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The Ubyssey Oct 3, 1963

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Array Olympians try new arena tonight
The new Thunderbird
Sports Centre will be christened tonight when Father
David Bauer's Olympians
sail into their maiden voyage
on home  ice.
They meet the Seattle Totems, runners-up in the Western Hockey League Championships last year, at 8:30
p.m.
Students can see the Olympians in game action for the
first time for $1.
The new arena is located
east of the back section of
C-lot.
Blue   reserve  section  can
be picked up by students at
the gate with presentation of
their student card.
Students may purchase
tickets at the athletic office
in War Memorial Gym until
5 .p.m. or at the arena after
7:30 p.m. Regular tickets
will sell for $1.50 in the
blues and $2.00 in the reds,
for non-students.
The UBC squad played its
first game against the more
experienced profess ional
Canucks Tuesday night in
Chilliwack. They lost 3-2 —
but it was close.
Experience    and    weight
showed when the heavier
Canuck forwards took out
UBC defensemen and dropped the puck for Canuck defensemen to shoot on goal-
tender Ken Broderick.
Father Bauer was happy
with the team's initial effort.
"When you consider how
Trail made out last year
against the Canucks just before going overseas — just
imagine what our boys will
be like with 40 games behind them," said general
manager Bob Hindmarch.
Ray Cadieux scored UBC's
first    goal,   assisted   by   Al
McLean and Terry Clancy.
Roger Bourbonnais, set up
by Gary Dineen and Marshal
Johnston after a pretty pattern play scored the other
Olympian goal in the second
period.
Star of the game was Canuck defenseman Ron Matthews whose twin goals
pushed them to victory. He
scored a 30-foot slap shot on
a break-away when his team
was one man short and
again with a short backhand
halfway in the final period.
FATHER  BAUER
.christening today
THE UBYSSEY
Vol. XLVI
VANCOUVER,   B.C.,   THURSDAY,   OCTOBER  3,   1963
No. 9
—don hume photo
Engineer's vice-president Steve Whitelaw demolishes expensive sculpture in front of library
Engineers smash sculpture
with sledgehammers, chain
Hundreds of engineers
Wednesday smashed five
university statues to bits
before shocked faculty and
students.
The statues, gracing the
university grounds since the
beginning of the term, were
completely destroyed.
Engineers using sledge
hammers, crowbars and bits
of chain, reduced the statues
to rubble in minutes.
Ever  since   they   first  ap
peared the statues have been
heavily criticized.
Students watching the debacle shouted insults and
shook their fists at the engineers as the wild rampage
continued.
A Fine Arts student, who
refused to give his name,
said a reprisal on the engineers would  be planned.
"Something those idiot engineers hold dear will go,"
he  said.
Mike Bjornson, Commerce
II, looked at the shambles
of chicken wire and steel and
said he thought the statues
were an eyesore anyway.
"But," he added, "that's
no reason for this sort of behavior. No one should do this
sort of thing to an artist's
works."
Engineers asked to explain
Continued on Page 3
SEE:   STATUES
Race split
in NFCUS
endorsed
EDMONTON (Staff)—The National Federation of
Canadian University Students was re-organized along racial
lines here Wednesday.
Following strong pressure from French-speaking universities, it was decided to break the organization into two
separate caucuses, held together by a loose superstructure.
will
NFCUS will now be composed of a French and an English caucus for decisions in certain key areas.
These areas will be outlined
by a special commission which
Will report to the 1964 Congress.
The caucuses will have equal
votes at the main congress sessions on these key issues,
which are expected to include
further constitutional changes
and controversial issues such
as federal aid to universities.
Eacn caucus will work exclusive of the other in dealing
with problems in its  area.
On subjects other than these
to be specifically detailed, voting structure will remain as at
present, with each of the 39
universities having   equal say.
Effect of the nine resolutions
passed at the 27th annual
NFCUS congress here is to give
the French-speaking minority
equality with the English-
speaking majority in a large
number of these areas.
The resolutions will abolish
the office of the vice-president
in charge of international affairs. His duties will be
handled by the national president.
Two vice-presidents will be
elected, one each by the
French- and English-speaking
groups.
These    vice-presidents    will
immediately   set   to   work   on
Continued  on  Page  2
SEE: NFCUS SPLITS
UBC law professor A. W.
Carrothers has been named
Dean of law faculty at University of Western Ontario.
He will take new post July 1.
DEADLY
POLITICS
See page 5
UBC student John Young
scored Canada's goal in 1-1
tie with U.S. that gave
Canucks a berth in 1964
Olympics in Japan. Page 2
THE       UBYSSEY
Thursday, October 3,  1963
Obituary  for   Conservatism
Purdy ideal politician —
but he didn't get elected
NFCUS   SPLITS
By TOM WAYMAN
Good candidates, loyal
party workers, and no seats
—that's B.C. Conservatism
in 1963.
An example of the high
calibre of Conservative
hopefuls was UBC professor,
Dr. Harry Purdy, the party's
distinguished — and unsuccessful — candidate in Point
Grey.
• •    •
Throughout the campaign
he retained his almost arch-
Conservative manner.
On Monday night, when
election fever reached its
pitch, and the stomachs of
even staunch party stalwarts
turned to jelly, Dr. Purdy
went ahead and taught a
class.
Before his class, Dr. Purdy
said he had taught the twice-
a-week course without a
break throughout his campaign.
• •    •
"I'm afraid some of them
might not show up tonight,"
Dr. Purdy continued. "I'm
certain some of them will
want to attend the football
game."
Unassuming, a master of
understatement — a perfect
non-excitable p o 1 it i c i a n.
But he wasn't elected.
The party backing Purdy
lacked nothing   in  the  way
Ubyssey political reporter
Tom Wayman spent election
night with professor Harry
Purdy, to find out what it
was like to run in—and, as
it turned out. to lose—an
election.
of workers and organization.
Alan Hackett, campaign
manager for the three Point
Grey Conservative candidates, took three weeks off
work to drive his candidates
hard:
"The candidates usually
were up at six and campaigning until midnight. We
kept them hopping," he said.
At the Point Grey Conservative headquarters at Forty-
first and Granville, one of
the election workers was
grey - haired Mrs. A. H.
Charlton.
She told me Monday night
she has been doing volunteer work for the Conservatives for 30 years.
"And  I'm a   staunch sup-
DR. HARRY PURDY
. . . calm and cool
porter—all the way," she
added.
On-campus, the Conservatives have their supporters.
Jim Richards, third-year
arts student and president of
the UBC Conservative Club,
listed some reasons for the
failure of his party and perhaps inadvertently emphasized some of B.C. Conservatism's shortcomings:
• •    •
Richards said he  couldn't
blame the Conservative
downfall on a Social Credit
traditional party vote.
The B.C. Social Credit,
party is only 11 years old, he
explained, whereas the longtime presence of the Liberal
and Conservative parties
should have influenced family voting.
Richards said it must have
been the mass of undecided
voters who resolved to go
again with Social Credit that
were responsible for the defeat of Conservatism.
He added part of the problem was these undecided
voters' unwillingness to believe a resurgent Conservative or Liberal party could
form a provincial government.
• *    •
"It's disappointing," Richards concluded. "Especially
Davie Fulton's defeat at
Kamloops."
Each of these statements
sums up a flaw in what appears to be present Conservative thinking:
Reliance on a hypothetical
traditional vote obviously is
a    failure.      B.C.    federally
Break out cold tablets —
Leadership's here again
Student bureaucrats, blue-blazer girls and boys and
other student leaders head for Leadership Conference this
weekend.
The weekend seminar, held at Elphinstone, will
feature discussion of student problems, debates and noted
speakers.
Prominent speakers stated to attend include: Dr. Gordon Shrum, Chancellor of the New Simon Fraser Academy;
John Liersch, who helped write the Chant report on education in B.C., and George Boechler, chairman of the
higher education promotion committee (HEP).
Delegates leave Friday, 4:30 p.m., from in front of
Brock Hall.
Continued  from Page  1
never was a Conservative
province, and in the last two
legislatures no Conservative
has sat in Victoria.
Undecided voters could
not embrace Conservatism
because much of their campaign stressed a cult of "personal leadership."
On the majority of posters,
pamphlets and platforms,
the visage and virtues of
Davie Fulton were extolled.
When Dr. Purdy was interviewed by The Ubyssey
before the election, his allegiance for Fulton was clearly stated.
On election night, Conservative symbol of Conservatism, Howard Green, commenting on the voting, did
not say it was a tragedy that
the programs of Conservatism had not been implemented.
•    •    •
Instead, he told The Ubyssey:
"I think it's a tragedy for
B.C. that Davie Fulton is not
in the Legislature."
Leader-worship obviously
also extends throughout
party ranks as well.
At the Conservative headquarters, when Fulton spoke
on TV, the crowd instantly
quieted . . . and stood up.
When he was finished,
they applauded.
Granted, feeling runs high
during elections, but applauding for an electronic
pattern is perhaps going too
far.
'There's another day, another time," said Dr. Purdy
when he conceded defeat at
10:45 p.m.  Monday night.
I wonder.
Law prof
gets post
at UWO
University of B.C. law professor, A. W. Carrothers, has
been named Dean of the Law
School at the University of
Western Ontario.
As an authority on constitutional law and labour relations
he conducted the 1958 inquiry
into the B.C. civil servants bargaining rights.
Carrothers, 39, was the
1961-62 President of Canadian
Association of University
Teachers and in this position
aided the former Justice Minister Donald Fleming inquire
into RCMP investigation of
communist activities on Canadian campuses.
He •will replace the former
justice of the supreme court of
Canada, Ivan C. Rand.
Carrothers is a provincial
nominee for a joint federal-
provincial committee looking
into the bargaining problems
of the fishing industry.
The 1948 UBC law graduate
received his Master's at Harvard and returned to UBC as
an Assistant Prof, in 1951. He
received his full professorship
in 1960 and is the first UBC
graduate to become Dean of a
law school.
the internal re-structuration of
their respective cultural
groups.
The new executive will be
made up of the national president, to be elected by the general congress; the two vice-
presidents; and three executive members elected by each
caucus.
Wednesday's r e s o 1 u tions
were passed unanimously.
The new organizational
structure goes into effect at
midnight Friday.
The fight for the concessions
to the French was led by 13
delegates from the five French-
Canadian universities in the
39-member   organization.
The resolutions were passed
after two days of debate and
back-room politicking aimed
at finding a way to accommodate French demands for stronger voting rights.
"This was a problem we had
to face up to," said NFCUS
national president, Dave Jenkins. "The whole of Canada
will have to face up to it soon."
Students  meet
LEIDEN, SWITZERLAND
(CUP) — Students from 36
countries are meeting here for
six days of discussion on "The
International student movement — past, present and future."
FOR THE
TAKE-OVER
GENERATION
"Traditionals" suits made with
Orion*
These are the suits that identify the best dressed men on
campus. Of 55% Orion — 45% wool, they couple rich luxury
looks with smooth fitting natural-line shoulders. Orion
gives these vested suits added shape retention and comfort
to put you thoroughly at ease anywhere.
In a wide variety of muted fall color tones. Suits about
$65.  (With matching or contrasting vests — about $75).
^UPOfiP du pont ot c*nada uMffiD
C A M A B A
These fine suits are available at:
Woodward Stores (Oakridge) Ltd., Vancouver
MONTREAL
•Du Port's registered trademark tor Its acrylic fibre. Thursday, October 3,  1963
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 3
Ron
QUIXOTE
If nothing else, the September 30 debacle generated considerable interest on campus.
This in itself is a feat of
some note, so we decided to
follow it up with a random
survey of how people felt
about the outcome.
Surveys being in the best
ear-to-the-ground tradition of
journalism, we forthwith present a sampler of comments
regarding the election, a dirty
ear and stepped-upon head
notwithstanding.
• *    •
A Tory: "It would seem that
people prefer highways to
truth and integrity."
• •    •
A student from Delta: "A
bridge! We got a bridge!"
• •    •
One from the North Shore:
"I .hear they're going to remove Lions Gate altogether."
• *    •
A New Democrat: (Poor
girl burst into tears at the
mention of the word "election.")
• •    •
A players club type: "Like,
man,  WHAT election?"
• •    •
A commerceman: "Got a
new prof  today."
• •    •
A commerce prof: "Finance
minister? Who, ME? I can't
spell  'contingent',"
• •    •
A neurology prof: "Oh,
well, at least the five of us
can share  a  motel  again."
• •    •
Three profs, in chorus: "My
application has already been
sent to U of T."
• •    •
A 21-year-old Tory: "Oh,
well, back to the books."
• •    •
A Board of Governors member. "Safe and sound for another five years."
• •    •
An administration spokesman: "!&"%!$*"
• •    •
A      student councillor:
"We're  all  going to  Quebec,
anyway."
• • •
A Lions fan: "Election?
WHAT election?"
• •    •
A Russian exchange student: "You people got same
kind government as WE
have."
• •    •
A Socred: (No comment—
he had his face turned to the
raining heavens, looking for
the sun).
STATUES
Continued  from Page   1
their actions said they didn't
like the statues.
"It's a sort of protest
movement," said one. "They-
re bloody awful and no one
should have to put up with
them."
"We're protecting the
campus from further junk
like this," said another.
Most students interviewed
termed the engineer's actions
reprehensible.
"There should be some
sort of legal action taken
against these bums," said a
shocked  onlooker.
ENTRENCHED IN THEIR WORK, construction men descend
into pit that will carry pipes to new education building
extension. Trench has caused closure of one side of University Boulevard  south of Main Mall.
Ash not canned;
starts on Monday
The show will go on. Bitter Ash, a feature film written,
produced and directed by UBC student Larry Kent, will be
shown  in   the  auditorium   starting  Monday.
Earlier there had been spec
ulation that the film might be
obscene.
One girl acting in the film
had refused to give clearance
for scenes in which she appeared.
The show has now been
cleared by censors for showing
on campus and all the actors
appearing in it have agreed to
the showing.
"The difficulties are all
cleared up," said assistant AMS
treasurer Kyle Mitchell Wednesday.
He said he has been notified
by th3 girl's lawyer that permission has been granted.
"I will know officially today," he said.
The film, although financed
entirely by Kent, is being
shown on campus under the
sponsorship of the Players
Club.
The AMS became concerned
over the film because they
would be liable if any legal
action was taken against the
Players Club, which is part of
the AMS, said Mitchell.
"We just wanted to make
sure we were protected," he
said.
The film will be shown in
the auditorium. Tickets are
available from  the AMS.
Campus Getz
bossa nova
Bossa nova comes to campus today.
Stan Getz, originator of
the new trend in jazz, will
entertain in the War Memorial Gym at noon.
Joining the jazz quartet
will be the Travellers Three.
It is the group's second visit
to campus.
The program is sponsored
by the Special Events Committee.
Butts approved
SUB gets site
near stadium
By   GRAEME   MATHESON
After five years of bitter frustration, UBC students may
at last be getting their Student Union Building.
The building now has a site
It will be built on the East
Mall where the present stadium is.
The administration offered
this site for the SUB early in
September but wary student
councillors postponed acceptance until they got word from
consultant Porter Butts.
BUTTS OK'S
Butts sent word last week
that the stadium site is acceptable.
Dean Feltham, chairman of
council's SUB committee, said,
"The site increases the difficulties for students using the
building.
"But this is not sufficient
cause to abandon the project.
Thousands of students would
need  and use the union daily.
"Their interest should not be
sacrificed because there are
other students who are handicapped in reaching the building."
He said all students will
benefit from organized group,
social and cultural programs at
the centre.
And, he said, the building
will be 50 per cent closer to
the campus centre than either
the faculty club or graduate
student centre — two sites getting full  use  now.
A thorough questionnaire
sent to 2,500 students in 1962
showed what the SUB should
contain.
There  will be complete  new
food services, bookstands,
lounges, recreation rooms, club
offices and student council offices.
There will also be a bowling alley.
To offset a site away from
natural student paths, student
council has asked for:
• a bus loop next the building.
• a car pool  drop-off.
• a minimal 500 car parking
lot.
• a promise of no buildings
between the SUB site and East
Mall.
But expansion of academic
buildings of the campus as a
whole lies away from the SUB
site.
So these concessions, says
Feltham, "Will mean everything to the success of the
Union."
Council is to approve the
facility list on Monday.
Then an architectural contest can go ahead to determine
the exact allocation of some
24,000 square feet to clubs, offices, libraries, and food areas.
Students
Your Formal
and
Semi-Formal
Clothing Rental Needs
Can be Met Best at:
McCUISHFormLatdWear
2046 W. 41st —Ph. 263-3610
Mon.-Sat.   9:30  to  5:30
ALL NEW OABMENTS
Special Discount to Students
Come to the
2laJwsL&L (Bail.
AT THE BEAUTIFUL
RAMADA INN
Saturday, October 5
Tickets AMS or Bu. 115
$3.50 couple
(includes 1  free  drink)
CHOOSE THE ARTS QUEEN
SPECIAL EVENTS TODAY . . .
Jha Stjcm $ai$ Quwdsd
and
Straight From Hootenanny
Jha J/uwallaM Jhhaa
TODAY IN THE GYM
ADMISSION 50c THE UBYSSEY
Published   Tuesdays,   Thursdays  and  Fridays   throughout   the   university
/ear by  the  Alma Mater  Society,   University  of  B.C.  Editorial   opinions
expressed are  those of the editor and not necessarily those of the AMS .
or   the   University.   Editorial   office,   CA   4-3U1G.   Advertising   office,   CA
4-3241,  L,oc. 26.   Member Canadian University Press.
Winner Canadian University Press trophies for general
excellence, news photography, editorial writing
THURSDAY, OCTOBER 3,   1963
Statutory rape
Usually, The Ubyssey is able to find an element
of humor in the stunts of the Engineering Undergraduate
Society.
But Wednesday's juvenile demonstration can in no
way be considered funny.
Although we stand with those who expressed displeasure with this year's collection of campus statues,
we cannot condone the wholesale destruction of university property.
The university administration must take immediate
action against those responsible.
This is not easy for The Ubyssey to say—having
long fought for the right for students to do and say as
they please.
But the undergraduate engineers have shown themselves to be incapable of accepting the responsibility
given them.
And it is quite apparent that the student court
system with its $25 limit on fines would be too lenient
for dealing with this situation.
The university—for the protection of its name outside the campus—must take the steps necessary to clear
itself in this affair.
The possibility of court action must be thoroughly
investigated.
Failing that the university has its own methods for
dealing with those who fail to recognize its authority.
• Wednesday—as those students who pride themselves
j   on their tradition of self-reliance must now realize—was
black day for the Alma Mater Society.
Thank the engineers.
Let's reconsider
Following the split of NFCUS into two racial groups,
the need for UBC to reconsider its role in the national
organization is even greater.
Malcolm Scott, now AMS president, said a year ago
that NFCUS was on trial this past year. UBC would
withdraw, he said, if NFCUS did not prove of value as
a national organization.
With Wednesday's restructuration, we will either
have to find a new and much superior justification for
remaining in NFCUS, or we will have to withdraw entirely from what must now be admitted to be a vastly
watered-down and weakened national pressure group.
Give free fixes
STAFF
EDITOR, Mike Hunter
Editors
Associate .... Keith Bradbury
News   Dave Ablett
Managing' .... George Railton
City   Mike Horsey
Photo     Don  Hume
-Sports  Denis Stanley
Critics    Bob  McDonald
Ass't City .... Richard Simeon
Senior  Donna Morris
Senior   Maureen Covell
Authorized   ;ih   second   class   mail
by   Post   Office   Department,   Ottawa,   and   for   payment   of   postage   in   cash.
REPORTERS     AND     DESK:      Tom
Wayman,      Jim      Smith,      Graeme
Matheson,   Ron   Thody,   Pat   Horro-
bin,   Bob   Burton,   Jenny   Puterman,
loy Brad, Brad Joyfully, Al Birnoe,
Don   Hull,   Al   Donald.
(       Caj°<   '
LETTERS TO EDITOR
Socreds bought voters
with their own money
Editor, The Ubyssey:
During  the course  of  the
past few  weeks,  I began to
hope     that    there    was    an
awakening   amongst the
people of B.C. I thought that
the  B.C.  voter was at least
going   to   use   his   ballot   to
repudiate arrogance and bad
government.
Save $33 million
Let's junk our laws against junkies
By  MARK  VOELKNER
Now that the election is
over and we have another
government for the next
four years (or less), we can
assume that our honorable
legislators will get down to
work and settle all the important issues they talked
about in their campaigns.
For example: one important issue that will now be
settled will be whether we
should pay $300 house taxes
and receive a $100 homeowner grant or whether we
shall receive a $200 homeowner grant (and, of course,
pay $400 in taxes).
There are, of course, many
more very important issues
like: Shall the Provincial
Government pay all education costs or shall the municipalities pay a share of it
which can also be read:
Shall John Doe pay his
school taxes to the Provincial Government or to the
Municipality or half and
half?
Let's  hope  that   after  all
these very grave and important issues have been settled,
they may find some time for
some trivial things such as
getting about 33 million dollars into the provincial tax
coffers WITHOUT ANY
COST TO THE TAXPAYER.
This is the amount that
one source quotes it cost us
to keep up the drug (nonsense) legislation.
So far, we hire an entire
police department to catch
drug traffickers and addicts
which alone costs us plenty,
but a further cost is created
through the increase in burglaries, thefts, robberies and
murder.
Let's face it, drug addicts
are sick people who at the
current black market rates
for drugs can not obtain the
necessary money for their
needs except by robbing or
stealing. Eventually the addicts are caught and sent to
institutions. (This also comes
from our taxes).
Of course, once in a while
our   police   force   is   really
successful and catches a
large amount of drugs which
immediately affects the market price and thus results in
more robberies, break-ins,
and thefts, since the addicts
are suddenly caught short of
money.
A great success  indeed.
So successful that it cost
us only about 33 million dollars a year. In Britain, we
have a glowing example of
what it could be like. Drugs
which can be produced
cheaply under government
supervision are given free
to addicts.
Since anybody, who as
soon as he becomes addicted,
can receive drugs free the
underworld loses its profit
and thus gives up or in Britain has. given up "pushing"
drugs.
Since we cure addicts
eventually anyhow (after we
catch them), why not start
there and let the savings pay
for the entire university
costs plus generous scholarships   to the  deserving.
After all, when a country
pays for the education of all
stupid morons, which will,
most likely, never benefit
society why not ALSO pay
for its bright young people
who will definitely pay back
their share by becoming doctors and thus providing better health services for the
people, or by becoming
chemists and thus possibly
providing cheaper plastic, or
becoming better qualified
teachers to provide better
education and in many more
and other ways they will pay
the investment back with interest that society invests in
them.
Let us stop wasting money
on futile drug control and
invest the money in our future. The drug traffic
through free drugs will then
die a natural death anyhow.
I hope that our legislators
may find some time for this
little issue after all their before mentioned important issues- have been settled.
I was grievously mistaken.
Not only was there no hint
of repudiation, but incredibly the government has
been given an even more resounding endorsement.
The idea of a third force
in B.C. politics was obliterated.
A man of fine character,
of unquestioned integrity, a
man with constructive plans
and high ideals was crushed
in his attempt to bring sane
government to B.C. He could
not win a single seat.
People of B.C., you have
shown yourselves to be
bought. Worse, you have
shown yourselves to be ignorant, for you have been
bought with your own
money.
The few thinking peop.e
of B.C. are bitter. The majority are happy. They are
again ruled by the government  they   deserve.
JOHN   CAIRNS.
Fort   Camp.
Price   is   wrong
Editor, The Ubyssey:
I have discovered a new
game. It is called "Guess my
original price" and consists
of peeling layer upon layer
of higher-price stickers from
bookjackets to discover what
fascinating number will turn
up on the bottom.
Mr. Hunter of the campus
bookstore and his "put another higher price sticker on
top" staff will be happy to
assist you.
WULFING von SCHLEINITZ.
Arts  III. Thursday, October 3,  1963
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 5
BACKGROUND
Politics of separatism
nothing like Brock Hall
By DAVE ABLETT
Ubyssey  News Editor
EDMONTON (Staff)—
French - Canadian students
are playing politics seriously-
Their arena is the National Federation of Canadian
University Students Congress here.
Their goal is another addition to a list of national organizations which have
knuckled under to the demands of French-Canadian
nationalism.
The list includes political
parties, the New Democrats
and the Creditistes. It includes the Canadian Chamber of Commerce.
There are 13 French-Canadian delegates compared to
140 English-Canadians.
The French, in other
words, are seriously outnumbered. The English have
been seriously out-manoeuv-
ered.
• •    •
Case in point — a series
of recommendations by the
national executive of
NFCUS for a reorganization
of the federation.
The recommendations, after repeating the expected
reaffirmations of the cultural duality of Canada and the
need for a change in the organization of NFCUS, suggested a new structure.
Essentially, it did this: the
present national affairs vice-
president would be discarded and replaced'by two vice-
presidents — one French,
one  English.
Between the congress —
the final legislative body —
and the executive would be
placed an English caucus
and a French caucus.
• •    •
Each caucus would elect
three members to a board of
directors. The congress
would elect a president and
the French and English vice-
presidents.
Needless to say, the concessions of the executive
were not expected by the
French.
They realized immediately
that the proposals would, in
fact, shift the centre of grav-
DAVE ABLETT
. . . serious politics
ity from the congress to the
equal caucuses because it
was there that the elective
power lay. The French and
English would hassle out
their problems in caucus
then use the relatively powerless congress to convince
the opposite sides the validity of their viewpoints.
•    •    •
The French caucus would
control one half of the president's board of directors. It
would be the body which,
decided in effect, the French
vice-president. Its wishes
would be considered in the
election of a president.
The French, preoccupied
with food troubles back
home in Montreal — the
leader of the Montreal delegation, Pierre Marois, was
leading a boycott of the university cafeteria -— reacted
admirably.
Jean Bellemare, the second in command in the
French delegation, took over.
Under the guise of taking
the executive proposals one
step further he rallied the
French universities and demanded what Dave Jenkins,
NFCUS national president,
had warned one week earlier
would result in the exile of
Montreal.
Bellemare demanded a
split of NFCUS into two
equal and autonomous bodies — one French and one
English —■ connected by an
undefined structure at the
top.
He rallied an independent
Sherbrooke University. (Ronald Fecteau, off on his own
particular track on Monday, emerged from a caucus
at 4 a.m. Tuesday noticeably
chastized). Henriette Ther-
rien, a petite blonde who
continually demands that
the translators speak more
loudly, followed Fecteau's
lead.
• •    •
Sonny Gordon, the president of McGill student council, agreed to a demand by
Bellemare that the French
minority be placed on a one-
to-one basis when dealing
with English Canada but the
English minority in Quebec
would receive only proportional representation.
What Bellemare would
not have dared demand a
week ago has become the
point from which the English must work. His backroom work has paid off.
The English-Canadian position, a much more drastic
one thare UBC suggested last
week, is shaky at best.
• •    •
The new organization of
the Canadian federation will
probably land somewhere
between the two positions.
At this writing, the delegates from the major French
and English factions are
meeting behind closed doors
to work out the compromise.
One of those delegates is
Malcolm Scott, the rotund
UBC student president who
saw his council's maximum
compromise become a minor
concession when the NFCUS
executive made its proposal.
Scott, the pride of the
Brock Hall bureaucrats, said
he is trying to inject some
new ideas into the backroom
negotiations.
But Brock's bureaucracy
is kid's stuff compared to the
politics of separatism.
What in hells going on?'
By JIM SMITH
"I don't know what the
hell is going on," said one
student, munching an apple.
His attitude was typical
of students attending an informal meeting concerning
the fate of the National
Federation of Canadian University students.
Jim Ward, first vice-
president of the student
council, conducted the meeting on the Library lawn.
About 30 students gathered to listen to him. Several hundred more sat on the
lawn talking and eating
their lunches just out of
ear shot.
Ward explained:  "The re
cent outgrowth of provincialism on the part of the French
Canadians is due to the unequal treatment they are receiving."
"I believe the position of
compromise taken by UBC
on the question of French
rights in NFCUS will help
awaken the rest of Canada
on  this issue," he said.
When pressed by a student, Ward admitted that
NFCUS is actually quite
useless for the average student, but  added:
"It brings students from
the two cultural blocs together.
"It is therefore worth the
money ($5,700) UBC spends
on it. It costs us to stay in."
Students who took part in
the meeting finished without coming to any solid
conclusions.
Steve McLeod, Science III,
said, "I think the French
should have their rights, but
they should live up to their
responsibilities."
Jane Barry, Arts I, said: "I
am not in favor of giving
veto power. It would destroy
what little effect NFCUS
has. Look at the United
Nations."
Marvin Malkin, Science
III: "I don't have any opinion, that's wh at I'm here
for."
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THE       UBYSSEY
Thursday, October 3,  1963
IN FALL, A YOUNG MAN'S FANCY TURNS...
Library lawn at noon hour is favorite spot to eat lunch,
or study, but mainly to get together with that girl who
sits three rows over in English. Sunny haven won't be
there for long: Weatherman predicts B.C.'s rainy season
isn't far off.
Photo story by Don Hume Thursday, October 3,  1963
THE       UBYSSEY
Page   7
HARDIAL BAINS
. . . a university
MAYLING  WEAVER
. . . is a coffee shop
Floating gabfest
Hot air types
form own group
By JIM SMITH
If you like to talk, join the Internationalists.
A group of UBC students has organized a freewheeling,
/ear-round academic symposium for students and faculty.
The   idea originated  with  a
speaker at last year's academic
symposium who suggested a
university could consist of only
a library and a coffee shop,
said its organizer, graduate student Hardial Bains.
His idea was that a student
comes to a university to learn
and then discuss what he has
learned.
The group includes graduate and undergraduate students from all faculties, foreign
students, professors and even
frosh.
"Our reason for existing is
both plausible and self-sustaining," said Mayling Weaver,
present  chairman.
"We provide a social setting
in which informed and misinformed people may voice
their opinion on any subject.
"We want students of any
race, religion, or political beliefs," she said.
The group holds two meetings a month, usually in the
home of one of the participants, but sometimes in the
form of dances or hikes.
Any member is encouraged
to arrange gatherings with the
chairman.
"Our group is instrumental
in alleviating the rigid professor to pupil ratio of overburdened lectures," said Bains.
"The student can meet the
professors in a more relaxed
atmosphere and ask questions
that have been bothering
them."
When a noted expert or public figure comes to Vancouver
he is invited to join the group.
Last June the  International
ists hosted General Indrajit
Rikkye, chief military adviser
to U Thant.
"I think we provide a much
needed extension to the extracurricular program," said Miss
Weaver.
The group currently has
about 150 members. Owing to
the limited space available, invitations are sent out so that
members attend on a rotary
basis.
Anyone interested in this
type of informal discussion group can get more information from Miss Weaver at
the United Nations Club, International House.
'Obscene'
book finally
published
TORONTO (CUP) — A student literary magazine,
branded as "obscene" by an
Oshawa printer who refused to
print it, has been distributed
at the University of Toronto.
Included in the magazine are
several poems the editors admit
contain frankly sexual imagery, a short story about a man
who rapes a woman in a moving subway train and a number  of  grotesque  illustrations.
The Ontario Attorney- General's office refused to rule on
the obscenity of the material.
But the Student's Administrative Council publications
commissioner thought it had
literary merit.
Here's inside dope
on outdoors contest
Canadian outdoorsmen are out hunting for the perfect
ouldoorsgirl.
Any girl who participates in some outdoor sport or
recreation is eligible to enter the "Outdoorgirl of Canada"
contest, sponsored by the Canadian National Sportsman's
show.
Winner will receive $500 and other prizes. She will
be crowned in Toronto in March.
Contestants must be nominated by a sport or recreation club. The club who nominates the winner win receive
$100.
Alabama muffles
student editor
UNIVERSITY, Ala. (CPS-CUP)—The 1962-63 American
''student editor of the year" has been silenced by the University of Alabama.
Mel Meyer, whose editorials
in the student Alabama Crimson and White during the anti-
desegregation riots the fall of j
1962 gained international at-1
tention and drew repeated
threats on his life, has been
told by university officials that
he may not "write upon or
comment upon" any racial
matters.
Failure  to  comply  with  the
university's demands, Meyer
said, will result in "severe
disciplinary action" and possible expulsion.
The Alabama administration
required Meyer and all other
students to sign statements
agreeing not to write or comment on any racial matters for
publication.
The adminstraition would
not allow Meyer to keep a copy
of the statement he signed.
When he appealed the policy,
he was told there could be no
change.
Meyer said he felt the new
policy was aimed directly at
him. He said the policy would
prevent him from acting as
southern, correspondent for the
Collegiate Press Service.
According to a spokesman
for the university the new policy only applies to the student
correspondents on the campus.
EXPERT TYPING
Available for all typing services. Contact Mrs. Booth,
TR 6-2788, or write or call
3417 Welwyn, Vancouver 12,
evenings.
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Edward Brown, director of the
news bureau, said that the
school "prefers professionals"
to do the racial news writing,
and said that a claim that the
policy would prohibit all comment by students was "silly."
The student correspondent
ban, said Brown, was the result
of long expreience with student reporters, and that there
would be no exception to the
rule.
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Student Performance: Tuesday, Sept. 24
Tickets $1.00
Box Office: Room 207 — New Frederic Wood Theatre
Alma Mater Society
OFFICIAL NOTICES
ApplicatknA
MANAGER-AMS CHARTER  FLIGHTS
Applications being accepted for AMS Charter
Flight Manager. Duties include arranging two
charter flight to Europe for next summer. Manager will receive free return fare as payment for
duties. Details available from AMS Secretary.
Please submit application and eligibility forms to
Secretary, Brock Hall.
Member—Constitutional Revision
Committee
Applications being accepted from those wishing
to work in the AMS Constitutional Revision Committee. Please submit application to Jim Ward,
AMS Vice-president, Brock Hall, stating year,
faculty, names, phone and qualifications.
Deadline for applications is 12:30, Tues., Oct. 1.
Member-Brock Hall Art Committee
Applications for membership in the Brock Hall
Art Committee will be received in the office of the
Fine Arts Department, Room 401A, in the
Frederic Lasserre Building .
leadership Conference
OCTOBER 4, 5, 6
CAMP ELPHISTONE
APPLICATIONS AVAILABLE AT AMS OFFICE — Page 8
THE      UBYSSEY
Thursday, October 3,  1963
J. K. STAGER
. . . partial to pingos
Two profs
paddle
for pingos
By BOB   BURTON
Two UBC geography professors canoed over 2,000
miles in the Arctic this summer in search of pingos.
Dr. J. R. Mackay and Dr.
J. K. Stager spent three
months studying the pingo
—an ice formation.
•*•        V        V
They started their adventure by paddling 1,000 miles
down the Mackenize river
in a 20 foot canoe.
Upon   reaching  the  delta
of   the   Mackenzie   they   became interested in pingos—
foot-hills   of   ice — scattered
over the land.
"These are caused by the
expansion of ice under the
ground," said Mackay.
There are about 500 pingos in the delta, he said.
V       v       HP
The two scientists also
studied sub-surface layers of
ice—some over 10,000 years
old.
"The ice has neither
grown nor decreased during this time, and would probably remain for another
10,000 years if not exposed,"
said Mackay.
Toronto gets
French paper
TORONTO (CUP) —A new
Toronto French - language
newspaper with a partial appeal to university students,
L'Alouette, was published last
Tuesday for the first time.
The eight-page paper will
come out once a month for the
first six months and then will
be published weekly, said
Jack Kane, a recent U. of T.
graduate and one of its editors.
Its immediate appeal will be
to the 60,000 French-speaking
persons, including students,
who live in Metropolitan Toronto.
'tween classes
Full Name or  Initials
GOLD STAMPED
ON BRIEF CASES
WHILE  YOU   WAIT
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319 West Pender Street
near Victory Square
Vancouver, B.C.   MU 5-9614
Izvestia man
speaks Friday
Ottawa correspondent for the Izvestia, official Russian
government newspaper, I. Tarasoff, will speak' Friday at
12:30 in Bu. 212. The meeting is sponsored by The Ubyssey.
CARIBBEAN  STUDENTS'
ASSOCIATION
General meeting will be held
in Bu. 214 Fri. at  12:30 p.m.
V ■*• •*•
DEBATING UNION
General meeting in Bu. 104
Friday noon.
*1*        •*" V
UBC BADMINTON CLUB
Club activities begin this
week. Members interested in
forming team to compete in
city league should attend tonight's session.
PHILOSPOHY CLUB
Anyone interested in becom
ing either an executive or ordinary member of the Philosophy Club is welcome to attend
an organizational meeting in
Bu. 202 at noon today.
STUDENT CHRISTIAN
MOVEMENT
"Education in India" will be
given by Mrs. K. Anaud in International House today, 12:30.
SLAVIC CIRCLE
Meeting for those interested
today at noon in Bu. 227. There
will be a discussion of plans
for International Week.
V *5r        •!•
FILM SERVICES  SOCIETY
Protectionists required to
show films for classes and for
Cinema 16. No experience is
necessary. Apply at the club-
room, Brock Ext. 357, any
noon hour.
VCF
A skating party, sponsored
by the Varsity Christian Fellowship, will be held in the
new Thunderbird Arena Friday.
The party begins at 7 p.m.
and will be followed by coffee
at International House.
SAILING   CLUB
First general meeting will
be held in Bu. 203 ta noon today. The year's program will
be discussed and a lecture on
elementary sialing knowledge
will be given .
•ir      T*      v
FRIENDS OF  CHAMBER
MUSIC
Fifty-cent student tickets for
New Danish Quartet, Queen
Elizabeth Playhouse, Oct. 12,
are now available at the
A.M.S. office.
GOSPEL STUDENTS
Invited to be present Mon.,
Oct. 7, at 7:30, 5611 Heather
Street, for a get-acquainted
evening. For information,
phone AM 6-9275.
*    *    *
SPORTS CAR CLUB
Meeting of the Sports Car
Club in Chem. 250 at noon today. The movie, "The Golden
Age of Motoring," will be
shown. Anyone wanting infor
mation concerning the Totem
Rally on Sunday, Oct. 6,
should attend.
*¥**¥•     *x*
CONSERVATIVE    CLUB
First general meeting will
be held Friday for all present
and prospective members. The
club's activities for the year
will  be outlined.
**• *I* •!•
PSYCHOLOGY  CLUB
The first meeting of the year
will be held today in Room 19
of the Psychology Hut. Dr.
Hare is to speak on "Operant
Conditioning in Verbal Behaviour." It is also the last chance
for speaker and seminar memberships.
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ST.   LAMBERT,   QUEBEC
CSA NEWS
There is a mixed bag of
interesting items for your
undevided  attention,
today. Putting our hands
into the bag we come
up with ... a Homecoming
Queen. Sad to say, it's
not that easy.  We put it as
a challenge to the
Chemists—Instant Girls.
Your market is assured.
Seriously though, we
think it's time that  the
Graduate Students had a
candiadte in the annual
Homecoming Queen
contest.    If you know any
sweet young gal who
might be inveigled into
representing us, please
contact the GSC office
(local 798). And, Ladies,
this is not a contest to be
shunned out of deference
to modesty, but a
tremendous tonic to bolster
your social life to new
peaks   of activity  .   .   .
v       v       v
Graduate  Student   ice
hockey will be played on
Tuesday evenings between
10:15 and 11:15.   Be at the
Winter Sports by 10 p.m.,
and please  bring any
equipment you may own.
(Including wives or sweethearts—spectators are
always welcome.)    The
GSA will subsidize the ice
rental to lmiit the charge
per player to  50  cents. '
The hockey is being
organized by Ross Turner
(rated at several ohms per
volt  in the Dept.  of
Electrical  Engineering),
and Mr. Schwencke, of
Slavonic studies, will be
the coach.
•jl *J» if*
The Students' Wives'
Club will hold its first
meeting on Wednesday,
October 9, at 8 p.m. in
Brock Hall. All students'
wives are welcome.   A
suggestion for the first
topic for discussion is the
use of apostrophies in the
club title . . .
•T* •!• •!•
Contributions to this
column are being begged
for upon bended knee (or
any other position, for that
matter).     Any material
you may have will be
absorbed thirstily by Mrs.
Chapman in the GSC
office.

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