UBC Publications

UBC Publications

UBC Publications

The Ubyssey Nov 17, 1972

Item Metadata

Download

Media
ubysseynews-1.0128076.pdf
Metadata
JSON: ubysseynews-1.0128076.json
JSON-LD: ubysseynews-1.0128076-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): ubysseynews-1.0128076-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: ubysseynews-1.0128076-rdf.json
Turtle: ubysseynews-1.0128076-turtle.txt
N-Triples: ubysseynews-1.0128076-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: ubysseynews-1.0128076-source.json
Full Text
ubysseynews-1.0128076-fulltext.txt
Citation
ubysseynews-1.0128076.ris

Full Text

Array 200 seize Sask U centre
TOT UBYSSEY
Vol. LIV, No. 19
^«™^————^.^—
VANCOUVER, B.C., FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 17, 1972
48    228-2301
REGINA (CUP) — About 200 students occupied the arts and
science dean's offices Thursday on the University of Saskatchewan campus here to protest upcoming faculty cutbacks and
action against staff-student parity on departmental committees.
The occupation followed a general meeting Thursday afternoon.
The student action resulted from a general meeting this
afternoon.
Students have demanded
A THOUGHTFUL  LOOK from this participant goes out over the
multi-media art show, which opened  in the SUB gallery Thursday
—ed dubois photo
night. Organized from the Alma Mater Society internal affairs office,
the show is a combination of mirrors, lights and paintings
Students vote, sit-in continues
ST. JOHN'S, Nfld. (CUP) — Students at
Memorial University here will vote today
>n whether to support the ad-
ninistration's decision to stop collecting
:ompulsory student union fees.
At the same time 1,500 students remain
idled up in the arts and administration
>uilding to protest the administration
nove.
University negotiators agreed Thursday the result of the referendum would
ae binding on the administration but
administration president Lord Stephen
Taylor vetoed the agreement.
But
    students   decided   to   hold   the
referendum anyway.
About 10,000 leaflets explaining the
reason for the occupation were printed
and are being distributed on campus and
in the surrounding community.
Reaction to the occupation is mixed on
the 7,500-person campus.
Engineering and education undergraduate councils executives have
condemned the occupation. The student
council has not been able to meet yet.
Students are getting some faculty
support.
Twenty-five professors walked out
Thursday when Lord Taylor entered the
faculty club.
The occupation began at 1 p.m. Tuesday
to protest the administration's unilateral
decision to stop collecting fees.
The administration decision would
effectively end student unionism on the
campus as students would have no way of
enforcing fee payment.
Students say Taylor- and the administration had no right to make the
decision without consulting them.
They say students, not the administration, must make any decision
about whether student union membership
would be voluntary or involuntary.
Since the administration made the
announcement on the first day of the five-
day mid-term break, students had to wait
until Tuesday to take action.
They organized a general meeting
Tuesday noon which was attended by 3,000
students — a remarkably large number
for this usually apathetic campus.
A large majority of the people opposed
the administration move and about half
decided to occupy the building.
dean Edgar Vaughn rescind a
ruling which disallowed a
division of social sciences
motion guaranteeing staff-
student parity in all divisional
departments.
If the dean does not rescind
his ruling by noon today, the
student union will organize a
student strike for Monday.
The social sciences division
council consists of
representatives from the
member departments. Several
departments have already
granted staff-student parity, so
there is a strong student
presence on the divisional
council.
Vaughn responded to the
division motion by circulating
a memorandum notifying all
concerned that he, in consultation with Regina campus
principal John Archer was
over-ruling the motion.
The arts and science faculty
council, under prompting from
Vaughn Wednesday ratified
the dean's decision. The
faculty council consists of all
faculty members and only
token student representation.
The social sciences motion
results from a controversy
over staff-student parity
which has existed for years.
Students now have no
guaranteed rights and may
receive representation in a
department only by faculty
consent. Although some
departments have already
granted student parity
representation, others such as
history, economics and anthropology have bitterly opposed such moves.
The opposition to parity
comes from individuals who
oppose students getting real
power to make changes in the
university. It would give
students the long-awaited
opportunity to press for
changes from a position of
strength.
Last year students in several
departments conducted
reviews of course content and
demanded sweeping changes.
Their demands were largely
ignored because they did not
have parity in most departments and university committees.
The other issue involved in
Thursday's student action is a
proposed faculty cutback for
the upcoming year. Last week
students held a successful
teach-in on the cut-back issue
and effectively laid the
groundwork for Thursday's
action.
Students are digging in for
the night. They now occupy the
entire first floor of the
classroom building which
houses the dean's office and
their numbers are mounting
steadily.
Brush-off
Arts students were given the
brush-off Thursday in their
attempt to have arts professors
formally discuss the possibility
of student representation on
faculty committees.
Arts undergraduate
president Brian Loomes said
arts dean Doug Kenny refused
to allow the matter to be placed
on the agenda of the next
faculty meeting. Page 2
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, November 17, 1972
Muck
—a consumer column
ByRYONGUEDES
Nine days ago Cunningham
Drug Stores Ltd., operating
under the name Shoppers'
Drug Mart, was fined $10,000
for feeding the public just a
little too much horseshit.
At Burnaby Provincial
Court on Nov. 7, after
pleading not guilty, SDM was
found guilty of "using untrue,
misleading advertising"
under Section 37(1) of the
Combines Investigation Act.
The offensive article had
been a flyer distributed in the
Burnaby area, pertaining to
the company's store at the
Middlegate Shopping Centre.
Among other things, the
flyer said "Shoppers' Drug
Mart offers the best dollar
value and saving on every
item,   everyday.   Whether
drugs, vitamins, prescriptions, or toiletries."
The consumer affairs
bureau, which brought the
case to court, had previously
snagged the SDM on several
minor charges, but never
before on one so monumental.
The fine of $10,000 was
apparently the largest one
ever levied in Canada for
false advertising. A nice,
token gesture. A nice feather
in the bureau's hat.
But the point is this:
regardless of their day in
court, regardless of the fine,
and even though they might
never advertise falsely again,
the friendly folks at Shoppers'
Drug Mart will continue to rip
the public off.
An elementary concept of
economics     is     that      a
monopoly, in eliminating the
competition, has the consumer in its sweaty little
hand.
And SDM is well on its way
to being such a monopoly. It
has already acquired enough
power, in buying out all
surrounding competition,
that it is already getting away
with murder.
A $10,000 fine is pocket
money to a multi-million-
dollar operation like this
company; they can make that
up with a few extra hours
overtime.
If you happen to have any
first-hand reports of rip-offs
at the hands of the SDM,
contact The Ubyssey.
If you don't want to talk to
The Ubyssey, call your
friendly bureau of consumer
affairs at 666-1151. j
'Fear and anger closely
connected for women'
By ROBIN BURGESS
"I choose anger."
So women's studies speaker Shelagh Day
told her audience Tuesday night.
In a highly personal, often poetic presentation to about 350 people in SUB ballroom, Day
told why she, as a woman, has made this
decision.
For her and other women fear and anger are
very closely connected, said Day.
"Fear makes me blank out anger.
"Often I only know that I'm angry afterwards."
With the realization comes angry fantasy.
In her fantasies, said Day, she is alone on a
platform with a megaphone before phalanxes
of men. But the reality is quite different.
"I protect myself because I'm afraid my
friends will not like me if I am angry."
Instead, she learned to deal with anger as a
"daily dose," she said. "The daily dose is hard
enough."
Day confessed to the audience:
"Somewhere in myself I'm afraid of being
crazed with anger — consumed."
For some people it is humiliating to turn to
anger, she said, and described her own
humiliation over losing her job.
(Day, a former UBC Arts I instructor was
one of a number of instructors who were not
rehired last year.)
But now that she sees it as part of a pattern
of sexism she no longer feels humiliated but
angry.
This is a relatively new insight for her, Day
said. Anger is something she learned to
sublimate by being "morally superior" or
"funny".
"To be morally superior means that I be
nice when others aren't — thick-skinned.
"I really dislike the stand more and more. It
is very tsk tsk — very saintly."
" 'Shove over' is a lot better than 'tsk tsk' ",
she said. "I dignify men with my anger."
Being a clown is also a defense, Day said, and
wondered aloud if she will ever "be brave
enough to give up being funny".
Day told her audience she learned to show
sexists what is wrong with their thinking by
pointing out the ridiculous.
"If I stop being a toughy now I will have to
learn to deal with my own fears and theirs,"
she said.
In order to survive she has rejected the male
vision of the world and substituted her own
vision, she said — a woman's vision.
"I am fortunate that I have friends who are
men who will share my vision. They share it
because it is nourishing for- them and relief for
them too."
Day said she knows that those who share her
vision are a minority.
"The world is a bunch of bad ideas acted out
by men and women as accomplices."
The only response is anger, she said.
"I expect women to stand up and refuse to
be victims and men to stand up and be vic-
timizers."
But the anger must be "clean anger", she
cautioned, not "dirty anger".
She elaborated: Dirty anger is indirect and
unlocated. "It comes out of confusion. It moves
over to hatred."
"Dirty anger" comes from feeling
powerless.
"She is given such restricted opportunity to
use power it is hard for a woman to realize she
is powerful."
The power lies in "clean, clearing anger,"
said Day.
"I want the clarity and power of this anger,
this vision," she told the audience.
Women's studies is presenting a panel
discussion on welfare women Tuesday, at 7:30
p.m., in SUB ballroom.
Of shrinks and racists
By FORREST NELSON
People believe in psychology
like racists believe in racism
radical therapist Phil Brown
said Thursday.
Students and professors
jammed Buch 104 to hear
Brown say he no longer considers himself a radical
therapist because he no longer
believes in therapy.
Brown attacked many
sacred cows, among them
Gestalt groups.
"Instead of revivals people
go to Gestalt groups. It's still
the same thing — the opiate of
the people.
"A clinical psychologist is in a
position of power."
When treatments were being
developed the experimentors
were getting results but:
"instead of medicine, they
were finding social control."
Brown said: "When Freud
said the superego acted to
control instincts like controlling prisoners, he was
really to the point.
"Personal acts and political
acts are the same. Politics talk
about human relations."
If a person feels a restraint
from masturbation or from
gay expression — that's
political, Brown said.
During the Victorian period,
despite their sexual ethic:
"there   was   a   whole   un
derground of sexual activity,
mostly among the poorer
class."
Freud's work was "really a
codification of Victorian
ethics. Keeping it up scientifically, keeps it up socially.
He based it on made up
categories like the oedipal
myth.
"A lot of people (who went to
Brown for help) thought their
friends didn't masturbate,"
Brown said. "It helped a lot to
find out they weren't unique."
He added: "Not only is
mental illness a social concept,
but revolution is eradicating it.
Mental health is revolution.
Revolution is mental health."
# City Nights Theatre
mBk. 150 E. Hastings - 685-5831
TONIGHT & SATURDAY
John Ford's 1941 Classic "TOBACCO ROAD" - 7:30 p.m.
Prime of Miss Jean Brodie — 9 p.m.
Maggie Smith (Best Actress Award)
MIDNIGHT SHOW TONIGHT
Battle Circus with Humphrey Bogart
STARTS SUNDAY FOR 1 WEEK ONLY
Salt of the Earth - 7:30 p.m.
MONTEREY POP—9 p.m.
^ 4^ with Jimi Hendrix, Janice Joplin, Ravi Shankar,     f%*\ ^
QQ^        The Who, Jefferson Airplane, Otis Redding        WW?
* * and many more
THE VILLAGE RESTAURANT
Featuring the finest in
CHINESE AND CANADIAN CUISINE
Luncheons and Dinners
DINING ROOM
FULLY AIR CONDITIONED FOR YOUR COMFORT!
Mon.-Fri. 10 a.m.-9 p.m.
Sat.-Sun and Holidays - 10 a.m.-8 p.m.
TAKE-OUT SERVICE
5778 University Blvd.
(Vz block from Gymnasium)
224-0640
«f W?t\^mm\^t\M^t\Wr1^m^^?t\Wr^^r\y^r1iymm
i
m
1
1
a
i
a
I
^AUTOMATIC TRANSMISSIONS
Over 17 Years Experience
COMPLETE SERVICE BAND ADJUSTMENT
ALL MAKES & MODELS
FREE TRANSMISSION INSPECTION
ONE DAY SERVICE
FREE PICK-UP & DELIVERY
We Specialize in TRANSMISSIONS -
7776/ Are Our Only Business
879-9710
res 874-1784
18th & Main - West of Jim Pattison's
Vancouver, B.C.
PRE-CHRISTAAAS
SALE '
YEARS OF LISTENING ENJOYMENT in this
QUALITY RECEIVER from PIONEER
with its 20 watts of Music Power, this handsome unit is a fine
choice for any home music centre.
aSKv"?- -cSriw
$
298
For an additional $89.95 you
may purchase two more AMX
77 speakers and convert this
system to Quadraphonic
sound reproduction.
NOW TWO LOCATIONS TO
SERVE YOU BETTER
SEE OUR NEW STORE AT
555 W. Broadway
876-4414
GARRARD 40-B
Automatic TURNTABLE
complete with base, top and
magnetic cartridge with diamond
stylus.
EreaOfe Semi ly
■W Commercial Electronics ltd
1305 Burrard St. 685-0345
555 West Broodwoy 876-4414
FREE PARKING AT THE REAR Friday, November 17, 1972
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 3
Phillips-small T liberal
This is the third in a series of interviews with
civic candidates by
Christine Krawcyzk
I was a few minutes late for my interview with
Alderman Art Phillips, The Electors' Action
Movement mayoralty candidate.
His press agent was however waiting for me at
the top of the stairs to lead me to "Art's" office
should I have gotten lost in the corridors of city hall.
On the way I was told that "Art" had been
detained on council business, but would be joining us
shortly for lunch at the White Spot.
THE UBYSSEY: What are your views on the third
crossing specifically and the general problem of
transportation in Vancouver?
PHILLIPS: I've been opposed to the Swan Wooster
proposal for several reasons. One of the main
reasons being that it would dump a great volume of
traffic right into the downtown core.
It would make it much easier for North Shore
commuters to commute in their private
automobiles.
Commuter traffic into the downtown core should
be by means of rapid transportation.
First off I think we should improve the bus
transportation immensely. We can do this at a
relatively modest investment and at some increased
annual operating costs.
The Greater Vancouver Regional District is
already negotiating to take over the bus service from
B.C. Hydro, on terms that are acceptable so that it
doesn't hit the property tax too hard.
I am in favor of that and want to see that as the
first step.
More experiments such as Park and Ride and
Dial-a-Bus should be instituted.
The second step we visualize is to develop a light
rapid transit system, which means not the capacity
of Montreal or San Francisco but a system that
would perhaps have half that capacity and be more
appropriate to tke size of Vancouver and the
downtown the size that we visualize for Vancouver.
That sort of a system would probably utilize the
Arbutus and Central Park right of way leading
ultimately out to the Airport and leading out to New
Westminster as our first priority.
QUESTION: How long would it take to complete the
system that you have described?
ANSWER: It would take eight or ten years if we got
going on it right today.
QUESTION: What are your views on the growth and
development in the city.
ANSWER: I visualize a change in emphasis here
from the direction we have been taking in the past,
namely trying to make it possible for people to live
closer to where they work.
That involves two steps. Developing some inner
city housing such as in False Creek so that people
can live closer to the downtown area and also
developing some office subcentres.
The industrial jobs in Greater Vancouver are
decentralized now. Our residential growth will have
to go up into the uplands in Surrey and Delta,
Coquitlam and Burnaby and to a certain extent the
North Shore.
We would also like some of the job opportunities
decentralized into these areas.
This would mean that instead of planning a city
where people lived 30 miles from the downtown
core and there was a heavy concentration of work in
the core you would plan a city where you de-
emphasize the core.
It would still grow but at a much slower rate than
past projections.
You would deliberately encourage sub-centres so
that people would not have to travel as far. I think
this is a better alternative than any massive transportation system.
QUESTION: Wouldn't this give a much larger
responsibility for planning to the Greater Vancouver
Regional District than the case at present? If so how
do you see that shift taking place?
ANSWER: The structures are there now. The GVRD
already has the planning function, it should assume
the transportation function.
There is no reason why this should not happen.
The political people who sit on GVRD are pushing for
it.
.QUESTION: You have talked a little about the
development of Vancouver but I would like you to be
PHILLIPS ... restrict development
more specific and talk about the trends you envision
for the development of the downtown peninsula.
ANSWER: There is approximately 90,000 people
working there now and the projections are for
something around 170,000 working there by the year
2,000.
We would like to slow down the rate growth in the
downtown by cutting down on the job opportunities in
the core.
We should amend the zoning regulations so that
there is more concentration of amenities in downtown for people who work and live in downtown.
Many open spaces, parks, pedestrian malls on
Granville Street. Much more concentration on
pedestrian facilities on ground level.
Walter Hardwick and I have been fighting the
Granville Street battle with the developers of block
42-52. We have got them to agree to build retail stores
on ground level continuously along Granville Street.
This is very important. We don't want a continuation of the kind of development where Eaton's
is, which tends to repel people at the ground level and
discourages pedestrian activity.
QUESTION: Would you consider banning traffic
altogether from certain areas of the city?
ANSWER: There are two places we could put in
pedestrian malls, Granville St. in downtown and
Pender Street in Chinatown.
I think mainly what we want to do is develop a
good public transit system.
I like the trend we are going to in Gastown where
we have not shut out automobiles but widened the
sidewalks and narrowed the pavement. The merchants there don't want to bar automobiles. They
think it lends some interest, excitement and action to
the city.
QUESTION: How about development in the West
End?
ANSWER: Council just passed a resolution to reduce
the density standard.
This is just a first step. We will be passing bylaws
to alter the density in various parts of the West End.
I would also like to see more services introduced in
the West End like day care centres.
QUESTION: The present City Administration has
been criticized for its welfare policies, particularly
its discriminatory policy against single unemployed
men.
ANSWER: I think that with the new provincial
government we are going to be able to review the
whole welfare situation, and come up with a much
more workable and humane system.
If we are elected on December 13th one of our first
priorities will be to get together with the provincial
government and discuss all that.
QUESTION: Another area in which the present city
administration has been criticized is in its running of
the police force. What are your views on that?
ANSWER: I think there has been some improvement
in police-community relations since the unfortunate
incident of the Gastown riot. There is however room
for much more improvement.
We should have more police on walking beats
particular communities to enable them to get to
know the community better.
QUESTION: How about Civilian Police review
boards?
ANSWER: I don't see any need for that at this time. I
think we can improve the relations between the
police and the community in other ways.
I think the structure of the police commission
should be changed. It should be enlarged to seven
and be made more representative of the community.
QUESTION: Do you think there is any validity to the
statement that City Hall is run by its bureaucracy? If
so what would you do about it?
ANSWER: It seems to me that's true. It's due to
political abdication on the part of the weak political
people.
I can't say that I blame the bureaucracy for
taking over if there's a vacuum there.
We hope to have much stronger people elected
this time which will eliminate the vacuum.
QUESTION: Would you like to see any changes in the
size and structure of council?
ANSWER: Yes. I would like to see area representation on council.
Two-thirds of the members of council should be
elected from wards and one-third at large. The idea
behind retaining the one-third at large is to ensure
that council doesn't become totally concerned with
neighbourhood issues.
I would like to experiment with that kind of a
system, and if that doesn't work out well then we can
go to a complete ward system.
I would not like to see a greatly enlarged council.
My preference would be to enlarge it by two making
it 12 aldermen plus the mayor.
QUESTION: What kind of pollution control
legislation can we expect from a TEAM administration?
ANSWER: We would certainly be tougher on
pollution control than has been the case.
The GVRD has largely taken over legislating in
this area.
The enforcement has to be strengthened because
there are people violating pollution control
legislation.
We must first tighten up on the enforcement of the
existing laws and if they prove inadequate we tighten
them up.
QUESTION: There is a great shortage of low cost
housing in the city, and what does exist has proven
inadequate. What would you do to alleviate this
problem?
ANSWER: The GVRD has taken over housing and
has hired a housing director.
I think we want to look at a much greater variety
of low cost housing. We want to avoid the big Raymer
type projects, that have proven to be social disasters.
I think low-cost housing should be scattered in
communities where, they don't dominate. We have
tried this in Champlain Heights, where some low cost
housing has been inserted in some cases almost
invisibly.
QUESTION: Do you plan any tax reform in the city?
ANSWER: I think the main prospect of tax relief for
homeowners will come from the province if the
provincial government implements its proposal to
take school taxes out of the hands of property
owners, and to take over a greater share of welfare
costs.
QUESTION: Do you think that there is a need for
more people participation in Council? If so, how?
ANSWER: We have talked about some priorities.
Changing the time of meetings to afternoon and
evening would allow more people to attend.
Afternoons could be spent on administrative
business and evening could be devoted to hearing
delegations.
We would also set up an information service at the
entrance to city hall.
We would decentralize planning giving the
communities a much greater responsibility.
Another thing we have talked about is holding
council meetings in the community.
QUESTION: How do you evaluate your chances for
victory at this time?
ANSWER: I think the last two elections indicate that
there is a strong desire for change.
Our position is very strong. We are the principal
alternative to the people that are there now.
I think that we represent the kind of thinking that
people want to see in the city. A much greater concentration on people and livability in the city. Page 4
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, November 17, 1972
No apathy
It's been a long time since UBC has had a real folk-hero.
Folk heroes have a strict set of qualifications that few
possess. It goes without saying that they must be honest,
forthright and true, but that is only the beginning.
A folk hero must champion the interests of the people,
through all adversity, with no thought of personal reward
other than that of victory.
A folk hero is something like a postman in this way —
through rain, snow, sleet and dark of night he delivers.
And, of course, a folk hero must do something great.
There is no room for little victories in the folk hero trade.
To become a hero, he must prove to all those lesser
people  he  loves and fights for that there is a way out.
Finally, a folk hero works alone. It is part of his nature.
This is the curse of the folk hero. It is the silent terror
that haunts him every waking moment and that turns his
nightly dreams into tragic nightmares.
It is the plight of a mortal god and it makes lesser men
quake and turn away.
Nathan Ganapathi never turned away.
Nathan Ganapathi is a staunchly resolute fighter for the
people. With clear vision and an unfailing grasp of the
inherent exploitation of the speeding driver, Ganapathi
proved it can be done.
Lord, lord, he shot Ray Hadfield down.
For 16 months Ganapathi neglected his UBC law books
in a long and arduous fight for justice in the streets. Because
of his unflinching war on the senile mandarins in the
legislature and the motor vehicle branch, their highway
robbery has been stopped, their blood-thirsty cries demanding our licences and our money have been stilled.
There are a lot of lesser men and women at UBC and
across this asphalt province that owe Nathan Ganapathi
more than they will«ver be able to express.
While slow-moving Victoria, with its Model T's and
horse carts that rarely surpass the speed of rolling molasses,
fumes and mourns in its confusion, the people of the
province must take to the streets in joyous celebration of
the victory of Nathan the Great.
And they must vow to themselves and each other, over
and over again, that nevermore will they allow the cruel
punishment of the valiant, courageous driver who dares to
defy the unrealistic and oppressive speed limit.
And with their vow they must muse upon the man who
challenged the unchallengeable, who championed the
outcast, who never let up his fierce, lonely attack on the
unconscionable actions of those who would restrict our
fundamental right to freedom of movement.
Nathan Ganapathi is a folk hero of the most exalted
order. His name must be a siren for us all.
B.W.
C,
'ontrolUd
** it it  by Hit,
o$ $oclit-^w j
t^i's   on\firstly
-Series •Me/K netds
(*+ +kc <xf)t*sc
a? H\c nctMs
*? +\r\L~   flUffc   )
&ir\cL as ztfck
H an   >*$+-ruMtn-f
o«P  oppress ten .
k)W Coold he
Letters
Never
again
I hesitate to criticize The Ubyssey for what must have been an
oversight in their Nov. 10 issue,
however I feel certain criticism is
necessary so that future mistakes
may be discouraged.
The matter of my concern is;
that upon my thorough investigation of the Friday publication I
found no mention of the Thunderbird hockey games on the
evenings of Friday and Saturday,
Nov. 10 and 11. Consequently I
missed the Friday night game and
only by good fortune did I find
out about and attend what turned
out to be a very good Saturday
night game.
My criticism is that The Ubyssey has been promoting an image
of itself as being a champion of
the ripped-off student. However,
in view of the fact we pay for
TWF UBYSSEY
NOVEMBER  17, 1972
Published Tuesdays and Fridays throughout the university year by
the Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C. Editorial
opinions are those of the writer and not of the AMS or the
university administration. Member, Canadian University Press. The
Ubyssey publishes Page Friday, a weekly commentary and review.
The Ubyssey's editorial offices are located in room 241K of the
Student Union Building.
Editorial departments, 228-2307; Sports, 228-2305; advertising,
228-3977.
Co-editors: John Andersen, Jan O'Brien
"Let there be apathy," intoned Jan O'Brien to the multitudes. "As
indeed there is Ganapathi," added Berton Woodward, crossing himself.
"Look, there surely is apathy!" cried an awed John Andersen, pointing
over the heads of Kent Spencer, Ed Dubois, Lesley Krueger and Christine
Krawcyzk, as they brawled on the easterly mountainside. Mike Sasges
covered his eyes, kneeling behind a suddenly enlightened Forrest Nelson.
Gary Coull rose in a surge of religious fervor, to dance ecstatically with a
trembling Simon Truelove. Only Robin Burgess looked to the east. "There
surely is truth," said she.
both the hockey games and The
Ubyssey it would seem The Ubyssey itself is ripping us off, i.e. by
neglecting the obvious, implied
responsibility of informing its
student readers of the events and
services available to them.
Ultimately though, things will
get better and this will never
happen again.
Scott Cameron
commerce 3
You're right, it will never happen again.
Alarm
Re false alarms cost $1500.
We, the undersigned, have two
complaints with regards to the
report made by the UBC fire
department's deputy fire chief,
John McKay in Oct. 31, 1972
Ubyssey.
(1) The improper use of name:
We as the engineering students
would like to be referred to as
engineering students rather than
"gears".
(2) The generalization of report or an almost libelous report:
"... if a bunch of gears...,"
such name calling should be avoided as it would undoubtedly give a
distorted image about engineering
students. Also such action could
be  libelous unless concrete evi
dence could be presented to show
that the "individuals" were indeed
representatives of the engineering
student body.
Lastly, we strongly advise that
the deputy fire chief be more
careful in the use of words when
making future public announcements.
disconcerted engineering students
14 signatures
Pro CYVR
In Tuesday's edition of The
Ubyssey, Linda Hossie states that
comments by Bob Bakshi and
Stuart Foster "cost them their
jobs" at CYVR. This quotation,
which tends to produce visions of
weeping wives and starving children, seems rather inappropriate in
the given context. CYVR staff
members are not, as the quote
seems to imply, paid for their
efforts.
CYVR does not have, as far as
I know, set policies on the use of
'distasteful' words. If there is such
a policy it is, fortunately, not
strictly enforced. Restrictions on
the unjustified application of such
words upon individuals, however,
seems reasonable. It is not a question of good or bad taste, but
merely one of respect between
individuals. If Bakshi and Foster
from The Varsity
had attacked the AMS and/oi
AMS officials on concrete issue;
with evidence to back themselves
up, the story would likely have
had a different conclusion.
Bob Bakshi's statement thai
CYVR radio policy "is more rigid
than any downtown" is completely false. He should realize
that a commercial radio station,
because of careful programming,
would not have allowed their tape
to be aired at all. The CYVR jocks
are given room for self-endeavoi
which is simply not available in a
commercial station.
Finally, radio stations are nol
to be judged, hopefully, as libera,
or conservative by the number oi
profanities per hour.
Please note that I have been
very tasteful and have not mentioned the word 'fuck' once during this entire letter.
George Abbott
arts 2
iff ore pro
I was one of the unfortunate
few to overhear the Bakshi-Fostei
program while browsing through
SUB last week. I could not tolerate it for more than five minutes.
Slander is too generous a de-
See page 13 l o a
Page
f Friday
HH5
<Smttt furt.
KE?T    BV      JfA. $«*P-
DIFFERENT TYPES of logs are explored this week beginning pf3. Drama
Show entertaining
but that's all folks
How the Other Half
Loves is not about
homosexuals. Alan Ayck-
bourn's romping comedy,
now appearing at the
Playhouse, cavorts
through the loving lives of
Ihe social classes and
reveals that neither half
loves any more nor any
better than the other.
It's a slick, polished
production. From start to
finish, it's one mad dash
of snappy non sequiturs
and flashy staging.
Humor is light and farcical, it bubbles and
percolates, sprinkling the
entire play with puns and
bathroom slapstick.
Superficial and saccharine,   but   long   on
entertainment, it will
amuse you if one point is
kept in mind: don't attempt to make more of
what the play says.
The story line is a
tangled web of miscon-
nections, crossed-wires
and misunderstandings.
The assorted love affairs,
the rendezvous, the alibis
are enmeshed in a net of
twists and complications,
all of which are made
believable thanks to the
fine acting. A critical
evaluation of what goes
on in the play is absurd; it
is not to be taken
seriously.
Frank and Fiona
Foster (Paxton
Whitehead and Barbara
PAT GAGE, GRAEME CAMPBELL
. . . energetic class comedy
Gordon) are the refined,
reserved and wealthy
English couple. Bob and
Teresa Phillips (Graeme
Campbell and Patricia
Gage) play the brash
beer-drinking, swearing
middle-class couple who
socialize with the
Fosters, but can't match
their style. William and
Mary Featherstone
(Owen Foran and Shirley
Broderick) are the third
and final couple, a
middle-class one moving
up the social ladder.
The stage is a split-set
of two houses, and
Stephen Geaghan's set
design and Richard
Ouzounian's direction
convey this with a
minimum of confusion.
Although the contrasts
between households could
be made more distinct,
and the boundaries
separating characters
become rather nebulous
at times, the dialogue
distinguishes who is
where, and when.
While the juxtaposition
of different times and
locations is easily adjusted to, it makes the
play unnecessarily
complicated.
The dinner party in act
1 is one example. William
and Mary have dinner
simultaneously with the
Fosters on Thursday and
the Phillipses on Friday.
No dramatic purpose is
served by this. It is not
essential to the plot
development, nor does
the information from one
situation lend itself to the
other. It is a device for
entertainment, and
nothing more.
—Steve Morris
TUXEDO
RENTAL & SALES
+ O.B. & S.B. Tuxedos
+ O.B. & S.B. White Coats
+ D.B. & S.B. Suits
+ COLORED SHIRTS
Parking at Rear
BLACK & LEE
Formal Wear Rentals
631 Howe 688-2481
ABRAXAS
CRAFTS
leather belts & bags ® batik
^ pottery © jewellery © macrame]
stained glass © candles
DISCOUNT WITH AMS CARD
& THIS AD
Mon-Sat 10:30-5:30
Fri 'til 9:00
1124 Robson St       688-3979
The Killing of Sister George
by FRANK MARCUS
An M.A. Thesis Production
Directed By Don Briard
November 22-25-8:00 p.m.
Tickets: $2.00
Students: $1.00
Tickets: Room 207 — Frederic Wood Theatre
FRITZ PERLS
FILM SERIES
Eight Films
NOV. 21, 28, & DEC. 5
at
Eric Hamber
Secondary School
5025 Willow St. - 7:30 p.m.
$2.00
Discussion led by
DAVID BERG of G est act
SPAGHETTI HOUSE LTD.
4450 West 10th Ave.
Hot Delicious Tasty Pizzas
- 22 DIFFERENT FLAVORS -
BARBECUED SPARERIBS - CHARBROILED STEAKS
FREE DELIVERY - Right to Your Door
Phone 224-1720 - 224-6336
HOURS - MON. to THURS. 11 a.m. to 3 a.m.
,FRI. & SAT. 11 a.m to 4 a.m. - SUNDAY 4 p.m. to 2 a.m.,
BUYING OR SELLING
REAL ESTATE?
Ph. Mrs. Joan Bentley-224-0255
RUTHERFORD-McRAE
733-8181
rushant
■* CAMERAS     *
4538 W.10 224-5858
DISCOUNT PRICES
WHITE TOWER PIZZA
* SPAGHETTI HOUSE LTD.
iSteaks-Pizza-Spaghetti-Lasagna-Ravioli-Rigatoni-Chicken Cacciatorell
OPEN
Mon. - Thurs.
4 p.m. - 3 a.m.
Fri. - Sat.
4 p.m. - 3 a.m.
Sun.
4 p.m.-1 a.m.
TAKE OUT ORDERS ___   t%mf%t\
HOME DELIVERY    738-9520
DINING
LOUNGE
FULL
FACILITIES
3618 W. Broadway'
(at Dunbar)
738-1113'
UNIV. OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
RING DAY
NOVEMBER 20, 1972
These exclusive designs were created for the University of British
Columbia. One side features THUNDERBIRDS in bold letters
above the Thunderbird. The other side pictures your personal
yeardates and the college seal. Many options are available for
students to personalize their official college ring. The ring in the
centre also shows the college seal. THE UNIVERSITY OF
BRITISH COLUMBIA is spelled out around the seal.
Your official National School Services
Representative John Haines will be at The
Bookstore Monday between the hours of
9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. to give you personal
service.
the bookstore
WHETHER YOUR BUDGET
IS
^
-  •  .Jii
WE HAVE
A DIAMOND
JUST FOR YOU
The only difference fn our diamonds
is the size. The beauty Is the same
whether the diamond is small or large.
Choose a diamond to fit your budget
from our complete selection.
0.0. O&a*
LIMITED
REGISTERED JEWELLER, AMERICAN GEM SOCIETY
Granville at Pender Since 1904
Page Friday, 2
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, November 17, 1972 Keeping a journal
In today's Page Friday we look at journals.
C. Wright Mill tells us about scholarly journals.
We have a journal from a male student which
discusses his intellectual development and the
reading he is doing.
We have a journal from a former Arts I student
who started with Mill's definition and evolved it to
fit her needs.
We have journals from two women in a women's
studies seminar.
The student journals are anonymous because we
believe it gives them more authenticity and allows
freedom of thought.
The following article On Keeping a Journal by C.
Wright Mill is adapted from the appendix On Intellectual Craftsmanship from The Sociological
Imagination, New York, 1959. It is used by Ellen
Tollman's Arts I seminar.
At is best to begin, I think, by reminding you, the
beginning student, that the most admirable
thinkers within the scholarly community you have
chosen to join do not split their work from their
lives. They seem to take both too seriously to allow
such dissociation, and they want to use each for the
enrichment of the other. Of course, such a split is
the prevailing convention among men in general,
deriving, I suppose, from the hollowness of the
work which men in general now do. But you will
have recognized that as a scholar you have the
exceptional opportunity of designing a way of living
which will encourage the habits of good workmanship. Scholarship is a choice of how to live as
well as a choice of a career; whether he knows it or
not, the intellectual workman forms his own self as
he works toward the perfection of this craft; to
realize his own potentialities, and any opportunities
that come his way, he constructs a character which
has as its core the qualities of the good workman.
What this means is that you must learn to use
your life experience in your intellectual work:
continually to examine and interpret it. In this
sense craftsmanship is the centre of yourself and
you are personally involved in every intellectual
product upon which you may work. To say that you
can 'have experience', means, for one thing, that
your past plays into and affects your present, and
that it defines your capacity for future experience.
As a serious student, you have to control this rather
elaborate interplay, to capture what you experience and sort it out; only in this way can you
hope to use it to guide and test your reflection, and
in the process shape yourself as an intellectual
craftsman. But how can you do this? One answer is:
you must keep a journal as do many thinkers and in
such a journal as I am going to describe, there is
joined personal experience and professional activities, studies under way and studies planned. In
this journal, you, as an intellectual craftsman, will
try to^et together what you are doing intellectually
and what you are experiencing as a person. Here
you will not be afraid to use your experience and
relate it directly to various work in progress. By
serving as a check on repetitious work, your journal
also enables you to conserve your energy. It also
encourages you to capture 'fringe-thoughts' various
ideas which may be by-prouducts of everyday life,
snatches of conversation overheard on the street,
or, for that matter, dreams. Once noted, these may
lead to more systematic thinking, as well as lend
intellectual relevance to more directed experience.
J.ou will have often noticed how carefully accomplished thinkers treat their own minds, how
closely they observe their development and
organize their experience. The reason they
treasure their smallest experiences is that, in the
course of a lifetime, modern man has so very little
personal experience and yet experience is so important as a source of original intellectual work. To
be able to trust yet to be skeptical of your own
experience, I have come to believe, is one mark of
the mature workman. This ambiguous confidence
is indispensable to originality in any intellectual
pursuit, and the journal is one way by which you
can develop and justify such confidence.
By keeping an adequate journal and thus
developing self-reflective habits, you learn how to
keep your inner world awake. Whenever you feel
strongly about events or ideas you must try not to
let them pass from your mind, but instead to formulate them for your journal and in so doing draw
out their implications, show yourself either how
foolish these feelings or ideas are, or how they
might be articulated into productive shape. The
journal also helps you build up the habit of writing.
You cannot 'keep your hand in' if you do not write
something at least every week. In developing the
journal, you can experiment as a writer and thus,
as they say, develop your powers of expression. To
maintain a journal is to engage in the controlled
experience.
IL
/nder various topics in your journal there are
ideas, personal notes, excerpts from books,
bibliographical items and outlines of projects. As
you pursue your intellectual work you will notice
that no one project ever dominates it, or sets the
master categories in which it is arranged. In fact,
the use of the journal encourages expansion of the
categories which you use in your thinking. And the
way in which these categories change, some being
dropped and others being added — is an index of
your intellectual progress and breadth. Eventually,
the journal might come to be arranged according to
several large projects, having many sub-projects
that change from year to year.
All this involves the taking of notes. You will
have to acquire the habit of taking a large volume
of notes from any worth-while book you read —
although, I have to say, you may get better work out
of yourself when you read really bad books. The
first step in translating experience, either of other
men's writing, or of your own life, into the intellectual sphere, is to give it form. Merely to name
an item of experience often invites you to explain it;
the mere taking of a note from a book is often a prod
to reflection. At the same time, of course, the taking
of a note is a great aid in comprehending what you
are reading.
Your notes may turn out, as mine do, to be of two
sorts: in reading certain very important books you
try to grasp the structure of the writer's argument,
and take notes accordingly; but more frequently,
and after a few years of independent work, rather
than read entire books, you will very often read
parts of many books from the point of view of some
particular theme or topic in which you are interested and concerning which you have plans in
your file. Therefore, you will take notes which do
not fairly represent the books you read. You are
using this particular idea, this particular fact, for
the realization of your own projects.
points? — cannot be made until existing materials
are re-worked and general hypothetical statements
constructed.
Now, among 'existing materials', I found in the
journal three types relevant to my study of the
elite: several theories having to do with the topic;
materials already worked up by others as evidence
of those theories; and materials already gathered
and in various stages of accessible centralization,
but not yet made theoretically relevant. Only after
completing a first draft of a theory with the aid of
such existing materials as these can I efficiently
locate my own pivotal assertions and hunches and
design researches to test them — and maybe I will
not have to, although of course I know I will later
have to shuttle back and forth between existing
materials and my own research. Any final
statement must not only 'cover the data' so far as
the data are available and known to me, but must
also in some way, positively or negatively, take into
account the available theories. Sometimes this
'taking into account' of an idea is easily done by a
simple confrontation of the idea with overturning or
supporting fact; sometimes a detailed analysis or
qualification is needed. Sometimes I can arrange
the available theories systematically as a range of
choices, and so allow their range to organize the
problem itself. But sometimes I allow their range
or organize the problem itself. But sometimes I
allow such theories to come up only in my own
arrangement, in quite various contexts. At any
rate, in the book on the elite I had to take into account the work of such men as Mosca, Schumpeter,
Veblen, Marx, Lasswell, Michel, Weber, and
Pareto.
Bu
Jut how is this 'literary' journal used in intellectual production? The maintenance of such a
journal is intellectual production. It is a continually
growing store of facts and ideas, from the most
vague to the most finished, for example, the first
thing I did upon deciding on a study of the elite was
to make a crude outline based on a listing of the
types of people that I wished to understand.
After making my crude outline I examined my
entire journal, not only those parts of it that obviously bore on my topic, but also those which
seemed to have no relevance whatsoever.
Imagination is often successfully invited by putting
together hitherto isolated items, by finding unsuspected connections. I made new units in the
journal for this particular range of problems, which
of course, led to new arrangements of other parts of
the journal.
As you re-arrange a filing system or a journal,
you often find that you are, as it were, loosening
your imagination. Apparently this occurs by means
of your attempt to combine various ideas and notes
on different topics. It is a sort of logic of combination, and 'chance' sometimes plays a curiously
large part in it. In a relaxed way, you try to engage
your intellectual resources with the new themes.
Good work in social science today is not, and
usually cannot be, made up of one clear-cut empirical 'research'. It is, rather, composed of a good
many studies which at key points anchor general
statements about the shape and the trend of the
subject. So the decision — what are these anchor
in looking over some of the notes on these
writers, I find that they offer three types of
statement: (a) from some, you learn directly by
restating systematically what the man says on
given points or as a whole; (b) some you accept or
refute, giving reasons and arguments; (c) others
you use as a source of suggestions for your own
elaborations and projects. This involves grasping a
point and then asking: How can I put this into
testable shape, and how can I test it? How can I use
this as a centre from which to elaborate — as a
perspective from which descriptive details emerge
as relevant? It is in this handling of existing ideas,
of course, that you feel yourself in continuity with
previous work.
But, you may ask, how do ideas come? How is
the imagination spurred to put all the images and
facts together, to make images relevant and lend
meaning to facts? I do not think I can really answer
that; all I can do is talk about the general conditions
and a few simple techniques which have seemed to
increase my chances to come out with something.
JLhe sociological imagination, I remind you, in
considerable part consists of the capacity to shift
from one prespective to another, and in the process
to build up an adequate view of a total society and of
its components. It is this imagination, of course,
that sets off the social scientist from the mere
technician. Adequate technicians can be trained in
a few years. The sociological imagination can also
be cultivated; certainly it seldom occurs without a
great deal of often routine work. Yet there is an
unexpected quality about it, perhaps because its
essence is the combination of ideas that no one
expected were combinable — say, a mess of ideas
from German philosophy and British economics.
There is a playfulness of mind back of such combining as well as a truly fierce drive to make sense
of the world, which the technician as such usually
lacks. Perhaps he is too well trained, too precisely
trained. Since one can be trained only in what is
already known, training sometimes incapacitates
one from learning new ways; it makes one rebel
against what is bound to be at first loose and even
sloppy. But you must cling to such vague images
and notions, if they are yours, and you must work
them out. For it is in such forms that original ideas,
if any, almost always first appear.
Friday, November 17, 1972
THE       UBYSSEY
Page Friday, 3 rushant
** CAMERAS     *
4538 W.10 224-5858
DISCOUNT PRICES	
r ft
RESTAOTANT"
NOV. 16-19
SUB AUD. 50c
APPEARING  NIGHTLY ^**
KIBA
AT
IMfflGE
FULL FACILITIES
WEEKDAYS $1.00
WEEKENDS «i qn "book now for
VTCCPi^iHUJ   *I.3U y0UR  CHRISTMAS   PARTY"
DOORS OPEN 9:00 661   Hornby  St.    687-1547
RlVlERA Men's "Hair Stylists
"NEW NATURAL HAIR STYLING"
- MANICURIST -
SPECIAL STUDENT DISCOUNT
MONDAY TO THURSDAY - 20% OFF
650 Seymour St (opp. The Bay)
Phones:
684-6910
684-4611
FOUR WORDS . . .
AND THE FIRST WORD IS
TUMBLE EXTINCT
PLAYHOUSE TWO PRESENTS
^r^   BULL DURHAM
)S+J BY JEREMY WATSON
Q. E. PLAYHOUSE RECITAL ROOM
(THROUGH THE MAIN DOOR OF THE PLAYHOUSE-DOWNSTAIRS)
November 20-25 - 6:00 p.m. For tickets 684-5361
theBOOKFINDER
• COLES NOTES
SCHAUMS
• NEW AND USED TEXTS
POSTERS • CANADIANA
WE SELL BOOKS ON CONSIGNMENT!
4444 W. 10th Ave.
228-8933
THE CANADIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION
WISH THEY DIDN'T HAVE TO PRESENT
FREE!!!
DR. BUNDOLO'S
PANDEMONIUM MEDICINE
SHOW
LIVE RADIO COMEDY
STARRING: STEVE WOODMAN
BILL BUCK
MARIA GROPPER
BILLRIETER
TODAY NOON        sub theatre
SHOW BEGINS AT 12:30 SHARP
Journals
<
Summer rain
The following is an excerpt from a woman's
journal. She began keeping a journal as an
assignment for Arts I and continues today.
JULY 10
It has been raining for a week on our plastic
roof.
JULY 11
Lonnie, I tell you, the rain you wouldn't believe.
Four days now and we are mildewing in all
directions. From the time we got up this morning
until now late at night there has been a constant
down drench. It is quite mad.
Energy levels seem to dissipate slightly in such
wet weather. Some sunshine is needed. Some
sunshine for drying and baking our bodies, some
silent sunshine to soothe the weary mind and ears.
Scotch is a savior.
So is chocolate.
The lake is rising. It is a foot beyond the land
log.
Pretty far out.
I'm getting looney.
JULY 12
There are stars out tonight. Yes sir there are. I
don't believe it. The sky still exists above them
clouds. There are fuckin' stars. Do you believe it?
Jesus hell its amazing.
AUGUST 3
I wish this desk would stop filling up with
matches, ashes, thermometers, harmonicas,
spoons, cups, candles and envelopes so I could write
without having to knock the crud off.
Every day is an amazing day.
I know that now.
Joe — you change too. Many different people all
at once. Sunday, hardhat, construction worker,
mover. Today sometimes, Spanish curling
mustachioed warrior. As delighted with creek coho
and trees as I. Taking a visitor on a magic tour.
But the flies. Jesus, we couldn't think for the
flies.
Thurlow Island curling around my brains.
Taking me and me taking it and being constant with
the flow.
It glows.
It really glows. The whole greenness catches
the sun and bounces it back. Emerald city and
gleam shine in the face.
Do you believe it?
I believe it.
I'm amazed.
Gotta bury the garbage and get the dust out of
the house.
SATURDAY 26 AUGUST
To Blind Channel today. Good day not too hot
hair washed and swimming scenes with Laura and
Karen shining.
Such an amazing scene tonight. One of those
totally together flashes of fine feelings and
closeness; new cedar gathered for the floor. A
pipeful of excellent dope and me cooking dinner —
making smells of onions and bacon thru the house.
Laura and Karen knitting and chatting and Stuart
combing the snarls out of Gordie's hair. So incredible to see gentleness and body awareness
between two men. Stuart with two brushes of different strata and a comb really INTO Gordie's hair.
And the hair shining and billowing out into blonde
explosion, silver catching light around Gordie's
face very good.
FRIDAY NIGHT. Sometime in August last '72
maybe tomorrow
we'll build a dome
weather good ....
and have beans bread and popcorn
maybe trout
maybe deer
maybe tomorrow everyone will come to Mellon
Lake
and there will be activity
maybe the morning sked will land here
with Gordie
Tomorrow
all most anything could happen
I'll just wait and see.
OCTOBER 22 '72
This is not Thurlow Island and I am homesick.
I am sad.
Heads" do not stay the same here.
Neither do bodies.
No fault
— ed dubc
DOODLING . . . nothing new in journal
Her perfume was in his hair
and it didn't hurt.
Is the full moon an excuse?
you know I hate you
and I still care.
Is drunk-en-ness an excuse
Why must there be an excuse?
This is all bullshit
and you are full of it.
Where is the magic? That's what I want
This city is destroying me. I am destroyinj
There is no balance.
You gotta go down
to know up.
I can't stand it.
It was all so fine . . .
and its all so fucked.
Figuring it
Finally, tonight I could make somethir
the reading I have been doing. For the pas
of weeks my mind has been too abso
problems, mainly frustration about what I
or not doing, to concentrate on reading or
Don't know what the change was, but so
happened to release me, at least temporari
the feelings making me impotent.
So I finished reading Artaud, The The,
Its Double and am again excited by the pot
theatre to give people's thoughts and fe
chance to surface — to come close t(
breaking out of social constraints which h<
us in such narrow spheres. He also places ;
importance on the use of non-verbal langu
means of contact with the audience. Th
focus of so much modern drama is its tr;
emphasis on the text, everything being p
supportive roles. But it is only through
teraction of all parts of the theatre tha
transaction can take place.
I'm getting bored with this, maybe bee.
not certain of all the things he said and an
in a paraphrase of it.
Well, why am I writing this at all? (I n<
handwriting has just become freer than th
What purpose does this journal serve? -
hope. Yet I find a lack in energy while doin
is as a chore that I do this. Yet at times in
when I have been able to get into feeli
thoughts normally out of my conscious
exhilarated, no, that is too strong. I feel
some ways and also that I have accoi
something. But now I think of the people
hear this and wonder if I'm writing for th'
that they will get an impression of me tr
control to some extent. Could I just open t
at random and start reading to them -
Arlene, Vicki, Stan? No, at least not yet. T
to be more trust in our group, and it slowly
Page Friday, 4
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, November 17, 1972 eveloping the person
by opening up ourselves to each other — feeling out
the other people, their responses to what I might
say. The difficulty lies in projecting a response to
what I might say. The difficulty lies in projecting a
response from someone, even though we don't know
what the actual response from that person would
be. As in relationships, we hold ourselves back from
expressing verbally or non-verbally the feelings I
have. Things I see holding me back are the fears of
rejection, fear of hurting someone, insecurity with
knowing how I'm really feeling — whether the
feelings are actually directed at a certain person or
being deflected off her, and really directed at say,
my mother, father, another woman, etc. So with all
those things happening, I get lost in a maze of felt
feelings, confused as hell, with very few outlets of
expression.
As I was talking to Vicki last night, I became
more convinced of the idea which I realized after the
dance. Namely, there was a lot of affection being
shown by certain people to other people, men-men,
men-women, women-women, women-men. Yet to
me it seemed that the nature of the affection wasn't
real in most of the cases. It was a substitute for a
more far reaching and, of course, more threatening
sexual encounter and experience. Yet that sexual
energy exists in us, and it wants an outlet; so at
times it is sublimated into work, art, anger, but it
seems like it is also transformed into small displays
of affection. Because of the nature of that affection,
I can't tell whether it has a sexual base for the other
person or not. Since it has for me, I project it also
has for the other person. That isn't necessarily the
case though. So if I act on that sexual or erotic
desire, I run the risk of being rejected, thought
sexist, or possibly, even being satisfied. Yet it is the
first two which usually hold me back. So people tell
me risks are necessary to take for some reason or
another. But why something like being turned down
sexually has so much power seems crazy — no,
that's not really true, it does serve a purpose. But
the questions of why such high stakes? As if it was
the same as having my cock removed — and that is
so much the case in this society — the myth of the
man as the performer, the active agent, and of
course, as MAN. His manhood is epitomized in the
sexual relation, and to be found wanting or
rejected in that situation is to be castrated.
Then there is another whole range of things
wrapped up in approaching the woman as person
even after a sexual relation has developed. Since
phantasies are so strongly evident at the beginnings of relationships, to know the person as person
is almost impossible. The phantasies also make the
women larger than life size, out of proportion to
the person she is.
But something is going on, and I don't understand the causes or effects. I'm relinquishing
some of my power to that other person and allowing
her judgment of me, or rather her projected
judgment of me, to restrict my actions. It just
seems like so much bullshit. I give over my power
(of course all of this without hardly even knowing
her) to her, project a negative judgment by her of
me, blow her out of proportion through phantasies,
and have those phantasies scare me sc as not act!!
And this is normal? Yet whether spoken or unspoken people feel these sorts of things.
Women
The following journals were written by women
in a women's studies seminar. The seminar is using
journals to focus discussion on feelings and what
really matters to people instead of getting side
tracked into abstract discussion.
The journal entries are responses to lectures and
incidents discussed in the seminar. One seminar
member described the journals as a kind of
stripping. They are very personal.
However, there is enough distance to allow
people to discuss personal things. But it's not a
phony distance. People immediately get into things
deeper than they would have through discussion
only.
They believe one grows and develops by writing
and expressing true feelings. Academic discussion
doesn't change anything, it doesn't effect people.
Virginity
Again time has passed quickly and journal
progress is very far behind. I must first back up to
last Tuesday night at women's studies. I came
away with a mixture of frustration and annoyance
at myself and basic disagreement with what had
been said. I'm mad at myself for letting so much go
by me without letting my feelings be known. I'm
mad I let myself feel inferior or somehow
unqualified to participate because I lack the experience of the women around me. I'm satisfied
with my virginity — not proud but not ashamed
either. I'm content with where I am now — not that
I want to stay here but I can justify my development as an individual to myself to this point in my
life and I think this is important to be able to do.
Where I go from here depends on me and how I let
the people around me influence me. Important to
remember though is it's me doing the deciding. I'm
sounding to me like I'm afraid I might get pressed
into believing or advocating something I don't want
to and I guess that's true. My uneasiness stems
from the fact that though I've a fair idea of what I
want in my relationship with people, my rationale,
the why is not too logically or completely worked
out. I can't defend my ideas to a group because I
can't always logically defend them to myself but
they are real and meaningful to me and I don't bank
on changing for its own sake.
Write, just start to write and the mood will work
itself out. It's Sunday night, again — always. My
times at home fly by so quickly and it seems
without ever getting closer to Mom or Dad. We're
all over the place all the time and are never really
"together". The bickering was there again most of
the time. Oh why can't we relax together! I want to
go home but I hate facing that. Oh, I'm in a spinny,
stupid mood. I guess a few glasses of wine, more
than a few, contribute along with the empty house,
the fog horn and the desolate lament of Roberta
Flack. I want to cry and am but I don't really know
why. Life doesn't hold enough hours. I need more
time for me. The better part of the week is shot to
school, Saturday to work and Sunday to visiting I
should want to do and studying and seeing another
day fly by.
Lesbian love
I went to women's studies on Tuesday.
Discovered that Rita lives with her lover, husband
and family all in one house. Her lover is a woman.
Yeah, right! It is funny when I heard that Rita had
a lover I was rather surprised because she was so
big and fat, thinking that two men had found her
attractive, had seen past her physique, and then
found out, no, one man and one woman.
All the while the other women accepting this so
casually, so nonchalantly, me not wanting to sound
really straight, but all the while wanting to cry,
"Ooooh. But that's unnatural." Feeling uncomfortable and scared.
Funny thing about my fear of being/becoming a
lesbian, as though it would creep up unawares and
overtake me. Overwhelm me, as if it were some
power out of my control, a disease that would
transform me. Kinda like being possessed.
Realizing that when Rita said that I saw her, not
as a person who enjoys music, books, people, loving
men and women, but rather that "ooooh she's a
lesbian", and that one characteristic overrides who
she is as a person.
My Mom and sister coming home from their
encounter group, both caught up in the encounter
thing, and just revealing what they're feeling. Anne
and I talking to Mom about all the things they've
laid on us: always doing our best to perform for the,
good marks, self-conscious about the guys (or lack
of them) that we're going out with, always wanting
their god-damn approval.
Then Dad came in. As soon as he walked in the
door I started to crying. I at first stood by the sink
or the washer, merely an onlooker. I cried for the
next hour and a half or so. Mom, at first asking me
why? Really wanting me to help show my emotion,
something which she said she hasn't been able to do
either. After a long time Dad being interrogated by
Anne, "Why don't you tell us how you're feeling?
Why are you always so busy with no time for us?"
Finally Mom asked me again. All I knew was that
whenever I talked to Dad about any slightly serious
subject, in a situation which might be emotional or
angry, I started to cry. So I always avoid conflict
situations. Dad says I feel protective of him. Yeah,
I remember when Anne was challenging him, I
wanted to stop her and say, "Aw, come on. He's not
that bad." And then realizing that I was afraid.
Afraid of somebody saying something, I never
know when he'll explode and smash his fist on the
table.
The cover log and the diaries on this page are in the
special collections division of the main library.
*■■** m KB? SEP. Wtea««. ■
*******«?2 4522822 *&***? """"*'
FQUWP   JIT   ONCE,
'mm      '
AUTOMATIC
Self-Registering
■:'-'-pbr-'-it'0O6
Coupon.,
re m. %i
** <3*£
BIG BUSINESS .. . diary insurance from 1906
Friday, November 17, 1972
THE       UBYSSEY
Page Friday, 5 Films
Slick Elvis movie
made for his fans
Elvis  on  Tour,Produced  and
directed by Pierre Adidge and
Robert Abel.  Edited  by Ken
Zemke.
Elvis on Toiir is a movie for Elvis fans. It
is   a   well-filmed,   well-recorded,   un-
selfconscious record of a recent 15 day, 15
city   tour   by   the   King   and   his   huge
travelling show. The film has two things
going for it. The first is its extensive use of
split screen (Expo 67) technique. Editor
Ken Zemke uses  multiple images very
effectively,   especially   during   the   performance sequences. The device helps give
maximum coverage to the host on stage
(full orchestra, rock band, nine back-up
singers) and to alleviate the inevitable
monotony   that   results   from   filming   a
concert.
The second big attraction of the film is
Elvis himself. We see a great deal of him:
on stage, in limousines, in his private plane
ELVJS.. . in his finery
and waiting nervously backstage. My
present assessment of Presley is that he is
doing a great job of exploiting the aging
mystique of his past glories. There is some
self-parody in the film, but not as much as I
expected. He does his thing, and you can
take it or leave it. I got off on his act in the
movie; I would like to see him live; I would
never buy one of his records.
Your own assessment of him might range
from: "he's the greatest personality and
singer ever," to "he's a pathetic, pudgy,
phoney who deserves some pity but none of
my money." Whether you like the film or
not will depend entierly on your response
to Elvis's public image. If you like the
image, it is a great film; if you hate it, it
stinks.
Despite this critical anarchy, I think
there are some points that can be made
about the Elvis of this film that are not
simply a matter of taste. His outrageous
costumes strain the super-star image to the
breaking point. They consist of fantastic
jump suits that are studded from belled-
bottoms to cape with shiny metal and glass
gewgaws. His show is first-rate in terms of
lighting, orchestration, singing and schmaltz. Believe it or not, the orchestra calls
him onstage with the "Also Spracht
Zarathustra" [Space Odyssey 2001] theme.
His prancing on stage is neither as supple
nor as sensuous as that of Mick Jagger. His
voice and stylings are adequate, and sound
very good with his polished professional
backing. In sum, the show is slick and
unoriginal, but it gives his audiences
exactly what they want.
The film is not several things that I
thought it might be. It makes no attempt to
" show the man behind the image. Nor does it
probe the sociological or psychological
significance of the hysterical crowds. Nor
does it try to give a "real life" picture of
what a tour is like, or how it works.
The accent is always on the mystique of
Elvis. The result is a movie that is as slick
and as superficial as Elvis's stage show;
but, like the show it can be entertaining if
you dig the main attraction.
If you are one of the few who have not
seen Arthur Penn's Alice's Restaurant, you
get yet another chance this weekend at
SUB. Despite the title, the movie conveys a
very different feeling than the Ario Guthrie
song on which it is based. Penn portrays the
drop-out society of the late sixties as a sad
happy flash in the pan. He skillfully captures the joy, the aimlessness, the freedom
and the pathos of a brief generation who
thought they could beat the system by withdrawing from it. —David MacKinlay
Books
Niven sparkles again
The Moon's a Balloon, by David Niven
If you are wading through another
biography of Eleanor Roosevelt or Arthur
Meighen, or if you do not particularly like
biographies, David Niven's The Moon's a
Balloon might come as a welcome change
to your reading.
Now in paperback, Niven's
autobiography gives a human and very
palatable account of a lifetime. Starting
from Niven's middle-class childhood,
continuing through his escapades in private
schools, his education at the hands of
Nessie, "the 'ore wif the 'eart of gold", his
military career at Sandhurst and in the
Argyll and Sutherland Lancers, his brief
fling at bootlegging and horseracing in New
York, and his eventual trek to Hollywood
are all described honestly but colorfully.
"The Moon's a Balloon" is relatively
unique in that Niven wrote it without the
aid of a ghost-writer. Biographies seldom
benefit from the labors of ghost-writers;
they are often capable of rendering a
reasonably interesting story into prose that
is about as human as a transcript of a UBC
Senate meeting.
Thus, in writing the book himself, Niven
avoids the archetypal structure of the
celebrity biography: (i.e. Starry-eyed kid
seeks fame. Kid attains fame. Kid, now no
longer kid, goes sour. Pulls himself
together and transcends previous difficulties.)
As it is, Niven writes in a low-key, down-
to-earth style that distinguishes him as a
talented raconteur. His powers of
description are enviable, especially in his
account of life in middle-class post-war
Britain, military service in Malta, and
Hollywood during the thirties. He also has a
brilliant ear for dialogue.
The book is very funny. Niven's humor is
genuine, not at all strained. Not the syrupy
little anecdotes one often finds at the back
of Reader's Digest, but a rich,
Rabellaisean variety.
It is his self-deprecating humor that is
the most refreshing aspect of the book. It is
pomposity and fatuity that make many
autobiographies literally unreadable.
The title of the book is derived from e.e.
cummings. It is an appropriate choice; like
cummings, Niven does have a flair for
whimsy.
—Ryon Guedes
BETTER BUY BOOKS
pays CASH FOR BOOKS
TEXTBOOKS, QUALITY PAPERBACKS, ETC.
LARGEST SELECTION OF REVIEW NOTES IN B.C.
MONARCH - COLES - SCHAUMS - & OTHERS
We Trade Used Pocketbooks and Magazines
Located Near the Varsity Theatre at
4393 W. 10th Ave. 224-4144; Open 11 a.m.-8 p.m.
-TaK-El Your
CONTACC
12
HOUR RELIEF
v  m
10
Put out the symptoms of a cold for 12 hours
with one Contac-C.
Ideal for Students
SUMMER 1973
CAMPING TOURS
OF EUROPE!
5 WEEKS - SURF CAMPING TOUR - $260.00
(plus food kitty $37)
France, Spain, Portugal, Morocco
5 WEEKS - RUSSIA/SCANDINAVIA - $299.00
(plus food kitty $50)
Belgium, Holland, Germany, Denmark, Sweden, Norway, Finland, Russia,
Pol 2nd
6 WEEKS - GRAND EUROPEAN - $329.00
(plus food kitty $45)
Belgium,  Holland, Germany, Switzerland, Austria, Italy, Monaco, Spain,
Andorra, France
9 WEEKS - GREEK/SPANISH/TURKISH - $475
(plus food kitty $67)
France,    Andorra,    Spain,    Monaco,    Italy,    Greece,   Turkey,   Bulgaria,
Yugoslavia, Austria, Switzerland, Germany, Holland, Belgium
ALSO: 2-WEEK, 3-WEEK, 4-WEEK TOURS -
Inquire for Details! Air Fare Not Included in Above Prices.
Book   early.1   Students   from   many   countries   are   making
reservations now. You'll meet them in Europe!
We're in "THE VILLAGE"
"¥■■
burke's
world wide travel
5700 University Blvd.
Phone 224-4391
Page Friday, S
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, November 17, 1972 Music
Pianist scores hit
Another in the series of subscription
concerts took place in the Queen Elizabeth
Theatre last Monday evening, featuring
pianist Garrick Ohlsson with Simon
Streatfeild conducting.
Opening the program was the ear
shattering Overture — Portsmouth Point,
by English composer Sir William Walton.
The energetic percussion and brass sections ensured that everyone would be fully
awake for the guest soloist.
The first movement of Rachmaninov's
Piano No. 3 in D Minor was handled by
Ohlsson with meticulous precision and
clarity. The flowing main theme of the
allegro was kept in clear contrast with the
simpler secondary theme.
The quieter, more gentle mood prominent
in the intermezzo of the second movement
was treated to some very delicate, and also
some very forceful, keyboard work.
Streatfeild kept the orchestra well in hand
and maintained a carefully controlled
balance with the soloist.
Ohlsson was well able to display his
talents in the very lively third movement.
In many passages his fingers were a blur of
speed but the notes were distinct and clear.
At the end of his performance Ohlsson was
deservedly called back by the audience
four times.
It is a pity that the piano could not match
up to the pianist. It sounded like a well used
antique about 50 years old. Despite
Ohlsson's fine efforts, some of the keys
sounded definitely hollow, particularly in
the middle range.
The second half of the program opened
with the performance of the Concerto in C
Major for Double String Orchestra, by Sir
Michael Tippett. Only violins, violas, cellos
and double basses are used in this work.
The first movement was quite quickly
paced and spirited, though not particularly
interesting. The much slower second
movement, on the other hand, I found very
powerful, and it was highlighted by very
sensitive solos from concertmaster Norman Nelson and principle cellist Ian
Hampton. The brisker third movement was
a delightful conclusion for the piece and
featured some excellent interplay between
the opposing sections of the orchestra.
Leos Janacek composed the final piece
on the program, entitled Sinfonietta. It is in
five short movements, the first and last
being noisy fanfares, which featured some
excellent work on the kettledrums by
timpanist Don Adams, who I find, incidentally, to be visually one of the most
entertaining members of the orchestra.
The three middle movements give a strong
outdoorsy impression of space and
freedom, and the varying moods of gaiety
and peacefulness complete the overall
effect.
Other dates to watch for are Nov. 23,
when Ron de Kant, the principle clarinet of
the VSO, will perform with the Baroque
Strings at the Vancouver Art Gallery at 8
Pm- —Robert Mitchinson
Poetry
Layton will read
Irving Layton's family lived in a four
room compartment when he was a child of
six. The front room was a grocery store.
Above their bedroom was a brothel. Of that
time in his life and of his Montreal, Layton
says "My early childhood experiences in
Montreal put a crease into my mind that
neither theology nor socialism has been
able to straighten out. I see life as a
Dionysian cock and cunt affair with time
off, though precious little of it, for
meditation and good works."
Layton who is reading today, 12:30 at
Freddy Wood theatre teaches at York
University, and has published over twenty
books among his other pursuits. His poetry
has been called "crude and sensational,
egotistic, full of Dionysian frenzy, of the
joyous egotism of Catullus, of the irony of
Yeats and the scorn of Pound." The poetic
characteristics he has been credited with
are almost as numerous as his books.
—Jennifer Alley
PI
i
Specialized Service
[FThll
VW
YOUR PRESCRIPTION . . .
... For Glasses
for that smart look in glasses ...
look to
PlesclibtioH Optical
Student Discount Given
WE HAVE AN OFFICE NEAR YOU
2>rAPE
'CAUC     TArCTUCD
UNISEX
HAIR DESIGN
we love
long hair!
1123-1125 ROBSON STREET
20% DISCOUNT TO U.B.C. STUDENTS
ON PRESENTATION OF THIS AD
CO
tH
CNI
oo
to
s |
5 *
Q_ d
o t-
The Valachi Papers
Vogue
Joe Valachi told it alL.across the headlines
Of America.        MATURE: 12:05,  2:15,
»i» Granville       Coarse   language,   swearing and   brutality.        4:35, 6:55,
683-S434
R.W. MCDONALD, B.C. Director
9:10
"IIICKEY&
M1JWWS    Show Times:
Odeon
881   GRANVILLE
682-7468
12:00, 1:50
3:45, 5:45
7:45, 9:45
MATURE
They're just up the road . . .
waiting for you . . .
"THE HITCHHIKERS"
Coronet
SSI  GRANVILLE
685-6821
ANYTHING THEY WANT
^ ... THEY TAKE!
"Brute Corps"
Warning:
Much brutal violence.
-R. W. McDonald, B.C. Dir.    7:30
Varsitu
224-3730 **
4375 W. 10th
WINNER 1972 CANNES FILM FESTIVAL
JURY PRIZE AWARD
SLAUGHTERHOUSE
WestVan I FIVE
Occasional coarse language and
swearing.R. W. McDonald, B.C. Director     7:30,9:30
ROBERT SHAW - ANNE BANCROFT
ant* CARL FOREMAKUdRICHARD ATTENBOROUGH
jKYOUNG WINSTON
Hyland
GENERAL COLOR
ALL SEATS RESERVED
Tickets on  sale at Box Office Odeon
KINGS Y it KNIGHT Theatre,   881   Granville   St.,   or   call
876-3045 688-2308. j&
Grab Yours Today
The Handiest Book on Campus
BIRD CALLS
UBC's Student Telephone Directory
With 40 Money Saving
BONUS
COUPONS
Available at
UBC
BOOKSTORE
and SUB
Information, Publications & Thunderbird Shop
Friday, November 17, 1972
THE       UBYSSEY
Page Friday, 7 Books
I
Quebec needs unity
Choose, Pierre Vallieres, New
Press, Toronto, 1972.
"It's inexcusable for anyone who calls
himself a revolutionary to be unaware of
his own condition."
Pierre Vallieres, convinced that unaware
Quebecois revolutionaries are hampering
the progress of their own liberation
movement, set out to enlighten them.
The result is Choose!
This short treatise on the dialectics of
exploitation is a plea to Quebecois to rally
behind one common force — the Parti
Quebecois — in their bid to separate from
Canada. Should they decide not to follow his
advice, Vallieres says they stand to lose
forever the opportunity for self-
determination.
He sees the Quebecois' major problem as
one of markedly diverse ideologies.
The Front de liberation du Quebec, an
outmoded, moribund organization,
promotes a "popular revolution" strategy
of sporadic terrorism that is no longer a
valid means of acquiring the province's
independence.
The Parti Quebecois is a viable political
agency through which Quebecois have a
real chance to form a separate national
state.
"Armchair" revolutionaries waste
precious time idly cogitating abstractions,
unions refuse to more than indirectly
support PQ ideals and some Quebecois
fatuously dream of these unions forming a
new political party based on PQ ideals but
minus the 'stigma' of having one-time-
Liberal supporters within its ranks.
All this, Vallieres says, inhibits the
growth of essential solidarity among
Quebec francophones.
The basis of this situation is twofold. The
author accuses Quebecois of harboring
naive ideas of their condition which is
contingent on the world production process.
These misconceptions lead to the
multifarious ideologies of escaping exploitation, most of which attempt to
emulate "stereotyped" class struggles
rather than to adhere to Quebec's condition.
He views the world as the victim of imperialism, the outgrowth of a capitalism
that preys upon the masses to benefit
minority elites. Placing Quebec at the foot
of the North American imperialistic
pecking order, Vallieres explains how the
US exploits Canada and both exploit
Quebec.
The initial step toward surmounting this
is ". . . to harness our energies and our
potential for the realization of . . . a
national, independent state . . ."
Of all the revolutionary sects in Quebec,
Vallieres says, the PQ emerges as the only
one realistically capable of achieving independence. Supporting it is not tantamount to betraying their cause, but to
enhancing it.
Now is the time for Quebecois to unite.
Independence must be gained "within the
next few years," or the entire movement
will succumb to the federal and current
Quebec governments' determination to
smother it.
Total emancipation, however, will not
suddenly materialize with independence
and Vallieres is not so foolish as to ignore
this. His discourse on external imperialistic factors which will prevent it is
harshly truthful and potentially
discouraging.
He declares the cure-all the creation of
socialism — an impossibility until many
states acquire their own independence.
Only then will peoples desirous of this
system have the collective power
necessary to counter imperialists' fight
against it.
But Vallieres is optimistic and urges
Quebecois not to allow the reality of a long,
difficult struggle ahead overcome their
desire for liberation. He asks them to accept as inevitable the fact that the all-
important rewards of their struggle are
dependent on other, as yet unidentifiable
nations.
The crucial factor, he says, is for people
to start taking productive action.
According to Vallieres, Choose is a broad
reconsideration of the Quebecois condition,
an expansion more than an abandonment of
the ideas presented in White Niggers of
America. From a previously provincial
attitude, he is reaching for international
explanations; from a total distrust and
dismissal of sell-out political parties, he
has discovered the PQ can beat the current
system by using it to some extent.
In fact, after reading Choose, White
Niggers of America sounds like a child
whimpering about the proverbial neighborhood bully, and vowing "I'll show him',
with no concrete idea of how.
Even at that, Choose advocates concrete
action only for the first phase of the
struggle. It fails to provide more than a
nebulous, albeit hopeful, strategy for
complete and meaningful success for
everyone, after independence.
But at least it offers a viable beginning.
—Sandra Shreve
at
4560 W 10th.
919 Robson St.
1032 W Hastings
670 Seymour
duthie
BOOKS
Export A'
CANADA'S FINEST CIGARETTE
HONG KONG CHINESE FOODS
Just One Block from Campus in the Village
WE SERVE AUTHENTIC CHINESE FOOD
A T REASONABLE PRICES
EAT IN - TAKE OUT
We have enlarged our dining room to offer you
better service at no increase in prices!
Open Every Day from 4:30 p.m. to 11 p.m.
5732 University Blvd. Phone 224-6121
iff
rcA
m
evo-OO <*»C^E>^VO
HI-WAIST
JEANS
•
CORDS
BAGGIES
TWEEDS
MEN'S AND WOMEN'S TOPS
PRESENT STUDENT CARD FOR 10%
§JL  ^&^> 4431 W. 10th C^»J^
chartered
accountarts
We will be on campus November 20-24 (9 a.m. to 5 p.m.) to interview graduates interested in pursuing a career as chartered accountants. There are several positions available in the spring and summer
of 1973. At present a limited number of positions are also available
for Dec. 1972. Any Dec. 1972, April or August 1973 graduates
interested in public accounting who meet the minimum requirements for student registration as outlined in the "C.A. Handbook"
should see the Placement office for interview schedules.
ARTHUR ANDERSEN & CO.
■ ■ ■ •
"ALICE'S
RESTAURANT' IS
ARTHUR PENN'S BEST
WORK TO DATE. IT'S
MORE PERSONAL THAN
'BONNIE AND CLYDE.'
IT IS MORE ORIGINAL
ITHAN 'THE MIRACLE
WORKER.'"
-VINCENT CANBV.
N  Y.  TIMES
"ONE OF THE BEST
FILMS ABOUT
YOUNG PEOPLE
EVER MADE!"
| SUB FILM SOC PRESENTS
'Alices
RESTAURANT"
NOV. 16-19
FRI. 7:00 & 9:30
SAT. 7:00 & 9:30
SUN. 7:00
SUB AUDITORIUM—50'
ARLO GUTHRIE
— TIME MAGAZINE
, >. PAT QUINN ■ JAMES 5R00ERICK £m(iJ| .cotl.d„t PETE SEEGER ■ LEE HAYS  .*» Michael mc clanathan
GEOfF OUTLAW -UNA CHEN -KATHLEEN DABNEV .-a Police Chief WILLIAM OBANHttN        r>.|.«*> ml,.* P, MU.0 GUTHfliE
Page Friday, 8
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, November 17, 1972 Friday, November 17, 1972
THE      UBYSSEY
Page  13
Letters
From page 4
scription —  rank idiocy is more
like it.
Far be it from me to censor the
freedom of the media. Constructive criticism is one thing — even
biting, damning sarcasm has its
place, but what we were subjected
to falls short on both counts.
The program was an exercise in
bandying about assorted obscenities in reference to the AMS. The
executive was not even attacked
on specific issues, but on the
potential offenses of executive
bodies anywhere. The program
even makes nasty insinuations
about the personal habits and
cleanliness of certain executive
members; at which point the programmers obnoxiously chortle
with glee over their vain stabs, at
humour.
I fail to see why The Ubyssey
finds it incumbent upon itself to
eternally protect the underdog —
irrespective of who is in the right.
In this case, disregarding the
politics, or even the ethics of the
situation, Bakshi and Foster
deserved to be removed to preserve the dignity of the media and
in the interests of aesthetics, if
nothing else.
Yours very truly,
Holly E. Williams
arts 2
Con CYVR
Having been in SUB over the
past two weekends, I noticed a
predominance of hockey being
broadcast over CYVR. On checking with CYVR I learned that
these games were being played at
Thunderbird winter sports centre.
On contacting them, I was told
that these games were free to UBC
students. Now it seems strange to
me why anyone interested in
hockey, and also on campus (the
only place one can hear CYVR),
would prefer to listen to the game
on radio instead of seeing it live.
Furthermore, several people I
talked to at CYVR claimed that
although they would have liked to
broadcast music instead, the executive dictated what was going to
be broadcast. When I tried to
contact the president (Dean
Cooper) I found that he was the
game commentator!
My question to the CYVR executive is, "Who are you trying to
serve, students or yourselves?"
Tom Townrow
science 4
Cyclists
An open letter to cyclists at UBC:
I have the greatest admiration
for UBC's growing population of
cyclists. Bicycles provide efficient
Bikers need lights
transportation, require little
space, and do not pollute. Cyclists
deserve support in their campaign
for safe bicycle paths along major
access routes to UBC and elsewhere in the city.
With the arrival of the long
nights, however, I have observed
that some cyclists fail to take the
elementary precautions which can
greatly contribute to their safety.
It is essential that bikes be
equipped with clearly visible lights
and reflectors for night riding.
I have recently nearly run
down two cyclists who had
neither lights nor reflectors. They
only became visible at a distance
of less than ten yards, and had I
been slightly less alert, I might
have hit them.
In contrast, I have seen several
cyclists who wear armband lights
which are visible at a great distance. It would be almost impossible to hit them accidentally.
Cyclists need to remember that
they must obey the rules of the
road in the same way automobiles
do. This is necessary both for
their own safety and that of
others. (Cyclists also have no
special right to run down pedestrians, as they sometimes seem to
feel.) Those who fail to display
lights at night must share in the
blame for accidents.
Tom Perry
science 4
(pedestrian and occasional driver)
Pathetic
Re Page Friday:
I would like to express my
extreme disappointment with The
Ubyssey's pathetic coverage of
campus theatrical events this year.
While Page Friday has been giving
a large amount of space to reviews
of commercial films downtown
(complete with pictures), live
productions on our own campus
are given less than second-class
treatment. Recent reviews of Mac-
Loan regulations loosen
Some concessions have been made in the
federal student loan regulations, Alma Mater
Society treasurer David Dick told student
council members Wednesday.
Dick, just back from a meeting in Ottawa
with the federal plenary committee on loans,
said the committee has agreed to throw the
documentation regulation out and review the
summer savings and earnings regulations.
He said little progress had been made in
changing dependency regulations although
students may be able to get independent status
next year if their clergyman or academic
counsellor will sign a letter saying they are
independent.
Under present regulations applicants must
submit photostats of personal documents including their last income tax return or that of
their parents and must be 21 and have one full
year of work before enrolling to obtain independent status.
Engineering textbook committee chairman
Rick Knowlan said a proposed engineer
bookstore committee will be conducting a
survey among nursing and engineering classes
to find out which textbooks the students will be
buying next year.
The survey will determine how many
students will be selling used books, how many
will buy used books and what book the class
thinks should be used.
"We will then ask the profs which text they
will be using, tell them about the survey and
show them the suggested list of books," said
Knowlan.
"We will canvass classes for down
payments because books must be paid for in
advance. We will then know exactly how many
texts to buy as well."
Knowlan said the committee will tell the
bookstore management how many they will be
purchasing so the bookstore orders can be cut
accordingly.
UBC bookstore manager Bob Smith, who
also attended the meeting said he was initially
quite happy with the engineer's project.
"The survey you have planned is very
good."
Replying to Knowlan's statement that the
engineers will be able to purchase certain
books at lower prices Smith said, "I'll make it
clear to faculty and publisher that I will not buy
until I get the lower price.
"I'll step out completely on any books you
handle."
However, he warned the group to be
prepared for books with covers on backward
and pages missing.
Smith said if he had the resources to run
decentralized bookstores which catered to
certain departments he would be able to do a
better job.
Council continued the discussion tabled last
week on the $1,000 grant to the new National
Union of Students.
Five hundred of the $1,000 will be taken from
external affairs budget allotment. The other
$500 is to come out of the undergraduate
societies budget. However, no decision was
reached on whether it will be an outright grant
or per capita grant.
The $1,000 will be applied against UBC's
future NUS fees providing students pass the
spring referendum to join NUS.
However, if the referendum is not passed the
money will not be returned.
Council debated motherhood and apple pie
while trying to decide if they should send a
letter to the French government condemning
their planned nuclear test blast in the South
Pacific.
AMS president Doug Aldridge, vice-
president Gordon Blankstein and Dick opposed
the motion because they believe council would
lose credibility by sending the letter.
A motion to support in principle a letter of
protest was finally passed.
beth and Six Characters in Search
of an Author certainly did not
give the productions the attention
they deserved, whether or not the
critics liked the performances.
One might hope that, on a
campus as anonymous and apathetic as UBC, the student newspaper would encourage any cultural aspect of university life
which might promote a sense of
community. One of the few remaining highlights of life at UBC
is the variety and usually high
quality of theatre presented by
Freddy Wood, Dorothy Somerset
Studio and Mussoc.
Fortunately, your vindictive
review of Macbeth did not prevent
people from attending, but this
kind of malicious reporting must
certainly be discouraging both to
the performers and to intelligent
readers. Also, the review of Six
Characters was cursory and failed
to give any coherent critical insights into either the play or the
production.
Because campus theatre usually
presents much more worthwhile
material   than   most professional
companies in town, I would
expect that any critical approach
by the university paper would be
based on a sense of real interest
and pride. Instead we have been
getting flippant and superficial
reviews by writers who seem to
have read too many Time magazines. Adrienne Glen
social work 2
In case you haven't noticed,
there is a difference between an
English essay and a review. The
essay is expected to analyze a play
in unfathomable depths in a protracted, magniloquent and tedious
style. A review must be succinct,
terse and to the point. Readability
is the mark of a good review. The
Six Characters review was laconic
for that reason, but it wasn't
cursory. Campus productions have
been receiving secondary treatment, and PF has decided to
expand its coverage in terms of
space and art for each show.
However, a university production
will be evaluated like any other,
and a poor one will get what it
deserves. S.M.
Here's a sample of the
BONUS COUPONS in BIRD CALLS
This Coupon Good For $1.00
p q Off The Purchase of Any Large Pizza
-\ —I (Not Valid On Deliveries)
-* <T
°>
"■_ BOSTON PIZZA
jE Z 224-1720
H   4450 West 10th Ave. 224-6336
—.-,—-.———-■———-..,..,-,, -J
BUY YOUR COPY TODAY-ONLY 75c
and get more than your money back
by using only one of the
40 BONUS COUPONS INCLUDED
MS STOP-
FM JhAMS
166 W. Hastings 861 Granville 760 Columbia      1316 Douglas
COR.CAMBIE       THEATRE ROW       NEW WEST. VICTORIA
A DIVISION OF MURRAY GOLDMAN Page   14
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, November 17, 1972
Hot flashes
Language bank
to be started
A language bank is being
formed in Vancouver to provide
emergency translations for immigrants and visitors, Carl Beach of
International House said Thursday.
The bank would serve foreign
seamen in port, old and new
immigrants and anyone needing
emergency translations.
Beach said he hopes to have
volurlteers from among the
foreign students at UBC, members
of the faculty and the community
at large. The language bank expects to help people with legal
matters, illnesses and accidents.
Beach said the bank would be
centred in the IH offices, with a
24-hour telephone answering service. It is planned to be primarily
a referral service. He said a need
to set up English language classes
for various language groups in
Vancouver may be found as an
outgrowth of the bank's activities.
Business requests would be met
only if professional agencies are
unable to help. The translator
would be paid for this business
work, but not for emergency services.
The language bank is being
sponsored by IH and the Altrusa
Club of Vancouver, a women's
service club. IH is holding a fund-
raising party at IH on Saturday,
Nov. 25.
And so Jericho
Dennis Gray Grant, chairman
of the Jericho Parks Committee
will be appearing before city
council Tuesday Nov. 21.
He will be trying to bring back
the issue of Jericho park which
has been buried somewhere between city hall and parks' board
offices.
All interested persons should
attend to lend support.
Candidates
Mayoralty candidates Art Phillips, Brian Campbell, Bill Street
and Angie Dennis will talk on
future development of Vancouver
noon today in SUB.
Women's action
The women's action committee
will be meeting at noon in the
board room at the graduate student centre.
Er, Irving
Canadian poet Irving Layton
will be visiting campus this week
to read his poetry. He'll be appearing in Freddy Wood theatre at
noon today. Admission is free.
Here we go .. .
Once again The Ubyssey puts
out a call for all those interested
in reporting, photographing or giggling at the exciting day by day
life of the campus.
Anyone at all interested in
working on the paper is welcome
up in The Ubyssey office, SUB
241K.
We write, we skate, we even
have a basketball team, so anyone
Tween classes
TODAY
GAY PEOPLE OF UBC
Social   evening  8   p.m.   arts I   bluel
room.
L'ALLIANCE FRANCA     E
General meeting no* l IH upper
lounge.
POETRY READING
Irving Layton reads his poetry noon
inside Freddy Wood.
PRE-SOCIAL WORK CLUB
Probation officer from B.C. correctional services noon SUB 105B.
SMC
Vietnam— Will Kissinger really
bring peace with Bob Sims and
report on conference. These and
other exciting goodies noon SUB
215.
YOUNG SOCIALISTS
Nic Shugalo and No Canadian
Troops to Vietnam 8 p.m. 1208
Granville.
UBC SKYDIVERS
Meeting and rides for the weekend
noon SUB 216.
SATURDAY
SAILING CLUB
Regatta party 8  p.m. 3256 W. 3rd.
SMC
Demonstration 1 p.m. Rally at
Maple Tree square, march to courthouse where mayoralty candidate
Brian Campbell and Aid. Harry
Rankin will speak.
SUNDAY
FIRESIDE
SCM Christmas conference on the
agenda at 8 p.m., 6050 Chancellor.
MONDAY
SIMS
Lecture    on    transcendental    meditation noon stage room IH.
TUESDAY
RUS
Executive meeting noon rec. lounge.
STUDENT LIBERALS
Meeting   and   elections   noon   SUB
215.
BRAND NEW 1973
DATSUN
PRICED FROM
$
2245
BANK FINANCING
SOUTHSIDE
DATSUN SALES
290 S.W. Marine Dr.
(Nr. Cambie)
324-4644
(OATJUNJ
3-Speeds
'69.00
FREE — FREE
wth  10-SPEEDS
Fenders — Carrier — Light Set
We're Overstocked!
STUDENT DISCOUNT
Theft Insurance — Cables — Locks
3771 W. 10th (near Alma)
224-3536
who has any of these skills (or
would like to aquire them) can
help. We're here at noon on
Mondays and Thursdays, and on
most other days, so come on up.
rushant
™ CAMERAS     *
4538 W.10 224-5858
DISCOUNT PRICES
WE LOVE LONG HAIR
Hair Styling for Men
UPPER TENTH BARBER
4574 W. 10th 224-6622
iilms
The Vancouver premiere of
British films made by young film
makers will be held at the Vancouver art gallery tonight.
Film maker Annabel Nicolson
will introduce these London Coop films, on tour in North America, in person. Showing is 8 p.m.
and admission is $1.
Kashmir Curry Restaurant
For the Finest Food of India
STUDENTS!! We offer 10% concession on a full dinner. Groups
of 6 or more — 20% concession.
LIMITED OFFER - SO VISIT US SOON
Open every day 5 p.m. ■ 11 p.m. — Free Delivery of Complete Dinners
3934 Main at 23rd Phone 874-5722
<m
^TWWPP
Rates: Campus*- 3 lines, 1 day $1.00; additional fines, 2Sc;
Commercial - 3 tines, 1 day $1.50; additional lines
35c; additional days $1.26 & 30c.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone and are payable tit
advance. Deadline »11:39 am, the day before publication.
. PitbUcatknn Office, Room 241S.U.B., UBC, Van.8tRC
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Dances
11
WANNA BOOGIE THIS WEEKEND? Well, you'll get off on the
finest boogie band in Canada! King
Biscuit Boy and the Real Gooduns.
With the Northwest Co. Two locations. Friday nite — Queens Park
Arenex in New West. Sat. nite at
Hugh Boyd Gym in Richmond
(just off No. 1 Road). Both dances
8:30-12:00.   $2.0O/Head.	
IL CAFFE ANNUAL ITALIAN
Dance—Graduate Centre Ballroom
Admission $1.50. Friday, Nov. 2*.
9  P.M.-1  A.M.   Band—"SHOCKS"!
DANCE TO THE BLACK SHEEP,
International  House,  Friday,   Nov.
17, 1972, 9:00 p.m. $1.50/person.
GET A HOLD OF YOURSELF.
Stronghold  Is  coming!   Sat.,   Nov.
18, 8:30-1 a.m., SUB Ballroom.
Lost & Found
13
LOST BLACK LEATHER CASE
with three pens — Black fountain,
silver ballpoint and pencil. Reward
one  banana.   224-0197  Please.
LOST/BUTTERFLY PIN STERLING
mauve wings. Reward, $10. Phone
299-2729.
Rides 8c Car Pools
14
Special Notices
IS
GET A. HOLD OF YOURSELF
Stronghold is coming! Dance, Sat.
Nov. 18, 8:30-1 a.m., SUB Ballroom.
T. G. I. F.  Join the Group at Cecil
Green Park. Young Alumni Club!
Fridays 4 p.m. -1 a.m. — Also
Thursdays 8-12 p.m. For alumni
and graduating students.	
COMEDY IS ALIVE AND ON THE
critical list! ! Doctor Bundolo's
Pandemonium Medicine Show —
Today, Friday noon In SUB
Theatre—Tt's FREE! BE THERE!
THRIFT SHOP IN BASEMENT OF
University HiU United Church
(University Blvd.) will be open on
Saturday, Nov. 18, 10:30 a.m.-12
noon. Come for bargains! New
stock has been added!
NO. S ORANGE STREET, MAIN AT
POWELL is having a Junk Con-
testl JUNK! Like stop signs, airplane wings, toilet seats, and as
original aa you can get, cuz. If we
pick your junk as a winner, you
too can win a dinner for two at
the White Lunch, a Free Bus Ride
to Burnaby, a gift certificate at
the Army ft Navy, and many other
swell stuff. What will we do with
this Junk you ask? We're going to
plaster our walls, ceiling, and all
available places with it so that you
can point to a wrinkled stained
bedsheet for instance, and proudly
tell your friends "I did that."
So, starting when you want, start
bringing it in. Bring as many
as you can, but securely tie your
name, address and phone number
to each piece, so we'll know who
to contact. And don't. forget, we
got second, third and fourth prizes
too, like 2 dinners for 2 at the
White Lunch, and 5 Free Bus Ridea
to Burnaby. OKAY?
HAIR SHAPING PROFESSIONALLY
done at UBC Beauty Salon, 5736
University Blvd.,  Tel.   228-8942.
UBC BARBER SHOP (NEAR CAMPUS). Open Mon. to Sat. 5736 University   Boulevard.
$75 FOR 75*
40 Bonus Coupons In This
Year's Bird Calls
AVAILABLE  NOW
BUY   YOUR8  TODAY!
Bookstore and SUB
Travel Opportunities
16
HELP MUST SELL AOSC CHAR-
ter to Toronto departing Dec. 19th,
returning Jan. 3. Call 228-0764 —
Fare $129.	
ASSOCIATION OF STUDENT
Councils Travel Service, Room
100-B,   SUB,  224-0111.
Wanted—Information
17
Wanted—Miscellaneous
18
AUTOMOTIVE
Autos For Sale
21
•63 CHEV. STATION WAGON, 6
cyl., runs perfect, radio, good tires,
new battery, just $275. 228-4342.
(Dieter).	
1971 CORVETTE HARDTOP - CON-
vertible, AM-FM, 18,000, cherry-
silver-grey. Call Dave nights after
8:00 p.m.  685-6493.
Automobiles—Parts
23
BUSINESS SERVICES
Photography
35
p5e~1len0 anb gutter
Camera*
JUST
ARRIVED
•>    Fitted Leather Bag w. lens
mounts for Nikon & Pentax
959.95
•>    Vivitar's  Newest   Lens
F.5 mm 260 mm zoom. F4.5
$219.00
Many  More   Lenses to Choose
From While Quantities Last Only
3010 W. Brdwy.     736-7833
Scandals
37
THE   CBC    RELUCTANTLY   PRE-
sents Doctor Bundolo's Pandemonium
Medicine Show — today, noon, in
SUB Theatre, and they don't have
the nerve to charge for it, so it's
FREE! !	
GET A HOLD OP YOURSELF.
Stronghold is coming! Dance, Sat.,
Nov. 18, 8:30-1 a.m., SUB Ballroom.	
C-90 CASSETTES WITH PLEXI-
glas case. Buy minimum of 6 at
$1.50 each — get 3 FREE! Guaranteed against defects. Pickup point
on campus can be arranged. Call
732-6769.
Typing
40
IBM SELECTRIC TYPING SER-
vice. Theses, Manuscripts, Term
Papers, etc. Mrs. Troche, 437-1355.
EXPERIENCED TYPIST— ESSAYS,
theses, etc. Mrs. Brown, 732-0047.
EXPERIENCED TYPIST WILL
type essays and theses quickly and
accurately. Donna Peaker, 266-
4264,   Kerrisdale.	
TYPING OF ESSAYS, ETC. DONE
quickly and efficiently, 350 a page.
Phone  224-0385  after  5:30 p.m.
TYPING — FAST, EFFICIENT —
Essays, Papers, Theses. 41st and
Marine Drive.   266-5058.	
TYPING! ! —ESSAYS, BOOK RE-
ports, etc. — Reasonable, 3 years
exp. — Good location, 2nd & Burrard.  Phone  Sherl — 732-7823.
ESSAYS, THESES, ETC. EXPERI-
enced. Elec. typewriter, carbon
ribbon.  Reasonable rates. 738-8848.
EFFICIENT ELECTRIC TYPING,
my home. Essays, theses, etc. Neat
accurate work. Reasonable rates.
263-5317.
Typing—Cont.
40
FAST, EFFICIENT TYPIST AVAIL-
able for term papers, essays,
Theses. IBM Electric—Elite type.
Phone   327-5381.	
TYPING OF  ESSAYS,   ETC.   DONE
quickly and efficiently, 35c a page.
Phone 224-0385 after 5:30 p.m.
TOP   TYPIST  —   35c   PAGE
Lindsay,  phone 434-5843.
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted
51
PIZZA PATIO CORNWALL RE-
quires drivers over 21 with own
cars.    Phone    Stuart,    733-3471   or
736-7788.	
WANTED: PART-TIME COCKTAIL
Waitress   for   Night   Club.    Phone
687-1547 after 1:00 p.m.	
SUMMER   1973
CAREER-ORIENTED
SUMMER   EMPLOYMENT
OPPORTUNITIES
This competition is open to both
men and women.
IN THE FIELDS OF: Administration, Engineering and Applied Sciences, Bio-Physical Sciences, Social Sciences and Economics.
ELIGIBILITY: All full-time university students in the above fields
who intend to return to university
in 1973-74. Canadian citizens have
statutory preference for appointment.
TO APPLY: Submit a UCPA application form (available from your
University Placement Office) and
a list of courses taken, to the Public Service Commission of Canada,
203—535 Thurlow St., "Vancouver 5,
B.C. Apply before December tl,
1972. Please quote competition 73-
4200.
Work Wanted
52
INSTRUCTION & SCHOOLS
Tutoring Service
63
THOUGH THIS BE THE YEAR OF
The Mouse, roar into the UBC
Tutorial Centre anytime at Speak-
Easy or see Doug Brock, 12:30-
2:30 to register.
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
GERMAN UPRIGHT PIANO $580—
Simmons double bed $30 —i Italian
bedspread $25—Rug, 9 x 12, like
new $95.   228-4342   (Dieter).
RENTALS & REAL ESTATE"
Rooms
81
CAMPUS DOUBLE ROOMS, KIT-
chen, facilities, $60 per month. 5745
Agronomy,   224-9549.
Room 8c Board
82
CAMPUS ROOM AND BOARD, 5786
Agronomy Road. Sauna, color TV,
good food, recreational area. Phone
224-9684. 	
VACANCY ON CAMPUS MEN'S
residence, St. Andrew's Hall, 224-
7720 or 224-5742.
Communal Housing
85
HOUSE CLEAN BRIGHT, PREFER
grad. or mature student, easy
hitching to campus, $70 per month.
3873  W.  22nd.  228-0764.
Use Your
Ubyssey
Classified Friday, November 17, 1972
THE       UBYSSEY
Page  15
JayVees tune up
A star-studded Big Brothers
team featuring UBC alumni
and assorted other active Big
Brothers faces the UBC
jayvees tonight at 8 in War
Memorial Gym.
And Saturday the Simon
Fraser University jayvees
come to War Memorial in a
direct confrontation with UBC.
It's one of the few chances UBC
fans will get to see the intercity rivals meet head to head.
In the Big Brothers game
John Kootnekoff, coach of the
Simon Fraser University
Clansmen, will wear the Big
Brothers colors as will ex-Bird
Dave Way and Murray
Schapiro, formerly of the
University of Alberta Golden
Bears.
They'll be going up against
the jayvees, who are undefeated in the Lower
Mainland Totem League play.
Douglas College was dealt
with 80-62 Friday as was
hapless Capilano College
Saturday by a score of 82-37.
Wrestlers
host meet
The UBC wrestling team will
be seeing its first action of the
season at the UBC Invitational
Wrestling Tournament
Saturday.
The invitational will be in the
Winter Sports Centre, gym A,
starting at 11 a.m.
Coach Paul Nemeth has
received entries from the
University of Washington,
University of Puget Sound,
Seattle Pacific College,
Western Washington State,
Central Washington, Portland
State, Simon Fraser University and the University of
Calgary.
UBC will enter a strong team
including Olympian Taras
Hryb (190 lbs.), Bill McDonald
(190), Bob Ormond (177) and
Mike Richey (158).
The stiffest competition will
come from the University of
Washington, the team which
upset the top rated American
team last year.
UBC is fielding an exceptionally strong team which
should do extremely well
except in the 118 pound and
heavyweight classes. This
predicament is due to these
classes not being filled.
The team will be travelling
to Calgary in December and
touring the States in January
and February. Hopefully team
members will be sent to the
Canadian Inter-collegiate
Championships in late
February.
Anyone with high aspirations
is asked to attend the workouts
at T-Bird Stadium in room 214
Monday, Wednesday and
Friday at 4:30 p.m.
Teams battle
Twelve teams from
Washington, Oregon, and
British Columbia will battle for
top honors in the volleyball
tournament starting 8:30 a.m.
Saturday at War Memorial
Gym.
The tournament will include
two of Canada's national team
members, Mick Rockwell and
Bob Vosburgh. Both players
will be playing for the Vancouver Volleyball Club.
Top American teams to
observe will be Rubens Five
from Portland, and the Seattle
Volleyball Club.
SP0H TS
VTtfW** « -
^**^V*s.V "^
'Birds fly
to Calgary
Peter Mullin's Canadian
Intercollegiate Champion
basketball Thunderbirds will
be looking for two wins as
Western Conference play
begins on the weekend with the
Dinosaurs in Calgary.
The 'Birds have played just
one game so far, a 83-78 win
over the Grads.
In their 13-3 conference
record last season the 'Birds
dropped one decision to the
Dinosaurs (71-81) in their four
game, home and home series.
Calgary finished with a 7-9
record, tied for third place with
the University of Victoria
Vikings.
—sucha singh photo
IT WASN'T all cheers for UBC at recent Hockey Canada tournament
as the Calgary Dinosaurs beat same 6-5 in overtime and went on to
win the tournament. However, last weekend the 'Birds shackled the
Dinnies twice, 9-2 and 5-4. UBC meets Calgary for a fourth time
Sunday in Calgary.
In hockey:
'Heavy' work begins
Bob Hindmarch's Thunderbird hockey team travels to the
prairies this weekend for a three-game swing.
They play Friday and Saturday in Saskatoon against the
University of Saskatchewan Huskies and Sunday in Calgary
against the Dinosaurs.
Last weekend the 'Birds scored two impressive wins over
the Dinosaurs at home — 9-2 and 5-4. The high-flying Thunderbirds dominated Friday's game, but Saturday was a different story. Calgary held the edge with a 2-0 first period lead,
but the 'Birds tied the score 3-3 at the end of the second.
Brian DeBiasio scored the winning goal with just 10 seconds
left to give UBC its victory.
In other conference action the University of Alberta Golden
Bears downed the University of Saskatchewan Huskies by
identical 4-2 scores in their two-game series played in
Saskatoon. The Thunderbirds have a 4-1-1 record to date.
Gears favoured
By SIMON TRUELOVE
A strong engineering team were the favorites going into the
intramural bowling final Thursday night, having smashed VST
with a 226 average per game.
Soccer is coming to a close with Division II and III finals
Friday noon. The foresters, keen as hell as usual, are in both
finals; against Place Vanier in Div. II and the gears in Div. III.
In order to get intramural people together socially there
will be a social night Wednesday, with lots of foam, songs,
women, men, boat races, and perhaps a few tense confrontations between old rivals from the football and hockey
games.
It's happening in SUB 207 at 6:30 p.m. but if you have things
like basketball games or studying, come over later till 12.
Vic rapped
In a three game exhibition
tour of Vancouver Island, the
Braves field hockey team
dropped a pair of games, but in
turn rapped Victoria 5-1.
Peter Brynjolpon's hat trick
and one goal each by Neil
Tucker and Grant Forsythe
provided the winning margin
against the University of
Victoria Vikings.
However, against the
Esquimalt Rebels UBC ran up
against a more experienced
club and promptly lost 3-1.
Such was also the case in their
game with the Vancouver
Island Invitationals, where
they floundered to the tune of 3-
zip.
In other action, the Thunderbirds came through with a
steady game to defeat the
league leading Jokers A team
2-1.
j:
But do you iook^
as good
Bernard and Mel will
do it for you
A
Tbe
mm
For appointment
224-5540
University Square
Here's a sample of the
BONUS COUPONS in BIRD CALLS
co O
■z
This Coupon Worth $1.00
OFF ANY PRESCRIPTION
FILLED AT
UNI VERSITY PHARM A CY
5754 University Boulevard
224-3202
BUY YOUR COPY TODAY-ONLY 75c
and get more than your money back
by using only one of the
40 BONUS COUPONS INCLUDED
$
If     |\skis
SPECIAL
160
.00
FULL SIZE RANGE
REG. $205
336 W. Pender St. 681-8423, 681-2004
OPEN FRI. NIGHTS 'TIL 9;00
■■■■■■■  FREE PARKING AT REAR OF STORE ^BMB Page   16
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, November 17, 1972
Our Economy
Package
BlSlR
The Ultimate EDS1200 AM/FM receiver has
a full 100 watts of power, and a great number
of features not usually found in a receiver in
the $250 price range. Walnut case is included
too. BSR turntables have received excellent
reviews in stereo magazines. The model
310X has all the devices that make record
handling a breeze. Electra speakers are well
known as "good value" speakers. A minimum of fancy, a maximum of quality. Their
Electra 60's have an acoustic suspension
woofer and tweeter and they are in a lovely
walnut enclosure with textured grille cloth.
Mcdonald
8*V1
QO
i fc» H
<+>
Don't buy this system simply because it's a
good deal (as it happens, the previously
marked prices add up to $488.80). More important is that we think it's a true "sound"
value in that we can't think of a better combination of components, if you're looking for
a system in this price range.
Mill
0 ® © • • • •
Previously
Marked
Ultimate EDS12O0 $2».95
BSR310X $99.95
Electra SO's pair  $119.90
Previously marked
$488.80
System price
'377
FINALLY!
STEREO
FINANCING
WITHOUT
INTEREST!
Kelly's is proud to offer a new service financing with no charge to you for one
year. Any system on this page qualifies
for this introductory offer. Kelly's offers
you the following
• No finance charge for one year
• full warranties in all our systems
• free hookup wire (up to 100 feet)
• free connecting cables, antennas, etc.
• free delivery
• free installation and hookup
• free friendly atmosphere and honest
sound advice
CUISVIA-
^DOLBY" CASSETTE]
DECK NO. SC700I
True high fidelity sound for the first time ever in [
a cassette deck. Features include the famed I
Dolby Noise Reduction System, a wide-band con-1
tourless head, DC servo motor. Permits use of I
standard or high-performance chrome-dioxide I
tapes, makes possible three-microphone mixing I
Beware — this is not an "economy" cassette I
deck but a professional deck capable of the best I
recording using chromium dioxide tape and the |
famous Dolby System
WITH $20
OF
MEMOREX
TAPE
AKAI
GX365ISNOW
"BROADCAST
APPROVED"
■§« V m |
The GX-365 has 3 motors. 3 heads, solen
oid operation, the exclusive Akai Glass
Ferrite focus-field heads, automatic reverse operation, 4 speeds, automatic
recording level control, built-in 50-watt
amplifier, sound-on-sound, sound with
sound, frequency response of 30 to 38,000
plus or minus Mb and wow and flutter of
less than .04% RMS at 7(4 ips.
The GX-365 has virtually every feature
for professional or home use. It sold well
at its previously marked price of $869.95,
and our sale price of $695 makes it unbeatable.
Previously SALE
Marked
$869.95
THE ULTIMATE
NEW AM/FM
4-BAND&
CASSETTE
PORTABLE
RADIO
20 WATT
AMPLIFIER
From:
$   & G
wit ST"~    ** * *'     - «•
Deluxe high uality 20 watt
solid state amplifier with bass
and treble controls, full input
facilities, tape output, etc. Reliable. Ideal for a beginner's
system. Model EDS277
PREVIOUSLY
MARKED
SALE
*89-95
AM, AM. Short Wave. Long]
Wave
CASSETTE   PLAYER   AND |
RECORDER
SLIDE-TYPE VOLUME AND |
TONE CONTROLS
AC/DC OPERATION, SOLID |
STATE
BUILT-IN CONDENSER Ml
CROPHONE
' LOADED WITH FEATURES
MODEL RCV400D   SALE
$148i
KELLY'S
Stereo
MARTS
2714 WEST BROADWAY
540 GRANVILLE • PARK ROYAL
611 COLUMBIA, New West 648 YATES, Victoria
22 VICTORIA CRESC   Nanaimo
SansuM-
| empIreJ|
] ELECTRA
.,_£,_.
.—-*--  OO GO
"THE"
SANSUI
SYSTEM
| A successful stereo system con-
Isists of three base components;
the power source, the sound
source, and the outlet ... speakers.
For power we've chosen the Sansui 310 receiver. It's a fine
AM/FM stereo receiver with 44
watts of power and a signal
strength meter.
For sound it's the Elac 620 turntable, the highly rated model from
West Germany. We include walnut base, tinted dust cover, and
diamond magnet cartridge from
Empire
The speakers are Electra 100's, a
ten inch 3-way system that will
handle plenty of power.
Previously
Marked
Sansui 310,  $319.95
Elac 620U,  $114.95 |
Base, cover,   $25.00
Empire cartridge,     $44.95
Electra 100's  $259.95
J* JK  #
:  W I
' t r. -
rkirlill
Previously marked
$764.75
System price:
$596
Turntables ... AR XA previously marked $129.50 Sale $95,
also: Dual, Thorens, Elac, BSR, Garrard, Speakers . . . Also
Sansui, JBL, Altec Lansing, KLH, Bose, Quad, Akai, JMI, etc.
Receivers ... Kenwood KR5150 Previously marked $499.95
Sale $377. Also: Fisher, Harmon Kardon, Akai, Sansui, Pioneer,
etc. Amplifiers . . . Sony TA1120F (disc) 50 watts RMS per
channel previously marked $499.95, Sale $349, also Quad,
Kenwood, Harmon Kardon, Akai, Sansui, JBL, Marantz, etc.,
Tape Decks . . . Roberts, 1725 mark II (used) reel to reel tape
deck, super deal at $149. Roberts Model 1630 tape deck for
only $99. Also, Concord, Philips, Revox, Akai, Sansui, etc. . . .
Portables, All at super deals too, names such as: Grundig,
Sanyo, Nordmende, Ultimate, Electra, etc.
Above items at 2714 W Broadway only
Mail orders answered promptly

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
http://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.ubysseynews.1-0128076/manifest

Comment

Related Items