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The Ubyssey Feb 3, 1977

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Array Tuition hike sparks shrugs
By KATHY FORD
Student leaders reacted with
uncertainty Wednesday to a
statement Tuesday by UBC administration president Doug
Kenny that tuition fees could increase as much as 40 per cent next
year.
Student leaders in most
professional schools said they do
not know what they will do in
reaction to Kenny's statement that
students in their schools may face
higher tuition increases than will
other students.
Kenny made the statement after
the Universities Council's annual
report was tabled in the legislature.
Council chairman William Armstrong said Wednesday the report
showed the minimum amount
B.C.'s three public universities —
UBC, Simon Fraser University and
the University of Victoria — need
to prevent tuition fee increases is
$194.2 million.
But in the budget, announced last
week, the Social Credit government allotted only $184.5 million in
operating grants to the universities.
Kenny said, "some tuition fees
may have to go up as much as 40
: i nc md i j<jc ■
^Vol. LIX, No. 44        VANCOUVER, B.C., THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 1977
228-2301
More women
than ever
enrol at UBC
Women areentering professional
faculties at UBC more than ever
before, this year's enrolment
figures show.
Bill Tetlow, director of UBC's
office of institutional analysis and
planning, said Wednesday this
year's enrolment figures show that
the number of women entering
professional faculties such as law,
medicine, forestry and engineering
is definitely increasing.
Tetlow also said the number of
women entering UBC has increased.
"The percentage of women attending university has been increasing on a very long-term
basis," he said.
This year's female day student
enrolment is up about 400 to 10,078,
and the number of male day
students dropped.by about 200 to
13,010.
Tetlow said part of the reason for
increased female enrolment in
professional faculties is that
women were previously unaware
they could enter faculties such as
forestry.
The enrolment figures show that
the humber of female students in
law, medicine and agricultural
sciences has increased while the
number of male students in the
same faculties has decreased. '
The number of women in
professional faculties has greatly
increased when compared to
figures from five years ago at
UBC.
There were 50 female law
students at UBC in the 1971-72
academic year while this year
there are 189. The number of
women in forestry jumped to 51
this year from four in 1971-2.
For the first time ever at UBC
women outnumbered men in first-
year student enrolment.
Total enrolment for the winter
session of 24,335 is about one per
cent more than for last year.
Seepage 2: MORE
KIDDIES BALLOONS CAUGHT UP in mean old tree are enough to
break heart of veteran Ubyssey photographer Matt King. Balloons were
apparently lost by school children on UBC visit.
per cent but the average increase that personally, "you can take it
for most students may be much for granted that we'd oppose it.
less ihan that." "We already pay more than arts
Professional    school    under- or science students do. There is no
graduate    society    executives solid reaction from us yet, but I'm
contacted  Wednesday   are   un- only speaking for myself."
certain what to do if differential       Forestry undergraduate society
fees are implemented. president Egon Weger said UBC
Dentistry undergraduate society should   look   at   its   own   intra-
president Anne Crowley said,  "I structure first,
really wouldn't like to comment        "They waste a lot of money at
until I see what happens. physical   plant,   for   example.
"If   differential   fees   are   im- Beforethey make the students pay,
plemented,   besides   making  a they should try and tighten up in
formal protest of course, I don't areas like that,
know what we'd do. "I don't go along with a   dif-
"I think there are two questions ferential  fee  increase.   But   I'm
here: should fees go up, and should game   for   an   increase   if   it's
there  be   differential   fees?   But necessary.   We   have   to   look
nothing is settled." realistically at the situation.
Architecture    undergraduate        "Let's face it,  we don't  want
society president Arne Tune said, much of an increase. And I don't
"we've not talked about this as a see   why   there   should   be   dif-
group.   But   because   we're   a ferential increases anyway. As it is
professional school and all of us we pay more than a lot of faculties,
have degrees, we have all put a lot It's unfair.
of   time   and    effort    into    our        "But   if   there   are   justifiable
education so far. reasons, I guess we might be able
"Some of us wouldn't be able to to see their viewpoint."
afford any more  if there  were        He said he plans  to attend a
differential fees. We already pay meeting   organized    by    some
more than many faculties anyway, student representatives to discuss
"I'm not sure what organized possible   actions   protesting   fee
thing we  could  do,   since  many increases,
students are out working." AMS external affairs officer Moe
Doug Malyuk, pharmacy under- Sihota said Wednesday  the AMS
graduate society president, said he will meet with undergraduate
has no comment to make as he has society presidents Feb. 7.
not studied the report or Kenny's y *'The  AMS *is   planning   some
statement.                                       y^^eourses of action," he said. "We
Jim    Burns,    law    students^/ have  some  very /-definite,; very
association      external      vied/ concrete ideas. A decisien about
president, said he could not spea* which" ones we use will be maile in
on behalf of the association, bim Seepage'2: STUDENT?/
1 :    . . J/
Students attack
composition test
By HEATHER WALKER
Several English 100 students said
Wednesday in a CBC Hourglass
forum in SUB they did not think the
English composition exam had
adequately tested their knowledge
of English.
One student said he had failed
the exam although he had received
A and B grades on all his English
essays this year.
The student, who said he was in
first-year science, said he looked
over the exam when it was
returned to him, and found only
minor mistakes which he would
have corrected if he had had time
to proofread the exam.
"I don't think the whole English
100 mark should be based on one
exam which you have to pass in
two hours," he said.
Another student said he was in a
remedial English section, which he
did not think he needed.
The student said he also failed
the English composition exam.
"I proofread the exam when I got
it back, and I failed because I left
out two commas, one capital letter
and two periods," he said.
"We should look at what the
remedial classes are doing,"  he
Housing offers belly-dancing at Gage
Sexuality, belly dancing,
massage, astrology, yoga and self-
exploration are among 20 courses
the UBC housing office is offering
to Gage Towers residents this
March.
Housing will offer the courses as
part of a cultural and personal
growth centre it is setting up in
Gage to counteract the
dehumanizing - aspects of
university life.
The program, brainchild of Gage
residence co-ordinator John Mate,
will cost interested students $1.50
to $2 for a two or two and a half
hour session. Four evening
sessions will be offered in a four-
week period — one session a week.
Mate said Monday the purpose of
the program is to counteract the
impersonality of residence life and
to give res students a wider perspective on the world.
"The basic idea is to offer people
another look at reality besides the
academic perspective. The concrete high-rise idea we have here is
not very good for personal
development.
"I have seen elsewhere
residences that are much better for
human awareness."
Mate said housing is allocating
$1,500 to expand the program in
September and plans to offer up to
60 courses in personal development
and cultural skills.
Included in the expanded
"miniversity" would be workshops
on dreams, fantasy, gestalt
process, bioenergetics, acupressure, chanting and integration, the Sufi way of learning,
meditation and transactional
analysis.
But Mate said the courses
housing is offering in March are
the 20 most popular according to a
questionnaire filled out by 200
Gage residents.
Photography, European cooking,
pottery, Japanese cooking, self-
defence for women and yoga are
among the most popular courses,
he said.
Mate        recommends        the
miniversity become a project of
the social and sports committee,
and a sub-committee be set up to
administer the program.
Mate says in the written proposal
for the program that students
experience alienation in
elementary and secondary school
and university does little to reverse
this process.
He said development of the intellect at university is often
achieved at the neglect of and often
the expense in potential
development of our emotive,
feeling, physical and creative
parts.
See page 8: HOUSING
said. "The book could be used for
Grade 8 or 9 if you're lucky.
"I feel these remedial classes
are worthless. They might be good
for people with Asian or East Indian backgrounds, who don't know
English that well, but I don't need
it. I feel I've had that background
for*12 years."
The students were part of an
audience of about 50 listening to the
CBC Hourglass forum being
televised in the SUB conversation
pit.
English 100 chairman Jonathan
Wiesenthal, Bill Broadley,
president of the B.C. Teacher's
Federation, and Jim Carter, a
teacher who has worked with the
education department to prepare
the core curriculum, participated
in the forum.
Wiesenthal defended the English
100 exam, saying students who
thought they should not have failed
the exam should talk to him and
have their marks reassessed. And,
he said, failing the exam does not
mean a student will fail English
100. Students who consistently
receive high marks in English 100
essays will not fail because they
fail the composition exam, he said.
Broadley said the BCTF is opposed to the core curriculum
because it does not allow for individual differences among
students.
But Carter said the core
curriculum is necessary because,
"there are things we all should
know."
One teacher in the audience
objected to the core curriculum
because, she said, teachers
already have a core curriculum
which they teach.
"We have textbooks which lay
out what we teach," she said. "The
Social Credit government has had
its way with getting the NDP in the
ferries and ICBC, and now they
want to get the teachers too. The
core curriculum implies that
teachers are teaching in a helter
skelter way all over the place." Page 2
THE        UBYSSEY
Thursday, February 3, 1977
SRA orders press out
The student representative assembly held an in-camera session
Wednesday to discuss board of
governors member Basil Peters'
complaint over a story quoting him
in The Ubyssey.
Themeeting adjourned without a
decision being made when Ubyssey
co-editor Sue Vohanka entered the
meeting and some members objected to her presence.
Peters and other SRA members
asked that the meeting be held in
camera to discuss Peters' complaint about a statement attributed
Student leaders meet
From page 1
consultation with undergrad
presidents." .
He said possible actions range
from tuition fee strikes to simple
acceptance. "We'll let you know as
soon as we decide on something,"
he said.
Commenting on a suggestion
that part of the proposed increase
be in the form of a cost-of-living
allowance clause, Sihota said,
"then we'll always have increases.
There never has been a decrease in
the cost of education.
"That proposal is out to lunch."
Universities council member
David Helliwell said Wednesday a
More women
enrolling
From page 1
The total of undergraduates at
UBC decreased slightly this year
but the number of grad students
increased.
Tetlow said he could not predict
if a tuition increase would affect
next year's enrolment figures.
The number of part-time
students — those taking less than
12 units of courses — decreased by
about one per cent from last year.
COLA clause is only a suggestion.
"If it were implemented, it would
mean the fee revenue will be a
fixed percentage of the universities' operating budgets.
"If operating expenses go up, so
do fees, and if they come down,
fees will too."
He also said he predicts the
Universities Council will recommend that the universities' boards
of governors vote to have a basic
fee increase of 25 per cent.
to him in the Jan. 14, 1977, issue of
The Ubyssey. After a brief
discussion, SRA voted to remain in
camera.
A reporter and two spectators
were ordered out of the meeting
before discussion began. The only
indication given of what was to be
discussed given to the spectators
was that it would concern The
Ubyssey.
As soon as Vohanka entered the
meeting, the discussion ceased.
After a few minutes of informal
discussion, SRA voted to adjourn
until next Wednesday after
Vohanka and a reporter who entered the meeting after her refused
to leave.
SRA was considering striking a
special committee to consider and
resolve the dispute when the
meeting adjourned.
STOP THE SLAUGHTER
Greenpeace film showing
SPEAKER - DR. PATRICK MOORE
Thurs., Feb. 3 - 12:30 p.m.
SUB Theatre  .75' donation
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Further information may be obtained from:
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Thursday, February 3, 1977
THE
UBYSSEY
Page 3
NDP must 'find new dimensions'
By SHANE McCUNE
If the NDP is to win the next
provincial election, Dave Barrett
must "find new dimensions" and
the party must learn money
management, former NDP attorney-general Alex Macdonald
said Wednesday.
Macdonald, now MLA for
Vancouver East, spoke to 35
students in Gage towers Wednesday evening. Although his
speech was advertised as a forum
on polarization in B.C. politics,
Macdonald spoke on the subject for
only a few minutes before launching into a discussion of
democratic socialism in general
and the NDP in particular.
He spoke for about 20 minutes
before yielding the floor to
questions from the audience.
Macdonald said B.C. politics will
be polarized at least as long as the
"coalition government" holds
together.
' 'The coalition is held together by
fear of the NDP," he said. "It's
bound to break up sometime, but
not before the next election," he
said.
Asked whether Dave Barrett
would continue as NDP leader,
Macdonald said:
"There's no opposition from any
quarter of the party to his leadership in the next election. But I've
said to him, and I think he knows,
that he's got to find new dimensions, or he'll lose again."
Asked what he meant by "new
dimensions," Macdonald said,
"you've got to go back to the
drawing board and come up with
new ideas and approaches, and not
give glib answers to tough
questions."
In response to another question,
Macdonald   admitted   that   the
NDP's campaign strategy in the
1975 election focused too heavily on
Barrett.
"We shouldn't have run as the
Barrett party," he said.
Asked who was responsible for
that strategy, Macdonald said, "it
is surprising how little time
politicians have to consider major
decisions sometimes."
"You haven't answered the
question," said one of the listeners.
"Well, I avoided it," said
Macdonald.
Macdonald said the NDP would
have to improve its expertise in
money management.
' 'In welfare, we have to put more
accent on ways for people to find
work than on just getting money,"
he said.
Gays to picket
CBC buildings
OTTAWA (CUP) — The National
Gay Rights Coalition will organize
pickets of CBC buildings in major
cities across the country Feb. 19 to
protest the corporation's policy of
refusing public service announcements for gay groups.
NGRC has also sent letters of
protest to prime minister Pierre
Trudeau and secretary of state
John Roberts.
The CBC reviewed its policy on
public service announcements
following a Halifax Gay Alliance
for Equality intervention before
the Canadian Radio-Television
Telecommunications Commission
hearings on renewing the licence
for the Halifax CBC outlet, CBH.
In its intervention, GAE
protested that CBH's refusal to
accept a public service announcement for its telephone
counselling service discriminated
against homosexuals.
In a Jan. 7 letter to GAE, Peter
Meggs, CBC vice-president for
audience and public relations, said
"The CBC's policy clearly excludes subjects deemed controversial.
"It is felt that the request of your
organization represents subject
matter which is still considered
controversial by our audiences and
therefore we must continue to
apply the policy and refuse your
request in the area of public service announcements," he said.
"However, CBC programming
will continue, as it has in the past,
to give suitable opportunity for the
expression of the main points of
view about homosexuality including opportunity for
homosexuals themselves to put
their view forward."
NGRC spokesman John Duggan
said: "According to the CBC, gay
people are controversial subject
matter. However, the public
service announcement refused by
the Halifax station was direct,
factual information concerning the
organization's services and not
opinionated messages of subject
matter, controversial or otherwise,
as interpreted by the CBC."
The announcement read: "The
Gay Alliance for Equality is
operating a counselling phone line
for male and female homosexuals.
The phone line is for problem
solving, giving out information and
for referrals. The hours to call are
from 7 to 10 p.m. Thursday, Friday
and Saturday. All calls are strictly
confidential. The number is 429-
6969."
Pointing out that there are more
than 50 gay organizations across
the country, Duggan said, "There
is certainly no controversy about
the fact  these organizations  do
exist, and many of them have been
long established as respectable
social service agencies in their
respective communities.
"The CBC's decision to reject
announcements from these
organizations is a denial of the
right of all people, and not just
homosexuals, to be made aware of
the activities or organizations in
their communities."
Prior to the decision to apply this
policy, some CBC stations across
the country did run announcements for gay groups, he
said. He said the CBC's policy
"ignores the fact that 10 per cent of
the audience, which according to
Mr. Meggs, still considers gays
controversial, is in effect made up
of lesbian women and gay men.
At their annual conference in
Vancouver Dec. 16 to Jan. 2,
members of Canadian University
Press decided to boycott CBC
advertising in their student
newspapers until the CBC policy
changed.
Asked about the boycott's effect,
John MacEwan, director of radio
for the Maritimes, said, "Students
are no longer receiving information that they are entitled to
have."
He did not feel the boycott was
having any effect on CBC policy.
QUIET PLACE TO PLAY FLUTE is found in SUB by grad student Maureen Clarke. Stairs
to run up and down than scales. Musicians and others often use SUB stairs to practice skills.
—matt king photo
may prove harder
Board approves rent, food increases
The board of governors Tuesday
approved a five per cent increase
in residence food prices and rent
increases of as much as 17.8 per
cent.
Board finance committee
member George Morfitt said the
food price increases were considered by both the finance committee and food services head
Robert Bailey to be the lowest
increases possible.
"These were the rates the
students were prepared to accept,"
Morfitt said.
The rates, which are effective in
September, were recommended by
the joint residences committee,
made up of acting housing head
Michael Davis, Bailey, housing
business manager Susan Nickles
and one student representative
from each of the five residences.
Student board member Basil
Peters said he and newly-elected
student member Moe Sihota had
discussed the increases with Davis
and were satisfied they were
necessary.
Peters said although he and
Sihota did not like the idea of increases, they were "as happy as
we can be with them."
But Sihota said he  could not
support the increases because
students have asked him to express
their concern about the increases
to the board.
"I've been speaking to members
of the student housing access
committee and the Gage liason
committee, and because of my own
feelings and things said in these
meetings I would find it very
difficult to support these increases."
Sihota said the residence rate
increases will combine with a
tuition fee increase, increased food
prices both in and outside of
residence and increased transportation prices to cause financial
problems for students.
Price increases could limit the
accessibility of a university
education, Sihota said.
"I realize the university is in a
financial bind, but I hope the board
Book prices to rise
Book prices will increase slightly
next year, UBC bookstore
manager John Hedgecock said
Wednesday.
Although he could not give an
exact estimate, Hedgecock said it
would be a "small increase." Book
prices rose 10 per cent this year.
He said publishers did not announce price increases as usual at
recent book sellers' meetings, but
prices will likely go up to keep pace
with inflation.
"Book prices don't go up as fast
as other things. They usually keep
behind inflation," Hedgecock said.
There have been few distribution
problems this year, unlike earlier
years, he said. "Things are really
going on a lot better this year."
Hedgecock said the bookstore's
profit this year will not be as large
as last year's $108,000 profit.
"One thing I'm certain about, the
surplus is not going to be as much
as last year," he said. He said
increased wages will cut profits,
which are placed in a special fund
for bookstore expansion.
will realize the students' ability to
pay is limited."
Administration president Doug
Kenny told the board in the closed
part of the meeting he believes a
tuition fee increase is necessary
next year to prevent the university
from cutting programs.
He asked the board to consider at
the March meeting the possibility
of tuition fee increases, Sihota
said.
Rooms in Gage residence will
rent for $887 next year, an increase
of 11.5 per cent. Gage low-rise
apartments will cost $936 per
person, a 17.8 per cent increase.
Rooms will be slightly less expensive at Totem Park than Place
Vanier residence next year. Rent
for a single room in Totem will
increase 6.9 per cent to $1,451 while
in Vanier rent will increase by nine
per cent to $1,467.
A double room in Totem will
remain at this year's.rate of $1,347,
but a Vanier double will increase
by 3.4 per cent to $1,370.
A senior single room in Totem
will cost $1,588 next year, an increase of 9.8 per cent. Senior
singles are larger than regular
single rooms. Rents will increase
by five per cent in Acadia Camp
and 10.6 per cent in Acadia Park. Page 4
THE
UBYSSEY
Thursday, February 3, 1977    *•*.„
Let's fight
tuition hikes
. Student leaders on campus will meet Monday to try and
work out some kind of strategy to oppose tuition fee
increases.
We hope they'll consider a suggestion.
It seems obvious that if any effective moves are going to
be made to oppose tuition fee increases — those moves will
have to happen now.
After all, the Universities Council will be dividing the
three universities' shares of the university allotment soon.
Once that's done, UBC's board of governors will make a
decision on how much tuition fees should be increased.
Administration president Doug Kenny has already told
the board that tuition fees should be increased 25 per cent if
the university is going to maintain the programs it currently
offers without making too many cutbacks.
And the board will discuss, and make a decision based on,
Kenny's recommendation very soon. It will — unless
something drastic happens first — decide to go along with
Kenny's recommendation and zap! tuition fees will increase.
What we're suggesting is that strong action is needed now
— before the board makes a decision about Kenny's
recommendation.
We're suggesting that student leaders launch a campaign
urging students not to pay any fees next year in excess of
their tuition fees this year.
And we're suggesting that student leaders organize a rally
or demonstration within the next month — before the board
makes its decision — which will show the board that students
are serious about not paying any increases.
If that can happen, it will urge the board and the
university administration to go back to the government and
pressure for additional funds to be granted to the universities.
But the board and the administration won't have any part
of that until they're convinced that students are serious
about not paying increased tuition fees.
There's time for a concentrated campaign among
students, to explain why tuition fees should not be increased,
to explain why the whole idea of tuition fees is not a good
thing, to explain that they hinder the accessibility of
post-secondary education.
So we urge the student leaders to consider initiating that
kind of campaign at their meeting Monday. -
Because we think that if they pass up this opportunity to
protest tuition fees, any actions later will be as successful as
flogging a dead horse.
(J d
J
j
-J J
o
J /
J
4SN&ttW)
Letters
Endangered turkey speaks out
Well folks, I'm back again,
riding a swell of unpopular demand
and highly critical defame.
Such emotional accolades —
"Who the fuck does he think he
is?" raved one unidentified
engineer. "We'll teach that asshole
not to mess around with us,"
chorused another group. "What
shall we do with the scumbag?
Why don't we tank him?"
Brilliant, but entirely predictable. Must you always be so
goddamned trite?
You realize, of course, that all
this does is prove that it takes 62
gears to tank one arts student.
Fortunately for you, the thought
of engineers and water is so
revolting that my pen breaks out in
hives and has constant nose bleeds
just thinking about it.
The only cure is to give it a brisk
workout until the symptoms
disappear.
I suppose I really should be
thanking all of you for this flattering attention — thanks to you
my goal in life has been made clear
to me, and my future assured.
Since the 62 signatures of my
contract have demonstrated such a
Turkeyman
This is a gesture of support for.
Kevin McGee as he tries to decide
whether he is a man or turkey.
Kevin's decision shouldn't be too
difficult.
What separates a man from the
beasts is his ability to think, to use
his brain in a rational manner.
Obviously, it does not make sense
for Kevin to willingly present
himself at the library pond —
unless he consciously decides that
is really what he wants to do, that
is, go swimming in February.
If he decides through a logical
process of thought that it is too cold
to swim in February and he doesn't
want to go, he will not.
This is what we call "using one's
head."
Now, it is obvious that turkeys'do
not use their heads at all. In fact,
they are most often seen without
them since they have no real use
for them. Since Kevin obviously
uses his head, it will be seen that he
cannot be a turkey — whatever his
decision.
It is also clearer now exactly
why Kevin found the term
"turkey" so appropriate for the
engineers.
Carol Nielsen
arts 3
Cathy Simmons
social work 4
Sheila Lidwill
arts 2
John Russell
graduate studies
Susanna Neufeld
arts 3
paucity of originality, allow me to
make a few suggestions to add a bit
of class to the occasion.
For starters, why don't we make
today a special event, and get some
worldwide publicity? I suggest
putting me in the library pond,
armed with a copy of the Red Rag
and throwing in a killer mink
wearing water wings.
We could bring in the press and
television, film the struggle and
show it globally on closed-circuit
screens for $10 a throw.
Since this is my own idea, I
would get a complete monopoly on
the residuals — T-shirts, dolls, TV
spin-offs, disco hits, board games,
etc.
I expect to take in between $10
and $20 million, and with this
money I'd like to take off to Pango-
Pango and work on developing a
special strain of guard minks.
Train the little bastards to go for
the throat of anyone wearing jackboots and a red jacket.
With a potential market of 20,000
here at UBC, I could sell them for
$50 each and be set for life.
Who knows, the possibilities are
limitless.
They could be trained to go for
thecolors of engineering jackets at
other universities around the
world, and perhaps in time we'd be
rid of these mindless buffoons.
One last point — this afternoon I
put myself on the endangered
species list of the Audubon Society,
so anyone who knocks me off is
subject to a $5 million fine.
One can't be too careful when
one is dealing with drooling mental
deficients.
Donations may be mailed to Box
123, SUB.
Kevin McGee
arts 4
Gazette supports Ubyssey
a
As originators of the CBC radio advertising boycott, we would like to
indicate our support to The Ubyssey in your efforts to refuse advertising from the CBC.
We oppose your student council's interference with The Ubyssey as
advertising decisions should be part of the editorial policy of any
paper. We realize that a concern of the publishers is money, but this
should not be a priority when deciding to run or refuse advertising
from people practising discrimination.
The Dalhousie student council executive had voted in favor of ordering us to continue running CBC ads, but the council as a whole
supported the Gazette, 16-3-0. Dalhousie student council president
Gord Neal said, "I don't support discrimination. I don't care how
much it costs."
CBC's discrimination against gays is a national policy, and if you
check locally you'll find that the same policy exists in Vancouver.
Urge your council to cease interference. If, in fact, they order you to
run CBC ads — don't listen to them.
Dalhousie Gazette
Of thanks and kept words
We are writing Ihis letter in
partial fulfillment of a commitment made upon the word of an
engineer.
Pathetic
On Tuesday my lunch was interrupted by the engineers,
parading their tattered old
machismo image through SUB in
the company of a naked female on
a horse.
There may have been an era —
(maybe two decades ago?) — when
that sort of thing was risque. In
1977, it's merely pathetic.
Perhaps some public-spirited
group on campus should start a
fund, with the object and purpose
of dragging the engineering faculty
— kicking and screaming, no doubt
— into the 20th century.
N. Green
law 1
Engineers always keep their
word and the Red Rag
was delivered as usual, on time.
We would also like to take this
opportunity to thank all those
people, you may not all know who
you are, that donated to the CKNW
orphan's fund through the pancake
breakfast or otherwise.
With your kind help we were able
to make a total donation of $300.
Keith Gagne
Steve Creed
engineering undergraduate society
Cheers!
THE UBYSSEY
FEBRUARY 3, 1977
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the
university year by the Alma Mater Society of the University of
B.C. Editorial opinions are those of the staff and not of the AMS
or the university administration. Member, Canadian University
Press. The Ubyssey publishes Page Friday, a weekly commentary
and review. The Ubyssey's editorial office is in room 241K of the
Student Union Building. Editorial departments, 228-2301;
Advertising, 228-3977.
Co-Editors: Sue Vohanka, Ralph Maurer
"The Red Rag is out, gang!" twittered Cnris Gainor. "Oh, let me see,"
said Marcus Gee and Bill Tieleman, grabbing at the daintily-designed paper.
"Oh, yechh, it's fuchsia!" gasped Kathy Ford in horror. "Hey, the
engineers are showing their true colors," exclaimed Ralph Maurer and
Heather Walker gleefully. Sue Vohanka walked over and picked up the
scurrilous material. "I wonder how they talked the printers into using this
pink ink," she mused. Amanda King and Shane McCune looked on with
interest as Doug Rushton and Steve Howard made plans for putting out a
baby blue Ubyssey next press day. Matt King and Doug Rushton discussed
the best method for reproducing the vile color in a photograph which they
would use to blackmail the Fuchsia Rag's authors. "It'll never work," said
Verne McDonald. "They'll only answer red mail." Nancy Southam threw
up. And there's a staff meeting at 1 p.m. today. Should be a qood one,
after Last night's SRA meeting, so show up.Doug Field and Dave Hancock,
Once again, the non-engineer
population of this university has
been shown what men some
members of the engineering undergraduate society can be.
I hope Kevin McGee shows up
today, and I for one will be there to
cheer you on.
But why just throw him in the
pond?
Why not cut his hands off so he
can never write again?
Mike Berris
commerce 1
The Ubyssey welcomes letters
from all readers.
Letters should be signed and
typed. Pen names will be used
when the writer's real name is also
included for our information in the
letter and when valid reasons for
anonymity are given.
Although an effort is made to
publish all letters received, The
Ubyssey reserves the right to edit
letters for reasons of brevity,
legality, grammar or taste.
Letters should be addressed to
the paper care of campus mail or
dropped off at The Ubyssey office,
SUB 241K. Thursday, February 3, 1977
THE
UBYSSEY
Page 5
By GURUCHARAN SINGH
Singh is director of the Kundalini
Research Institute, which specializes in the
study of addictive and toxic food substances.
The article is reprinted from the
Dalhousie Gazette, student newspaper at
Dalhousie University in Halifax.	
Canada runs on caffeine, delivered direct
to all citizens regardless of race, creed,
color or age in tea, coffee, colas and
chocolate bars.
The price your body pays for just one cup
of coffee is high.
Your stomach temperature rises 15
degrees, stomach acid secretion increases
as much as 400 per cent, your heart speeds
up by 15 to 20 beats, the lungs work 13 to 15
per cent harder, the blood vessels in your
brain get narrower, and your over-all
metabolism speeds up 15 to 25 per cent.
While the mouth isn't too fussy about its
intake, the body is on the alert, producing
twice as much urine as normal to flush the
xanthine compounds - the family of alkaloid
poisons to which caffeine belongs - out of the
system.
Were you a small mouse, and a drop of
pure caffeine were injected into your skin,
you'd quiver, waver and in a few minutes
collapse in a state of near-death!
Coffee — culprit
masquerading
as best friend
Caffeine impairs that part of the central
nervous system responsible for carrying out
precise tasks.
To protect the nervous system from overexcitation, especially in the. cortex, the
enzyme cholinesterase opposes the action of
the chemical acetylcholine which is
responsible for triggering electrical impulses across nerve synapses.
Caffeine inactivates the cholinesterase,
providing the initial "lift" and increased
sense of well-being, mental clarity and
alertness.
Since caffeine contains no food value, this
^mp
extra surge of energy must come from your
own body's emergency reserve system.
Unreplaced energy, once spent, produces
depression, to which the usual antidote is —
another dose of caffeine.
The effects of caffeine on the circulation
and heart fall into two categories —
mechanical and chemical.
Locally, the effect of the caffeine is to
stimulate the heart to beat faster. In
response, the principle brain centre for
slowing the heart is activated. .
The tension between these opposing
directives produces stress, and can lead to
irregularity of heart action.
Stress, in turn, triggers a chemical
reaction; more adrenalin is added to the
blood which releases bound fats into free
fatty acids and raises the cholesterol content.
Studies show that coffee drinkers increase
their risk of coronary heart disease and
thrombosis by 35 per cent more than non-
coffee drinkers.'
The same holds true for high intakes of
other caffeine products.
When it hits the stomach, caffeine causes
a sharp rise in hydrochloric acid secretion.
Usually the acid recedes in a few hours,
but in a recent study of healthy adults, five
per cent did not return to normal, arid over
time all these people developed serious
stomach disorders.
The effect of caffeine on sleep is perhaps
the most popularly known.
While it does not interfere with the first
stage of sleep, it does delay the onset of
sleep.
Over a long period of sleep deprivation,
Ihe effects of the caffeine will make you feel
more tired than if you had stayed awake
using cold showers or other methods.
The conflicting nerve impulses to muscles
caused by caffeine result in extra tension.
When the body experiences a stress
situation, it has a standard chemical stress
reaction that can be measured, the main
To boycott or not —
the question coffee prUes pose
The following article is an editorial
reprinted from the Dalhousie International,
a monthly publication of the Dalhousie
Gazette, student newspaper at Dalhousie
University in Halifax.
Before you decide to join the coffee
boycott, or to applaud the efforts of
researchers who are developing coffee
substitutes, consider the following facts.
Coffee provides employment for more
than 20 million people in 50 producing
nations.
And coffee accounts for more than a
quarter of the export earnings of 11 Latin
American and African nations.
Coffee, like other primary commodities
produced in the third world, arrives on the
supermarket shelf as a result of "free
trade" between countries.
The unequal nature of trade relationships
between developed and developing nations
has been obscured by the myth of fair exchange.
In reality, the coffee producers are
trapped by the laws of supply and demand:
when the harvest is good, prices will fall;
when it is poor, prices will rise but there will
be less to sell.
Either way, the coffee producing nations
are at the mercy of their buyers. The value
of the product increases considerably once it
has been processed into instant coffee.
This takes place mainly in the rich
countries, which have erected tariff
barriers against finished products in order
to discourage developing nations from
manufacturing goods prior to export.
Brazil has recently managed to develop a
processing industry.
However, other coffee producers have
been unable to break the stranglehold of the
multinational companies, which
manufacture instant coffee in the consuming countries.
The dynamics of present world trade
systems can be summarized briefly.
Developed nations have the industrial and
agricultural capacity to offer a wide variety
of products for sale. Developing nations
usually have to depend on one or two
primary commodities.
Developed nations can alter their
production of manufactured goods to meet
fluctuations in the world market without
severe economic repercussions. Developing
nations have less flexibility, as a commodity
such as coffee takes years from the time
seedlings are planted until the trees bear
fruit.
Developed nations receive a rising price
for their manufactured goods, and are busy
developing synthetic substitutes for raw
materials. These factors have contributed to
a drop in the purchasing power of the
agricultural exports of developing countries.
The coffee market is controlled by 18
multinationals, and the coffee growing
nations compete with each other for a share
of that market.
Could they follow the example of the
Organization of Petroleum Exporting
Countries and combine to assume control
over the supply and price of coffee? In doing
so, they would.be faced with many difficulties.
Oil can be turned off at a tap and left
underground, so it is relatively simple to
restrict the amount sold.
Coffee growing, on the other hand, is a
labor-intensive industry, involving millions
of small farmers.
Coffee beans are also perishable, so stockpiling on a large scale would require the
development of a manufacturing industry in
producing nations.
Even if the developing countries were to
receive a fair price for their coffee, this
would not ensure a just system of exchange.
In Brazil, which produces a quarter of the
world's coffee, much of the crop is harvested on large estates owned by wealthy
landlords.
By the time the benefits of coffee sales
have trickled down to the workers on such
estates, they have very little to show for
their labor.
In Tanzania, on the other hand, coffee is
cultivated on smallholdings farmed by a
chemical group most often used for this
measurement being the catacholamines.
Recent study has shown that even moderate
amounts of coffee result in a significant
urinary catacholamine secretion.
One effect of the additional stress is the
decreased ability to make major changes in
behavioral patterns.
Any change in habit requires an expenditure of energy and some stress. You
regulate how much you usually stress or
risk in order to preserve yourself.
If the brain checks the body and finds that
it's already in a stress condition, you won't
be able to exert as much to change your
habits - e.g., the caffeine habit.
Habituation does occur with regular
caffeine intake.
If you drink four or five cups of coffee a
day over a period of months and then stop,
you'll experience classical withdrawl
symptoms — mental craving, dizziness,
weakness and headaches.
One popular relief from these symptoms
is to take aspirin. But to give that immediate
sense of "well being," most aspirins sold
today contain the culprit itself — caffeine.
The caffeine habit can be broken.
By first examining yourself to see just
what the habit does for you, you can plot a
practical counter-attack.
Since caffeine is taken primarily as a
stimulant, you can replace the caffeine with
food having real fuel and nourishment
value. The "lift" will feel much the same,
but qualitatively it will be different.
Instead o f tearing your body down in order
to provoke emergency reserves into action,
it will build your body up.
A handful of raisins, chewed slowly, will
help perk you up without the subsequent letdown of caffeine stimulation.
For coffee-taste addicts there are a wide
variety of coffee substitutes available at
natural and health-food stores.
Tea can be replaced with herbal teas,
which aside from omitting the caffeine,
have the additional advantages of soothing
and healing powers.
Colas can be relieved of their duties by the
intake of fruit juices or a sasparilla (honey
and soda water mixture).
Chocolate, which robs the body of B
vitamins and blocks the proper utilization of
calcium, can be replaced with natural carob
flavoring.
It might take a little time to get used to
these new flavors, but during that same
period you'll just be getting used to feeling a
lot better than usual, as well.
-»*... tUrtJtU*?K*J»*-
single family, and growers have been
organized in a co-operative structure. This
has led to a much fairer distribution of
revenue.
Given the current terms of trade as
described above, who is likely to suffer as
Ihe result of a North American coffee
boycott?
Will the multinational companies be
prepared to reduce their profit margins
when they are in a position pass the loss
down the line to the producing nations?
And will the elite of those nations absorb
such a loss when they control the living
standards of their peasantry9
Yes, North American families will be
adversely affected by a rise in the price of
coffee.
But it is ultimately the poor families of
Latin America and Africa who will be
punished by a drop in demand motivated by
self-interest in the west. Page 6
THE
UBYSSEY
Thursday, February 3, 1977
Drinking
again?
Are you an off-campus student
who likes to drink at the Pit?
Does this habit mean you drive
home slightly "impaired"?
The Vancouver People's Law
School has just the course for
you.
Impaired driving and the law is
the subject of one of 10 Sunday
afternoon seminars. The seminar
Hot flashes
is Feb. 6 from 1:30 p.m. to 4:30 Christmas Seal auditorium at the
p.m. corner of 10th and Willow. It will
To   pre-register   for   this   free be    followed    by    an    informal
lecture, phone 681-7532. discussion on South Africa.
South Africa        UELtlaims
Women's issues and education
in South Africa are the subjects of
an Oxfam and United Nations
association   presentation   Friday.
Judith Marshall, Oxfam South
Africa project development
co-ordinator, will give the
presentation at 7:30 p.m. in the
'Tween classes
The Musqueam Indian band is
claiming the entire University
Endowment Land.
If you want to learn more
about the land claim, come to the
grad students' centre garden room
at noon, Friday. The graduate
student association is presenting a
program on the Musqueam band
and the UEL, and it's free.
civil
7:30
Symphony
noon,     War
TODAY
AMS ARTS GALLERY
Fine   arts   prof   Lionel  Thomas  on
myths, legends and concepts of his
Images, 1:30 p.m., SUB art gallery;
astronomy   prof   Michael   Ovendon
on the origin  of the constellations,
noon, SUB art gallery.
CHINESE STUDENTS'
ASSOCIATION
Joe   Wai   on   history,   development
and future of the Chinese Cultural
Centre   and   Chinatown,   noon,   Bu.
100.
POLITICAL SCIENCE
Anthony Birch of Exeter, England,
on Scottish  nationalism, noon,  Bu.
102.
CHINESE CHRISTIAN
FELLOWSHIP
The   church   in   China,  noon,  SUB
205.
CPSC soc
General    meeting,   noon,   old
engineering building.
UBC  INTRAMURALS
Co-rec    badminton,   doubles,
p.m., War Memorial Gym.
INTER VARSITY
CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP
Don  McLeod on  being a Canadian
noon, Chem. 250.
DEAN OF WOMEN
Free     Vancouver
Orchestra     concert,
Memorial Gym.
INSTITUTE OF
ASIAN RESEARCH
Asian studies prof Steve Harrell on
the social structure of three Taiwan
villages,   4:30  p.m.,   Bu.  Penthouse.
GAY PEOPLE OF UBC
Meeting,    organizing   dance,    noon,
SUB 211.
ENGLISH DEPARTMENT
Free  Canadian  movies,  Klee Wyck,
My   Financial  Career,  This Was the
Time, noon, Bu. 106.
SIMS
Group    meditation    and    advanced
lecture, noon, Buto. 297.
CHRISTIAN SCIENCE
ORGANIZATION
Testimony     meeting,     noon,    SUB
117.
UBC LIBERALS
General meeting, noon, SUB 213.
YOUNG PROGRESSIVE
CONSERVATIVES
General meeting, noon, SUB 119.
PHOTOSOC
Start   preparing   prints   for  second
exhibition, March 1 to 5.
GREENPEACE
Film, Save the Seals, Patrick Moore
speaking, noon, SUB theatre.
FRIDAY
CHINESE VARSITY CLUB
Sign up for CVC sports, SUB 216A.
AMS ART GALLERY
Exhibition: The Arrow of Time:
Myths, Legends, Art and Science in
Astronomy, 11:30 a.m. to 2:30
p.m., SUB art gallery.
YOUNG SOCIALISTS
WI   ombudsperson   Steve   Watson
MUSSOC
presents....
an original
revue
February 2-5 &
9-12 8:30 p.m.
Old Auditorium
Tickets V.T.C.
& Outlets
Student Matinee
Feb. 10th
12:30 P.M.
$2.00
Tickets
A.M.S. Business Office
on the issues before the student
movement,  8 p.m.,  1208 Granville.
CHINESE STUDENTS'
ASSOCIATION
Ballroom dancing, 7 p.m., SUB 212;
folk song group, 5:30 to 7:30 p.m.,
SUB 213; free Cantonese club,
noon, Bu. 316.
SKI CLUB
Disco, free to members and guests,
8:30 p.m., SUB party room.
UBC MEN'S GYMNASTIC TEAM
Men's gymnastic competition, UBC
vs.  Eastern Washington,  7:30 p.m.,
PE Unit 2, gymnastics gym.
SKYDIVING
Dinner, 5:00 p.m., Spaghetti
Factory, Gastown, general meeting,
noon, SUB 215.
FOAM!
Mattresses
Bolster
Camper—Boat
Cushion
Foam Chair
Orthopedic
Wedges
Camping
Pads
MADE TO ORDER
Open Six Days a Week
9 a.m. -5:30 P.M.
United Foam 1976 Ltd.
3696 W. 4th
738-6737
FRIDAY NOON PROGRAM
Presented by the Graduate Students' Association
Ihe Musqueam and the U.E.L
This
A slide and tape presentation
is   the  first  in   a  series  of  weekly   informational   events
sponsored by the GSA. Admission is free, and you can bring your
lunch.
FRIDAY 12:30
GRAD CENTRE GARDEN ROOM
UBC SINGLE STUDENT RESIDENCES
TOTEM PARK AND PLACE VANIER
REQUIRE RESIDENCE FELLOWS FOR
1977-1978
A Residence Fellow, as the name implies, is a fellow residence
student who interacts with House members on a daily basis. In
this role, the Residence Fellow acts as a friend and peer
counsellor in helping students develop as individuals and
community members.
The position provides an opportunity to develop basic human
relations skills that will enable the Residence Fellow to make a
positive contribution to residence life. As a part of the total
residence team, the Residence Fellow contributes to the overall
quality of residence life and provides support and assistance to
the House Advisor.
Applications forms are available at the Student Housing Office in
the Ponderosa Building and at the front desk of each residence
area: Totem Park, Place Vanier and Walter H. Gage.
Applications will close on Friday, February 18, 1977.
UBC SINGLE STUDENT RESIDENCES
REQUIRE HOUSE ADVISORS FOR
1977-1978
As a mature senior student living and working within the
residence, the House Advisor provides basic paraprofessional
advisory services to residence students.
As a student leader and a part of a residence area team, a House
Advisor is important in developing a sense of community within
the residence area and in contributing to the overall quality of
residence life.
This position involves diversified tasks and calls for a
commitment of purpose and flexibility in responding to varied
situations. Candidates will possess a basic knowledge of human
relations skills and a willingness to further develop in areas such
as communication, leadership and counselling.
Application   forms   are   available   at   the  front   desk   of   each
residence area. Totem Park, Place Vanier and Walter H. Gage, and
at the Student Housing Office in the Ponderosa Building.
Applications will close on Friday, February 18, 1977.
IS 3 g§]E]B]E]B]E]B]G]E] e]S]e]E|e)g] ggggaggggggggggEjEjEjBjEjicj-
1       CANDIA TAVERNA        I
[3 FAST FREE PIZZA DELIVERY IS
H Call 228-9512/9513 IS
IS |g
H 4510 W. 10th Ave., Open 7 Days a Week 4 p.m.-2 a.m. S]
13 IsIslalslsIalalalaBIalslalaBIaBBIalalalalala BEBEBBIalaBBIHaB |tn
Henneken Auto
EXPERT VOLKSWAGEN SERVICE
8914 Oak St. (Oak & Marine) 263-8121
S.Kg.
TUESDAY - FRIDAY    8 p.m. - 12:30 a.m. NIGHTLY
SATURDAYS    7 p.m.- 12:30 a.m. NIGHTLY
HAPPY HOUR FF,IDAr    8-9:00 p.m.
FAMILY HOUR SATURDAY 7 - 8:00 p.m.
MAir: FLOOR - SOUTH END - S.U.B.
SUB FILMS presents
JACK NICHOLSON
ONE FIEW OVER
THE CUCKOO* NEST
This Thurs. - 7:00
Fri., Sat., Sun. -J7:00, 9:45
WE CLASSIFIEDS
RATES:    Campus - 3 lines, 1 day $1.50; additional lines 35c.
Commercial — 3 lines,  1 day $2.50; additional lines
50c. Additional days $2.25 and 45c.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone and are payable in
advance. Deadline is 11:30 a.m. the day before publication.
Publications Office, Room 241, S.U.B., UBC, Vancouver.
5 — Coming Events
SKI APEX during mid-term break.
Snow's plentiful. Ask for Bill at
228-8943   or  224-9866.
FREESEE: Today, Vancouver Symphony
Orchestra. Free concert, War Memorial Gym.  12:45-1:45 p.m.
10 — For Sale — Commercial
30 — Jobs
COMMUNITY SPORTS
RACQUET STRINGING
Very low rates. Excellent workmanship. 24-hour service, plus exceptional prices for racquets. Call 733-
1612. 3616 West 4th Ave. Open 10
a.m.
11 — For Sale — Private
LOUDSP5AKERS Hegeman One's praised by the Absolute Sound upto 64
watts.$250.   Phone  Nick  929-2662.
VEGA. 1971 wagon 34,000 miles. $600.
Days, 228-4925, leave message.. Nights
228-9831.
THE FISHING VESSEL OWNER'S Association of B.C. requires a secretary/manager. Please reply giving
background and experience, salary expected, availability for interview and
for commencement of employment.
Industry experience helpful but not
essential. Reply in writing only to
Mr. Richard Martinolich, 203-8941
Granville St., Vancouver, B.C. V6P
4ZS.
40 — Messages
70 — Services
85 — Typing
EFFICIENT    SELECTRIC     TYPING    my
home. Essays, thesis, etc. Neat accurate work. Reasonable rates.
263-5317.
EXPERIENCED TYPIST. Reasonable
rates. Call Monica Thompson, 985-
8124.
15 — Found
20 — Housing
ROOM & BOARD AVAILABLE. 2270
Westbrook Cres. (on campus). Phone
228-8948  or   224-9866.
ACCOMMODATION for two students.
Mtele, non-smokers preferred. Furnished upstairs $80 per month, downstairs $90 per month. Apply after
4:00 p.m. 5548 Kings Road, next to
campus.
EBCELLENT TYPING at home on IBM
Selectric. Vancouver pick-up. Reasonable   rates.   986-2577.
CAMPUS DROP-OFF for fast accurate
typing. Reasonable rates. Call 731-
1807 after  12:00.
EXPERIENCED TYPIST. Work at home.
Rate: 70c per page and up. Phone
876-0158  if  Interested.
EXCELLENT TYPING on IBM Selectric.
Neat, accurate and fast. Reasonable
rates.  922-4443.
99 — Miscellaneous
SKI WHISTLER
Bent cabin day/week.  732-0174
UBYSSEY CLASSIFIED GET RESULTS Thursday, February 3, 1977
THE
UBYSSEY
Page 7
SRA spending stays down
The student representative
assembly has spent little of its
$33,000 budget this year, Alma
Mater Society treasurer Herb
Dhaliwal said Thursday.
But it plans to spend more money
on expanding its programs before
the fiscal year ends in nine weeks,
he said.
The AMS advanced its fiscal
year by two months this year, to
prevent the AMS from running out
of money in May, as has happened
before, Dhaliwal said.
Thegreatest saving of SRA funds
was made by the teaching and
academic standards committee,
which has spent only $500 of its
$6,000 budget. This committee is
producing an anti-calendar, but is
waiting for senate approval before
continuing with it, AMS external
affairs officer Moe Sihota said.
He said senate will not approve
the anti-calendar before March, so
the committee may delay it until
next year. The committee will
spend all of its budget printing the
anti-calendar, Sihota said.
"It will be the most thorough
anti-calendar yet."
The special projects committee
has spent $2,000 of the $6,000
allotted to it. The money was spent
promoting National Student Day
and on a letter campaign which
protested tuition fee increases.
More than 6,000 protest letters
were sent to education minister
Pat McGeer.
Sihota said this committee will
spend more money if another
protest is organized against tuition
fee increases.
The student housing and access
committee has spent only $250 of
its $1,000 budget. But it will spend
more soon protesting residence fee
increases, Sihota said.
Only $300 of the $2,000 legal
expenses fund has been spent. The
SRA paid a lawyer to present a
legal opinion that student board of
governors member Rick Murray
could not remain a student
representative on the board
because he was no longer a
student.
Sihota said more money will be
spent on legal advice when the SRA
gets a legal opinion next week
about the validity of next year's
proposed residence rate increases.
Some increases are more than the
provincial 10.6 per cent increase
PANGO PANGO (UNS) - This
tiny inland kingdom's infamous
two-headed monster split against
itself after the Stupid Reactionary
Assembly bulldozed the local
newspaper's leading heavy out of
their meeting.
BLACK & LEE
TUX SHOP
NOW AT
1110 Seymour St.
688-2481
George & Berny's
VOLKSWAGEN
REPAIRS
COMPLETE SERVICE BY
FACTORY-TRAINED
MECHANICS
FULLY GUARANTEED
AT REASONABLE RATES
731-8644
2125 W. 10th at Arbutus
limit. He saidhe and fellow student
board member Basil Peters will
present the opinion to the board if
the lawyer says rent increase
legislation covers student
residences.
Sihota said the lawyers are also
forming an opinion on whether
tuition fee increases are covered
by the Anti-Inflation Board
guidelines.
"We want the lawyers to come
down with a really strong opinion,"
he said.
The SRA has given only $100 of
the $1,000 allotted for donations,
Sihota said. The group protesting
the Trident nuclear submarine,
Pacific Life Community, received
a donation.
Dhaliwal said there is no reason
to spend money frivolously. He
said there are sure to be projects
later this year which need money.
'DECORA TE WITH PRINTS*
SUMMER EMPLOYMENT
REGISTER NOW
Placement Office
Office of Student Services
Ponderosa Annex F
grin bin
ART REPRODUCTION
ART NOUVEAU
Largest Selection
of posters in B.C.
Photo Blow-ups
from negs and prints,
jokes, gifts, etc.
3209 W. Broadway
738-2311
(opposite Super-Valu)
ID ECO RA TE WITH POSTERS*
FREE
VANCOUVER
SYMPHONY
ORCHESTRA
TODAY
War Memorial Gym
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Check it out AStudent-Railpass is a super deal; the best and cheapest way to see
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Stations are like small towns with everything a traveler needs You meet fellow
backpackers (Europeans, too) You can sleep on board, couchettes are bargains. Your Student-Railpass
even covers some ferry steamer and motorcoach rides Best of all with the Pass you can stay loose,
park where you like, move on at whim There's always another tram you can catch
To get a Student-Railpass you have to be a full-time student under 26 Both Student-Railpass
and Eurailpass are sold here through your Travel Agent You can't buy them in Europe.
If you've less than or more than two months, get a Eurailpass Same idea but you ride First Class.
Available in two or three-week Passes, or one, two, or three-month Passes
If you're not about to enl!st why not plan to see Europe with a Student-Railpass
No, you won't have to pass a physical
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TRAVEL
Room 100P S.U.B., University of B.C. 224-0111 Page 8
THE        UBYSSEY
Thursday, February 3, 1977
Student workers fired, rehired
Canadian University Press
Thirty eight Simon Fraser
University student assistants who
work in the library here reported
for work Friday only to find
themselves out of a job.
All but four were rehired Monday, but with reduced working
hours and some with drastic cuts in
their pay.
Pat Georgeson, Association of
University and College Employees
co-ordinator, charged the terminations came at this time
because most of the students had
signed union cards last week.
The students had to join the
union because of a B.C. Labor
Relations Board ruling in
December      that    they    were
members of the AUCE bargaining
unit, which covers most SFU
clerical and library workers.
Some students' wages were
reduced to $3 an hour (the B.C.
minimum wage) from $4.44 an
hour, as they were reclassified
under the administration's interpretation of the AUCE contract.
Some of the student assistants
French a Ph.D. requirement?
said they were fired on three hours
or less notice Friday.
But Margaret Jans, library loans
division head, said all student
assistants were told when they
started their jobs that they could
be terminated "at any time,"
because they were employed
strictly for a loans division move in
the library. Jans said the students
were all hired for a period of two
months less a day.
Jans said hours for all assistants
will be cut back, although she
claimed the library is trying to
"give more students work."
Georgeson said there are
already full time library staff
performing the same work as the
reclassified students and getting
paid $5.59 an hour.
The union has pledged to launch
a grievance action with the labor
board.
TORONTO (CUP) - A "very
thorough and serious discussion"
on the merits of making French a
requirement for all doctoral
programs will be undertaken by
the University of Toronto's School
of Graduate Studies (SGS) at the
urging of the academic affairs
committee.
The requirements currently
require knowledge of a foreign
language only "when a substantial
10c dates at UWO
LONDON (CUP) — In what
appears to be a throwback to the
days of blue chiffon and the big
prom, the University of Western
Ontario student council has set up
a computerized dating service.
The service started Jan. 10 after
student council voted 14-12 for the
proposal in November.
The project "will be run in a
business-like fashion" to ensure
confidentiality, according to
council vice-president Steve
Lichty.
Applicants will be asked to fill
out a form containing 50 questions.
The responses will be transferred to punch cards and fed into a
computer. The cards will be
matched and the applicant will get
the name and number of his or her
computer-chosen mate.
Students must pay a one dollar
application fee which is good for as
many as 10 dates according to
council executive Larry Haskell.
The entire $450 project is slated to
run on a break-even basis.
Housing offers programs
From page 1
"These other parts of our being
are primarily developed through
experimental, non-academic
forms of learning. Through experience we become increasingly
aware of both our inner and outer
worlds.
"A healthy learning environment will provide a balance
of experiences that offers individuals the opportunities to
develop all parts of their being, so
that they can evolve towards increased levels of wholeness, integrating, maturity, independence,
and interdependence."
SUMMER EMPLOYMENT
REGISTER NOW
Placement Office
Office of Student Services
Ponderosa Annex F
UBC Alumni Nominations
. . for 1977-8 UBC Alumni Assciation Board of
Management Elections are open until
NOON, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 11th
For full information contact:
The Returning Officer
228-3313
Rendale
Apple bee
Wrangler
Lee
Levi's
Big Blue
Seafarers
Brhtania
Place for Pants
part of the literature of a candidate's research area" is in that
language.
But one professor expressed
dismay that the requirements
ignore that Canada has two official
languages.
"I've been in this country 10
years now, and I sometimes have
to pinch myself and ask, 'where am
I?' said Tom Langan.
"The cop-out is so complete in
this country, it is just appalling.
You all amaze me!"
"This is the highest degree in
library science in a bilingual
country," Langan said.
"The holders of this degree
should at the very least be able to
read the two official languages."
8/9 or Small Jobs
ALSO GARAGES
BASEMENTS
& YARDS
732-9898
CLEAN-UP
ATTENTION
ALL ARTS STUDENTS
Nominations Are Now Open
For The Following A.U.S. Positions:
(March 77— March 78)
A.U.S. EXECUTIVE:
—PRESIDENT AND SRA REP
—VICE PRESIDENT
—TREASURER   —SECRETARY
SRA REPRESENTATIVES:
—5 ARTS REPS TO THE STUDENT
REPRESENTATIVE ASSEMBLY
Nominations Close Feb. 8, 1977,
With Elections To Be Held
Wed. Feb. 16, 1977.
Nomination Forms Available
In Buch 107 12:30— 1:30.
Coming February 9- II
WILLIAM
SPRINGFELLOW
AUTHOR
DISSENTER     IN     A    GREAT
SOCIETY:   a   Christian   view  of
America in crisis.
FREE     IN     OBEDIENCE:     the
radical Christian life.
A     PRIVATE     AND     PUBLIC
FAITH.
AN   ETHIC   FOR   CHRISTIANS
AND    OTHER    ALIENS    IN   A
STRANGE LAND.
A     SECOND     BIRTHDAY:     a
personal     confrontation     with
illness, pain and death.
MY PEOPLE IS THE ENEMY: an
autobiographical polemic.
SOCIAL CRITIC
"Affluence in America is a new
kind of poverty. . . which renders
its victims vulnerable to
conforming pressures of every
sort — perhaps especially so in
politics, in acquiescence to
totalitarian rule which offers to
protect the consumption of the
affluent by escalating the
persecution of the official poor."
"The most basic issue is,
manifestly, that health has
become primarily a commercial
enterprise in this land, which even
the mythology of Dr. Velby
cannot conceal."
ATTORNEY
THEOLOGIAN
Stringfellow, through his work
with the Episcopal Church, his
contributions to Sojourners and
Christian Century, his work with
the World Council of Churches
has consistently spoken of the
Biblical message for our day.
"America is a demonic principality in which death is the reigning idol."
A graduate of Harvard Law School, he spent 7
years as a pioneering white lawyer serving Blacks
and Puerto Ricans in East Harlem. From there he
became active in the civil rights movement, and the
protest against the Vietnam War. Following
dismissal   of   charges   against   him  for  harbouring
Father Daniel Berrigan when he was a fugitive,
Stringfellow became one of the defense council in
the so-called Harrisburg case against Berrigan and
others for their destruction of draft records. He
also defended Bishop Pike on charges of heresy.
SCHEDULE OF EVENTS
WEDNESDAY
FEBRUARY 9
12:30 - Law School Rm.
101
"THE LEGAL PROFESSION
VS. JUSTICE"
1:30   -   Seminar   Rm.   179
Law School
7:30 — Lutheran Campus
Centre
"THE DEMONIC ELEMENTS OF PROFESSIONALISM"
THURSDAY
FEBRUARY 10
12:30-S.U.B. Ballroom
"ETHICS FOR CHRISTIANS
AND OTHER ALIENS"
7:30   -
Centre
Lutheran    Campus
"THE     CHARISMATIC
GIFTS  OF THE CHURCH"
FRIDAY
FEBRUARY 11
12:30-S.U.B. Ballroom
"SIGNS OF HOPE"
3:30   -    Lutheran   Campus
Centre
Open discussion.
■THESE EVENTS ARE OPEN TO ALL-

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