that may
not exist at all in other, less cosmopolitian cities
than Vancouver.
Student athletes representing UBC have
accomplished much this year considering they
have to deal with the added pressures of attending
one of the most competitive schools in North
America. You can't be a dumbass jock and get in
to UBC.
All "things considered, the vast majority of student-athletes have managed to strike a terrific balance between athletics and academics. The UBC
women's basketball team has two players who
have been named Academic All-Canadians in
Laura Esmail and Erin Fennell.
Take for instance, Laura Bennion. In addition
to going to medical school, she is an alternate captain for the women's hockey team. In fact
Bennion founded the team four years ago, and
coached it for two, but that was before she
enrolled in med school.
But people like Bennion have largely gone
unrecognised.
UBC Athletics offer students an entertaining
and inexpensive product and the fact that these
athletes and coaches represent UBC with excellence and class while carrying the same course
load as the rest of the student population should
only add to our respect So next year, take the time
to recognise the job that your classmates are
doing—you may even have a pretty good time. So
just watch it*>
•'  #-   .
Hess
Canada Post Publications Sales Agreement Number 0732141
Don't marginalise
Law inequalities
The indignant reaction of some of
my law school classmates to the concerns raised about 'equity issues' in
the faculty calls for further response.
Those who object to the voicing of
these concerns have clearly had a
different (and more positive) law
school experience from those raising the concerns. When a few of us
made a complaint about sexism and
other oppressive behaviour last
semester we also experienced a
loud indignant backlash. What we
also heard was quiet support of our
complaint from women who felt too
silenced to speak out with us. I do
not raise equity issues as a personal
attack on any one of my classmates
or professors. I raise them because
our learning environment should
not be one which silences us. The
equity concerns that have been
raised are an opportunity to ensure
that we have a school which is inclusive and sensitive to the harmful
effect of words and actions on others, regardless of whether the intention was for those words and actions
to create harm. If you were indignant because someone spoke out
about sonMthing in our school, ask
yourself whether attacking a seeming minority for raising these concerns is the appropriate response. If
you want a school to be proud of,
consider that a more productive
response would be to address the
concerns, rather than to marginalise those raising them.
Kim Stanton
Law 2
Persuaded by abortion facts
I would like to re-address the issue
in response to letters written on
abortion on Feb 10, 1998 of the
Ubyssey. The letters on abortion are
so   emotionally  persuasive.   But
should anybody just base their opinion througb emotion, or be persuaded by not looking at the biological
facts? Even in a grade ten biology
textbook we are told that life begins
at the moment of conception, when
the sperm meets the egg in the fallopian tube. Any embryologist can
tell you that these are the first stages
of life. Judith Javis Thompson, an
author, philosopher and brilliant
Women's Studies Scholar is now
willing to admit that abortion is
killing, but that it is a woman's right
to her own body. We should not discredit the fact that millions of lives
are being killed by abortion.
Frances Macapagal
History 2
No pride
in "Pride list"
I was disturbed by the front page of
the Feb 5 Ubyssey Pride UBC's special issue on homosexuality.
The front page implies, due to
the large word 'pride' that the people listed on it are worth taking
pride in. After all, most of them
would be admired by historians or
the general public. I was therefore
disgusted to note that the Ubyssey
and Pride UBC included the name
'Ernst Roehm'.
Ernst Roehm, the leader of the
S.A.—the parainQitary "brown
shirts' of Nazi Germany—was
responsible for the death of thousands of Germans. His army of
thugs propped up a government
that crushed the democratic ideals
that the Ubysseyhas historically supported.
The SA was used to oppress
homosexuals. On May 6, 1933 it
was the "brown shirts" who sacked
and destroyed the Sex Research
Institute in Berlin, Germany's main
centre for the promotion of gay
rights. I am sure that Pride UBC
must know this because the director
of the institute, Magnus Hirschfeld,
is included in your list of those you
take 'pride" in.
Roehm merits utter contempt
not sympathy or respect on the flimsy basis that he was homosexual.
Most of your readers would take
"pride" not in Roehm, but in those
that Roehm opressed.
An apology would be appropriate.
RickHiebert
ed. The Ubyssey did not mean to
suggest that all those names mentioned on the cover of the Pride
issue were worthy of pride. The
names were used to illustrate the
diversity of the LGBQ community.
We regret any offense we may have
caused.
Respect Tibetan
sovereignity
Most of Bo Chiang's opinion piece
(the Ubyssey, February 10, 1998) is
full of inaccuracies and reeks of a
patronising and colonial attitude
towards Tibetans. I guess it should
be expected as he represents the
very people who have occupied and
colonised Tibet
Tibet and China are both ancient
countries with ancient histories.
There have been times in their
mutual histories when one has
come under the influence of the
other. This in no way extinguishes
the sovereignity of that country.
Take the present case of Lebanon, it
is obvious to anyone that with the
massive Syrian military presence
that is they who are in charge of the
country. Yet no one has even suggested that Lebanon is a part of
Syria. To base claim on another
country based on some historical
incident is imperialism at its most
basic.
Tibetans in 1911 under His
Holiness the 13 th Dalai Lama
declared their independence from
China, period. It is utter nonsense to
suggest that they did so to remain a
part of China. It negotiated and concluded treaties with Great Britain,
Nepal and other neighbouring countries. Even Chairman Mao, during
the Long March, when they came
into Tibetan territory and were
given food by monks from a
monastery remarked that that was
their first foreign debt Tibet is still
suffering from the Chinese repayment of that debt' EJuring the 2nd
World War Tibet stated its neutrality
and remained so under intense
British and American pressure to do
otherwise. With the fall ofthe Burma
Road the U.S. and Great Britain
needed to get supplies to their
Chinese Allies and hoped to build a
road through Tibet If Tibet were
indeed a part of China all the Allied
delegations to the Tibetan government would have been unnecessary.
PRC propaganda to the contrary,
Tibet was an independent nation
before the Chinese occupation.
Bo Chiang claims that "presently
freedom of religious belief in Tibet
is actually respected." If this were
true then why are the monks and
nuns in Tibetan monasteries still
harassed, arrested and tortured?
Why is the 9 year old Panchen Lama
still under Chinese arrest? Why are
photographs of His Holiness the
Dalai Lama still banned in Tibet? As
a Tibetan I would prefer the inquis-
tion to this Chinese "religious tolerance."
In December of last year an independent and respected body, The
International Commission of Jurists
said that Chinese-ruled Tibet was
under an "alien subjugation" and
called for a UN run referendum to
decide its future. The Tibetan question has been fraught with Big
Power politics and political and economic expediency. Where countries
like Canada should be standing up
for what is right and moral they
instead choose to strike a bargain
with the devil in the name of the
trade.
Tibetans do indeed want to preserve their culture and religion. We
can do so without "big brotherly"
help of people like Bo Chiang. We
can do so only when we have
regained our independence.
Ttmri-na T.hahingpa
A Tibetan MllOJi
by Adam Jones
Together with many who heard you speak at
the APEC forum on January 20,1 would like to
thank you for the respect you showed the UBC
community by convening the forum and facing some very probing questioning from those
present Like many in attendance, though, I
remain perplexed by the university's actions
prior to and during the APEC conference, and
by the explanations you offered for those
actions.
In the exchange that followed the round-
table, I asked you directly about the university's involvement in two specific actions. On
both occasions, your office appears to have
caved in to political demands by an illegitimate outside authority. One was the
November 22 decision by the Prime
Minister's Office to extend the security
perimeter around the Museum of
Anthropology two days ahead of schedule.
This enabled the federal government to occupy the grounds of the museums, and the
RCMP to evict and arrest a number of peaceful protesters who had erected a "tent city"
on the lawn. The reason you have given
forum for going along with the decision was
that tlie demonstrators posed a potential
threat to the treasures inside the museum.
Come now, Dr. Piper. The protesters had
been supremely peaceful throughout, to the
point of using washable paint for their slogans and coUecting their cigarette butts in
plastic Baggies. Why were they suddenly
transformed into a
threat to the museum's holdings? Why
did museum staff
themselves express no
such concerns?
~^/ The second deci-
Perspective
sion involved the substantial reduction of the
area designated as a
"protest zone" on the day
of     trie     conference,
November 25.    Again
knuckling under to pressure from the Prime Minister's Office, you
agreed to redraw a line the university had previously negotiated with the RCMP. The new
boundary reduced the designated protest
space to a tiny patch where the protesters
would be all but invisible to the leaders in
their passing limousines. The added congestion, and the frustration of protesters at being
denied any meaningful opportunity to protest
very likely contributed to the well-known
fence- pulling and pepper-spray incidents that
followed. Indeed, contemplated this possibility. You wrote to the Prime Minister's Office on
November 19 expressing concerns about the
decision "to reduce significantly the area available for line of sight access to the APEC leaders," claiming it "increase[d] the risk of a serious incident arising out of...frustration"
At the January 20 forum, you stated that
you eventually reached a compromise with
the PMO that balanced their "security' considerations against your own desire to provide space for protesters. But this begs a far
more pressing question, Dr Piper. What security concerns could have persuaded you to
change the boundary even by a centimetre,
when (to quote from your November 19 letter) "the boundaries previously agreed... by
the RCMP would in no way endanger the
safety ofthe APEC leaders"?
On occasion, university officials or employees appear to have played a vanguard role in
the APEC-related abuses. Last October 31,
three students were charged with criminal
mischief for writing anti-APEC slogans in
erasable "glass chalk" on a campus building.
The university apparently requested their
arrest Surely, Dr. Piper, similar activities have
been a staple at UBC since time immemorial
the delinquency of certain Engineers comes to
mind. Why, only when there was an added element of poUtical speech, did the university
crack down?
As well, what role did your office and/or
other university officials play in the seizure of
a Tibetan flag from the Graduate Student
Centre prior to APEC? Among the documents
released recently is an e-mail from a university employee, notifying your office that she had
asked Campus Security to remove the flag
after protests by a couple of anti-Tibetan
activists. Why did you not act immediately to
overturn that instruction? If it was not brought
to your attention at the time, why did you not
at least condemn it post facto?
In closing, Dr Piper, although I am glad you
convened and appeared at the January 20
forum, I feel you have yet to fully grasp the
scale and character of the abuses that were
rommitted on our campus last November.
Your accounting of the university's involvement in the fiasco is far from complete. And
you have done nothing to indicate how you
will ensure that such disgraceful police actions
and outside political interventions are never
again permitted at UBO>
Adam Jones is a PhD. Student
m the Department of Political Science
I career
your
/
Operations Management
Program
you will learn a structured problem-solving
approach to improving business operations
International Trade &
Transportation Program
1 you will learn to analyze international markets
and develop successful trade strategies
program options:
• two year diploma programs
• one year diplomas for university graduates
• one year certificate taken part-time while you work
Join us for an information session where you will
learn about these programs, job prospects and the
application process.
DATE: Wednesday, March 4
TIME: 6 pm - 7 pm
LOCATION:    BCIT Burnaby Campus
Campus Centre
(Town Square A & B)
3700 Willingdon Avenue
FOR GUARANTEED
SEATING CALL
434-1610
reginfo@bcit.bc.ca
BRITISH COLUMBIA INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY
Doug Pryde, CGA works for municipal government in Penticton. He's
just one of 27,000 Certified General Accountants who are managing the
future. Whether they work in industry, government or serve small- and
medium-sized businesses, CGAs are changing the way Canada does
business.
If you are working toward a degree and are aiming for a career you can
take pride in, add to that achievement with a CGA designation. The CGA
professional accounting program combines real, practical experience with
the latest developments in Internet CD technology. And that means the
future is at your fingertips.
You may already qualify for advanced placement in the CGA Program. To
find out how the CGA Program fits into your future, call: 604-732-1211
or 1 -800-565-1211 or visit our website: www.cga-bc.org
CGA
Certified General Accountants Association of British Columbia
1555 West 8th Avenue Vancouver, BC V6J 1T5
Telephone: 604-732-1211 or 1-800-565-1211 Fax: 604-732-1252
E-mail: info(« cga-hc.org Weksite: www.cga-hc.org
CGA. We're the Name Brand for Business in Canada. '4 4
So what iF DADDY isn't going to
give you a car For graduation.
TACOMA
ItRCEL
^oorRW4
Well give you
$1000
towards a new Toyota
theToyota Grad
Program.
or $500 towards a Certified Used Toyota.
Got proof oF your graduation From an accredited college or university? That's all you need
to qualify for the Toyota Grad Program, You can be driving any brand hew Toyota in our line
up or a Certified Used Toyota at these terrific savings offered only to grads. See a Toyota
dealer or visit our website. You're not going to walk to all those job interviews are you?
® TOYOTA
1-888-T0YJQTA-8 / www.toyete.ca

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
http://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.ubysseynews.1-0128077/manifest

Comment

Related Items