UBC Publications

UBC Publications

UBC Publications

The Ubyssey Sep 11, 1984

Item Metadata

Download

Media
ubysseynews-1.0128065.pdf
Metadata
JSON: ubysseynews-1.0128065.json
JSON-LD: ubysseynews-1.0128065-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): ubysseynews-1.0128065-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: ubysseynews-1.0128065-rdf.json
Turtle: ubysseynews-1.0128065-turtle.txt
N-Triples: ubysseynews-1.0128065-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: ubysseynews-1.0128065-source.json
Full Text
ubysseynews-1.0128065-fulltext.txt
Citation
ubysseynews-1.0128065.ris

Full Text

Array THE UBY
Vol. LXVII, No. 1
Vancouver, B.C. Tuesday, September 11,1984
Students furious
over liquor laws
By PATTI FLATHER
The student housing office formulated new residence policies on alcohol
which restrict student's right to drink and students are fuming.
Among housing proposals are the following:
• No parties of any kind are allowed from Sunday night to Thursday
night, including beer nights.
• All residence-wide parties must have professional, paid bar staff.
• Students must see a counsellor after two alcohol-related offences. A
newly created alcohol committee will determine when offences occur.
• Drinking games are prohibited at organized social functions.
Katherine Fitzgerald, former Gage towers beer night manager, said the
move will increase off-campus drinking and driving because students will
go there to drink.
"Just because students can't drink here doesn't mean it'll stop them,"
Fitzgerald said. Beer nights are a tension outlet she said, adding many
students attend the functions as a social event but do not drink.
"In Gage everyone is over 19. (It is an admission requirement to Gage).
We are adults and should be entitled to make our own decisions," she said.
Many Totem Park and Place Vanier residents are also of legal drinking age.
Fitzgerald said the Gage council is planning a protest.
Nancy Bradshaw, Alma Mater Society external affairs coordinator and a
Gage resident, said the proposals were ridiculous.
"Students who'd like to have their beer nights should be signing petitions
to get beer nights reinstated," said Bradshaw.
Housing director Mary Flores said the policies are defensible and will be
finalized after meetings with the residence associations this week. But she
said student housing is worried more students will drink, and drive.
Some of the strict regulations are due to a campus RCMP crackdown on
liquor licenses, Flores said. Last March the RCMP told housing they would
allow only two "special occasions" licenses per month for each "organized
society" such as a residence association. Liquor is sold at "special occasions." And the RCMP decided recurring events such as beer nights do not
qualify for "special occasion" licenses at all, Flores said.
"It's in keeping with the law. It's a responsible move, but students are
going to have to be given opportunities to drink in a responsible manner
elsewhere on campus."
Flores claimed most resident students are pleased with the "special occasion" limit. "People are trying to sleep and study on weekdays," she said.
Housing is applying for weekend pub licenses for Totem, Vanier and
Gage as an alternative but license approval may take six months, Flores
said.
Andy Lucko, head of the UBC RCMP detachment, said the Liquor Control Board is behind the restrictions on organized drinking events. The LCB
grants licenses while the RCMP only issues applications, he said.
Last February the LCB told the RCMP to enforce the "special occasions" permit limit, Lucko said. "The rule has probably been here all along
but not really enforced."
The RCMP, the LCB and housing met in June to discuss alcohol, Lucko
said. But Lucko, who had not seen the current policy proposals, said housing then took the matter into its own hands.
UVic enrolment down
By PATTI FLATHER
Fewer students are enrolling at
the University of Victoria because
they cannot afford increasing
education costs in these lean times,
UVic president Howard Petch said
Friday.
Petch warned that if the enrolment drop continues, staff and programs must be cut.
"Our first year has been absolutely devastated," said Petch.
Eighteen per cent fewer first year
students enrolled in UVic this fall,
and Petch said the figure would
have been higher without UVic's
new engineering program. Most
UVic students were registered by
Friday.
Petch said be blames provincial
government policies and high
unemployment for preventing
students from reaching university.
"I think it's been caused primarily
by the (provincial government)
elimination of the grant program."
Petch said high youth unemployment, new provincial high school
exams and tougher university entrance requirements also contributed to the drop in enrolment.
Half of UVic students are from
out of town and must pay an additional $4,000 in living expenses,
Petch said.   "Many students just
can't face going so much into
debt," he said.
With an all-loan student aid program introduced in the spring B.C.
students could face a $20,000 debt
load for a four-year degree. UVic
tuition fees increased 26 per cent
this year.
Staff and programs will be cut if
the drop in first year enrolment
continues, said Petch. Each one per
cent admissions drop mean
$100,000 must be cut from UVic's
budget, he added.
UVic's executive council meets
today to examine the drop. But cuts
are not yet needed because UVic anticipated a five per cent cut this year
and overall enrolment dropped only
2.4 per cent, Petch said.
Cutbacks jeopardize education
charlie fidelman photo
"National and provincial well-
being is threatened by decreases in
(education) funding," UBC's president told the Day of Concern at
Robson media centre Saturday.
George Pedersen told the 200
people present the importance of
convincing the government and
public of the economic and social
functions of higher education is
paramount.
Pedersen said "education's effectiveness and programs of
research are being impaired.
Reducing commitment to education is a false economy," he said.
B.C.'s three university faculties
organized the Day of Concern to
bring attention to post-secondary
education in B.C.
Vancouver city alderperson
Marguerite Ford said cutbacks are
AMS creates LOTO UBC
UBC's student society kicked the year off with a lottery last week.
The grand prize is at least an average tuition ($1,450).
The lottery the Alma Mater Society organized offers up to 10,000
tickets at $1 each with half the proceeds going to tuition prizes and
the other half to jthe AMS bursary fund, organizer Nancy Bradshaw
said Saturday.   •
"We hope to bring media attention to increasing tuition and the
elimination of student grants which are causing inaccessibility to
universities," Bradshaw said. She appeared on CBC Television
Thursday and ori the Dave Barrett radio show Friday morning and
added that the publicity helped ticket sales.
Any student can buy tickets and non-students can sponsor UBC
students or buy a ticket as a donation. If a donor won, the awards office will determine a needy student Bradshaw said.
To give ticket sales a boost, there will be a competition between
undergraduate societies, clubs, residences, sororities, fraternities and
other interest groups for prizes, Bradshaw said. The prize draw will
be held Oct. 19. Groups selling tickets receive a 10 per cent commission as well, she added.
Bradsha#said one's chances of winning this lottery are much better than in the provincial lotteries. And any student in financial need
who does aot wh| a tuition is still eligible for the AMS bursary fund
student council established this year, she said.
J%
- if
FIRST EDITION
jeopardizing the intellectual integrity of our universities. In discussing
the necessity of academic freedom
she said it is necessary that
"restraints don't hit hard on
politically unpopular or sckcalled
insignificant courses".
Ford said "universities are not
frills to be dispensed with when
times are tough. Restraints on them
shouldn't fall dispropotionately.
There must be scientific knowledge
for its own sake, not necessarily for
its commercial value."
She said investment in universities is justified , adding they are
autonomous settings for research.
"(This) independent research is
necessary . . . (because it) provides
distillations of information that we
can trust".
Robert F. Alexander, president
and chief executive of Microtel
Ltd., backed her statement stressing
the "tight coupling between universities and capitalistic industry".
Alexander said industries need
highly educated graduates who are
"shaped in universities and then
further developed once in the industries".
He said it is important industry
have access to research conducted
at the universities "thus avoiding
years of independent research".
SFU president William Sayweil
said "education is one of the major
catalysts in economic growth". He
said that higher education and
research will play an important role
in our quest for economic recovery.
"Investment in education becomes
an investment in human capital,
providing highly qualified people
for the market place."
Sayweil said the provincial
government cutbacks at a time
when the universities are most important to the province is questionable. "It's time for us to reaffirm our commitment to higher
education. For our own long-term
economic interest, human capital
must be enhanced," he said. Page 2
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, September 11, 1984
Protesters weave
VANCOUVER (CUP) — Demonstrators protesting the visit of
former U.S. secretary of state Alexander Haig claimed some of Vancouver's most expensive real estate
Thursday.
Chanting "Haig go home", 150
protesters wove brightly coloured
string across Burrard Street's 600
Council asks
student president
to resign
VICTORIA (CUP) — The
University of Victoria student society executive asked their president to
resign last week.
They asked for Joanne Howard's
resignation in a meeting with her
September 5, saying her performance as president was unsatisfactory. Howard submitted her
resignation, effective immediately,
following the meeting.
According to vice president programs Mike Peterson the resignation request was promoted by
Howard's lack of leadership and
responsibility, her failure to perform her duties or to reach consensus with other executive members,
as well as her continual absence
while attending summer classes.
"There was a lack of confidence
in Joanne at the executive level,"
said Peterson.
"It was a ruthless political power
play," said Howard, calling the
charges inaccurate and unfounded.
She said she decided to withdraw
quickly rather than fight "what
promised to be a dirty battle."
In her letter, Howard said she
was resigning due to circumstances
beyond her control. Executive
members said they would have
started impeachment proceedings if
Howard had not resigned.
The executive vice presidents
hoped to keep the matter quiet,
Peterson said but an anonymous
letter to the UVic student
newspaper, the Martlet, brought
things into the open.
Howard is the first UVic student
president to leave office before her
term ended.
The president's position will remain vacant until the October 10
student society by-election.
'thediner1
Serving   U.B.C.   and   West  Point   Grey
for the last 25 years.
We put our Sole in your
FISH & CHIPS
English Style Home Cooked Meals
at Reasonable Prices - including
Roast Beef and Yorkshire Pudding
Open Monday to Saturday
8:00 a.m. to 8:30 p.m.
Closed Sundays fir Public Holidays
For the early ones,   we start serving
breakfast from 8.00 a.m.
4556 W. 10th Ave.   - 224 1912
• * • •
*   LovE ■
h    ®    .
**QuicheS
'}'
at
SOCIP/SAU\D
QUICHE
$5.95
/     t                Ewsiyday • ./   /
wX                    ^rDrT1 *
/"X             5:30 ■ 7:30 X    -;
■^ ( A\ the back of the Village ) %          ,
block stopping traffic and blocking
almost all entrances to the Hyatt
hotel where Haig was speaking.
Haig, condemned as a war
criminal by the demonstrators,
spoke at a $150-a-plate dinner sponsored by the youth wing of B.C.'s
Social Credit party. Some demonstrators carried signs reading
"Socred youth heil Haig."
"Haig's appearance was sponsored by the young Socreds which
shows who they really admire,"
protest organizer Cindy Shore said.
She linked U.S. president Ronald
Reagan's social service cut-backs to
the Socred restraint program. Haig
served under Reagan.
The Socreds mirror much of the
Republican party's program, Shore
said, citing elimination of rent controls, slashing social'programs, and
"massive government expenditures
to line the pockets of big business.''
With speakers blasting anti-war
songs by Vancouver political-punk
band D.O.A., protesters created
the web of twine and yarn across
the street. Webs have been used as a
symbolic protest by women's peace
groups.
After completing the web,
demonstrators moved on the posh
uptown hotel, surrounding the
main entrance. They forced open
one of the doors and chanted their
disapproval of Haig's presence to
those inside the building. Twenty
police stood inside guarding the entrance.
Haig spoke on "The future of
American policy, domestic and
foreign."
PANGO PANGO (UNS) —
Hairy puce blorgs on this tiny island
community sang and rejoiced at the
appearance once again of The Daily
Blah after a prolonged absense.
Blah spokesblorg Chatty Blather
said lots of things.
THE
THUNDERBIRD
SHOP
CLUB: Team Jackets
By SYMAX — Serving B. C. for 36 yrs.
Wool Melton, Leather & Nylon
Jackets with Cresting
at Team Prices!
See us at the Thunderbird Shop
Lower Level
Student Union
Building. U.B.C.
Hours: Mon.-Fri.
8:00 a.m.-7:00 p.m.
Sat. 10 a.m.-5:00 p.m.
Telephone: 224-1911
Visa & Mastercharge
Accepted
The Ubyssey
can change
your life
'<S
NX
Anna Banana's true life testimonial
Before I found The Ubyssey, I didn't know what fun was. I thought wild, decadent,
marathon parties would tarnish my sterling virtue, politics was men's business, and Jesus
had something important though ill-defined to do with my life. Boy was that
nowheresville. And then one day, seemingly for no reason at all, I made the wise choice of
stopping by The Ubyssey office at SUB 241K and asking about news, reviews, graphics,
sports and photography opportunities. Sure enough, there was a place for me. Yes, now
I'm ecstatic. I'm just dying to go scoop the Sun, and get another cider from The
Ubyssey's own fridge. And most important, I've learned to be a force in our social and
political environment, working for a more equal world.
Join the Ubyssey
and come to the staff meeting
Wednesday noon at SUB 241K Tuesday, September 11,1984
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 3
Jobs. Education
■ •I
r for women
By ROBERT BEYNON
Job prospects for women in the
1980s are dismal and women's
second-rate place in universities are
not changing quickly, say two
reports compiled recently by a
woman student's officer workers.
The report on women in the
workplace in the 1980s, compiled
by Nancy Horsman, said the largest
labor force increase is expected to
be women in the 25-44 age group,
who will increase by 5.6 per cent per
year between 1980-5.
But the report said 80 per cent of
these women will go into clerical
work where average wages are 27
per cent less than the average wage
workers receive. The average salary
rate for selected skilled and unskilled occupations dominated by men
is 132 per cent of the national
average, says the report, which is
based primarily on the Economic
Council of Canada's report, In
Short Supply: Jobs and Skills in the
1980's, published in 1982.
The    report    also    said    that
although women constitute 40 per
cent of the work force, their
unemployment rate is higher and
that 50 per cent of unemployed
women fail to return to the fulltime
workforce.
"Women will be segregated into
a "ghetto" employment situation in
offices, banks, etc.," the report
said.
According to the report the best
bet for employment in the 1980s
would be science, business or
medicine with some background in
computers. These are areas which
few women are entering.
The report said women at UBC
are suffering due to the new micro-
technological changes. Jobs are being trained to use new equipment.
"The report is based on information that is already available to
anyone, Stats Canada, provincial
government and Economic Council
of Canada projections," said
Horsman.
In   a   second,   related    report,
Horsman says technological change
is occuring and new jobs are emerging while women continue to enroll
in traditional faculties such as nursing and arts which will provide few
jobs in the future.
Horsman blames womens' failure
to enter non-traditional fields on
lack of encouragement at all levels
of education.
"The counselling should begin at
the secondary level to encourage
women to go into the sciences and
industrial education," said
Horsman. "The counselling is
almost too late when women reach
UBC."
Horsman said efforts should be
made to place capable women in the
president's office, hire more women
professors, and point women
students to non-traditional studies
such as engineering.
She said workshops should also
be organized to help women overcome   math   anxiety   and   other
psychological problems women experience when they enter non-
traditional fields.
Associate vice president Don
Russell said that the university is
improving its representation of
women but that it takes time. A
positive sign is acting agricultural
dean, Beryl March, who is a
woman, said Russell.
"I agree in principle that women
should be encouraged to enter non-
traditional fields," Russell said.
Transcript errors
delayed admission
By PATTI FLATHER
Several hundred B.C. high school
students were left in the dark as to
whether or not they were accepted
to different universities this August.
More than 600 UBC applicants
alone did not know if they were accepted by mid-August due to delays
and errors in provincial transcripts,
UBC register Ken Young said Friday.
Young said the provincial
government moved too quickly to
implement the new provincial high
school exams, which now account
for 50 per cent of grade 12 grades.
"They had a time line that was very
short to set up these procedures,"
he said.
Only a handful of applicants
have not been notified now, Young
said, adding no UBC applicant
would be turned down because of
the delay. In 300 cases at UBC, high
schools did not submit some grades
to the education ministry and in 250
cases the ministry made errors,
Young said.
"It's been very hard on the
students. When you try to make
plans for September and haven't
got an authorization to register
form it's very unnerving." Young
said he was very embarassed by the
delays.
The education ministry had promised transcripts would be ready
July 24. UBC did not receive them
until early August and then many
were incomplete, Young said.
Education ministry spokesperson
Dick Melville said the government
is partly at fault for the delays
which made transcripts arrive
several weeks later than last year.
"This was the first time around
for the ministry and for the outside
agency, the Educational Research
Institute of B.C. (which
amalgamated the school and provincial examination marks.) Certainly we had some delays."
Melville said incomplete information from schools and students failing to specify which universities to
send transcripts to made up most
delays.
Melville said he did not know of
any student refused admission
because of the delay. "Ninety-nine
per cent of the cases are resolved,"
he said
But last month it appeared some
students would be shut out of
university, he added. "The biggest
problem was the Cranbrook area,"
he said. One straight-A Cranbrook
student and governor general's
award winner was initially refused
admission to the University of
Alberta due to a late transcript," but
was later accepted, Melville said.
Education ministry officials met
with UBC's registrar's office last
week and representatives of B.C.'s
three universities will examine the
delays with the ministry later this
month to avoid a repeat next year,
said UBC registrar Young.
Library hours reduced
Due to a decreased budget this year's UBC's libraries have cut their
hours.
The library branches weekly winter schedule has been cut by 112 hours.
Bill Watson, assistant librarian for public services, said the opportunity for
flexible studying hours is reduced.
But he said the hours cut, which are morning and late night hours, were
not hours when many students occupied the libraries. "In our estimation,
the cutting effects the least number of people possible," Watson said.
He added the hours cut translate into a $30,000 savings for the library,
only 7.5 per cent of the $400,000 their budget is cut.
The money is being cut from the part-time staffing budget, Watson said.
Wage savings from not hiring part-time workers account for $30,000 of the
entire cuts. The library also cut $370,000 this year because seven full-time
positions became vacant due to retirement, Watson said.
If budget cuts occur next year a library branch may be closed. "From a
money-saving point of view it's quite attractive," said Watson.
Alma Mater Society president Margaret Copping said the reduced library
schedule concerns her. "It's one of the largest employers on campus," she
said, adding that many part-time jobs at the library have been cut.
Copping added the reduced access to books and other resource materials
could cause competition among students, especially graduate students, who
rely on them. "At what point does the competition become critical?" Copping asked.
— neil lucente photo
"DOWN WITH HAIG, down with war, U.S. out of El Salvador!" roar demonstrators outside hotel where former
U.S. Secretary of State Alexander Haig was speaking to devout Nazi, . . . Socred Youth. While Haig droned on
about the merits of U.S. imperialism, spiders outside built a web of peace to unify themselves in the endless struggle against Big Business, Big Government, and Big Brother Ronnie.
Student loans here on time
By RENATE BOERNER
Students are receiving their loans
on time this year, despite applications for provincial loans arriving
two weeks later than last year and
two months later than in previous
years, said the UBC director of
awards and financial aid Friday.
"The delay isn't going to affect
students because we hired additional staff," Hender said. The
awards office was authorized by
UBC president George Pedersen to
hire four extra people to compensate for the delay, he added.
Hender said the additional effort
made by the awards office has been
matched by the provincial ministry
of education. Ministry assessment
of loan applications, which usually
spans six weeks has been cut to two
to four weeks, he said.
The deadline for loan application
was July 1 and Hender said students
who had their application in by July
31 should have received their loan
documents. "The delay should not
be causing students who acted on a
timely bases any problem," he said.
Hender said the awards office has
processed more than 4,000 loan applications and is further ahead than
last year. There are 25 per cent
fewer applications than last year,
Hender added.
Hender said the drop in applications may be due to their late arrival, the bus strike or the provincial government's replacement of
the grant on all loan programs this
spring.
"The loan program is still the
pits," Hender said, "but most
students feel the system has worked
quite well. Things were late to start
off with  but  they are no longer
late."
Students whose loans are late can
have their tutition fees deferred by
the finance department. And the
awards office will make emergencv
loans. "We will do advances oi:
their Canada Student Loan starting
on Monday (Sept. 10)," Hender
said.
AMS sots up hifcltlii$| posts
Hitchhiking is now official.
Hitching zones to and from campus have been designated by the
Alma Mater Society to compensate for the continuing bus dispute.
Incoming traffic should hitch at:
— Burrard and Davie;
— Broadway and Granville;
-- Fourth and Burrard;
— Alma and Tenth;
— Dunbar and King Edward;
— 41st and Oak;
— Granville and Marine Drive.
Outgoing traffic will use the five zones in the bus loop to get to:
— Downtown via Fourth;
— Tenth to Granville and points East;
— Sixteenth, East;
— Sixteenth to Dunbar and points East;
— Marine Drive to Oak Street and points beyond.
10,000 signs have been printed saying "UBC" and fliers have been
placed on cars on campus to explain the system.
Signs are available in SUB and carpools are being arranged
through Speakeasy, a student administered service organization in
SUB.
But AMS president Margaret Copping said hitchhikers and drivers
should exercise normal caution in dealing with strangers.
^ Page 4
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, September 11, 1984
UBC students vote on CFS
By MARTIN WEST
A campus referendum will be
held in November to decide if UBC
students will become full Canadian
Federation of Students members or
not.
Alma Mater Society president
Margaret Copping said she favours
joining CFS. "Standing together in
the CFS, the student body has far
greater lobbying power than simply
as an individual university," Copping said.
Student council member Duncan
Stewart, delegate to the Edmonton
CFS national convention this year,
said that though UBC might continue to enjoy some CFS services on
campus like CUTS and Students
Working Abroad if membership
isn't passed, the university has a
moral obligation to help fund services it benefits from.
"Basically, we have three options," Stewart said. "We can go it
alone, which would limit our advantages greatly. We could form
another organization like CFS, but
this would simply be duplicating
hard work already done, or we can
join CFS and work towards making
the organization better than it has
ever been before."
However, neither the AMS nor
the council is taking official positions on the referendum now. After
more information has been
gathered, Council may take sides,
but for now it merely encourages
students to vote in the referendum,
Stewart said.
If the AMS takes a position on
the referendum, they will allocate
funds to promote their position on
campus with posters and advertisements in the Ubyssey, Stewart
said. But he doubted a decision
would be reached until the end of
September.
The AMS has been a prospective
CFS member for three years.
CFS started in 1980 and has acted
as a lobbying, consulting and
researching group for post-
secondary institutions across the
country.
In the political arena, the CFS
has a full time researcher who investigates government policy effects
on post-secondary education.
Presently, a brief is being prepared
for the premier's office outlining
the formation of a student advisory
board that would report to the
ministry of education.
Donna Morgan, CFS Pacific
chair, said the formation of the
board would be an important step
in enhancing student involvement in
government policy making. "Increased representation in Victoria
can only have a beneficial outcome
for all students in the province,"
Morgan said.
As well as acting for the collective
student body, CFS membership
also includes many benefits for the
individual. Over 1000 merchandise
and service discounts are available
to members in B.C., ranging from
travel accommodations to clothing
bargains.
The CFS is also the issuing agent
for the International Student Identity Card. The card provides student travellers with discounts
abroad and is free to all CFS
members (full time students).
Morgan said, "people at UBC
aren't seeing the individual services
available as UBC is not yet a full
member, and are probably not
aware of the impact CFS has had on
collective services such as upgrading
the student aid program."
Where it costs so little to look so great!
REDKEN
. FOR MEN, WOMEN AND KIDS
• NO APPOINTMENT NECESSARY
? Get a great haircut from a fully
licensed professional stylist for
just $6. You can be sure you'll
always get our best. It's the only
way we know how to cut hair
and we guarantee it.
Toppy's
Great(K)Cuts
2389 W. 4th Ave. 734-4541
,    3701 W. Broadway      222-3331
WIN
A Bianchi Ace
12 Speed!!!
Ask about it & your
FREE Clipboard
4
UNIVERSITY
PHARMACY LTD.
5754 University Blvd.
In the Village
224-3202
ATTENTION
ORIENTATION
WEEK ACTIVITIES
Tuesday, September 11
PUNCHLINES, Free Comedy
SUB Plaza 12:30 p.m.
Wednesday, September 12
Hires Root Beer Boat Races
Open to all, SUB Plaza
12:30 p.m.
Thurday, September 13
MUSICAL CHAIRS
SUB Plaza 12:30 p.m.
$100 Prize to winner
ERIC BURDON presented by
AMS Concerts, Commodore
Ballroom, Doors: 7, Show: 8 p.m.
Friday, SeptembeM4
Intramural FASHION SHOW
SUB Plaza 12:30 p.m.
Miller   presents   POWDER   BLUES
Free    Concert,    Maclnnes    Field
3:30-7:30 p.m.
IMAGES IN VOGUE with BOLERO
LAVA
All welcome SUB Ballroom 8 p.m.
$4 advance.
•   •
For as little as $17.00 a
month, Granada will rent you
a terrific colour TV that we
look after for no extra charge.
There's no better way to
watch TV!
Granada has showrooms
everywhere-one just around the corner trom
you1 Call us now.
1009 Kingsway
Vancouver.
873-6311
We're open 9 AM to 9 PM, and Saturday till 6.
WORRY-FREE  COLOUR  TV.   FOR  NOW  OR  FOREVER.
GRANADA^ %
BOX OFFICE
University of British Columbia
FREDERICK WOOD THEATRE
presents
LOOK BACK IN ANGER
by John Osborne
SEPTEMBER 21—29
(Previews Sept. 19 & 20)
Curtain: 8 pm
STUDENT SEASON TICKETS
4 Plays for $13
September 19-29
LOOK BACK IN ANGER (Osborne)
November 7-17
TWELFTH NIGHT (Shakespeare)
January 16-26
THE IMAGINARY INVALID (Moliere)
March 6-16
HAPPY END (Weill)
a musical
FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE
Support Your Campus Theatre
ROOM 20: Tuesday, September 11, 1984
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 5
UBC faculty find
better jobs elsewhere
This article previously appeared
in the July 4-10 Summer Ubyssey.
July 7, 1983
It is raining in Barkerville. A
UBC commerce professor and his
family pack the tent and themselves
into the car. Driving down the slippery highway, they hear on the
radio that the provincial budget
abolished faculty tenure.
Associate commerce professor
Michael Gibbins says two weeks
after the budget the first phone calls
came to commerce asking, "Hey,
anybody out there unhappy?" He
continues, "It doesn't take them
long. By the end of the summer
everyone (in commerce) was getting
phone calls.
"It was the budget. That was the
catalyst."
Gibbons, sitting in his emptied
office, is trying to explain why he is
leaving UBC for the University of
Alberta in five days.
"The political situation is part of
it. The financial situation is part of
it." Then he adds smiling, "Maybe
it was just time."
Gibbins thought seriously before
putting himself on the market last
summer.
"I started it," Gibbons says,
"because I got some pretty interesting inquiries . . . I'm a pretty
marketable guy, I guess.
"Every one of the inquiries was
for a significantly higher salary and
better working conditions. I don't
think I'm a mercenary but it made it
easier to go," he says.
Gibbons, an articulate silver-
haired man, is one of a growing
number of UBC faculty deciding
they will enjoy work better at a
university that is not stricken by
severe government cutbacks. Other
faculty members are retiring early
and new faculty cannot be attracted
to UBC.
The provincial government cut
UBC's budget by five per cent for
1984-85 and provincial officials
have told the UBC administration
to plan for another five per cent cut
for 1985-86. Seventy-seven faculty
and 113 support jobs have been cut
this year to help cope with the
resulting $18 million deficit.
And faculty voted this August to
accept a wage and increments freeze
for the second year in a row.
These factors are taking their toll
and UBC's quality will likely suffer.
In Gibbin's department, accounting, five full-time professors and
more part-time lecturers left this
year. Gibbins said many remaining
professors have been receiving offers continuously and he adds he
does not know how accounting will
cope.
Gibbins says recruiting faculty,
which he has done for accounting is
a problem due to the financial
crisis.
Few Canadians graduate with
Ph.D.'s in accounting, Gibbins
says, so UBC must recruit in the
U.S. This means UBC is "competing against a salary structure that
is way higher than UBC's."
Gibbons predicts a bleak future
for UBC in the short term. He says
because the professors already leaving are hard to replace commerce
may hire more part-time, less
qualified people.
Gibbins also predicts program cuts,
enrolment restrictions, and a shift
by professors to consulting to keep
their incomes competitive.
Gibbins blames provincial cutbacks to education for this situation
and says in the future B.C. will be
less prepared than it ought to be.
"There's an anti-education spirit in
By PATTI FLATHER
this province that I find very disturbing," he says.
Gibbins points out other provinces have financial problems but
B.C. is different. "Other provinces
seem to be managing these problems without the class warfare going on in B.C."
G
ordon "Skip"' Walter,
another commerce professor, has
more stories about discontented
faculty finding better opportunities.
Walter appears the quintessential
businessman — crisp blue shirt, and
dotted tie, shiny black shoes, and a
well-trimmed moustache. He waves
his hands and raises his eyebrows as
rfgcwages
Faculty to c}tIfo £*
_July4.. 10, 1984
1,r!nl Procedure^
>*»-»■ UTentk
*eeksdur
-""wntheunivers,lvfortwoor
rin« "-Tin. said Fisher
""""»"«•   of  c(,„ccr„ed
proposed
commit-
Snide**? „~&
^wfCV
/v
,no»'
x.«S>>'
,nd
SW
o»*
\l\a
f-'r>,  - s*%, s'«* sar °W , h » <*■,,/
^&Ta*
he tells of Ron Taylor, a friend and
colleague who left last year for Rice
University, Texas.
"He teaches 50 per cent of what
he taught here, is paid twice as
much, has 10 times the clerical support, and four times the travel support."
Walter pauses, looks out the window.
"And his children are given free
tuition at a place where it costs
$5,000 a year.  Well, he's a very
talented guy and I just ask if we
decided to hire him tomorrow what
are the odds of getting him back?"
Walter says Taylor told him from
Texas, "Gee, it's nice to be in a
place where we're planning what to
do for the students rather than what
to cut next."
Walter says the commerce faculty
exodus is part of a trend caused by
provincial government funding
policies and increasing competition
for commerce professors.
"The provincial government is
putting pressure on UBC that
creates a pessimistic atmosphere
here," he says. These pressures
depress faculty, he adds.
Walter proudly says UBC has
had the best Canadian business
school, period. Then he says the
faculty has no chance of improving
and every chance of deteriorating.
Commerce dean Peter Lusztig
knows the serious problems now in
maintaining a quality faculty.
"We lost an unusual number (of
faculty) this past year," he says in
an interview in his spacious Angus
office. He is friendly, a short man
with glasses and bushy eyebrows.
He says seven faculty left this year,
compared with three on average.
"The seven are people we didn't
care to lose."
Those professors cannot be
replaced, Lusztig says, because he
cannot find new people willing to
replace them.
Because so many commerce
faculty left, Lusztig asked senate
for permission to restrict enrolment this fall. (375 are now admitted per year). Lusztig says now
more restrictions are unlikely since
several vacancies are filled with
part-time faculty drawn from the
business community.
But Lusztig says commerce has
passed its limit of part-time professors. "We teach very few courses
that allow drawing lecturers from
the business community."
Also due to faculty leaving, commerce suspended its two-year licentiate in accounting, and the Masters
in Business Administration program will take 25 fewer students
next year.
Lusztig is trying to keep
discontented faculty another year.
But he warns if faculty see UBC's
financial crisis as ongoing. "It is
likely they will succumb to the
sirens from abroad."
"The whole continent knows
we're in trouble," Lusztig says articles on UBC's financial problems
appeared in the New York Times
and the Wall Street Journal.
Due to this, Americans come to
UBC to "raid" faculty, Lusztig
says. Then he laughs. "Well, we used to do it to them."
He says commerce and UBC risk
See page 6: FACULTY Page 6
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, September 11, 1984
Faculty restless wis cutbacks continue
From page 5: SOME
losing the best faculty first. The
commerce faculty is hardest hit now
because many unfilled positions exist in U.S. business schools, he
adds. These jobs' availability only
add to UBC's comparatively low
salaries for business profs, and the
provincial government education
cutbacks, he says.
"The academic environment is in
a state of seige," Lusztig says. Then
indignantly, "The provincial
government's setting up Discovery
Park and then castrating the university located nearby."
Commerce is not the only area
suffering the "restraint" side effect
of faculty loss, says Lusztig. He
says restraint will severely affect
computer    science,    engineering,
physics and economics and "It's
not going to be long before it
becomes a university-wide
phenomenon."
Lorna Gibson, an assistant civil
engineering professor, resigned this
year for a position at the prestigious
Massachusetts Institute of
Technology. She says she resigned
for two reasons.
"One, I got a very good offer.
And I find the financial situation at
UBC discouraging," Gibson says.
Gibson fits under the term junior
faculty. Laughing she says she was
the junior faculty in her department. She stayed at UBC for two
years.
"I haven't had a raise since I got
here. It doesn't look like I'd get one
next year. Or the next," she says.
VIDEOmALLEV
Means Movies
£VHS
3560 W. 41st at Dunbar
1000's of Movies in stock
NOW SHOWING
• Footloose • The Dresser • Romancing The
Stone • Educating Rita • Liquid Sky • Blame it on
Rio • Reckless • Where the Buffalo Roam • The Big
Chill • The Hotel New Hampshire • Ziggy Stardust • The
Last Waltz • Splash • Iceman
COMING SOON
• Racing With The Moon • Against All Odds • Fire
Starter • Never Cry Wolf • Up The Creek • Ice
Pirates • Yentl • Making The Grade •
SPECIAL
U.B.C. Students Get Member Rates
At VIDEO ALLEY
' $25 VALUE
2 MOVIES AND A VCR
ONLY $8.50
Mon. —Thurs. only Offer expires Sept. 30/84
VIDEOmAUEV
3560 W. 41st Ave at Dunbar
Lots of Free Parking
 266-6272	
AEROBIC      WORKOUTS
o
P
O
Q
0Q
CO
$
CD
--»
Co
3
O
5)
O
$89
ONE YEAR
UNLIMITED
at all locations!
FOR FULL TIME STUDENTS
(limited offer—regularly $199)
Canadian Memorial Community Centre, 16th & Burrard
St. Paul's, Jervis & Pendrell, West End
South Vancouver Nautilus Centre, Fraser & 41st
X     Cameron Recreation centre, Lougheed Mall, Burnaby
(Richmond, Coquitlam, Burnaby, Port Coquitlam, Surrey)
922-1177
■ (Phone for schedule) — Bring this ad for free workout
I—— —— — ——— _-._——________
Gibson says she will be paid more
money and has better prospects for
a raise at MIT, though she will probably work harder.
Gibson saw an advertisement for
the position and responded. "I
think the provincial government has
a lot to do with it ... I wouldn't
have looked if things were better,"
she says.
Assistant history professor
Catherine Legrand, although not in
one of the most competitive
faculties, says she received an attractive job offer last year.
"It was a real difficulty deciding
whether or not to stay." Legrand
says the UBC history department is
very strong and if firing of professors starts, she will leave.
"It was really tense last year. If
there's another five per cent cut in
UBC's operating budget it will be
much worse. I imagine they'll start
firing."
Computer science department
head Jim Varah says his highly
competitive department is lucky no
one has resigned to date because
many faculty are depressed by the
cutbacks. And computer science
cannot attract faculty to fill one
year appointment, he adds.
"Our salaries are no longer competitive with other Canadian
universities, to say nothing of U.S.
universities and industrial research
firms."
"I certainly disagree with the
provincial government's priorities
because they don't fund higher
education. This is certainly the root
cause of the present problem. I
deplore that."
on
Aapcin \Jver5e<x5 L^uitural^Tddocluti
JAPANESE LANGUAGE CLASS:  The lessons will be conducted
Tn either individual or small group classes.
INTRODUCTION OF ENGLISH TEACHERS TO JAPAN:  We assist
in the teaching contract with prospective institutes
in Japan.
B £ , kiSm&.m   B * £ » « 8 (7 r  y ? •> i   'Jlc«fct>FJ*S©^
< # js * a* w b* am • 3 *i -e # * *) 3> - #j £ * »? it,
2-2580   Burrard   St.   Van.   V6J   3J7 TE*L.   733-1746
I"
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
crib
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
L.
GRE4T    GeArurrotA*    &eowu&i i 1 i
t>obj£fd-  to \V\£.   conditions ootVioadl be.\co^>.
Carch\A of -H\t <,wk\W phot \*
\.tAv<Jt be. rccxlLj  Wo/varcj; c*rcx^li<f<, *wicilr\+ txr fei& c*r\e<^.
i-Kub.f be  at><>olu+e. conndi^eurs of twfKyeXS.
3. Must  W>v^   <no   uso.cJro v\cx-jc   ^o^lle-t  treu/wpV^d  rxs   K)
4- Mo^V  tx<i-4   ont-  o+Ksr "borcj   of
&.ir\cA   \?r\r\0. tWi$  pA£k£
JU^A   wont   cXo.
o\  "PA^  paper  UlH\ vAOU.£c>p\££.
3431 W. BROADWAY • 738-5298
HMR
CORKY'S
styling
731-4191
3644 W. 4th (at Alma)
CORKY'S FROSH AWARD
^Sr
Awarded seasonally to outstanding male and female
Thunderbird athletes.
1984 Olympic winners
PAT TURNER
Rowing
While not technically a first
year student athlete, Pat took
last year off school to concentrate on his preparation for the
Los Angeles Olympics. A student in Physical Education, he
rowed for Canada in the men's
heavyweight eight which edged
out the United States by 0.4
seconds to win the gold medal.
PAUL STEELE
Rowing
Paul also look last year off
school (Geology) to concentrate fully on his preparation
for the Games. He was also a
member of the heavyweight
eight which captured the gold
medal over the Americans at
Lake Casidas under coach Neil
Campbell.
TRICIA SMITH
Rowing
Tricia, a UBC Law Student,
took aim at a gold medal in the
women's coxless pairs but
were defeated by a strong
Romanian crew. She brought
home a silver medal for Canada
and added to the largest collection of medals ever assembled
by Canada.
THE FROSH AWARD: each male and female frosh award winner receives
$20 worth of hair care products, free hairstyling plus a CORKY'S t-shirt.
Nominees also receive a t-shirt. Tuesday, September 11, 1984
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 7
¥*vO,
4»
Campus eateriess
Those of you in residence may only
now be discovering the pitiful lot Fate
has dealt you. Yes, you know what I
mean, pancakes that double as hockey
pucks, breaded liver that gives cold
shivers, and eggs mixed in metal vats,
like cement. With cement mix.
You may not know the feeling one experiences on a cold, wet morning when
your cold, wet porridge sticks in the
bowl even when turned upside down. Or
when the cook reminds you that "insects
are 99 percent protein, you know." It's
enough to leave a bad taste in anyone's
mouth.
To some more seasoned students, it
may even seem that on-campus food is
by nature dull, stale, repulsive and ill-
begotten. Not so. Those in search of
food on campus, like turkeys around
Thanksgiving, have a choice of ways to
get stuffed.
Eateries west of Blanca can be divided
into three handy categories: the good,
the bad, and the ugly. Though few, the
good restaurants are worth tricking a
friend into treating you to an evening
out. What happens after that is strictly
up to you.
The bad, including most cafeterias on
campus, offer lunches that are ir-
recallable by dinnertime. As for the
ugly, just don't visit your friends at
Vanier around twilight.
The Pit, UBC's ersatz nightclub
located in the basement of SUB, makes
the good category because of its
hellaciously delicious hamburgers. They
go for $1.60 a shot, $1.45 on Tuesdays.
The fish and chips are consistently good,
and at 30 cents a cup, The Pit has the
cheapest coffee on campus.
And at the Pit you can get progressively smashed   during  and   after
your meal, and
watch MTV, dance,
play games, and
gaze at past
Ubysseys plastered
on the walls until
one a.m. The Pit
food bar is open for
lunch and closes at
11 p.m.
Regrettably, the
Pit has an atmosphere that gives
one new appreciation for the Dump-
ster Corral nortn or
SUB. The music is
turned up too loud
in the daytime to
allow the casual
chit-chat intrinsic to
the university experience, and if
there is any kind of
sports event on the
big screen, sensitive
people, may be
the door.
The closest thing UBC has to real dining can be found at the Red Leaf, a
Chinese restaurant in the Village. The
lemon chicken and vegetarian hotpot are
always the first to go on our table. The
Red Leaf serves 11:30 to nine weekdays,
and is closed Saturdays.
Fellini's, also at the Village, offers
passable neo-vegetarian food and
titillating cheesecakes, though meals are
sometimes short on content. It also has
the most expensive coffee on campus, 75
cents. Fellini's is open 11 a.m. to midnight all days except Sunday, when it
closes at 11 p.m.
The Village has a pizza joint, UBC
Campus Pizza. Journalistic sources with
the good,
the bad,
and the ugly
By ROBBY ROBERTSON
shouted right out
Wmk%
intimate knowledge of the situation
report pizzas sometimes come with flies
on them, that is, when you didn't order
them. Though open til 2 a.m. or later all
nights except Sunday, they won't let you
just drink beer, and that means more
than just splitting the garlic toast.
The last place you can get a real meal
is the Hong Kong Kitchen, in the Village
on tenth. Their Cantonese cuisine is not
as good as the Red Leaf's, but is a good
bargain for the bread. They have good
luncheon specials for $3.25, and are
open from 11:30 to 2, and 4 to 10
weekdays, and 4 to 9 on weekends. P.S.
— don't forget the egg foo yong.
Three campus cafeterias make the
good category. The first of these is the
Bus Stop,, centrally located on main mall
north of Henry Angus. There, one is
served good honest coffee and but-
terhorns along the long formica bar by
friendly elderly women, a refreshing
change from the almost exclusively early
20's UBC environment.
Another popular spot is The Barn, repainted over the summer on south Main
Mall. While their food is predictable, the
aggies and geers who give the place its
unique atmosphere like it anyway. And
it's a great pit-stop on the trek from
B-lot to Buchanan.
On the artsie side of campus, in the
basement of the old math building, is
Yum Yum's Cafeteria, known by
everyone as Old Aud. In addition to the
usual, it specializes in cheap, fast Cantonese food served with Hong Kong hustle, authentic disposable chopsticks, and
10 cent tea (free with a combo). Nice un-
pretentiouse atmosphere and inexpensive beer and cider.
Foremost among UBC's purveyors of
bad taste is the Subway Cafeteria in
SUB. While they have the largest variety
of dull, ordinary food on campus, their
most recent price rise has angered the
hungry.   Their   hike   includes   such
popular items as date squares, up a dime
to 60 cents, and coffee, up a beaver to
40, 10 cents more than at the Pit.
This is not only crippling to the majority of downtrodden poor students. An
ordinary Alma Mater Society junior
bureaucrat who drinks a modest two
cups a day sheds an extra two cariboo a
week, or 16 bills a year. You think
they'd be upset.
If the Suoway is too low for you, drop
down a floor to the deli,' which has better food at only a slightly higher price.
Limited varieties of insipid food
abound on campus. At small cafeterias
such as Edibles (lower floor in the Scarfe
Building), the IRC Snack Bar (in the
IRC building), and the Ponderosa Snack
Bar (in the Ponderosa Building), one can
find identical specimens of soggy egg
salad sandwiches and chalky brownies.
Scatologists take note.
These cafeterias serve those too bored
to realize what this kind of food can do
to them. Remember, you are what you
eat, pizza-face.
Two of these cafeterias deserve special
mention for their select clientele. In one,
the Arts 200 (in Buchanan), one finds
young hopefuls who aspire to famous
artsy fame. In the Gallery, which offers
expensive cocktails, one finds famous
artsies who wish they were hipster saints.
Duke's, a cookie store new in SUB as
of late last year, has tempting cookies,
but at a price. By selling by the pound,
they avoid revealing the real price (high)
of their Hawaiian coconut, chocolate
chip, and other kinds of cookies.
A special mention is due Wreck
Beach, at the bottom of trail six past
Place Vanier. While warm weather holds
out, one can have the unique dining experience of feasting on anything from
chicken dinners to pizza to heavenly
brownies, and sip beer, cider, dacquiris,
and the now-famous Hugh's Yucaflux
while basking like a lizard. Dress down
for this one.
V>-
f*^*. Page 8
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, September 11, 1984
School faculty locked out
By VICTOR WONG
Students at Okanagan College
may be beginning their classes
several days late because for the
past two weeks the faculty were
locked out of classrooms.
Negotiations have resumed on a
new contract between Okanagan
College and its faculty association
after a two-week lockout of the latter, said college principal Peter
Williams Monday. Okanagan College has campuses in Kelowna, Pen-
ticton, Vernon and Salmon Arm.
The initial dispute was over a
clause requiring the faculty to increase its workload from 120 to 150
students per instructor and from 15
to 18 hours of class time per week
for each instructor. Williams said
the college asked for the increase so
the college would be able to meet a
10 per cent salary increase pervious-
ly agreed upon.
"We found that if we did not get
the workload increase we would be
in a deficit situation," said
Williams.
This year the provincial govern
ment reduced its funding to
Okanagan College by seven per
cent. The college's current
operating budget is $17 million.
The lockout ended this week
when both sides reached a tentative
aereement on the workload issue.
But Williams said he could not
release the details of the agreement,
adding that both sides agreed on a
news blackout until the faculty
association votes on the proposal.
"It's our understanding that the
negotiators are recommending acceptance of the agreement," he
said.
Due to the length of the lockout.
Williams said classes may not begin
until Sept.   17.  "We will have to
make arrangements to ensure that
students will receive the benefit of
the entire semester," he said. He
added that the college was considering moving its examinations to a
later date.
And 30 students occupied
premier Bill Bennett's constituency
office in Kelowna Friday, to protest
the government's role in the lockout
and also the effects of college funding cuts.
College student association chair
Heather Gropp said the
government-appointed college
board was reluctant to reopen the
college against government wishes.
The Socreds are responsible for the
lockout, she said.
5poc
30C
ZXtC
ONLY AT
FELUNI'S
WILD
ELEPHANT'S
FOOT SOUP
(When available)
"Tl
•GREAT SANDWICHES
• FABULOUS CHEESECAKES    £
• CAPPUCCINOS • ESPRESSOS
U             • NANAIMO BARS
n Located at the back of the Village
II      on Campus        x
WELCOME BOCK
TO
RESTAURANT
3293 W. 4th ph 73-BEERS
While you were away we've
added a new sidewalk patio,
plus a new menu. We still have:
160 golden amber imports
the city's best burger (CKVU & CFox)    *
the city's best nachos (Vane. Sun)        " ■
To help you overcome the
CUTBACK BLUES
bring in this coupon, along with
some old or new friends, for a
FREE McFOGG BURGER
when another is purchased.
(offer expires October 31st)
ITS THE YEAST
WE CAN DO!
DATEN   Sp.pf iq-14
TIME 95
PLACE    S.U.B i*fi~r
CELEBRATING
A DECADE OF EXHIBITIONS
1975 - 1984
DAILY DRAW
• Daily winner at 2 p.m.
• $50 Gift Certificate
name:_
phone:_
address:
•NO PURCHASE NECESSARY*
MflQINUS
EXHIBITION
AND SALE of
FINE ART REPRODUCTIONS
AND ORIGINAL PRINTS
OVER 1000
DIFFERENT IMAGES
Old Masters, Modern Art, Oriental,
Renaissance, Impressionist,
Group of Seven, Pre— Raphaelite
Photography, Matted Prints,
Contemporary Exhibition Posters
ORIGINAL ETCHINGS
Escher, Wyeth, Monet, Rembrandt,
Hiroshige, Picasso, Renoir, Pratt,
Dali, Secunda, Rockwell, Weston,
Peel, Thomson, Colville, Markgraf,
Danby, Harvey Edwards, Van Gogh
DISCOUNT POLICY
Most Prices
Well Below Normal Retail!
Starting at $2.50
TMis is a grey box. Some boxes aren't grey. This box is.
STUDENT DISCOUNTS AND
SAME DAY SERVICE
SAVE 20% &
SAME DAY SERVICE
AT THE.
WESTERN OPTICAL EYE LAB
With your prescription and
STUDENT I.D. CARD -
ChOOSe ANY FRAME
IN OUR STOCK.
WESTERN OPTICAL
 EYE LAB	
Mon.-Fri. 8:30-5:00
2nd & Burrard
(1742 w. 2nd Ave.)
731-9112
LIBRARY HOURS
UBC libraries are open fewer hours than last year because of
budget cuts. To affect as few students as possible, only late
evening & weekend hours have been shortened.
HOURS FOR SEDGEWICK LIBRARY ARE UNCHANGED -
open Saturday mornings & evenings until 11 pm
(including Saturday evenings as of October 13).
ASIAN STUDIES U3RAR.Y
MONDAY-THURSDAY      S:ioa™-Zp*n
FRIDAY 8,3oa*>i-5>™
Saturday ianoo/i - 57™
crmje library
Momday-THi/RSDAY       <?4™-<?pm
FRIDAY lam-Sp™
CURRICULUM LABORATORY
Mowday -Thursday     lnw-iopm
FRiOAY jam- 5pm
SATURDAY, S UN DAY     /2-hook-5pm
DATA LlKI?AR.y
MOM DAY-FRL, DAY ^am-Arpn
Film ubkary
MON DAY-F!*jDAV     ST.3oatvi-4-;3ofW\
MM LIBRAE
MotJDAY-THURSDAY      %ar*-iOPr*
FRIDAY 8«.™-5pm
SATURDAY
5 UN/ DAY
/2-H0OKl-S>M
l2-v>ooin-%prr,
F/WE ARTS LIBRARY
MONDAY-THURSDAY
FRIDAY
SATURDAY
SuMDAY
8arri-l0prv\
Zam-5p<ro
/Z- ho^n-3 P™
(SOVERMMeNtT PUBLiCATiOHiS
8, Microforms
WON DAY -FRIDAY "gam-Spry
SATURDAY, SUN DAY       fZ^co^-Spm
LAW UBRARY
MOMDAY-THURSDAY
FRIDAY
Saturday
Son DAY
8am-IOpr+i
fam- Sp/v\
IZriootn-Spm
(2-V\OOV\-%p/v\
N\Ac MiUAM U3RAR.Y
MoNOAY-THURSDAY    3<3TO-fOpv*
FRIDAY ?A^i-SpM
5 atur day, Sunday     iZr\oo^-^p<^
HospiTAL LIBRARIES
BIOMEDICAL. BRANCH
HAMBeR LIBRARY
sr PAUL'S LIBRARY
MAP LIBRARY
M0NDAY-FRJDAY ^a*v,-5"prv,
SATURDAY* fihoon-Sprv,
ItdosaA SaTurdaysthrough o<CT(.
MATH library
Mon DAY-THURSDAY      8a*n-1pm
FRiDAY •ga~-i-Sp,n
SATURDAY fZ^oom-Spm
IA^S\C L13RARY
MONDAY-Tl+URSDAY      ?(m- IOpw>
Fp.|0AV gam-   jpm
SATURDAY, SUWOAY  /2/iooin- 5pry\
SfcD&tWiCK UNDERGRADUATE LIBRARY
MoWDAY-FRiDAY 2a^-llpw
SATURDAY law-Spm*
SUNDAY lm.ncOY\- llprr,
t "^oyt\ - II prvi lo<L<% [inmvul odT I 3
Social wop-K Library
MOW DAY -THURSDAY f^m-IOpm
FfUDAY q«»vi-S~pm
SATURDAY* /Znoow-e'pA)
* closed SaTordays through OcT(?
spee/AL coLLecT'OKis
MONDAY-FRIDAY   Z.IOam-Spm
SATURDAY ll^oon-Spm
iWlLSoM RECORDINGS COILECTION
NWNJDAY-THURSDAY        ^a^-^pm
SATi/RDAY, SUWDAY    llnwfl-Spm
Woodward RioMeoicALMSRARY
MOMDAY-THURS0AY   ga^-ioprv,
FRjDAY g'aw-S-pm
5ATVRD>Ay l2.noon-S7prr\
Si/MDAy 12. y ooh-8pv*i
C MONDAY-THURSDAY      gam-IOpr*)
<   FRIDAY Sarvt-5-prry
(__5ArUR.DAY,SUMDAY   /Z-lOOH-S'prt)
n
HoudAV Hours Posted Tuesday, September 11,1984
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 9
GR IT-BUSTERS
Or, Fear and Loathing at the Bayshore Ballroom
By VICTOR WONG
On Sept. 4, 1984, the Liberal Party
of Canada got its backside swatted.
Hard.
The election is history now, with
the Conservatives garnering the
largest parliamentary majority in
Canadian history. What happened?
Many people blamed the media.
Was it really their fault?
One way to find these answers
was to talk with the reporters, campaign volunteers and others who
had gathered at the Liberal national
headquarters in the ballroom of the
Westin Bayshore.
4:40 p.m. In the main reception
room, some CBC technicians converse about the election.
"Say, aren't the polls in Newfoundland closed by now?" one of
them asks.
"Yep," says another. In fact, the
CP press teletype in the ballroom
had just hummed into life 30
minutes earlier, buzzing with the
poll results from the Maritimes. But
press reporters would not be able to
use it until eight since it was guarded by a Liberal press officer who
didn't want the results known until
the polls had closed in B.C.
When the technicians heard this,
one said, "Geez, you know, that's
pretty useless. I'll bet you anything
the network's already broadcasting
to the pickup here."
The CBC was already broadcasting the results from St. John's
to the rest of the Maritime region;
at the same time, the results were
being relayed by telephone to the
Ottawa control centre to update the
national tally. This information was
also relayed to CBC stations and affiliates. A direct line to the station
was set up in the Bayshore
ballroom, accessible to the press.
It's 6:30 p.m. A Toronto Star
reporter is defending the media.
"I'm tired of people accusing us of
being biased against the Liberals.
Take that picture in the Globe and
Mail (John Turner with horns). I'm
sure that was an accident."
Someone asks which candidate
his paper endorsed. "John
Turner," he says, grinning
sheepishly. "The Star's the only
paper in Canada that did."
"Really?" asks a woman from an
Edmonton TV station. Someone
else says, "Well, I guess no one's
going to believe the Star anymore,
eh?" Chuckles erupt from the conversation.
6:52 p.m. A man from the CBC,
holding his earpiece tightly, is
listening to the poll results from
Ontario and Quebec. He turns and
looks at reporters from the Globe
and Mail and the Ottawa Citizen.
"Hey, want to hear something?
Quebec's got 15 Liberals —"
"Fifteen? My God," gasps the
Globe man.
"Uh-huh, 15 in Quebec, 15 in
Ontario. . ." The Liberals won 73
of 74 Quebec seats last election,
picking up the 75th in a by-election,
and won 52 of 95 Ontario seats.
The CBC man continues. "Oh,
an independent got elected —"
"Who?"
"Someone named Roman — I
didn't get his first name — in
Yorkville North. He beat Peter
Worthington." The listeners gather
round.
Worthington, for those not
familiar with Toronto, is an
outspoken Tory columnist for the
Toronto Sun.
At 7:35 p.m. campaign
volunteers start to file into the
ballroom. Richard Teason, a youth
volunteer from Fraser Valley East,
figures the Grits should get at least
two seats in B.C. — Vancouver
Quadra and North Van-Burnaby.
Asked about the Grits' misfortunes, he says, "I think the party
was a little disorganized when the
election was called." His friend and
coworker adds, "The Tories were
better organized for the election
than the Grits were."
Teason agrees. "The Liberals
had spent a lot of time getting their
convention together, and not
enough time getting the campaign
together."
Teason says he doesn't think
Turner called the election too soon.
"No, more like Trudeau may have
resigned too late."
"Trudeau probably hurt his party more in Western Canada than he
realized," says his friend. "A lot of
people are voting against Trudeau,
not really against the Liberals."
But James Hatten, president of
B.C.'s Young Liberals, suggests the
media influenced voters to think a
change of party was necessary, adding he distrusts the media. "The
media reflects perceptions but they
make them too," he argues.
Hatten also feels the media and
the Tories made too much of
Turner's patronage appointments.
"I don't think patronage should
have been an issue for the Tories to
exploit. Given what Mulroney said
about patronage, he should be taking as much a beating about it as
anybody." Mulroney made comments to an audience prior to the
campaign implying he would give
Tory supporters patronage posts.
8:27 p.m. The ballroom is filling
rapidly with Liberals, well dressed,
upper middle class, some in their
twenties, most in their late forties,
all watching the large-screen televisions set up throughout the
ballroom. A whoop and a loud
cheer goes up when CTV announces
Turner leading Bill Clarke, 17 votes
to 12, in Vancouver Quadra.
9:10 p.m. Dave Dewer, a retired
business contractor turned Turner
volunteer, talks about his campaign
work in Quadra.
"When I started out, I thought it
was going to be a lot tougher than it
was," he says. "But when I got in
there, I couldn't believe what the
papers were saying whatsoever! I
was campaigning near the Turner
headquarters, and my experience
was, we had a landslide. I got a lot
more committed Liberals than I did
Conservatives. Most people like the
man, and they got a good impression of him."
His interview is interrupted by
the arrival of North Van-Burnaby
Liberal candidate Iona Campagnola and her entourage, amidst
profuse cheering and shouts of encouragement.
Later   on   near   the   CP   press
TURNER . . . did the media mafia doom him?
UBC happy with Tories
By LAIRD SWANSON
Students are generally happy with Brian
Mulroney's Progressive Conservative victory, feeling that it was time for a change — not necessarily
Tory.
Kathleen Scherf, graduate studies, called the
election "not a PC victory, but a Liberal
rejection."
"It was the best thing that could have happened,
for sure," said Ludek Uher, education 5. "The
Liberals were not sensitive to what the nation
wanted, particularly the west, because they were in
power too long.
"Everything was expected. The polls suggested a
runaway and that's what happened."
Uher, however, said he was not sure the Tories
could run a more effective government. "Nobody
really said what they were going to do; they said
'just let us in and see what we'll do'. Their way is
'say as little as you can and do whatever you
want.' "
Michael Fong, education 1, was happy at the
change of government, but is not an ardent Tory
fan. "The Liberals have been there long enough.
We should give the PC party a chance. Get someone else in, and if they blow it, get someone else
in," he said.
Fong expressed doubt about the Tories' ability to
keep their promises. "They won't be able to keep
all their promises, and I know they won't do
anything with their promises — they just wanted
the power."
; Pat Cotter, commerce 3, didn't care for Brian
Mulroney, saying "he is a kind of sneaky personality."
t Michael Estlin, a forestry student, said he was
disappointed that the Conservatives had won a majority. "A lot of people I know were hoping for a
rtiinority. I was," he said.
' Estlin also admitted some benefits may result
from increased Western representation. "Not
everything will be better now, but hopefully some
new policies will include the west," he said.
Colin McMillan, a commerce student, said that
he thought everyone must have been surprised by
the Conservative landslide. He expressed concern
that the Tories may cut back on social spending:
"The new government will promote jobs, but make
a lot of people unhappy regarding social services. A
lot of social programs will be hit."
McMillan added that he was in support of the
Conservative government: "The PC will be good
for trade, the economy, the country as a whole, and
the individual in the long run."
teletype, Vancouver Sun reporter
Rick Ouston is arguing with Gillian
Parson, a law 3 student, occasional
freelancer for Vancouver Magazine,
and an obviously devout Liberal.
She and Ouston are discussing
the Turner win. "You know, we
had some pollsters working at 10
last night, and at that time it was
neck and neck," says Parson.
"The weekend vote changed a lot
of minds, too," says Ouston.
"John Turner was walking the
sidewalks, showing up in places
. . . people talked. People in the
neighborhood talked."
Ouston is asked about the $4.3
billion figure Mulroney had given as
the price tag for his election promises. "They're all meaningless,"
he says. "What's a billion? In a
federal budget of $98 billion, it
matters not."
"Well, I would have thought you'd
have attacked him about that, asked him where the money was coming from," says Parson indignantly.
"How do you get specific about all
these statements?" retorts Ouston.
He comments that the $307 million
that John Turner had.found lying
around wasn't going to make much
of a difference, given that the
federal budget was overspent by $30
billion.
"But why didn't you attack
Mulroney more about the figures he
gave?" Parson persists.
"The numbers he gave were
nothing! They were meaningless!"
"There wasn't much made of
that —"
"We hope not!"
I interrupt the conversation to
ask Ouston why the Sun-published
polls on Quadra saying Clarke was
leading Turner were so off. "The
last poll was published three weeks
ago," he says. "A lot of minds have
changed during these last three
weeks. It appears the people of
Quadra knew the Liberals were going down, so they decided to give
John Turner a seat, without giving
the Liberal Party a government."
"But do you think they voted for
John Turner because they knew the
Liberals were going down?" asks
Parson. "Was it a sympathy vote?"
"Yes. A sympathy vote, and the
realization that maybe he deserves
one of the 282 seats."
By 10:00 John Turner finishes his
concession speech and everyone
leaves the podium. James Hatten is
disappointed — not about the
speech, but about the loss in
general. "I think it's the worst thing
that could happen to the country,"
he says, "but I don't think it's bad
for the party. I think there could be
some benefits to the party in the
long term."
Asked to clarify his stance on
media coverage of the campaign, he
says, "I don't want to sound like
sour grapes if I say it was abysmal,
but I think it is. These poor guys are
crammed on two buses, and they
ride around for sixty days together,
they get the same speech over and
over again . . . they get so used to
it they drink each other's
bathwater. All they can do is report
the abnormalities, rather than the
tone. We should have got a report
on what the event was like. Instead,
we get a report on what the heckler
said."
Later Hatten and Parson discuss
the media's faults in reporting the
campaign. "The sad part is," says
Hatten, "I don't know if they'll
learn anything."
"I doubt it," says Parson. "I
doubt it."
"Yeah. I'd like to see the press
exposed to the same glare of
publicity, the same light, the same
questions about everything about
them that the politicians* are exposed to. The press would be better for
it, reporting would be better for it,
politics would be better for it." Page 10
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, Septt
Go to Totem Park. Get
evicted for not partying all
night. Move into B-Lot.
Go to bookstore. Spend rest
of cash on new editions of
books you bought last year.
Discover only page numbers
changed.
Gake over
Search for SPMD office. Sign
says "out of town."
Wait for  10th Avenue  bus.
Stay until dispute settled.
Computer records destroyed
in blackout. All records lost.
Re-take English comp, go to
Pit to collect free beer.
You have won second prize in
a James Hollis look-alike contest.
Big deal, eh. iber11,1984
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 11
 1
Campus   cowboys   impound
your car.
See head honcho Al "Hoss"
Hutchinson.
Pay  exorbitant  towing   fee,
bribe if necessary.
You're   elected   to   student
council.
Collect   $200   honorarium,
resign (in that order).
Join Ubyssey.
Drop all courses. Give mornings, afternoons, evenings,
sleep.
Go to Ubyssey office. Come
out in four years (turns).
Congratulations, you're invited to Knud George
Pedersen's Palace for tea and
crumpets. Admire fine china,
miss turn.
RCMP raid Wreck Beach and
impound clothes. Ubyssey
photographer gets picture. Go
to Ubyssey office to complain.
Raid faculty club where your
English prof, soon to be de-
tenured, buys you a drink.
Good for passing English
comp next time around. Page 12
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, September 11, 1984
Step to the
Head of the Glass.
withpentel
QUICKER CLICKER 0.5mm. Automatic Pencil
Reg. $3.98
P205 0.5mm. SHARP Pencil
$098
Sale    Xeach
53
Reg. $4.98
Hi Polymer SUPER LEAD(C505)
(12 leads per tube) AO^
Reg. 98<t Sale Ox EACH
Hi Polymer SUPER LEAD (CI 5)
(30 leads per tube) $ 1 39
Reg. $1.98 Sale      I EACH
$Q49
Sale     OEACH
n
■
3H
^JjJiii
Get them fast while supplies last!
BOOKSTORE Rgfltgl
-  H,
RACK. TO SCHCM**
i#m*M>\^>n
mm*m\mW / O
ALL CALCULATORS
mmmmmmm
<5a/e &xte. &»?, 5efifo»6er2?'&
>"Ai»faMi^
liiflBl
ALCULATORS
FOR THE PROFESSIONALS &
THE STUDENT!
Xi
The UBC BOOKSTORE carries a full line of
CANON, CASIO, HEWLETT PACKARD,
SHARP, AND TEXAS INSTRUMENTS
CALCULATORS. All at a LOW PRICE!
SHOP & COMPARE OUR PRICES.
"A*
AVE NOW!
Western Canada's
Largest Bookstore
BOOKSTORE
NOWi
#    %gM9ti
! Wednesday Everon** anil
^
*4 #
%
^
sharp School -W ise!
Pick a perfect schoolmate
bl-VAh
mmtm *
wmmmmmmm
raft rin (Sq fSn gft
Pan fp rsusii bsi
Reused cp
EL-506
ADVANCED
SCIENTIFIC
CALCULATOR
Has decimal/hexadecimal conversion
key and makes quick
work of complicated
mathematical
problems, with 48
programmable
functions.
|l *dihum\\
Mm
rWK
ilsa («3 CD CD CD [3
fTit^rnrJirrirnnricbtplCS
£3 d] E3 ED E3 CE3 CZ3 Cjj G3 £3
mfinrrirnnnrinrsifiKl
iiSii ill jji
(Sa djj e& eSij^Bk^
bbbb';b
BBBBB
flBBll
EL-540
SOLAR SCIENTIFIC
CALCULATOR
You never need batteries
with this sensational solar
PC-1401
POCKET-SIZE SCIENTIFIC COMPUTER
With instant BASIC command keys for easy programming.
4.2K-byte RAM for memorizing up to 3,534 steps and 59
preprogrammed scientific functions, it all computes to
make it both versatile and practical.
ALL SHARP PRODUCTS ARE
20% OFF
lO EJalEl CD CD
■n (§3 (S) |&i i^j (i
i»i tit ftn nn ijjj| nig
rtn rift I^iE? EUsili
■ion.
BBBflBf
BBBBBl
EL-545
SOLAR SCIENTIFIC
CALCULATOR
Solar powered 10-digit
scientific calculator with
powered 8-digit scientific UNTIL THE END OF SEPTEMBER^ preprogrammed
calculator. 36 preprogram- ...iivff^^^i functions. Designed with
med functions. SO lux.
^gsS*"
user ease in mind. 50 lux.
EL-5103
SCIENTIFIC
PROGRAMMABLE
CALCULATOR
Big on features, small
in size, easy to use
and very versatile,
direct formula entry,
with 63 scientific and
statistical functions.
SHARP
HARP
SHARP ELECTRONICS OF CANADA LTD. JilmZiZ*'*™*
*W.
ALL SHARP PRODUCTS SHOWN HERE ARE SOLD AT
BQlilliiiE Tuesday, September 11, 1984
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 13
Cuts mean leaner year
Non-union worker . . . working
By ROBERT BEYNON
Despite financial cutbacks, UBC
completed renovations of $500,000
to the president's house this summer. The lower, public floor exterior is redecorated with a Mexican motif complete with earthy
tiles and terra cotta colours.
The entire Norman Mackenzie
mansion at 6565 Northwest Marine
Drive facing out on Juan de Fuca
Strait was refitted for president
George Pedersen and for events
with business and government
"defined as formal entertainment."
Most students and faculty were
not as lucky as Pedersen this summer. Students faced a harsh world
with few jobs. The university
retrenched in the face of Social
Credit education cutbacks. The
UBC of five years ago continued to
crumble apart.
The big world was not kind to
students this summer. The B.C.
Central Credit Union estimated
31.3 per cent of post secondary
education students were
unemployed this summer. And that
figure was even higher in more
depressed areas like the Kootenays.
Other students like Fern Pitten-
dreigh, a single parent with two
children, could not make enough
Office serves women
By SARAH MILLIN
The office for women students in
Brock Hall has been serving UBC
women for more than sixty years.
"You name it, we provide it for
women," says office director June
Lythgoe. "We facilitate and assist
women students in any way appropriate."
The office for women students,
formerly the office of the dean of
women, first opened in 1921.
Lythgoe says it is one of the oldest
student services in Canada.
"Our most important service is
counselling," Lythgoe says. In the
past three years use of the office has
increased 30 per cent because of
their reputation for counselling,
says Lythgoe.
There are four full-time professionally trained counsellors working
in the office. "We look at counselling through women's eyes," says
Lythgoe.
The office gets many people
looking for career orientation,
counsellor Margaretha Hoek says.
"Women have a tendency not to
look at career options. We help
people explore those options a lot,"
Hoek says.
"Our intention is to create the
kind of context at the university
within which women will be able to
take the best possible advantage of
their educational experience here
and perform to the best of their
ability," Lythgoe says.
She says the counsellors deal with
many women who have been
physically and sexually abused. The
counsellors recommend that the
women go to a doctor and they have
a good liason with student services.
"We want to entourage women
to look at the way social issues
design and shape their self-image
and attempt to take away their self-
blame and dislike," says counsellor
Caren Durante.
Another counsellor, Nancy
Horsman, says the lack of self-
esteem of women comes in many
shapes to the office. "We deal with
eating disorders like bulimia and
binging," says Horsman. "I also
see a lot of women from immigrant
families arriving with cultural and
identity conflicts."
The office also provides various
workshops on skills for women as
an educational function. "We try
very hard to do our homework
before we put on a workshop so we
can provide a quality workshop,"
says Lythgoe. "We want to make
sure we are helping the students."
The workshops include three sessions on essay anxiety and writing
called "Essay Blues". The essay
seminars are open to all students.
Workshops on assertiveness are
also offered.
Assertiveness is often
misunderstood by younger
students, says Lythgoe. "Assertiveness is not aggression or passivi
ty. The purposes of the workshops
to teach women to communicate so
that they are neither exploited nor
do they exploit others," Lythgoe
says.
Other workshops include a career
planning series, time management
and a stress drop-in. "There are
dimensions of these issues which are
clearly relating to being women,"
Lythgoe says. Because of this, she
says most of the workshops are only
open to women. There are also
several discussion groups on a range
of subjects relating to women.
"We hope we can have the same
kind of workshop for math blocks
soon," Lythgoe says. The
counsellors in the office think that
women's experiences and abilities in
mathematics are much different
than men's.
In the office is a row of book
cases that are the resource library.
"We have a very fine resource
library on almost every area of concern for women imaginable,"
Lythgoe says. She adds the resource
area is available to both men and
women, "We encourage men to use
it."
"We're also developing an
academic and career choices library
for women," says Lythgoe.
She says they want to encourage
people to come in and chat and feel
comfortable. "I think a continuing
dilemma is how to let people know
Turn to page 15: OFFICE
WE MAKE
COPIES
PEOPLE
SWEAR BY,
NOT AT !
Copies • Binding
Passport  Photos
kinko's copies
|S706 University Blvd.!
Vancouver, B.C
V6T1K6
iL
BED&
BEEAKE&STI
AN
INVITATION
Join a Network of Quality B & B Homes
NORTHWEST BED AND BREAKFAST
established 1979 — now expanding service
in the Vancouver area.
* Meet people from around the world
* Use your spare room to supplement income
* Payment in U.S. Currency
Reservations and references required of guests
Applications now being accepted from prospective hosts to join a network of
300 homes from British Columbia to southern California.
Information: NWB&B
7707 SW Locust Street
Portland, OR 97223
(503)246-8366
money to attend school although
they worked full-time this summer.
She says she will take a loan out this
year to go back to Emily Carr College of Art and Design.
Pittendreigh says she has to
return to college even if it means she
compiles a toal loan debt of $20,000
by the time she completes Emily
Carr. "I'm a single mother trying to
go back to school to break out of
the single mother ghetto. I won't be
a welfare recipient. I want to better
my children's lifestyle."
The summer bus shutdown also
hit students on the lower mainland
and Victoria hard. Catherine,
psychology 4, who preferred to remain anonymous for fear of prank
telephone calls, says her brother
drove her from their Deep Cove
home to school and back every day
of her summer session course
because she could not find a ride.
"Last year I quickly found a car-
pool," Catherine says, "but this
year 1 haven't got a ride from
anyone. I'm really disappointed."
UBC also took over the graduate
student centre in a surprise move
this May, ending its food services
and freezing the centre's assets.
Vice president academic Robert
Smith, then acting president, says
the Graduate Students Society
broke a 1982 agreement which gave
control of the centre to the GSS and
the administration was therefore
justified in taking over the centre.
But GSS coordinator Mike
Howlett says UBC broke the 1982
agreement by taking over the centre. "The university is really attacking the principle of student
autonomy," Howlett says.
The GSS and the administration
are presently negotiating the future
of the centre.
The provincial government in
particular was no nicer to students
than the world at large, and UBC
itself was also hit.
The results of restraint are obvious around UBC. For two years
the university has not received
money from the provincial government with which to increase faculty
wages, and faculty are beginning to
leave saying they can find better
working conditions and wages
elsewhere. Commerce professor
Gordon "Skip" Walter says commerce professors are leaving UBC
because of provincial government
funding policies and increasing
competition between schools for
commerce professors.
Walter describes one commerce
professor who left for a Texas
university, "(There) he teaches 50
per cent of what he taught here, is
paid twice as much, has 10 times the
clerical support, and four times the
travel support."
Walter says UBC's commerce
faculty used to be the best in
Canada but it cannot improve and
will likely deteriorate. This year
seven faculty have left commerce
compared with three during an
average year.
Department heads say a new-
wage contract faculty agreed to this
August is not going to help the
situation. The contract included a
wage and increments freeze for the
second year in a row.
The faculty executive and the administration are also negotiating a
firing procedure for the first time in
UBC history. Faculty association
president Elmer Ogryzlo says the
procedure is necessary so the
university cannot fire faculty at random.
Bill 3 of the provincial government's July 1983 budget allows the
administration to fire faculty for
economic reasons.
And a senate committee report
released this May says if UBC
receives another five per cent cut in
funding from the provincial government this year, UBC will have to cut
faculties, departments or programs,
so that the entire university does not
suffer.
In response to UBC's problems
the administration and board have
become increasingly business
oriented and conservative. Earlier
this year the board created the new
position of vice president community relations and development largely to attract private capital to UBC.
But former marketing executive
David McMillan, who began the
job July 1, says he will not attract
capital to UBC until at least 1985.
"There won't be a great chute
opening in the sky pouring money
down on our heads just because
there's a new vice president,"
McMillan says.
The board also accepted the first
non-union tender on a UBC contract since the early 1960's this summer. Yukon and B.C. Building
Trades Council spokesperson Clive
Lytle says the board was following
the provincial Social Credit government's line when it made the decisions to award the contract to
Wilson Industries. And Lytle says
the largely Social Credit-appointed
board made the decision for
political reasons, which UBC vice
president finance Bruce Gellatly
denies.
The fiscal crisis which influenced
the changing nature of the board
and administration is almost entirely the result of the last two Social
Credit "restraint" budgets.
In the July 1983 budget finance
minister Hugh Curtis brought down
The Public Sector Restraint Act ending tenure; university funding was
not increased, which made for a
decrease when inflation is considered; and the government reduced   the  student  aid  budget   from
Turn to page 15: SOCIAL
Bernard ■
Labrosse J
hair studio inc. '
5784 University Blvd. J
IN U.B.C. VILLAGE I
NEXT TO BANK OF COMMERCE |
MONDAY to SATURDAY - 9:30-5 p.m. I
APPOINTMENTS - 224-1922 or 224-9116 |
VALUABLE COUPON ]
worth  $6.00 I
Free bottle of Lavel or Kerapro shampoo with presentation of   |
this coupon after your cut or perm. i
Expires Oct.  IS,  1984
WE SELL JO/CO PRODUCTS , Page 14
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, September 11, 1984
Burp!
THE UBYSSEY
The Ubyssey is published Tuesday and Fridays throughout the academic year by
the Alma Mater Society of the University of British Columbia. Editorial opinions are
those of the staff and are not necessarily those of the university administration or the
AMS. Member Canadian University Press. The Ubyssey's editorial office is SUB
241k. Editorial department, 228-2301/2305. Advertising 228-3977/3978.
Jane Mair roared into the office, tripped over Elena Miller, who was definitely not discussing politics with Gordon Clark, to murmur at
Chris Wong something about his choice of clothing. (Chris had recently returned from New York). Robby Robertson, the deft amuser of
custom officials the world over, was engaging Charlie (Chunk) Fidelman in a game of "Find the missing Surname". Prima Donas of the
joust, Kathy Giles and Corraine Lavallee, had been glued to the walls by Renate Boerner, whom had recently discovered the true joy of wall
paper. Monte Stewart, the illustrious soujourner of the far off lands of Victoria Drive was comparing neighbourhoods with Sarah Millin, Irish
fairy of the West End. Craig Brooks, who just never found the door, although he'd been shown a couple times, found himself, interestingly
enough in a conversation with Victor Wong who had some difficulty with the English language as both Robert Beynon and Patti Flather
would attest. Laird Swanson and Betsy Goldberg were off in a corner with Erin Mullan and Neil Lucente who had been caught at the market
near the vegetables (the others) so often that people like Martin West were beginning to talk. Everyone put aside their fond summer
memories to giggle at Bonnie Fordyce who, it was rumoured, had voted for the Liberals. And suddenly, at the point of almost virtually no
possible reasonable conceivable return, Stephen Wisenthal was caught quivering in the corner with avaricious glee.
Students in residence should be storming the student
housing office in protest against the proposed alcohol regulations.
These regulations are denying students their basic rights.
One of these gems is the rule that no parties be held from
Sunday to Thursday night. Besides ignoring the existence of
long weekends, this rule also denies students the right to set
their own timetable. Surely if students can put together a
course schedule without conflicts they can plan parties
responsibly.
Another proposal is that all residence wide parties use paid
professional bar staff. This is a waste of money, students'
money.
One of the most disturbing proposals is the creation of a
committee to determine alcohol offences committed by
students. The committee is spying on students. What does
the committee consider an alcohol offence?
Students live in residence because it is convenient and to
meet people. They don't live in residence to have a parental
committee looking over their shoulders.
That is, assuming that such a committee could enforce the
regulations. If a student is found guilty of two offences it is
then mandatory that they see a counsellor. Another infringement of student rights.
Another proposed change to the rules is the prohibition of
drinking games at any social function. Students should be
free to entertain themselves as they wish providing they are
not hurting anyone.
If the proposals go through, there will be an even more
dangerous situation: students driving back to campus after
having a few drinks. This could lead to increases in serious
accidents, license suspensions and traffic violations. If the
student housing committee considers drinking in residences
a potential hazard they should study the hazards of drinking
and driving.
Students should be banging in the doors of the student
housing office for the infringment on their rights that the office is proposing.
Letters
Circus shocks student
Letters
The born-again entrepreneurs in
the Alma Mater Society have struck
again. During the last week, the
Student Union Building has been
transformed into a three-ring circus
Fronting a tuition fee attack
The UBC Fee-Hike Strike Committee calls on all students to join
the strike and demonstrate against
the tuition fee increases at 12:30 on
September 12 in front of the new
administration building.
In the fall of 1983, the UBC
Board of Governors announced its
intention to raise tuition fees by 33
per cent in September 1984 initiating a plan to continue increases
by 125 per cent by 1986-87. Despite
the AMS petition of 6500
signatures, a demonstration of 350
on January 19, 1984 and other expressions of protest against these increases, BOG made the proposed
increase official reality.
Since then, BOG has announced
cutbacks in enrollment (535 first
year arts students) and has been
wielding the axe at faculty and
staff. Also, the government has
since abolished B.C. grants and
reduced B.C. financial assistance by
83 per cent. All this at a time when
the dollar has dropped sharply,
wages are being reduced or frozen,
the cost of living is soaring and
youth unemployment is at record
highs.
these rising costs are preventing
numerous young people from
beginning or continuing post-
secondary education programs.
Furthermore, these cutbacks mean
we are paying more or less as the
quality of education deteriorates.
The UBC administration claims
to oppose this onslaught against
higher education but. rather than
fighting the cutbacks dictated by
the government, it is implementing
its policy and attacking students,
faculty and staff.
It is only now that the administrations   of   UBC,    Simon
Fraser University and University of
Victoria, have decided to "speak
out" on their "Day of Concern".
This is a hoax. Government cutbacks in education have been
escalating for over 10 years across
Canada, causing fees to rise for
some time now.
Clearly the administration and
the government represent the interests of the rich and do the dirty
work for the monopolies (foreign
and otherwise) to make the working
people, the poor and the youth
carry the burden of the economic
crisis so that they may rake in huge
profits.
Some people are organizing the
Fee-Hike Strike. Students may pay
tuition fees at the  1983-84 rates.
Their cheques, made payable to
UBC, are being withheld from the
university and, instead, handed in
the Fee-Hike Strike Committee to
be stored in a safety deposit box.
This way the administration will
be pressured into reducing this
year's  fees  to  the   1983-84 level.
Cheques will be received at a collection table on campus or sent to Box
126, SUB. They will also be received at the September 12 demonstra-
and   help
tion.    Contributions
welcome.
The strike is an appropriate and
practical measure. Of course, it involves some risk (possible late payment fee of $40 and/or denial of
course credits) but we have far more
to lose if we do not resist these attacks now.
Barb Waldern
Unclassified
Note — The content of letters
represent the views of the writer and
are not necessarily those of the
newspaper staff. The Ubyssey has
an open letters policy.
of food vendors, sales promoters
and high tech hawkers barraging
students for their money. What
should be a quiet space for students
was reduced to a nightmare of noise
and confusion.
Who authorized the AMS to turn
the campus into a commercial
sideshow? And how will these ill-
gotten gains be spent by our student
society? It's time for the AMS to
account for its actions.
The university should be a place
for thoughtful study and critical
awareness, not a money-making
enterprise. In hard times like today,
it is particularly appalling that
"our" student society should consume itself in such ventures instead
of financially helping the students
whom it claims to represent.
Perhaps the $32 we each pay in
student society fees is going in the
wrong direction.
Kevin Annett
Graduate Studies
Grad Centre not so bad
We would like to inform
students and the UBC administration of the excellent facilities and
services available at the Graduate
Student Centre.
On August 24th we held a fund-
raising event (a film night/beer
garden) in the Garden Room of the
Centre. We were met with helpful
and professional assistance by
members of the Graduate Student
Society in making the arrangements
for this event. For members and
associate-members there are no
costs for the use of the Garden
Room, which has a licensed bar,
microwave oven, coffee-making
equipment, projection room, roll-
down screen and outdoor seating in
a garden.
There are many other facilities in
the Graduate Student Centre which
students should know about and
take advantage of.
We would also like to inform the
university administration, and Mr.
Neil Risebrough, associate vice-
president for student services, in
particular, that we have complete
faith in the abilities of members of
the Graduate Student Society to run
the centre, and appreciate their willingness to make available excellent
facilities and services to students at
little or no cost.
We believe the administration,
and in particular Mr. Neil
Risebrough, should take a lesson
from the GraduateJStudent Society.
Finally, we believe that
autonomous student organizations
and facilities is a principle that
should not be violated.
BUI Coller
Students for a Democratic
University (formerly Students
Against the Budget) Tuesday, September 11, 1984
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 15
Social Credit ends grants
From page 13: CUTS
$23.3 million in 1982-83 to $14.6
million in 1983-84.
In this February's budget the
Social Credit party ended the grant
program, making B.C.'s student
aid program the only all loan program in Canada. That budget also
cut university funding five per cent.
This January the government
moved to close down David
Thompson University Centre in
Nelson although it was the second
largest employer in that depressed
Kootenay city. Nelson residents occupied DTUC for 95 days this spring and summer to ensure the
library    stayed    open.
Because the Socreds never arranged financing for the loan program they announced in this
February's budget, loan applications did not reach UBC's awards
office until the last week in June,
two months after they arrive most
years.
Assistant financial awards director Dan Worsley says the applications' lateness means many students
may not receive their loan confirmation before September.
And students attending summer
session at Simon Fraser University
could not apply for loans until their
term was half completed.
The labour ministry also cut
work-study funding to UBC from
$150,000 in 1983-84 to $50,000 this
fiscal  year.  At  some colleges the
program that gives on-campus work
to hard-up students was entirely
cut, Canadian Federation of
Students Pacific chair Tami
Roberts says.
At the national level little of importance for education happened
this summer, despite the federal
election. A representative secretary
of state told an International Youth
Year conference the federal government was seeking ways to intervene
in provincial education funding,
but nothing happened.
The Canadian Association of
University Teachers designed a
parliamentary act which would encourage provinces to spend education money the federal government
designated to them for education.
CAUT executive secretary
Donald Savage says the act is
designed to delineate the fiscal
responsibilities for "such provinces
as B.C. who consistently violate the
EPF (established programs financing) understanding."
CAUT also organized a legal
defence fund for faculty who may
be fired in B.C.
Little happened at the student
government level this summer. The
Canadian Federation of Students
asked students to refuse to pay the
allotment of their B.C. Hydro bill
that went towards B.C. transit,
because of the bus shutdown.
The UBC Alma Mater Society
student council, for the first time in
AMS history sent a budget back to
committee, at an August 29
meeting.
UBC's Capital Projects Acquisitions Committee tendered out the
new SUB expansion should be
finished by December. CPAC administers student funds for special
projects.
Office loses one position
From page 13: OFFICE
we are here in order to help them.
This is not a threatening place to
come," Lythgoe says.
Besides the office itself, there is
the Mildred Brock lounge for
women. "We want to make it a
meeting place for women," says
Lythgoe. The lounge is a quiet place
with chairs and sofas and a small
work area. The lounge is nonsmoking.
The   office   is   funded   by   the
university administration. Recent
cutbacks have hurt the office, says
Lythgoe. "We lost one part time
counselling position and some support staff." The staff now consists
of four fulltime and one part time
counsellor and two support staff.
Campus-Cuts
Haircutting For Men and Women
Now Open U.B.C. Village
(5736 University Blvd.)
228-1471
♦PRICES
Cut $8.00
Shampoo $1 50
Blow Dry $2.50
Perms $29 00
Streaking $29.00
Colours $15.00 and up
(cellophane, henna etc )
(additional charges for long hair
and change of hairstyle)
*HOURS
Monday to Friday 9 a.m. to 7:00 p.m.
Saturday 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Sunday 12 to 5 p.m.
"Professional stylists
"No appointment
necessary for cuts
"For appointments
call 228-1471
FREE FITNESS CLASS
V.
A
\
<
f2/&rc4$& iz> Mutter \
l  4 40 PM      *♦
* War Memorial Gym L-Lower Intensity
* * Gym B West Osborne H-Higher Intensity
Session:   First Term - Sept 17 - Dec 7 84 BBody
Second Term - Jan 14 - April 3'8S
COSX: $40.00 _   Choose any of the classes lited above as many times a week as
you like, any time, any location, any intensity
S   2 00 — Drop-in per class
Registration:   First   Term   -   Sept    4-14.   Second   Term       Jan    2-1 I    at
.    -A- Intramural-Recreational Sports (Rm. 203), War Memorial Gym
-^SlmSfdi* or late registration during first week of exercise class
^TJf^KV Sponsored by Recreation U.B.C. For Fitness Information
yG/Wt(P   *VALID UNTIL SEPT. 22. 1984 738-4I69
Eye Exams Arranged
CPfTBIE OPTICAL!
I heTcore centre    LTD.
3302 Cambie at 17th. Vancouver
879-9494
ALL PRESCRIPTION GLASSES 30°7o OFF
FOR THE FASHIONABLE
STUDENT ON A BUDGET
PLUM CLOTHING
3638 W. 4th 733-0603
EXERCISE
ACTIVE
WEAR
SILK
WOOLENS
AT
INCREDIBLE
SAVINGS.
'PLUM CLOTHING IS PLUM PERFECT"
FOURTH & ALMA - OPEN EVERY DAY Page 16
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, September 11, 1984
Wang Toon explores social themes
By ROBBY ROBERTSON
A Flower in the Rainy Night, a
Taiwanese film directed by Wang
Toon, offers a compassionate look
at one prostitute's life. It portrays
both the light moments of com-
raderie with her sisters at the
brothel as well as the pain that
comes with old age and a forced exclusion from normal family life, so
central to Chinese values.
Through the immediately em-
pathetic character Bai-mei, the film
gives emotional expression to important Chinese social themes,
although her escape from the
brothels and quick assimilation into
the rural village of her youth
sometimes appears too idyllic.
The film traces the life of Bai-mei
in Taiwan as she is sold to a family
who later resells her to a brothel in
her early teens. It opens with an
adult Bai-mei sitting on a noisy,
dreary train that seems the instant
symbol for her trying life. Several
flashbacks reveal her harsh entrance into the brothel, and her
eventual development into a
hardened and streetwise prostitute.
Appropriately, this casts the first
half of the movie in the stricken
emotions Bai-mei silently expresses
on the train.
Perhaps the most tangible and
realistic part of the movie is its portrayal of the brothel. The colourful,
dingy, and cheap atmosphere of the
brothel is made all the more sharper
by occasional flashes of biting
humour. When Bai-mei shrinkingly
enters the brothel, one of the older
whores lounging in the house says,
"I was a virgin once too."
In another scene, Bai-mei saves a
INTERNATIONAL
HOUSE
INTERNATIONAL
HOUSE
Gate 4 Lounge
1783 West Mall
228-5021
Open Sept. 4184
12:00-2:00 p.m.
Bagels/Cheese, Coffee, Tea
(or bring your lunch)
Licensed Lounge
Open Sept. 10/84
7:00-11:00 p.m.
INTERNSHIPS
PROVIDE
SENIOR STUDENTS
IN THE
FACULTY OF ARTS
WITH
WORK EXPERIENCE
BEFORE GRADUATION
IF INTERESTED IN NON-
PAID, STUDY RELATED
WORK-PLACEMENTS IN
VANCOUVER
SEPTEMBER - APRIL
COME TO
THE OFFICE OF
INTERNSHIP PROGRAMS
ROOM 213, BROCK HALL
TELEPHONE 3022
new girl from the advances of a
disgustingly drunk hare lip. The
sleazy and oppressive scene is saved
by a funny line as the drunk gropes
Bai-mei and says stupidly, "This is
the real stuff!"
The new girl later confesses to
Bai-mei she has fallen in love, and
their dialogue brings into focus the
central theme of love and family,
which societal pressures exclude the
prostitutes from ever participating
in.
About half way through the
movie, Bai-mei decides to scorn
these social norms and fulfill herself
by having a baby. Her consequent
rejection by her foster family
reveals some of the injustice within
the social code, and she continues
back to the fields of her youth, symbolic homeland of all true Chinese
values.
Her acceptance into the rural
community is a positive statement
on the basic kindness of the Chinese
people, but the ideal nature of the
rural setting gives too easy an out
for what could have made this film
an importnat investigation into the
injustice that plagued Bai-mei.
Life in the fields is further over-
idealized by a lightning-quick scene
dramatizing the land reforms of the
1950's. But this positive political
content may have been necessary to
insure the film was seen as respect
of the government, a consideration
on Taiwan.
The film is redeemed by its
numerous small insights into the
Chinese way of doing things. When
Bai-mei has morning sickness, her
innocent old country mother says,
"I guess the doctor was right after
all," indicating a fundamental lack
of faith in the Western science that
still lives on in Taiwan.
And although the work avoids
the hardest questions it does offer
an endearing portrait of some facets
of Chinese life.
UBC WINTER SPORTS CENTRE
SPORT SHOP
Next to Osborne Gyms
FEATURES:
SKATE RENTALS -
MEN'S/LADIES (EVEN
GOAL SKATES)
BROOMBALL RENTAL
EQUIPMENT
CURLING BROOM
RENTALS
RACQUETBALL/
SQUASH RENTAL
EQUIPMENT AND MORE
NEW THIS YEAR! A
HIGH QUALITY SKATE
SHARPENING
MACHINE. NOWWE
CAN PROFILE YOUR
BLADES AS YOU
WANT THEM OR ADJUST YOUR ROCKER
OR HOLLOW FOR
YOUR STYLE OF PLAY.
"\
on-
.-"^■v   „*\  .-:
^
X s 4
//.';-
"V
oW
\
~4 -. w
%
;l
>:
^^
<•
^     ' ^ - X
^
\ \
m- -'  *^~%
n
■Y   -
■V        "
•\
NOT ONLY THAT-WE-SELL TAPE, LACES, STICKS,
EYEGUARDS, PUCKS, RAQUETS, ETC.
THE LARGER THE RADIUS,
THE LONGER THE BLADE-
TO-ICE CONTACT.
FINE DRY CLEANING
at Bargain Prices
off
EVERY
DAY
•  Any Faculty, or Staff
of U.B.C.
•  All Students
at
UNIVERSITY MARTINIZING
University Village (Square)
2146 Western Parkway
Tel: 228-9414
• Professional Dry Cleaning
• Shirts and Laundry
• Alteration & Repairs
• Seamstress on Premises
• Drapes
• Sleeping Bags and Blankets
• Suedes and Leathers
• Pillows and Renovations
• Well equipped Plant
to give you fine services
DISCOUNT VALID WITH INCOMING ORDERS ONLY.
NOT VALID WITH OTHER SPECIALS
Save On Books
Receiving Books:    in SU B119
Sept 4 -14,1984
Mon. - Fri. 8 a.m. -12:30 p.m.
Mon. - Thurs. 6 p.m. - 8:00 p.i
Selling Books:
in SUB 125
Sept 10-24,1984
Mon. - Fri. 8 a.m. - 4:00 p.m.
Mon. - Thurs. 6 p.m. - 9:00 p.m.
THIS IS HOW IT WORKS:
You bring in your books
and assign prices.
We sell them.
Simple?
Note: 15% Handling Fee charged
on all books sold.
USED BOOK
STORE Tuesday, September 11, 1984
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 17
Cheremosh leaps   celebrating life
By BONNIE FORDYCE
Sixty-five rigorous and colourful Ukrainian
folkdancers handclapping, footstomping and stor> telling on stage accompanied by a live 23-piece orchestra
unavoidably won a standing ovation from its captivated, eager audience.
Cheremosh Ukrainian Dance Ensemble
Artistic Director: Rick Wacko
At the Queen Elizabeth Theatre
If dance is the soul of a people, then Edmonton's
Cheremosh Ukrainian Dancers showed a proud, un-
shakeably warm spirited people, admirably energetic
and enthusiastic.
amagmoat
st»g»anait»aaBsneBpaatieHe)a«»>.»9na«»y^
»g)M)^3«>M^is«na5tia«egwpatt»mB«g^a
mmmt)mtlmmWmntm^m«tmmilTm^mmtmtam^m^mm1la»
The evening ended with an exciting dance,
"Hopak". Like the familiar Ukrainian church domes,
the dancers competed to attain great heights. Through
polka-like rythms, spontaneous jumps and leaps, they
seemed to go to extreme lengths to please the crowd.
And in a somewhat objective manner individuals were
able to laugh and be laughed at, sometimes through
the use of caricatures and stereotypes.
Wacko used the dancers' talents and physical
abilities to appreciable limits. Though it seemed he
worked as hard on their smiles as he did on the height
of their leaps, their leaps were more convincing. By the
end of the show the smiles were completely overwhelmed by the vigor and happiness of all other
aspects of the performance.
The conservative
"family-dressed-for-church" audience, there perhaps to celebrate
their heritage, would have been on
stage in seconds dancing and clapping along, had they been invited.
Folkdancing is one of the oldest
art forms. Attitudes shared by artists Marcel Duchamp, Robert
Rauschenberg, and Merce Cunningham aren't far from the attitudes cultivated by Cheremosh's
Artistic Director Rick Wacko and
Founder Chester Kuc in the Sunday
performance at the Queen Elizabeth
Theatre.
For Rauschenberg, art is not an
end in itself but simply a "means to
function thoroughly and passionately in a world that has a lot
more than paint." The artists of the
century turned their attention outward on the world around them,
not inward on their own reactions
to it, he believes, trying to break
down the barriers that can exist between art and life.
The Ukrainian dances talk about
what is important to them. They
speak of the world around them,
almost always with a unique sense
of humour and appreciation: Baba
goes to the market, a young Don
Juan contends with six dates, the
craft of embroidery is celebrated,
the change of seasons is ritualized.
The dances, some narrative and
some ritual, show an attitude
toward life which incorporates people working co-operatively as an inseparable organism, harvesting,
bartering. Some of the dances in
large circles showed the distinctions
between individuals, and some of
the dances involved individual
character development.
The show opened with the traditional Dance of Welcome, a
modern version of an ancient
Ukrainian tradition offering bread
and salt. The audience becomes acquainted with the people, their
energetic rhythms and colours.
From here it went into several
dances, some gregarious and
festive, others quiet and lyrical.
Two of these were the graceful Spring Branch Dance and the story of
the life of the first Ukrainian immigrants in Canada.
Special mention should be given
to Luba Kuc and Anne Filipchuk
for the spectacular costumes. The
costumes contributed much to the
magic in the show, giving visual
boundaries to the dances and to the
regions they came from.
The director, Wacko, enabled us
to see more than one view: people
as products of cultures and cultures
as products of people; both the view
of people as a group and the people
as individuals.
Unlike Duchamp, courting life
with his art, (as in his well known
deliberately unfinished piece, Bride
Stripped Bare by her Bachelors,
Even) the traditional peoples of the
Ukraine with their rich, colorful
culture in comparison, could be
said to be married life. Their
dances are their life, and their lives
are their dances.
Cheremosh and Wacko show a
people playfully and passionately
involved in a world they know has a
lot more to it than paint. Bravo.
The audience
would
have danced
on stage
if invited
rRSrKSEWSsaRStKaaKRKatKSWUKKB
Young '80s poets write
By ELENA MILLER
"You are reading this too fast/
Slow down, for this is poetry/ and
poetry works slowly./ Unless you
lie with it a while/ the spirit will
never descend."
Canadian Poetry Now: 20 Poets of
the Eighties
An anthology of 20 contemporary
Canadian poets published by House
of Anansi Press.
This poem by Ken Norris was
written specifically for the readers
of his anthology, Canadian Poetry
Now: 20 Poets of the Eighties.
The anthology contains the work
of ten men and ten women and
Norris warns it cannot be read
through once lightly. "It's easy to
quickly cut across the surface/ and
then claim there was nothing to
find./ . . . Poetry is an exercise in
patience,/ you must wait for it to
come to you." his poetry demands.
In the fortnight or so I have lived
with Canadian Poetry. Now, some
of the poems have come to me, and
some have not. Some are about half
way there, and will come if I wait
for them.
One of the first poets to come
across, and still my personal
favorite, is Robyn Sarah. Her
poems, like most of the poetry in
CPN, are about the personal and
the particular. But her method of
expression is more open and less
oblique than many of the other
poets. Her strong assured voice
makes some of the others sound
weak and tentative.
Sarah's images are always
specific and understandable and are
drawn directly from reality: "eggplant slices sweating/ on the
breadboard, the washing machine/
spewing suds into the toilet."
In Maintenance, Sarah is concerned with the split between
poetry, and the drudgery of everyday life which gets in the way of
creating poems. The poem claims
the two are separate and cannot be
combined. Yet such is the miracle
of her writing; that in writing about
the separation she combines ever-
day life and poetry.
Two other excellent poems by
Sarah are An Inch of Air, and
Broom   at   Twilight.   She   is   the
outstanding poet in an anthology
which does not give prominence to
one poet in terms of space or arrangement.
Another concern of these poets,
naturally enough, is language,
which reflects a faith held by the
poets in the power of words.
However, sometimes this reliance
on words leads- to confusion.
Christopher Dewdney's The Drawing Out of Colour, which incorporates geological terminology, is
merely playing with language. But it
is beautiful language:
"In the silent radar forest/ ir-
ridescent scarabs bear coiled
trilobites/ in slow procession up the
meridian of symmetry./ A canopy
of precision optical instruments/
eidetically dissolves in the rain of
sensorium."
One reason for the obscurity of
these poems is many are almost too
personal to be understood by
strangers. Many of the poems in
this anthology lie on the borderline
of comprehension, and only their
beautiful and intelligent use of
words persuads the reader to be patient; to read slowly; and wait for
the poems to come. Page 18
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, September 11, 1984
TUESDAY
MUSEUM OF ANTHROPOLOGY AND THE DU
SUN YAT-SEN SOCIETY OF VANCOUVER
Lecture,  7:30 p.m.,  Museum of Anthropology
auditorium, free admission.
INTERNSHIP PROGRAM
Informative interviews for internships in social
planning, public health, writing, television,
museum work, etc., 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. daily,
Brock Hall, room 213.
WEDNESDAY
FEE-HIKE STRIKE COMMITTEE
Demonstration against tuition fee increases,
noon, in front of the New Administrative
building.
THURSDAY
STAMMTISCH
Social evening for people interested in the German language and culture, 7:30 p.m.. International House, upstairs lounge.
ISMAILI STUDENTS ASSOCIATION
General meeting, noon, SUB 206,
STUDENTS FOR A DEMOCRATIC UNIVERSITY
(FORMERLY     STUDENTS     AGAINST    THE
BUDGET!
Public meeting on the bus shutdown — featuring
Colin Kelly, president Independent Canadian
Tranist Union, noon, SUB 207 209
UBYSSEY
Another great, glorious press day All volunteers
welcome, noon 112:30 p.m.) to ?, SUB 241K
FRIDAY
FEE-HIKE STRIKE COMMITTEE
Open meeting, noon, SUB lounge.
STUDENTS FOR PEACE AND MUTUAL DISAR
MAMENT
First general meeting, all welcome, noon, SUB
205.
AMS ROCKERS
General meeting, noon, SUB 212A.
AMS NOON CLUB
Lecture on why noon at UBC is actually 12:30
p.m.. Pope Bobby I, noon, SUB 241K.
'Tween classes are minute missives
(hey, six point isn't THAT bad) about
upcoming events of general interest to
members of the UBC community.
Events will be run up to one week in
advance, space permitting. Due to the
overwhelming volume of 'Tweens, we
regret they cannot be taken over the
phone. Or under the phone for that matter. Please completely fill out forms
available in The Ubyssey office SUB
241K (the north-east corner of the big
fort) by 12:30 p.m. (that is noon at
UBC) the day before you wish it to appear. The Ubyssey is published
Tuesdays and Fridays, except when
His/Her Holiness Pope John P. visits,
The Queen drops in for tea, or a holiday
intervenes.
We don't like being authoritarian (we
found the word in a beat up copy of
1984 — we think it has something to do
with authors and journalism), but you
MUST fill in the forms completely. If
not, it won't be run. Simple.
Letters.
We really like them.
Lots.
Why? Because we don't have to
write that section of the paper. And
besides, reader surveys show they
are one of the most read sections of
the paper! And who are we to
disappoint our readers?
So get out your typewriters (you
can use ours any time other than
Monday and Thursday afternoons),
set the margins 70 spaces apart, and
triple space the whole thing.
Although The Ubyssey has a
open letter policy, sexist, racist or
offensive material will not run. The
Ubyssey reserves the inalienable
right to edit for taste, brevity,
length, grammar, etc.
The Ubyssey operates as a giant
magnanamous editorial unit, so
there is no editor. But if you must,
address it to one. Also, Women, as
well as men, edit our letters pages,
so please do not address it to "Dear
Sir". Leave that to the Sun. "Dear
omnipitent ones:" will do.
Thi* box (« hot gray.
In fact, it is 20 per cent black.
There is no »uch thing as grey in printing.
You will learn that and other bits of trivia H you join the Ubyssey. Drop by SUB
214K. in the north-east corner of the big fortress-like building between Gage and
Aquatic centre.
THEBACK
CHAIR
A new concept in sitting
Enjti\ the Chiropracticallv
recommended BACKCHAIR
(or beuer rare of your bark.
Perfect for students, computer
programmers, musicians, writers.
WESTCOAST BACKCHAIR STORE
2170 West 4(h Avenue • 734-7623
STUDENT REPRESENTATIVES
Faculty Of Arts
NOMINATIONS ARE INVITED FOR
STUDENT REPRESENTATIVES TO THE
FACULTY OF ARTS:
a) One representative from the combined major, honours, graduate, and diploma students
in each of the departments and schools of the
Faculty of Arts.
b) Two representatives from each of First and
Second Year Arts.
Student representatives are full voting members in the
meetings of the Faculty of Arts, and are appointed to committees of the Faculty.
Nomination forms are available from School and Department
Offices, the Dean of Arts' Office, the Arts Faculty Adviser's
Office, and the Arts Undergraduate Society Office.
Completed nomination forms must be in the hands of the
Registrar of the University not later than 4:00 p.m., FRIDAY,
SEPTEMBER 21, 1984.
^MwsKyCyi
SALE
OF UNCLAIMED
LOST & FOUND ARTICLES
Thurs. Sept. 13
11:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m
BROCK HALL
ROOM 208
vTHE
RATES: AMS Card Holders — 3 lines, 1 day $2.50; additional
lines, 60c. Commercial — 3 lines, 1 day $4.50 additional lines, .70c. Additional days, $4.00 and .65c.
Classified ads are payable in advance. Deadline is 10:30 a.m. the
day before publication.
Publications Room 266, S.U.B., UBC, Van., B.C. V6T2A5
Charge Phone Orders over $10.00. Call 228-3977.
COMING EVENTS
60 - RIDES
TOUR TIME
at Main & Sedgewick
LIBRARIES
Every Day This Week
10:30 a.m., 12:30 p.m. & 3:30 p.m.
Meet in Main Library Entrance
BLIND STUDENT NEEDS RIDE from New
WEST, to UBC Mon-Wed & Fri. for 9:30 -
2:30 (Negot.) will help with gas. Susan
526-5991.
BLIND  STUDENT  NEEDS  RIDE to  UBC
from 30th & Main. M.T.W, & F. for 8:30
class. Contact Linda 321-2311.
WANTED!
Women To Play Rugby
- no experience necessary
- everyone welcome
- social team sport
PRACTICES: THURSDAYS 6:00 pm
at  BALACLAVA  FIELD  (W. 30th
Ave. at Balaclava)
COME OUT AND TRY!
More info:
Joanna 733-3877
70 - SERVICES
The Ubyssey . . .
11
FOR SALE - Private
1973 RENAULT R12 SW. 4-Speed, 100,000
Mi. Gd. cond. new exhaust, brakes. $900
o.b.o. Zena 22&-S844, 228-0960.
ALMOST NEW 1969 100 cc Yamaha Street
M/C Only 1700 Mi. $265. Also 10-speed
Bottecchia bike. $85. 263-3440.
CANTERBURY, Osaga Mens & Ladies
wear. Newest fall styles. Tiger, Tachikara,
Osaga; joggers, court shoes. Volleyballers
knee pads, sweatshirts & pants, bags.
Wholesale prices. Team Discounts. Ph:
Doyl 224-0136 or drop by: Gage E. 3A, Rm 2
The best service
on campus.
80 - TUTORING
NEED TO REVIEW high school math or
English? Phone 733-3135 for tutoring by experienced, certified teacher.
85 - TYPING
TYPING -
734-8451
Fast, accurate, reasonable rates.
30 - JOBS
St. George's School
St. George's School require duty
masters to provide custodial care in
it's boarding houses under
housemasters' direction. Candidates
are typically senior undergraduates
or young unmarried. Outstanding
character references required. Free
suite and board in return for some
evenings and occasional weekend
duties. Opening available immediately. Apply in writing to:
The Headmaster
4175 W. 29th Ave.
Vancouver, B.C.
V6S 1V6
WORD PROCESSING $1.50/PG IDS)
CRWFt major - Winona Kent 438-6449
located in south Burnaby.
TYPING. Essays & Resumes. Also Transcription from cassette. Spelling corrected.
Layout on resumes optional. 263-4736.
WORD   PROCESSING.    Reports,
resumes, etc.  For professional results at
very competitive rates call 266-2536.
EXPERT TYPING. Essays, term papers,
factums, letters, manuscripts, resumes,
theses, IBM Selectric II, reasonable rates.
Rose 731-9857.
TYPING & WORD PROCESSING SERVICE.
Resumes, theses, etc.  Reasonable rates.
Colleen 590-1894
PROFESSIONAL (HOME) TYPING. Essays
theses. Reasonable rates. Call 876-2895
and/or 872-3703.
INVESTMENT Business Opportunity. Sell WORD PROCESSING SPECIALIST. All
Canada Savings Bonds with national jobs, year around student rates, on King
brokerage house. Mr. Starke 689-3324. Edward route. 879-5108. Tuesday, September 11, 1984
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 19
Grid 'Birds winless in two starts
By MONTE STEWART
After going through training
camp like world beaters, the
Thunderbird football club has
recorded neither a touchdown nor a
victory in two league contests.
Last Friday, the Calgary
Dinosaurs lambasted UBC 22-2 in
the 'Birds first home loss since
1981. The previous Saturday, Sept.
1, the Saskatchewan Huskies
blasted the 'Birds 28-5 in Saskatoon.
The defending Canadian champion Dinosaurs have lost Greg Vavra
but they still have Lew Lawrick.
The quarterback who lurked in
Vavra's shadow for four seasons
was too much for the UBC defense
to handle.
"I've been waiting for a long
time (to get the starting job)," said
Lawrick in reference to his role as a
back-up to Vavra, the Most
Valuable   Player   in    Canadian
University football last year.
Lawrick, a fourth year management student, demonstrated his
ability to direct the offence, passing
for two touchdowns and handing
off for one more. Josh Borger and
Tony Spoletini were on the receiving end of Lawrick's touchdown
tosses. Elio Geremia ran 75 yards
for the other Calgary major.
Tom Dixon scored UBC's only
points on a couple of wide field goal
attempts. The second year place
kicker has not hit a field goal in
seven tries this season.
While Dixon has come under
pressure because of his inaccurate
foot, the T-Birds anemic offence
has increased the kicker's burden.
Glenn Steele actually ran for a 37
yard touchdown in the first quarter.
However, it was called back as a
result of a clipping infraction by
George Piva.
While Steele and fellow running
back Terry Cochrane helped UBC
gain satisfactory yardage along the
ground, the passing game left terribly little to be desired. Quarterback Jordan Leith had a sporadic
game, completing only nine of 24
pass attempts for 108 yards.
Leith, who threw two interceptions, did not get any help from his
receivers.
Andrew Murray, Randy
Jamieson, and Bob Skemp all dropped passes that they should have
caught. Frank Cusati replaced Leith
in the fourth quarter and completed
seven of 12 attempts for 54 yards.
Borger   repeatedly   victimized
defensive back Roger Zan. The
UBC defender was looking over his
left shoulder when Borger, to the
immediate right, caught Lawrick's
15 yard touchdown-pass.
Geremia appeared to be going
out of bounds at least twice when he
romped for his 75 yard major. The
Thunderbird defence forced the
Calgary running back towards the
sideline. However, the would be
tacklers let up and allowed Geremia
to zigzag downfield for the score.
Another experienced quarterback
did in the 'Birds in their season
opener in Saskatoon. Doug Siemens
scored two touchdowns himself as
the Huskies, bolstered by a
tenacious defence, roasted the
T-Birds.
It was Saskatchewan's first victory over UBC since 1981.
This Friday, the 'Birds host the
University of Manitoba Bisons at
7:30 p.m. at Thunderbird Stadium.
Defensive end Kevin Burt, just
one of several injured Thunderbirds, would like to return to the
lineup but his sprained right ankle
will probably require additional
treatment before he can suit up.
CITR FM 102 will broadcast this
Friday's game live, beginning at
7:15 p.m.
SPORTS
If you can read this
Sports Ubyssey Wants You!
'Birds win with Hull
w
hen it comes to writing
sports, the idea of deterence is commonly ignored by all Ubyssey
athletic analysts.
From the gridiron to the rink to
the pitch to the courts to the kitchen
— where would all Thunderbirds be
without home cooking? — The
Ubyssey finds the story and
splashes it on the pages before it
disappears forever. The time has
now come for the Ubyssey to recruit
new sports afficianados, people
who will give a total team effort and
reap individual glory at the same
time.
Now is the time to begin your
long illustrious career in journalism. Just think, you get your
name spread throughout the campus. Groupies begin to know and
love you while radicals you are not.
Sports Illustrated, Inside Sports,
the Hockey News, these are just
some of the many magazines which
might reward you for lugubrious
prose which first appeared — with
your personal by-line-on The
Ubyssey sports page.
We need men and women to
cover UBC varsity events and
report back to our flock of faithful
readers. Naturally, some athletic
skill is required for this self-rewarding position.
If you can run the 100 yard dash
in 20 minutes or less, you qualify
for our team. Of course, you must
be a knowledgeable sports fan too.
If you can accurately differentiate a
hockey puck from a volleyball,
we'll put you on the active roster.
And even if you can't, well,
shucks, we'll give you a second
chance.
These are just some of the
numerous events which you can
cover for the finest rag west of
Blanca: football, hockey, women's
field hockey, soccer, tennis, skiing,
rowing, volleyball, basketball, gymnastics, squash and rugby.
Help The Ubyssey rid the sports
world of its ominous, inconsequen-
Super
Valu
3250 West Broadway
at Blenheim
5% DISCOUNT
Off Your Grocery
Order
Ask at the cashiers
for your Student
Discount card.
Student/AMS card I.D. required. Minimum purchase $30.00
Details at Store
tial, deprecatory, loquacious,
unimaginable, and just plain stupid
cliches. Heck, we might even help
you pass the English Comp exam.
In the past 30 seconds, hundreds
of dearly devoted dedicated diehard disciples have decided to join
Sports Ubyssey. These erudite expressive non-extremists have vowed
to contribute to richly rewarding
respectable research of high calibre
university athletic endeavours.
The upcoming weeks will prove
to be no easy task for these industrious individuals who do know
the difference between assonance
and alliteration.
These individuals must now overcome the most difficult obstacle to
a career at Sports Ubyssey: they
must find the heralded Ubyssey office which, some people believe, is a
mere figment of the imagination.
They must walk, jog, run, cycle
or crawl to SUB 241k — before it's
time to produce the next edition.
By MONTE STEWART
Bobby Hull propelled the hockey
Thunderbirds to an exhibition victory over Kokodu Bunnies of Japan
Sundav.
Hull scored two goals as the
'Birds rolled to a 5-1 victory over
their Japanese opponents. Former
T-Bird Bill Holowaty, who played
in Japan last year, scored once and
added two assists for the winners.
Graham Kerr and Craig Angus also
scored for UBC while Yugi Iga
scored for Kokodu.
Fred   Masuch   was   behind   the
'Birds bench, replacing the
departed but not forgotten Jack
Moores. Masuch, an assistant to
Moores for the past.two seasons
was given the head coaching job
when Moores resigned.
Moores, a former captain of the
'Birds, will help Masuch every once
in a while.
The T-Birds host Kokodu again
this evening at 8:00 p.m. at
Thunderbird Winter Sports Center.
The Bunnies then hop over to the
prairies before returning home.
IN SUB
Lower Level
A tiny place but famous for
their SANDWICHES. Also
homemade Samosas,
Chicken Pies & Cornish
Pastries.
Open daily 7:30 a.m.-5:30 p.m.
Tlie Globe and Mail, Guiada's better
iiifomiation source for over a century
Now available at the special student rate of 502 OFF
Consistently, The Globe and Mail, Canada's National Newspaper, keeps
you informed intelligently and concisely on the subjects that are important to you — national and international news, politics, finance, business,
current affairs, art, entertainment, science, medicine, fashion, and sports.
Now for a limited time only, Canada's National Newspaper can be delivered to you six days a week at the special student discount of 50% off.
Take advantage of this limited-time offer now. Complete and mail this
coupon with your payment (or call toll free 1-800-268-9125. B.C. residents
"      call 112-800-268-9125).
Whatever the subject, we keep you informed.
TheODbeandMail,   444 Front Street West, Toronto, Ontario M5V 2S9
SPECIAL HALF-PRICE STUDENT RATE
3 months    $19.50        6 months    $39.00
YES. I'd like a Student Subscription to The Globe and Mail al the special student rate of 5(K7 off the regular price.
Please deliver The (jlobc and Mail lo the address below..
Enclosed ts m\ cheque or nune\ order or credit card authorized for:       !    3 months      I i 6 months
Name	
Street	
UniversitN
Campus __
Province „
Residence
C'it\	
Postal Code
Room # 	
Student ID #
Telephone 	
This address is On campus, or       . Off campus
!    Cheque or Money order enclosed         Visa    I ^Mastercard    \    American Express
Charge Card E\pir\ Date Card Number
Signature    (Required lo validate offer)	
Note: Offer valid onlv where home delivery i
Lilable and expires November 30, NK4
t&r <fcW*r ont) illoU Page 20
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, September 11,1964
Budget rejected
By PATTI FLATHER
In an unprecedented move student council voted to send their
budget to committee at their last
meeting.
The 1984-85 Alma Mater Society
budget will be voted on at the Sept.
19 council meeting. The budget is
usually published in the first winter
Ubyssey.
External affairs coordinator
Nancy Bradshaw, who asked council to send the budget back, said she
"strongly disagreed with some of
the things going on in the budget
committee." While Whistler cabin
received $59,000 in funds not approved by council, the budget committee cut the external affairs
budget by $500, Bradshaw said.
Finance director James Hollis
said budget committee spent much
time examining individual budgets.
He said he found charges of committee impropriety "extremely
demoralizing."
The committee held a special
budget meeting Wednesday to
discuss budget priorities. In the
meeting's open session input on the
budget was allowed before budget
committee revised the budget and
unanimously approved it, Simon
Seshadri, student administrative
commission representative to
budget committee, said.
The revisions included a $400 increase for external affairs as well as
an increase to.council's emergency
fund, he said.
Seshadri said the bus strike and
the fact some committee members
were rarely available caused delays
in drawing up the budget. Council
should choose important committees
carefully in the future and consider
member's availability, he added.
Council tabled a motion concerning the graduate student centre's
spring takeover by the administration until the Graduate Student
Society and UBC president George
Pedersen have a scheduled meeting.
A motion asked council to reaffirm support for independent,
student-run facilities and urged the
administration to honour the 1982
agreement transferring centre control to the GSS. The motion also
urged the GSS and the administration to agree on the size of the debt
and on paying off the centre's debt.
Michael Gordon, a member of
the AMS ad hoc committee investigating the takeover, said the
president's ad hoc committees
recommendations seemed to
threaten student autonomy.
AMS president Margaret Copping said Neil Risebrough, associate
vice-president student services, was
not contacted by the AMS committee to give the administration's side
of the story. Copping said she
hoped the AMS committee would
find out the administration's side.
Council amended a motion to
spend $14,000 on miscellaneous
furniture repairs to the SUB
business and executive offices to a
$9,000 limit on expenses for carpet
and tile replacement.
Arts representative Duncan
Stewart said the full expense was
unnecessary because some AMS
furniture to be replaced was not in
poor condition. AMS vice-president
Doug Low said the work is a safety
measure to repair hazardous tears
in the carpets.
Council approved not more than
$500 for the hitching zone plan
designed to facilitate rides to UBC
for students during the bus stoppage. This money, along with $450
from the administration, will pay
for signs, flyers, and wages for 10
people distributing them, Copping
said.
Council also passed a motion Ombudsperson Debbie Bellamy
reinstating student court as the said she favoured the motion
highest body in the AMS. Two because "council is not always corn-
advertisements will be published in pletely fair voting on its own
The Ubyssey for court positions, policies."
LSAT
PREPARATION TRAINING
Law School Admissions Test
• Taught by Professionals & Educators
• Lecture Format   • Low Tuition
• Materials Updated Regularly
• Flexible Hours   • Practice Tests
• Visa Accepted    • Tape Library
fifj Centers across Canada and the U.S.A.
OCXLOfl     CV7 Classes Forming Now For Upcoming LSAT
Educational Centers f
LSAT
Weekend Courses (Fri. Evening, all Sat. and Sun.)
1984, Sept. 14-16; Nov. 16-18; Feb. 15-17, 1986.
414- 12O0Bu<r.rdSt
Ontario
Alberta
Vancouver, B C
(M?££Zm    (416) 968-9596 (403) 278-6070 (604) 684-4411
B.C. & Yukon
THE
THUNDERBIRD
SHOP
*3.
BACK TO SCHOOL
SPECIAL
^%^^^
G*s
Budget
run! i Mr      "•*
rS^-
rentacar
rent a truck
SPECIAL
STUDENT
DISCOUNT
10% OFF REGULAR RATES
WITH AMS CARD.
MOVE YOURSELF
AND SAVE!
(2 AND 4 HOUR
SPECIALS)
WE FEATURE □ CARS AND TRUCKS A
DISCOUNT COUPONS: 2 FOR 1 DINNERS, ATTRACTIONS'
50% OFF MAJOR HOTELS! WITH EVERY RENTAL
"A CONVENIENT NEW LOCATION TO SERVE YOU-lst AND BURRARD*
  736-3388
FOR FREE U.B.C. PICKUP
INFORMATION CALL
736-3388
THIS COUPON
WORTH
$3.00
ON THE PURCHASE OF ANY
Penmcro crewneck
SWEATSHIRT
Reg. Value $14.98
Offer Expires Saturday, September 29
£^ One coupon per shirt — No cash value! mmm.
12 oz.
$3.99
With this coupon
Reg. $5.98
Win $50. Gift Certificate
Treat 4 of Your Friends!
oaa nL^ujdU.
RESTAURANT
Name	
Address:	
3293 West 4th Avenue,
Vancouver, B.C. V6K 1R8
Telephone: 73-BEERS
.Tel.
No Purchase Necessary
Draw date: Friday, September 28
SPORTS BAGS
from
Penmons
• 9"x9"x20" Nylon
• Detachable Shoulder Strap
• End Pocket
Reg. 11.98
with coupon
While Quantities Last!
5.99

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
http://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.ubysseynews.1-0128065/manifest

Comment

Related Items