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The Ubyssey Nov 14, 2013

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Array VARSITY SPORT OR COMPETITIVE CLUB? // UBC proposes how they will determine the future of sports teams P3
EVERYTHING OLD IS NEW AGAIN // At the Freestore, one person's trash might be your brand new come-up P7 // Page 2
WHAT'S ON J    THIS WEEK, MAY
THURSDAY   10
COWS ON CAMPUS
11:30 A.M. -2 P.M. @ PARKING LOT
BEHIND MACMILLAN BUILDING
The BC Dairy Association's mobile
classroom comes to UBC to talk
about sustainable farming practices
Also, live cows.
Free
FRIDAY ' 11
PRIDE AND PREJUDICE
7:30 P.M.-10 P.M. @ FREDDY WOOD
See Jane Austen's witty classic
come to life — watch UBC's
production of Pride and Prejudice.
Colin Firth won't be there, but it'll
still be good. Read our preview on
page 6.
Regular $22, seniors $15, students
$10, youth $2
OUR CAMPUS//
ONE ON ONE WITH THE PEOPLE WHO MAKE UBC
ON
THE
COVER
The T-Birds won their 13th Sam Davidson Memorial Trophy this
weekend, continuing their two-year undefeated streak at the CIS
nationals. Rookies and seniors banded together to fight through the
tough opponents. A celebratory embrace was just a matter of time.
Photo by Fran Harris.
Want to see your events listed here?
Email your events listings to
printeditor@ubyssey.ca.
^|THE UBYSSEY
i
SATURDAY ' 12
GO OFF CAMPUS
ALL DAY ©VANCOUVER     \
You have a U-Pass. Papers aren't   ■
due for anothertwo weeks. Go   !
out and explore Vancouver.
Main Street. Commercial Drive.
Downtown. The possibilities
are endless.
Free (in terms of transit)   ]
-JOVEMBER14.2013 | VOLUMEXCVI ISSUEXXII
Staff abuzz
at spelling
bee in 1KB
=HOTOSCARTER BRUNDAGE^HE UBYSSEY
Top: teams gather to compete in the spelling bee. Bottom: Harry
Young holds up the much-coveted championship trophy.
<*-
EDITORIAL
Coordinating Editor
Geoff Lister
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News Editors
Will McDonald +
Sarah Bigam
iews@ubyssey.es
Senior News Writer
Brandon Chow
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Culture Editor
Rhys Edwards
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Aurora Tejeida
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Sports + Rec Editor
Natalie Scadden
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Tang.AdrienneHembree^
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The Ubyssey is the official studentnews-
aaper of the University of Rmish Cn-
urnbia. It is publish^
andThursdaybyTheUbyssey Publications Society. We are an autonomous,
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of British Columbia. All editorial content
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Ming Wong
Managing Editor, Print
Middle school spelling memories
were evoked as university staff
members participated in the fourth
annual UBC Library and United
Way Spelling Bee.
The top floor ofthe Irving K.
Barber Library was taken over by
spelling enthusiasts on Wednesday
afternoon. The goal of this spelling
competition was to raise awareness
for the United Way charity.
"The idea is to get people out,"
said Harry Young, the organizer
for the event.
Young said each department
at UBC typically holds an event
in support of United Way. Four
years ago, UBC's libraries decided
to host a spelling bee and it's been
going strong ever since.
Unlike a Scripps-style spelling
bee, this competition is in a team
format. For four rounds, each team
writes the word down after the
quizmaster says it, and afterward, they mark their own paper.
The team with the most correct
words win.
Wordplay was the name of
the game, which also called for
puntastic team names including
Building Operations' Bumblin'
Beez and CiTR's Spellcasters.
Word difficulty increased as
the rounds went on, moving from
spelling "minuscule" to "maelstrom" to "olecranon."
After four rounds of spelling in
a team, there was a tie between
Ceremony Affairs' Lexicons and
the Sauder School of Business'
Show Me the Honey, so it was
down to an old-fashioned spell-off.
"[Just like] primary school
spelling bee, folks," said spelling
quizmaster Trish Rosseel.
Both teams sent representatives to the stage, and in the end,
Sauder's Jan Wallace won it for
her team with the word "prosopopoeia." The David Lam Library
head librarian was enthused to
beat the English Department, who
had been the reigning champions
for three years in a row.
"We have been competing with
them for several years," Wallace
joked. "We've always eyed them
enviously and finally we've dethroned them."
A self-professed bookworm,
Wallace said her knees were shaking when she stood up front.
Although the spelling event was
aimed toward staff, one student
team managed to sign up.
Alexandra Valahu, a first-year
Arts student, saw the poster,
and requested to make a stu
dent team. Though they did
not emerge victorious, the four
first-years — Valahu, Mohammad
Memon, Ana Cristina Barajas
and Winnie Ng, of the A Bee Cs —
all recommend that students join
next year.
Shagufta Pasta of United
Way said they have raised over
$220,000, which is about 38 per
cent of their goal of $590,000
this year for both the Vancouver
and Okanagan UBC campuses.
The money goes to support stopping bullying, childhood poverty
and senior isolation in the city. ^
British  Columbia
LEGISLATIVE
INTERNSHIP
Pro
grar
2015
PROGRAM DIRECTOR
Karen L. Aitken
Legislative Assembly of B.C.
BCLIP@leg.bc.ca
ACADEMIC DIRECTOR
Dr. Patrick J. Smith
Simon Fraser University
psmith@sfu.ca
ACADEMIC ADVISOR
Dr. Gerald Baier
University of British
Columbia
baier@politics.ubc.ca
The BCLIP is an educational six-month
opportunity for Canadian university
graduates to work in British Columbia's
parliamentary system. Your academic
training will be enhanced by exposure to
public policy-making and the legislative
process by working in the executive and
legislative branches of the provincial
government at the Parliament Buildings in
Victoria.
B.C. residents are eligible to apply if they
have received their first Bachelor's Degree
from a Canadian university within two
years of the start of the 201 5 program.
Apply online at
www.leg.bc.ca/bclip
Deadline
January 31, 2014
Location:   Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
Term:  January 5 to June 26, 2015
Remuneration:  $22,920 for six months // News
)RS WILL MCDONALD + SARAH BIGAM
VARSITY SPORTS »
FIT WITH
UNIVERSITY MISSION
COMPETITIVE SUCCESS,
COMPETITION AND
PROGRESSION
PARTNERSHIPS
\
COMMUNITYSUPPORT
AND TRADITION
=ILE PHOTO KAIJACOBSON3THE UBYSSEY
SUPPORT FOR
COMPETITIVE SUCCESS
GRAPHICMING WO NG3THE UBYSSEY
UBC will be deciding which of its varsity teams keep their status, and which ones are reclassified as competitive sports clubs.
UBC Athletics announces criteria for sports review
Brandon Chow
Senior News Writer
On Nov. 8, UBC Athletics released
an outline ofthe criteria they will
use to classify sports teams.
In an upcoming athletic review,
UBC will examine its 29 existing
varsity teams and decide which
of them will be shifted into anew
strand dubbed "competitive sports
clubs."
The restructuring will be done
by a UBC think tank founded by
UBC VP Students Louise Cowin in
May 2012, which follows a model
provided by Canada Sport For Life.
Using this criteria, teams would
be judged based on five categories,
with different weight assigned
to each. Thirty-five per cent is
allocated for competitive success,
competition and progression; 15
per cent for support of competitive
success; 20 per cent for community
support and tradition; 10 per cent
for partnerships; and 20 per cent for
a fit with the university's mission.
Teams will be asked to provide
data on these criteria for a minimum of five preceding years, but
can provide data for additional
years as well.
According to the UBC media
release, the criteria was created
by an advisory team made up of
representatives from the university,
coaches, athletes and alumni. This
team met with alumni, student
athletes and coaching staff prior to
creating the criteria.
UBC is currently asking for feedback on the criteria. This will be
open until Dec. 1. Teams will submit
their data for the criteria in early
2014. The changes are scheduled to
come into effect in September 2015.
"[UBC Athletics is] going
through this criteria development
and agreeing on which sports will
go where on the sports model and
why," said Ashley Howard, UBC's
managing director of athletics.
"Once the model is agreed [upon],
we'll go through the assessment
phase of all of our teams, and some
teams would be placed in our competitive clubs strand."
Teams that could be reclassified
as competitive clubs include both
varsity teams and competitive
non-varsity teams. Under the new
structure, varsity teams moved into
the competitive sports club category would undergo a restructuring ofthe resources they currently
have access to.
"Right now we're looking at the
types of things a competitive club
would have access to," Howard said.
"And rather than a full time
coach, we're discussing honorarium
coaching support, or if the club is
student led, then a student leader.
We are also discussing subsidized
facility access during non-peak
times."
She also said UBC is still figuring
out branding for competitive teams
in this classification.
"We're still open in terms of our
discussion about whether competitive teams would be Thunderbirds
or whether they would be UBC
competitive clubs, but in some way
that doesn't exist now, they would
be recognized as UBC teams, so
there would be that sense of legitimacy and appreciation for what
they do," Howard said.
"There is a big difference between the two strands, but we are
really excited about the new strand
and the opportunities that it offers."
Rob Ragotte, head coach of
UBC's Nordic skiing team, said that
the proposed criteria appear to
be fair.
"I don't think any of it came as
any surprise to people based on
what I've read and discussed so
far," said Ragotte. "We think that
we're in a position where we'll end
up being a competitive club, which
might be a benefit for us. It's kind of
a wait-and-see type of thing just because ... what it means for each team
hasn't been decided yet, but overall
I think the [proposal] is a solid set
of criteria that seems to judge the
teams on a level playing field."
Doug Reimer, head coach of
the women's volleyball team, also
thinks the criteria seem reasonable.
"The key criteria are sound since
they weigh competitive success and
coaching as most important, but is
well rounded as it includes student
academic success, community
involvement and impact as well as
tradition," said Reimer. "I think
they are taking a lot of input and
time to try and capture the wide
variety of varsity sports experience
at UBC." a
NEWS BRIEFS
BOOM! Pizza blows up
At last week's AMS Council meeting,
councillors decided to scrap the
name BOOM! Pizza for the pizza
place in the newSUB and replace it
with the name Pie R Squared.
After spirited debate, Council
voted to keep the name BOOM!
Pizza 14-17-1. But later in the
meeting, VP External Tanner Bokor
motioned to reconsiderthe vote,
citing blowback from students
about the name.
After debating the motion again,
Council voted 20-8-2 to change to
name of the new pizza place to Pie
RSquared.
The name change cost the AMS
$5,000 since they already spent that
money developing a brand around
the name BOOM! Pizza.
The debt are walking
The AMS has launched a "Walking
Debt" campaign that aims to make
post-secondary education more
affordable.
"Actual financial assistance is core
to why we're at university. It's what's
driving our ability to get an education," said Tanner Bokor, AMS VP
external.
According to Bokor, students in
B.C. owe an average of $27,000 in
debtaftertheirdegree.
Bokorsaid there will be a discussion forum regarding the issue within
the next few months.
"We're hoping for a positive
dialogue with the provincial government," said Bokor.xi
DRUGS»
Researchers challenge
ruling against
prescription heroin
Arno Rosenfeld
Features Editor
Is access to heroin a human right?
If you are a chronic opiate
addict, it just might be. At least,
that's what Providence Health
Care and five patients are arguing
in a constitutional challenge to
the federal government's decision
to ban doctors from prescribing
heroin to patients exiting a joint
UBC-Providence research trial.
"Challenging the federal
government in court is not a
decision we took lightly," Providence president and CEO Dianne
Doyle said at a press conference
announcing the legal challenge
Wednesday morning. "But we feel
it is unethical for us to do nothing
when the human rights of one of
Canada's most vulnerable patient
populations is being threatened."
The conflict emerged when
federal health minister Rona
Ambrose announced in early October that heroin and other illicit
drugs could no longer be prescribed under a special exemption Health Canada had granted
Providence physicians.
The decision directly impacts
the SALOME trial, a joint research project between UBC and
Providence examining heroin's
effectiveness treating people
with chronic heroin addiction
who have not benefited from
■drovicfence
^-^ HEALTH
CARE
How you w
nt to be tre
mence
^0Yi
lu want to be treated.
He
PHOTO CARTER BRUNDAGE3THE UBYSSEY
Scott MacDonald and Larry Love spoke at a press conference Wednesday morning.
other treatment drugs such
as methadone.
"This is treatment — a treatment for an illness, similar to how
we treat diabetes or high blood
pressure," said Scott MacDonald,
a physician involved with the
trial. "I do not understand why
the health minister overturned
the decision by Health Canada."
The minister's decision, announced on Oct. 3, will not affect
current patients involved in the
UBC-Providence study, as university research was exempt from
the new regulations. However,
when SALOME trial subjects
finished their twelve months as
part ofthe study, many were continuing to receive treatment with
the drug.
"People are coming forward,
volunteering to help the creation
of new knowledge, and until the
results are known, people want
to continue to receive the study
drug — they expect to get it," said
Aslam Anis, a health economics
professor at UBC overseeing the
logistics ofthe SALOME trial.
Anis said he believed the minister's decision was ideological
and hoped the Providence legal
challenge was successful.
So far, 76 patients have completed the trial, set to conclude
in 2015. MacDonald said 21 were
approved for a 90-day prescription of heroin before the minister's decision.
"Our government has closed
loopholes that allow for the
feeding of addiction under the
guise of treatment," read a statement emailed by health ministry
spokesman Michael Bolkenius,
who declined to answer questions
by phone. "[The exemption] was
not intended as a way to give
illicit drugs to addicts."
Larry Love, a SALOME patient,
told media at the press conference
how his life had changed since he
began receiving regular doses of
heroin from the Providence clinic.
Before, he said, "I would get
up in the morning and I would
go wherever and get some heroin
and inject it, and that's pretty
much all I did all day — it was a
life of hell, sometimes you don't
eat."
Now, he said, he receives a
regular dose of heroin twice a day
and is able to maintain an otherwise stable life.
"We are bringing this legal
challenge to save our lives and the
lives of others," said Love.
Providence has retained
Joseph Arvay, a prominent
Vancouver attorney specializing in constitutional rights, to
argue their case before the B.C.
Supreme Court.
Arvay said the constitutional
challenge will focus on three
points: that healthcare is a provincial not federal matter; that the
health minister's decision violates
heroin addicts' right to maintain
physical well-being; and that the
Insite safe injection site case set a
favourable precedent.
Arvay is confident that science
is on the side of Providence and
the five patients behind the
legal challenge.
"It seems to me that the government will be left to rely on
political ideology rather than science and medicine," Arvay said. XI NEWS    I   THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 14, 2013
DRINKING AND PARKING »
MINING »
Push for prepaid parking
PHOTO CARTER BRUNDAGE3THE UBYSSEY
Two students sent a letter to the City of Vancouver about their parking initiative.
Hannah Scott
Contributor
Two UBC undergraduate economics students have sent a letter to
the City of Vancouver, asking the
city to offer prepaid parking for
drinking drivers.
Leighton Hay and Curtis Kuz-
necov said their proposal is aimed
at those situations where people
drive downtown for an evening out.
Afterwards, they may end up without a designated driver.
"Currently, you would have to go
back either onto your phone or to
front-load the meter at 9 a.m. to pay
for that parking. You cannot do it
beforehand," said Hay.
They hope the program would be
initiated in the downtown Van
couver entertainment district, and
expand from there if successful.
"It's a win-win situation," Kuz-
necov said. "For the government,
the City of Vancouver, they get more
revenue from parking, and it's good
for all the citizens around here
because they have that option, [and]
there's [fewer] drunk drivers on the
road."
However, this option may not
appeal to everyone. When undergraduate student Alex Wickett goes
downtown with friends, they choose
to take a cab back. "Divided by four,
it would probably be cheaper than
prepaying," she said.
Hay and Kuznecov developed
the initiative as an assignment for
UBC professor Robert Gateman's
Economics 210 course. XI
ALTERNATIVE
DISPUTE
RESOLUTION
POSTGRADUATE
CERTIFICATE
PHOTOCARTERBRUNDAGE3THE UBYSSEY
Activists and students raised concerns about the ethical aspects of a joint UBC-SFU mining institute at a campus talk.
New mining institute raises ethical concerns
Project aims to teach mining practices in developing countries
ViniClUSbla :        Ene'ler said mine securitv '■   undermine artisanal mining. The
<j)'HUMBER
Vinicius Cid
Contributor
On Thursday, Nov. 7, the Social
Justice Centre hosted a talk debating UBC's role in a new mining institute, as well as broader
ethical implications associated
with the mining industry.
The Canadian International
Institute for Extractive Industries and Development (CIIEID)
will be funded by a $24.6 million
grant from the Canadian International Development Agency
(CIDA) which will go to both
UBC and SFU. The institution is
intended to help educate people
in developing countries about the
best practices for mining.
Yves Engler, a Montreal-based
writer and political activists who
has written several books critical
of Canadian foreign policy, led
the talk.
Sam Stime, a UBC civil engineering graduate student involved
with "Not From My Campus,"
a blog critical ofthe CIIEID,
opened the talk. He introduced
the audience to the moral and
ethical concerns surrounding
overseas mining by Canadian
companies and the implications of establishing the CIIEID
at UBC.
"This is our time to ask tough
questions to our government
and universities," Stime said.
"Through this institute, there is
now a link between us and the
federal government's agenda
of imposition.
"This development intervention [the CIIEID] is poorly
thought through. I say, hold on
until consultations are made and
the right people are guided."
Engler then took the stage,
talking about human rights
abuses by Canadian mining
companies abroad, the pro-company foreign policy of Stephen
Harper's government and the
rerouting of development aid to
corporate projects.
Engler highlighted the example ofthe Porgera Gold Mine
in Papua New Guinea, which is
administrated by Toronto-based
Barrick Gold and headed by magnate Peter Munk.
Engler said mine security
personnel gang raping locals was
brushed off by Munk as "a cultural habit," and severe ecological
damage caused by the mine led
the Norwegian government to
divest its stake in the project.
Engler followed up by elaborating on the intrinsic ties between
Canadian mining companies,
the various Canadian federal
agencies such as the Canadian
International CIDA and the
Canadian Security Intelligence
Service (CSIS) and Canada's
foreign policy.
"I would assume the majority
of students at UBC, when shown
the facts about what Canadian
companies and Harper's governments are doing — they will not
be particularly fond ofthe idea
of UBC enabling the process,"
said Engler.
The Q&A session focused on
the role the CIIEID would play in
the mining industry, in Canadian
foreign policy and in developmental efforts abroad.
Marcello Veiga, an associate
mining engineering professor
at UBC and leader ofthe CIDA
proposal to establish the CIIEID,
rebuked links between the new
institute and Canadian mining
corporate interests, emphasizing
that the CIIEID would centre its
efforts on artisanal mining and
researching better practices for
developmental purposes.
"It is the main mining-related
problem in the world because of
the environmental destruction it
causes in developing countries.
They need the know-how. We also
know corruption is a tremendous
problem and we will work to combat it," said Veiga.
When an audience member
brought up social concerns
regarding CIIEID projects,
Veiga said they too would be an
important component ofthe institute's activities.
"We're working with NGOs in
Colombia, Peru and Ecuador. We
have Latin America first in our
minds," Veiga said.
Engler maintained his opposition to the institute.
"Canadian mining corporations
capitalize mining projects and
undermine artisanal mining. The
idea that the federal government
would give dozens of millions to
promote that is ridiculous. There
is a bigger picture out there."
After the talk, Stime elaborated on steps that can be taken to
minimize corporate influence on
the CIIEID.
"What we're proposing is for
the institute to receive no in-kind
aid from corporate companies
and no mining executive associated with the mining industry. It's
a conflict of interest and inappropriate," said Stime.
Engler took a more extreme
position, believing that the
CIIEID's work, corporate interests and Canadian foreign policy
will inevitably clash.
"The intent of funding the
CIIEID is not about bringing actual regulations and development
abroad; it's about giving a gloss
of corporate responsibility," said
Engler, "No matter if the money
is public or private, it jives with
Harper's pro-mining policy.
"Even if those within the institute were to lobby against the
policy, I don't think it would do
any good."
Ale Hinao, a SFU graduate
student, thinks the CIIEID role
is misguided.
"There's this perception that
the people in Canada know better
and go south to teach them their
mining practices. It worries me a
lot," said Hinao. "There are a lot
of problems that First Nations are
having with the extractive industry. The government should work
with communities here."
Hinao thinks localized efforts
are a better alternative to solving
challenges surrounding mining.
"There are efforts coming from
South American governments
to create an organization so that
foreign companies can go to trial
if they violate human rights and
harm the environment, so I think
that's a good initiative to support."
Andrea Vasquez, a forestry
graduate student at UBC, agreed.
"It's colonialist, and that's
what we keep doing with development aid and institutions like the
CIIEID." XI // Sports + Rec
EDITOR  NATALIESCADDEN
RSDAY, NOVEMBER 14,
SOCCER»
T-Birds take second straight national title
3-1 win over Laval Rouge et Or in final gives UBC its 13th championship
TOPPHOTOSCHARLESVANEGAS3THEEYEOPENER   BOTTOM PHOTO FRAN HARRIS/CIS
Clockwise from left: T-Birds celebrate after their gold medal win; Greg Smith gives a victory cry; Harry Lakhan fights Laval forthe ball; Lakhan passes across field. Below: Niall Cousens shields the ball from a Laval defender.
Nick Adams
StaffWriter
The UBC men's soccer team are CIS champions once again.
This weekend, they fought three hard
battles in order to lift the Sam Davidson
Memorial Trophy late Sunday afternoon in
New Brunswick. On Thursday, the 'Birds defeated the Universite de Montreal Carabins
1-0, then beat the York University Lions in a
tight 2-1 match to gain entrance into the CIS
finals for the second year in a row.
Following a rest on Saturday, the 'Birds
didn't seem as ready to go as one might
think. After conceding early in the first,
they were chasing at the half. Some words
in the locker room, however, would prove
to be enough of a difference to give the
'Birds the edge they needed to win 3-1. At
the end ofthe day, the 2012 champions
proved with vigour why they deserve to be
repeat champions.
"Winning doesn't get old," said head
coach Mike Mosher. "Every time is better
than the last, and to go back-to-back is a
pretty sweet feeling."
Mosher now has four national titles in his
18 years as UBC head coach.
The T-Birds' run for their record 13th
national title started last Thursday in
their quarter final match against the
Montreal Carabins.
Some final scores don't fully reflect the
match that was played. This game, however,
was not one of them. UBC outshot Montreal
6-1, and although a 16 per cent goals per shot
average is less than ideal, it was enough to
put them ahead of a pushing Montreal side.
Early in the game, both sides were
fighting and the referee was quite aware.
Thirteen fouls and two yellow cards later,
the first half was an entertaining one that
showed neither team wanted to go out in the
first round. Putting up a good show, Montreal keeper Kenan Morina stopped five UBC
shots, but let the sixth by.
In the 68th minute, UBC defender Sean
Einarsson broke the deadlock and scored his
first ofthe tournament — but not his last —
and also the first ofthe game. In the end, the
single goal would prove enough to push Montreal off the podium and send UBC forward to
contest York in the semifinal on Friday.
After pummeling St. Mary's University
3-0 on Thursday, York was on a high head
ing into their match against UBC on Friday.
Finishing with an 18-3-1 overall record, the
York Lions seemed like a worthy adversary
to the T-Birds' nearly lossless 19-1 season.
Although the 'Birds aren't used to trailing, as their +39 goal difference for the 2013
season suggests, they proved that they can
be an underdog team very quickly in the
first half. Lions striker Dylan Sacramento
put York ahead in only the 12th minute.
Passion and a possible head injury would
turn the tides. Once again, Einarsson
stepped up to the plate. After going down
only minutes after the York goal, Einarsson
came back on with a mummy-wrapped
head. The apparent injury, however, proved
to be exactly the opposite. With 25 points
throughout the season, Navid Mashinchi
stepped up to take a corner. Einarsson met
Mashinchi's curling corner with his bandaged head and leveled the game at 1-1.
"It was very inspirational to us," Mosher said after the game. "I told our team at
halftime that we needed everyone to play
like Sean."
After that, the 'Birds turned up the pace.
Although the Lions outshot the 'Birds 5-3
overall, the chances on net were not nearly
as impressive as the ultimately fruitless
creativity in the neutral third.
Creativity and chemistry are a deadly
combination and an important factor in
any match. Luckily, teammates Mashinchi
and Milad Mehrabi have a good dose of it.
Showing off late in the second half, Mehrabi
finished a beautiful behind the back pass
from Mashinchi for the 59th minute
game winner.
Although the Lions pushed hard in the
closing minutes, their efforts fell short.
They went on to play UNB — and lose 1-0
on PKs — in the bronze medal match. UBC,
however, would go on to play Laval for the
2013 CIS title.
The 'Birds were eventually able to solve
the Universite Laval Rouge et Or in a roller
coaster of a game.
Starting out shaky, the 'Birds once again
trailed in the first half when Laval midfielder Amaury Fauvergue scored his first of
the tournament. After a foul in the middle
ofthe park, Laval chipped the ball into the
box and, upon a clearance from the UBC
defense, Fauvergue sent the first-timer shot
dipping across the net and over UBC keeper
Luke O'Shea.
"In the first half, the effort was there,"
UBC striker Niall Cousens said after the
game. "Maybe we got a little bit nervous and
the mental side wasn't there, but we just
calmed down in the second half and kind of
trusted our abilities, trusted each other, and
we got it done."
Cousens was a pivotal part ofthe UBC
offense, holding the ball up top and allowing
the midfield to push forward. Without him,
creative players like Mashinchi, Mehrabi
and Reynold Stewart wouldn't have the
space to score their combined 28 goals over
the course ofthe regular season.
The 'Birds displayed perfect example of
this in the 51st minute. On a defensive break,
Cousens held the ball at the circle, allowing
Mashinchi to run down the right flank.
Breaking past the left defender, Mashinchi
cut back and placed a slow pass onto the
running foot of Cousens. With a clinical
finish that comes only with the experience
of a striker like Cousens, the shot was placed
over the hands of Jean-Francois Desrosiers,
the Laval keeper. Cousens would go on to be
named tournament MVP.
As they proved in their semi-final match,
the T-Birds' talent shines when pressured.
Eleven minutes later, Mehrabi found a
ridiculous amount of unmarked space off
a flick from Cousens. Completely open
with the keeper out of position, Mehrabi
put his head down and pounded home the
game winner.
Finalizing their victory, Mashinchi rounded up a weak Laval clearance and slotted
home his lone goal ofthe tournament. At the
end ofthe day, the 'Birds proved their dominance with a 3-1 victory.
Back-to-back titles in any sport is a difficult feat, but there is a reason UBC's mens
soccer team has been able to do it.
"A longtime ago, Joe Johnson, my father
[Dick Mosher], Dave Partridge, the players
that I played with and the players who played
with me before that [created] a winning
culture," Mosher, who was named CIS men's
soccer Coach ofthe Year, said happily after
the game. "That's the expectation here. The
bar has been raised very high and it's up to
the boys to strive to that level."
With solid coaching and a team with lots
of young depth, the 'Birds definitely have
a shot atthree-peatingthe CIS title again
next year. Until then, they'll just have to be
content with being the first back-to-back CIS
men's soccer champions in over a decade. XI
MEN'S
SOCCER
BY THE
NUMBERS
<3/\  4   *+  wins-iosses-
OU"A"0 draws over last
two years
straight CIS national
championships
6   f\ wins-losses at nationals
w inthelasttwovears
Doints for CIS MVP II Culture
RHYS EDWARDS
LIFESTYLE »
Healthy living in the dark times
How to cope with seasonal affective disorder as a university student
GE3THE UBYSSEY
Seasonal affective disorder, or SAD, causes depression during certain months ofthe year.
Sarah Manshreck
Contributor
It's that time of year.
Exams are kicking into high
gear, and the general consensus on
campus is to revert to poor eating
habits and lock yourself away
from daylight in the basement of
the Koerner library. Even more
noticeable is the change in daylight
hours: days are shorter, colder and
much wetter.
Between breaking out the rain
boots and pulling consecutive
all-nighters, it's easy to slip into
a depressive cycle. Most students
can identify with having "winter blues"; however, fewer may
have heard of SAD, or seasonal
affective disorder. Although SAD
can be serious, there are many
ways to break yourself out of the
winter blues and improve your
mental health.
According to the Canadian
Mental Health Association, SAD
is a mental health disorder where
shortened daylight hours and lack
of sunlight cause clinical depression, most commonly during the
winter. Humans have a natural
biological clock that tells us to
sleep when it's dark outside. This
clock affects brain chemicals
such as dopamine and serotonin,
which are directly linked to
happiness levels, and the internal
clock of those affected by SAD is
strongly affected by the change in
seasonal light.
Symptoms of SAD can often
be similar to bipolar disorder or
thyroid problems. They include
overeating and carbohydrate
craving, fatigue, avoidance of
social situations and anxiety. This
contrasts with typical cases of
clinical depression, which include
symptoms such as insomnia and
lack of appetite.
Raymond Lam, professor of
psychiatry and medical director of
the UBC Hospital Mood Disorders
Center, studies depression and
SAD. During a 2008 lecture at the
annual meeting ofthe Society for
Light Treatment and Biological Rhythms, he discussed light
therapy as a treatment for SAD.
This treatment involves exposing
people affected by SAD to a light
50 times more powerful than a
normal light bulb for 30 minutes a
day. He reports that this treatment
has reduced symptoms in patients
and has proven effective.
There are less intensive methods for breaking students out of
the winter blues, however. The
UBC Health and Wellness Centre
encourages meditation in order to
allow students to get "connected
to the present moment." Although
the wellness centre cites many
kinds of meditation, some that
involve chanting or watching an
object, all involve "attention and
focus." Engaging in this positive
mental activity requires no equipment, and groups on campus such
as the UBC Meditation Community are open to beginners looking
to get involved.
Exercise also contributes to
building positive mental health,
according to the Canadian
Mental Health Association. Not
only does exercise reduce such
symptoms as depression, anxiety
and fatigue, but it also creates
social situations to put people in
contact with others who share an
interest in an activity. Furthermore, after as little as 10 minutes
of activity, exercise releases
endorphins — chemicals that
cause bliss.
There are numerous opportunities to engage in physical activity
on campus. The Birdcoop and
UBC REC host classes daily, and
the Fun Run Club provides a tight-
knit group to run the Wreck Beach
stairs. If you're looking for something a little more unusual, the
Quidditch Club fulfills two niches:
physical exercise, and indulging
your inner Harry Potter nerd.
To fuel physical activity, healthy
eating is critical for positive mental
health. The 2006 Feeding Minds
study, from the UK Mental Health
Foundation, draws a link between
additives and trans fats to diseases
such as attention deficit disorder.
The Canadian Mental Health
Association expands on this by
noting that food consumed is directly used to create brain matter;
in other words, you are what you
eat. To optimize brain function and
mood, foods consumed should include protein, omega-3 fatty acids,
whole grains and fresh fruit and
vegetables. Instead of eating dinner
out of a package or a Domino's box
regularly, buy as much fresh food
from your local grocer as you can
and cook your own meals. If eating
out or snacking regularly while at
school is a problem, pack a lunch —
and a water bottle to stay hydrated.
It's important to note that if
conditions worsen or you begin
to contemplate suicide, you
should see a doctor immediately.
Furthermore, if stress continues
to overwhelm you, the Speakeasy
counter in the SUB is a free AMS
service that offers a non-judgemental ear and academic, spiritual
and emotional support.
Exam season can be difficult.
However, UBC provides a plethora
of ways to maintain good mental
health during the dark season. %
THEATRE»
Pride and Prejudice comes to life on UBC stage for bicentennial
Kanta Dihal
StaffWriter
It is a truth universally acknowledged that a great novel must be
in want of many adaptations.
Pride and Prejudice, Jane Austen's best-known novel, is widely
adored, disliked, prescribed and
adapted — and it's 200 years old
this year. Theatre at UBC is joining
in the celebrations with a stage
production ofthe novel, starring
BFA acting students.
The classical story of Elizabeth
and Mr. Darcy finding each other
after having overcome pride and
prejudice hardly needs an introduction. Amidst the hundreds of
adaptations in dozens of different
media, how will this year's production handle the famous novel
and cater to its fans?
Surprisingly, the cast members
themselves are not big fans ofthe
novel. "I didn't even know the
story," admitted third-year Matt
Kennedy, who will be playing Mr.
Darcy.
Kat McLaughlin, a fourth-year
starring as Elizabeth Bennett,
used to outright dislike it. "I was
forced to read Pride and Prejudice
in high school, and I have never
enjoyed a single class ... where I've
been forced to read it," she said.
"[However], reading it for pleasure, you find a lot ofthe wit that
you might have missed before."
"I did not like Darcy," said set
designer Shelby Bushell, a sixth-
year double major in English
literature and production design.
"He's just useless and mean all
the time. But then I went to see
the first run-through of this
[play]... and it's the first time that
I've actually empathized with Mr.
Darcy."
Now, however, the actors ar =
taking the novel and play seriously.
Kennedy has not only grown real
sideburns for his part as Mr. Darcy
("They're a little uneven... [they'll
be] probably just right come
closing show"), he has also done
thorough research in the UBC
library. "There is just so much
information," he said. "Just having
access to that amount of information, looking at the themes ofthe
book, the concept of art versus
nature ... really helped [me] define
my relationship with Elizabeth."
"I had to figure out what it
meant to be a 'good woman' in
those days, which is completely
different from what it means now,"
said Nicole Yukiko, a fourth-year,
who will fulfil the roles of both the
mean-spirited Ms. Bingley and the
motherly Mrs. Gardiner.
The actors were overwhelmed
with advice from friends and
family. "It was tough!" said Daniel
Meron, also a fourth-year, who
will play both the eligible bachelor
Mr. Bingley and the kind, middle-aged Mr. Gardiner. "My mom
and sister absolutely love [Pride
and Prejudice], and so when I
found out that we were doing [the
play], they immediately wanted
to start coaching me and say, this
character is like this and this character is like that."
Pride and Prejudice has seen its
story rewritten dozens of times.
Some adaptations, such as Helen
Fielding's Bridget Jones series,
have become massively popular
themselves. Others, such as Pride
and Prejudice and Zombies and 50
Shades of Mr. Darcy (yes, it exists)
have tied in the famous story with
contemporary hype.
"Oh no!" the four actors
groaned collectively when confronted with the existence ofthe
Pride and Prejudice meets Twilight
adaptation Vampire Darcy's Desire.
Meron, however, does see this
as proof of the quality of Pride's
story. "You're not going to have,
in the next 200 years, various
adaptations of Twilight. This is
a story that can be told time and
time again, century after century,
because it's about real people."
This does not mean that such
eccentricities have been adopted
in the Theatre at UBC production,
however. "We wanted to bring out
the novelistic aspect of it," explained
Bushell. The Pride set is her first
theatre design. "We wanted to bring
it out as though the characters have
literally leapt out ofthe pages and
are telling this story."
So don't expect aliens, vampires
or zombies; the play is roughly
true to the time in which Pride and
Prejudice was originally written.
A contemporary adaptation would
have been difficult, according to
the cast.
Jane Austen's cadre of sassy ladies will find
staging of the classic tale.
"The whole story takes place in
such a different mindset," Yukiko
said. "A big aspect is the idea of
marriage, and what it means for
the women in these times, because
there were so few options for
occupations at that time. Marriage
was your occupation."
"Darcy gets rejected by Elizabeth for a dance. I mean, here, you
get rejected in the club by a girl,
=HOTO COURTESY DEB PICKMAN
renewed life at UBC in the theatre department's
you move on. [That] would never
happen [in 1813]," added Kennedy.
And yes, even the most hardcore
Austenites in the audience will be
catered to. "I'm excited for them to
come and see [the play]," said Yukiko. "They're going to love it." tJ
Pride and Prejudice runs at the
Frederic Wood Theatre from Nov.
14-30. THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 14, 2013    |    CULTURE
SWAG»
Feel-good free goods
UBC Freestore trades monetary
economy for campus culture
Alice Fleerackers
StaffWriter
A breast pump and two rice cookers, wool coats and fuzzy slippers,
a full Legend ofZelda costume
— these are only a few ofthe treasures to be discovered at UBC's first
ever "free store."
A completely volunteer-run
and student-lead project, the UBC
Freestore is exactly what it sounds
like: a place to pick up lightly used
books, clothes and other supplies,
completely free of charge.
"One man's trash is another
man's not-trash," said Kramer
Rappos, Freestore volunteer and
one of its unofficial founders, in
an attempt to summarize the project's philosophy.
At the most basic level, the
Freestore is a recycling resource,
providing students and other
community members with a convenient place to discard unwanted
items or pick up useful secondhand goods. Although waste reduction is a key motivation for the
project, Rappos, who is pursuing
a double major in political science
and philosophy, emphasizes that
the Freestore's goals are wide-ranging and difficult to define.
"The Freestore can show
folks that alternatives exist to
super-wasteful capitalism," they
explained. "However, I'm not sure
there is necessarily an essential
feature to it. It's what you make
of it.
"If you think it's a pile of trash,
it's a pile of trash; if you think it's
treasure, then it's treasure."
Political science student Sam
Dabrusin, another Freestore
volunteer, agrees that there are
many reasons to use the store. In
addition to "raising consciousness about disposable culture," he
explained that the Freestore aims
to improve students' financial situations by providing an affordable
way to meet important needs for
things such as clothing and school
supplies.
Charvel Rappos, an Arts student and Freestore volunteer, adds
that in addition to meeting their
material needs, the store allows
students to discuss ideas, study,
or just hang out in an open and
accepting environment. She said
their location in the Student Union
Building "provides a very safe
space for any students...be it on
campus and off campus," and fosters a sense of community within
the university.
Recently, however, the question
of space has become an increasingly pressing concern for the
Freestore. An offshoot ofthe UBC
Student Environmental Center and
Social Justice Centre, the store
PHOTO CARTER BRUNDAGE3THE UBYSSEY
The smiling fellows on the couch have organized the Freestore, a campus resource which allows students to trade free stuff.
currently runs out of a communal
meeting room it shares with these
resource groups. This arrangement
is problematic: its small size limits
how much "merchandise" the Free-
store can provide, and the noise of
shoppers rifling through clothing
racks is disturbing to the meeting
proceedings of other clubs.
In the hope of obtaining a room
of their own and increasing their
overall presence on campus, the
Freestore is debating moving to
official AMS club status. However,
becoming an AMS club poses several challenges for the store, including electing a treasurer, president
and vice-president and charging
members a minimum fee of $1 each.
All three volunteers agree that
these changes would undermine the
Freestore's core values. Dabrusin
goes so far as to call these changes
"pointless" and ultimately "counterintuitive to the whole goal [ofthe
Freestore]."
Despite these challenges, however, the volunteers remain steadfast
in their dedication to the project.
"Life is a disaster," said Kramer
Rappos, and "the Freestore makes
[it] better in a small way." U
If you're interested in what the Free-
store has to offer, they are located in
Room 245 ofthe SUB. Their free stuff
stack is moved outside of Sprouts in
the SUB basement every Friday from
11 a.m.-2 p.m.
MUSIC »
The man behind the brass: playing the "Last Post" on Remembrance Day
COURTESY LOGAN BENNETT
Logan Bennett played the "Last Post" at this year's Remembrance Day ceremony.
Alexandra Meisner
StaffWriter
As the clock approached its
eleventh hour, he stepped before
the gathered crowd to deliver one
ofthe most recognized bugles in
wartime history.
On Monday, Nov. 11, Logan
Bennett, a trumpet player for
UBC Pacific Spirit Brass quintet, helped to honour those who
fought and died in both ofthe
World Wars. His performance
ofthe "Last Post" was followed
by two minutes of silence as
his notes settled in the air, and
a blanket of emotion covered
the crowd.
The Remembrance Day ceremony held in the War Memorial
Gym hosted a variety of community and university organizations. Attendees included
members ofthe UBC Alumni
Association, UBC Athletics and
AMS president Caroline Wong.
The musical portion ofthe ceremony was left to Bennett and his
fellow brass players. "I've never
actually done a Remembrance
Day ceremony before," Bennett
said, during refreshments following the ceremonial activities.
"I had a bit to relate to in terms
of what the ceremony is about,"
he said. "My grandpa was in the
military."
The second-year masters student
at the UBC School of Music said that
during his performance ofthe well-
known piece, professionalism is his
main focus. "In the moment it's not
so much emotional, it's more about
getting the notes out. But right after,
it was really emotional."
The "Last Post" had a prominent presence in military tradition
during both world wars. Assumed
to have been composed by Franz
Joseph Hayden, it was used to signal
the end to a soldier's day of fighting,
or a hard night of drinking. In the
modern world, it can be heard at
the funerals of soldiers as a final
farewell to the men and women who
have made the ultimate sacrifice.
Bennett conveyed the significance ofthe bugle call by connecting it to his grandfather. "He
played in the military bands during
World War II, so I tried to use that
as fuel to make it mean something."
The Pacific Spirit Brass music
group consists of UBC students, and
was featured at the ceremony this
year through a high recommendation by their director, Robert Taylor.
"A lot ofthe gigs UBC School of
Music groups get are through word
of mouth — our director will approve if we can play," Bennett said.
This year's ceremony was a
special opportunity for the quintet.
"There's been a different quintet
that's done [the ceremony] for the
past couple of years," Bennett said,
"and one ofthe trumpet players
couldn't do it this year [so] our director recommended us."
"Between the two trumpet
players, Nick [Hall] and I, because
I'm Canadian... I thought it would
be better if I played [the "Last
Post"]." Bennett proudly took up
the responsibility of delivering the
"Last Post" for the emotional enjoyment of all in attendance, and
in remembrance of all those who
have fought. U
LAUNCH YOUR CAREER
WITH A POSTGRAD
USINESS 8    |    CULTURE    |    THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 14,2013
CULTURE VULTURE
It's a gallery inside a gallery
With a multitude of artists producing work that transverses
every medium, Vancouver has
quickly developed an expansive
art scene over the past several
decades. ForQuebec native
Samuel Roy-Bois, it's a perfect
fit.
Roy-Bois, a local interdisciplinary artist and faculty member
at UBC Okanagan, has altered
traditional perceptions of art
galleries with his newest installation, Not a new world, just an
old trick. After receiving an invitation from SFU's gallery curator,
Melanie O'Brian, Roy-Bois created a work best described as
an innovative harmonization of
architecture and art — a gallery
inside of a gallery.
Deriving its namesake
from the famous New World
Symphony by Czech composer
Antonin Dvorak, Roy-Bois' installation is currently featured at
SFU's art gallery in Burnaby.
"I thoughtthat by building
some sort of enclosure or space,
I would be able to create more interesting connections between
the pieces," said Roy-Bois. He
describes his work as "user
friendly," allowing visitors to
explore the installation and develop an interaction influenced
by the architecture. The gallery
is constructed of different levels
and furniture items that are open
to public use.
"It was like an almost full-scale
model," said Leslie Van Duzer,
the director of the UBC School
of Architecture and Landscape
Architecture, who participated
in a roundtable discussion with
Roy-Bois last Monday. "Rather
Alice in Wonderland-tike in
terms of its scale." 'ffl
THEATRE»
Decrepit dinner guests and contemptible canapes
Farcical comedy Cocktails at Pam's staged by UBC alumni on Granville Island
COURTESY MARYANNERENZETTI/STAIRCASEXITHEATRESOCIETY
Audiences will get to experience the schaudenfraude of a dinner party gone wrong in
Cocktails at Pam's.
Maura Forrest
Contributor
It's 1965, and Pam Cochrane's
perfect cocktail party is falling to
pieces. There are too many floral
arrangements, uninvited guests
are showing up and some of them
even suggest a most uncivilized
game of charades.
But audiences of Stewart
Lemoine's Cocktails at Pam's, a
new comedy presented by Vancouver's Staircase Equity Theatre
Collective, may find themselves
chuckling at the high-strung hostess' expense.
"Let's just say her anxiety gets
the better of her," said Maryanne
Renzetti, a UBC theatre grad who
co-produced the show and stars as
Pam. "That's probably putting it
lightly."
This is the second Lemoine production for Renzetti, who started
the Staircase XI Theatre Society
in 2009 with fellow UBC alumna
Becky Shrimpton. The company's
version of Evelyn Strange was a hit
during the 2011 Fringe Festival.
Renzetti has been hoping to premiere another of Lemoine's plays
in Vancouver ever since.
"I knew that I liked his style,"
she said. "I read this play in a Starbucks, by myself, and I laughed out
loud. I couldn't help it — it's just so
funny."
The production hasn't all been
smooth sailing, however. Cocktails
has a cast of 11, which makes it
Staircase's largest undertaking
to date. That's made everything
more difficult to organize — not to
mention more costly.
The show is directed by Stephen
Heatley, a faculty member in
UBC's department of theatre and
film. He is very aware of some of
the challenges facing independent
theatre companies in Vancouver.
"Here on campus we have a fair
amount of infrastructure," he said.
"But this [production] is a little bit
of a labour of love. Everybody has
to pitch in to make sure that it all
comes to pass."
Still, he says that directing a
play off-campus has given him
the chance to work with a varied
group of actors with different
types of experience.
"It's interesting to get that kind
of mixture of training and interests and style," he said.
He also points out that the larger cast means more opportunities
for young actors. Five members
of the company and both of the
show's designers have graduated
from UBC within the last 10 years.
Georgia Beaty is one of those
recent alumni. She finished the
acting program earlier this year,
and she has now landed her first
professional role as Rita, Pam's
maid.
"It's been an awesome experience," she said. "You get to bring
experienced actors together with
people like myself who are just
starting out. I couldn't really have
asked for more."
She thinks that the show will
appeal to just about everyone, from
UBC students to an older audience.
"It's a very quirky, fun, high-
energy show," she said. "And for
people who are interested in seeing a period piece, I think it's also
a good fit for them." tJ
Cocktails at Pam's runs until Nov.
30 at Studio 1398,1398 Cartwright
St., on Granville Island. A discount rate is available for students.
Tickets are available at http://cock-
tailsatpams.bpt.me/.
Emma Gavey
PhD candidate in Chemistry.
Coals:
Develop new magnetic
complexes for
memory devices.
Improve our health care.
Apply for Graduate Studies at Brock.
There are 44 programs, an array of specializations,
co-op opportunities and a world of possibilities.
discover.brocku.ca
For both sides of the brain.
Brock University | Niagara | Canada
FILM»
Cineclub film series crosses
cultures on the silver screen
Marlee Laval
StaffWriter
If the highly coveted foreign
cinema class fills up too quickly
during registration this year, the
department of French, Hispanic
and Italian Studies is offering an
alternative — without the hefty
tuition price.
Screening twice weekly at
no cost on the seventh floor
of Buchanan Tower, the FHIS
Cineclub is showing notable
and modern European films in
French, Spanish, Portuguese and
Italian, complete with popcorn
and English subtitles. With these
films, the club aims to provide
both education and entertainment
for both film fanatics and lovers
of language.
"Through movies, we can learn
a lot about culture and current
events that were happening [at the
time]," said Ana Robles, a graduate
student in the FHIS department.
"In the past years [the screenings
were] more centered on education,
but this year, we want to make it
more of a fun project, to familiarize audiences with a wide variety
of films from different languages."
"It was movies that got me
into taking Italian," said Gabri-
ela Angel, a first-year economics
student who heads the Italian film
screenings. "I found out about this
club through an email asking for
volunteers and I knew I'd love to
be apart of it."
The Nov. 4 screening featured a 1994 Italian film called
Il Postino: The Postman, a simple
story of how a famed poet helps
his postman express his love
towards a beautiful waitress in an
effort to win her over. Filled with
metaphors, light comedy and even
subplots of political tension, the
film manages to be a breathtaking
portrayal of Italy in the 1950s,
receiving high praise in reviews
everywhere and garnering a spot
on the Cineclub's roster.
Each screening typically only
features one language from the
department, but the Cineclub
has plans to combine a multitude
of languages in one film, with a
screening of The Phantom of Liberty scheduled tentatively for the
latter half of the second term.
"Our goal is to bring everything together," Robles said. "This
movie encompasses a lot ofthe
different languages and cultures."
In the meantime, the Cineclub
hopes to attract an enthusiastic crowd of cinema lovers on
Mondays and Thursdays from 4
to 7 p.m. to intimate, cultural and
thought-provoking shows. tJ
Read our web-exclusive preview of Malian singer Rokia Traore's
concert at the Chan this weekend at ubyssey.ca/culture. II Opinions
LETTERS»
What happens when you try to
make a class project 'real'
Robert Gateman, a well-known UBC econ prof, assigns his students
a real-life group project. Here are ideas from two such groups.
PHOTO KAIJACOBSON3THE UBYSSEY
One group's plan would allow residents to "adopt" a care for a transit station or bus stop.
Adopt-a-Stop to clean up
TransLink stations
Dear TransLink Board of
Directors:
Bus stops are heavily
used parts of our city and are
as much a part of a community
as streets, pathways, parks and
plazas. Unfortunately, due to their
high use, bus stops are consistently
littered and in need of care.
We understand the enormous
cost associated with maintaining
individual bus stops. In the
interest of city cleanliness, safety
and community involvement, we
propose that TransLink consider
introducing an "Adopt-a-Stop/Sta-
tion" program.
With this program, individuals
or groups could apply to adopt a
TransLink bus stop or SkyTrain
station for a commitment of
one year or more. The adopters
pledge to care for the location,
performing a specific set of duties
and receive recognition and other
incentives.
A tremendous precedent has
been set for Adopt-a-Stop/Station
programs. Cities such as Denver,
Portland and New Jersey, among
others, have implemented successful programs. Vancouver is already
home to the "Green Streets"
program and North Vancouver's
"Adopt-a-Street," showing that
community adoption programs
can work in the Greater Vancouver
area.
The Adopt-a-Stop/Station
program aligns directly with
TransLink's values and policies:
Environmental sustainability: The program would reduce
litter and vandalism, which affect
BIRD
SCALE
the environment and Vancouver's appearance (with potential
negative effects on tourism and
collective efficacy). As reported
by the Transportation Research
Board ofthe National Academies,
"cleaner, safer stations and stops"
is one ofthe "top benefits ofthe
program."
Community sustainability:
The program would improve
TransLink's relationship with
the community as well as having
the positive spillover of increased
social capital such as community
goal setting, and teamwork among
individuals and organizations.
We understand that Vancouver's transit system is a integral
part of Vancouver living.
We applaud TransLink's aim
"for continual innovation and
improvement in all aspects of
[their] business." We believe
an Adopt-a-Stop program is an
excellent opportunity to continue
the improvement of TransLink
and Vancouver as a whole. This
initiative is an opportunity to capitalize on volunteer work power,
increase the efficiency of bus stop
maintenance, improve community
relations and reduce the negative
impact of litter on our city.
Sincerely,
Daniel Robertson, Kathy Ho,
Sita Cheung, Keith Shotta and
Connie Tang
The authors of this letter are working on a group project for Robert
Gateman's economics class.
=HOTO GEOFF LISTER/THE UBYSSEY
A snowy December shut down campus and forced some students to take their final exams in January last year.
Fix deferred exams to make things fair
A sports injury, religious holiday, sickness or even "heavy"
snowfall can affect anyone.
In the last year alone, students
wrote around 700 deferred exams.
In other words, we all might find
ourselves trudging back in the
middle of summer to deal with an
unfinished exam.
When someone has to defer
an exam, they will generally find
there are three different options
to reschedule. The examination
policies vary between faculties, but
generally:
1. Students may reschedule the
exam personally with their professor, provided that professor would
agree to such arrangement.
2. Students may also write the
exam in the following final exam
period, provided that the course is
offered in the next semester.
3. Finally and most dreadfully,
students have to write the exam in
late July or early August if the first
two options don't work out — and
in many cases, they don't.
The problems we found
within the current policy include preventing students from
registering for courses that have
prerequisites until the exam is
taken, delaying applications to
majors and prolonging students'
graduation time.
These delays result in disadvantages for students applying for jobs
or graduate school. Furthermore,
students who have to write the
exam months after the material
was taught must spend extra time
reviewing the course material.
The time spent reviewing the
course material during the summer
results in the loss of income from
summer jobs, and may even jeopardize the fun and thrills of summer that everyone looks forward to.
In addition, one study by Giorgio
di Pietro showed that "the shift
of final exams to the end ofthe
academic year had a negative effect
on student achievement." In other
words, the study suggests that a
prolonged period of time before the
actual examination period results
in a lower exam score.
Also, the financial burden upon
international students — flying
back to take the exam in late July
and the associated additional living
expenses — canbe enormous, especially in the city of Vancouver.
What if we could eliminate the
current issues?
An alternative UBC could implement is to add another regular
deferred exam period in early January for exams deferred in December,
and in early May for exams deferred
in April.
With last year's unusual snowfall
in December on the last day of final
exams, UBC made the executive
decision of moving the deferred
exams to the first week of January.
If it worked then, why not implement that option permanently?
Ideally, as di Pietro concluded,
"examination arrangements should
be tested for their impact on student performance before they are
introduced. Sadly, many changes in
higher education are driven not by
student learning considerations, but
by other reasons such as financial
and administrative convenience."
If you want to get more information, or even get involved in helping
us change UBC's policy, please email
us at manormanl2@hotmail.com.
In the meantime, please share your
thoughts with us and kindly fill out
this survey as we need your help
to make a change: https://www.sur-
veymonkey.eom/s/JHS2PQ2 til
Mirko Ball, Cheng Peng, Matthew
Norman, Prapon Wongsanga-
roonsri andAdrienne Moopenn are
second- and third-year students
who started a group project for
Robert Gateman's economics class
aspiring to improve conditions for
students that find themselves in the
unfortunate position of having to
defer an exam.
OODWEEK MEHWEEKlj^ BADWEEK^
Men's soccer: Back-to-back national championships.
Rob Ford: Yes to smoking crack — and
almost half of Toronto still behind him. Hilarity.
Pizza: AMS is keeping Pie R Squared.
BOOM! Pizza is finally dead.
Heroin: Federal health minister shut down
heroin prescriptions for chronic opiod addicts, but UBC's trial with the drug can go on.
Ice sculpture in the SUB: It melted
Quidditch: Just generally. Also, Ryerson lost
to the University of Ottawa 270-0. Wow.
AMS Council: Their flip-flop on Pie R Squared
was embarrassing for everyone involved.
Canadian University Press: Invited highly
partisan, allegedly racist "journalist" Ezra Levant
to speak at their national conference.
Kanye: Why won't you love us back? 10    I    OPINIONS    I    THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 14,2013
ILLUSTRATION JETHRO AU3THE UBYSSEY
Communal "stores" like the Freestore are neat ideas, but let's make sure the quality stays
good. Donate nice stuff!
LAST WORDS
CRITERIA BRINGS SOME
TRANSPARENCY TO
SPORTS REVIEW
Well, after much rumour-mon-
gering and stone-throwing, UBC's
sports targeting review criteria are
in, and they give a much clearer
picture of what lies ahead.
The review puts a lot of weight
on criteria many thought it would:
success, support and competition.
But this doesn't clear up what
will happen for some teams —
especially football, which suffers
both a poor 33-48 record over the
last 10 years (performance and
competition is worth 35 per cent)
and from an expensive program.
While backroom talk makes it
sound like the sport is safe, it
would have to score extremely
well in areas like community
support (20 per cent) and partnerships (10 per cent) to keep
up with sports like basketball
and swimming.
At the end of the day, the
university is reserving 20 per
cent ofthe criteria to its own
discretion, essentially. While it
specifies what that discretion
is — student success and "fit" — it
ultimately gives the committee a
lot of power which we hope they
use prudently.
FREESTORE RADICALS?
The UBC Freestore's problem with
attaining AMS club status exemplifies the archetypal issue that
faces subversive organizations: the
need to be recognized as legitimate, while simultaneously disavowing the institutions that grant
this legitimacy in the first place.
The AMS' policy for constituting new clubs is, in some respects,
arbitrary. In addition to requiring a club to create an executive
committee and charge fees to its
members, official clubs must also
Essentially, students
are supposed to team
up and create projects
related to economics
that have a real impact
in the world. Cool!
submit a plan of programming,
an operating budget and a list
of assets to the AMS — plus, at
least two thirds of their members
must be members ofthe AMS.
These restrictions hamper the
ability of groups like the Free-
store to achieve their goal: the
creation of a non-discriminatory,
on-campus community.
That said, there is a difference
between a club in the conventional sense and an AMS Club with a
capital C. The latter is eligible for
loans and grants from the AMS, as
well as other privileges such as a
mention in the annual guidebook.
It requires time and money to support a Club, which is presumably
why the AMS has the constitution
policy that it does.
The Freestore already operates under the purview ofthe
Resource Centre groups, which
are currently struggling to make
use of their AMS-allocated budget
— so while not having their own
space is inconvenient, the Free-
store is hardly without support.
Furthermore, there are other,
non-official clubs at UBC (such
as the Night Club of UBC, who
hosted the Resurrect the Pit event
at the beginning ofthe month)
who are still able to sustain
their own programming without
AMS support.
If the Freestore is all
about creating a model
for alternative value
systemrand lifestyles,
they might be better
offwithouttheAMS
anyway
And if the Freestore is all about
creating a model for alternative
value systems and lifestyles, they
might be better off without the
bureaucratic restrictions ofthe
AMS anyway, much like the unofficial Slacklining club.
GATEMAN!
Apparently, well-known economics professor Robert Gateman
likes to give his introduction to
economics students "real life" projects. We don't know the details,
but essentially, they are supposed
to team up and create projects related to economics that have a real
impact in the world. Cool! Look at
that modern classroom.
Problem is, last year it seemed
like the whole class decided to
make their hip project the elimination of student fees — you know,
the things that pay for the Sexual
Assault Support Centre, The
Ubyssey, the AMS and more.
Wow! Great idea, guys! No way
that could go wrong! Your month-
long economics project should
totally impact student services in
a massive way.
Jokes.
This year, though, people are
working on some neat projects.
You can check them out in
two op-eds and a news article
published in The Ubyssey, and
presumably by lurking around
outside Gateman's lectures. Have
fun... XI
PHOTO LOO BUHCI/FUCKR
Juan Camilo Serpa argues that the campus community shouldn't shy away from the night.
Poor sexual assault policing hurts
otherwise innocent pedestrians
JUAN CAMILO SERPA
Op-Ed
I am not sure how many of you are
aware of David Suzuki's 30x30
challenge, but here is how it works:
commit yourself to spend at least
30 minutes a day outside in nature
for 30 days. As a campus resident
constantly toiling away in front of
my computer screen, the fluorescent lights of my office bearing
down on me, I thought it would
change my life for the better.
And it has. Since I began, I
have enjoyed the hour each night
I spent walking around campus.
But lately, things have
changed. Over the last few
weeks, I have been approached
by campus security three times.
First, it was a flashlight pointing at my face, just outside of
my residence. I had no other
reaction but to go back into my
residence and postpone the walk.
The second encounter was at 9
p.m. on a weekday. This time, the
security guards approached me,
and asked a couple of questions:
"Are you a student?" "Where do
you live?"
The guards were very friendly, but the encounter was all
but soothing.
One night, things hit rock
bottom. I was sitting on a
bench beside Green College at
8:45 p.m., enjoying the peaceful atmosphere. Two guards
drove towards me and got off
their vehicle. They asked me to
provide identification and my
phone number. They were very
friendly and almost apologetic.
They reassured me I wasn't doing
anything wrong.
However, the sole fact that
I had to explain myself, and to
provide personal information,
was daunting.
I immediately came home,
looked at the sketch of the sexual
assault suspect and compared
myself to the man. We are not
very alike, but I do fit the criteria: 5-foot-8, light skin with
an olive tone, a beard and, yes,
a hoodie. I was very distressed,
especially because campus security has my phone number and a
few records about my voyages.
I decided to avoid walking on
campus at nights, at least for the
short term.
I am not a sexual assaulter,
and I wasn't doing anything
suspicious or inherently wrong.
Why should I be feeling guilty?
Yet through increased questioning, flashlights and gathering
of my personal information, law
enforcement is discouraging me
from taking advantage of our
magnificent campus.
I sympathize with the victims
of the recent wave of sexual
assaults. We do need increased
security. But we cannot intimidate pedestrians. If anything, we
want more pedestrians.
I am not a sexual
assaulter and I wasn't
doing anything
Auspicious or
inherently wrong.
Why should I be
feeling guilty? Yet
through increased
questioning, flashlights
and gathering of my
personal information,
law enforcement is
discouraging me from
taking advantage
of our magnificent
campus.
To see why, let us for a moment assume that there are two
types of people: the "good" ones
and the "bad" ones (that is, the
assaulters). When the good ones
go out at night to enjoy a walk
around campus, away from the
busy streets, they are providing
a public service for the campus
community. They are providing
an extra set of eyes, ready to report any suspicious activity and
ready to aid a potential victim.
Economic research supports
this claim. There is lots of evidence that the intensification
of pedestrian activity leads to a
reduction in crime rates. However, if campus security begins
questioning pedestrians simply
because they are walking on
campus at night, the guards will
be discouraging the provision of
this beneficial activity.
So, how to secure our campus? This is my approach. After
dinner, go and stand in front of a
mirror. Ask yourself, "Am I a sexual assaulter?" If the answer is
no, then you should go and enjoy
a walk around campus. If you feel
unsafe, invite a couple of friends.
Enjoy the quiet places and embrace these spaces. Human agglomeration will drive the "bad"
people away. In other words,
your walk will impose a good
externality on the community.
I understand these measures
are taken with the best of intentions. I am reminded, however,
of a story from my home country,
Colombia.
Seventeen years ago, the guerrilla groups began kidnapping
travellers on the inter-city highways. The initial reaction ofthe
authorities was to question the
travellers, to check their baggage
and to collect their information.
This was a terrible strategy — it
didn't solve the problem and
created unnecessary fear. People
felt guilty about travelling. So
how did we tackle this issue?
The population decided to travel
again. This time, however, intercity travel was done en masse, in
groups of 50 or 100 automobiles
at a time. It was impossible for
the guerrilla men to assault these
groups. The end result: intercity kidnapping was completely
eradicated from society.
Let us learn this lesson. Let
us approach the problem in the
same way. Let us congregate on
campus at night, when victims
are most susceptible. And if you
ever get questioned by campus
security, just blame it on David
Suzuki. XI
Juan Camilo Serpa is a commerce
graduate student at UBC.
Come visit ourtumblr
page at ubyssey.
tumblr.com to check
out oursweet graphics
andallof ourtumblr
notes. // Scene
PIC OF THE WEEK
PHOTOCARTERBRUNDAGE3THE UBYSSEY
Be it the serene view from Pender Island or your dorm room, make sure you make time for breaks in between your studies.
COMIC »
slip'n'trip
byTubey
1      17        .p» i^
pinion
rennet
tuloey toons, com
What I'm thinking about these days
30%
Homework, midterms
and exams.
30%
Avoiding homework, midterms
and exams.
30%
I'm hungry.
10%
WhyTimmy
never called me
back in Grade
5 after our
Slurpee date.
CATCULTY
ARTS
LLUSTRATIONLUELLASUN/THEUBYSSEY
Write
Shoot
Edit z
Code
Drin
COME BY THE UBYSSEY OFFICE
SUB 24, FOLLOW THE SIGNS
Engineering Graduate Studies
University of Toronto
Solving the world's
most important problems,
one stem cell at a time
Nika Shakiba wants to understand how to best put cells
in a time machine. As a biomedical engineering PhD
student, she is investigating the mechanism by which
the watch hands can be turned back in mouse cells.
Those Induced Pluripotent Stem (iPS) cells then have
all the ability of embryonic tissue to morph into any
cell a body needs. If Nika — a Vanier Canada Graduate
Scholarship recipient — gets a closer look at the
clockwork in iPS cells, it will mean less dependency
on embryonic stem cells, bringing us one step closer
to a self-healing world. Her future? Healthy.
Got something big to solve? Our Engineering
graduate programs can get you closer.
MEng: Customizable professional master's degree.
Involves coursework and optional research project.
Select from over a dozen specializations including
entrepreneurship and leadership, energy studies,
healthcare engineering and advanced water
technologies.
MHSc: Clinical engineering master's degree. Includes
coursework, internship and research thesis.
MASc: Traditional, research-intensive master's degree.
PhD: Highest degree in Engineering.
UNIVERSITY OF
TORONTO
Engineering
Visit gradstudies.engineering.utoronto.ca 12    |    GAMES    |    THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 14,2013
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15- Indian exercise method
16-Class
17-Sum
18-Soon
19- Away from the wind
20- Distinguishing feature
23-Witch
24-Encountered
25-Sawbuck
26- Latin word meaning "nothing"
27-Climbed
32-Not many words
35-Actor Davis
36-Carnival site
37-In spite of
41- "CarTalk" airer
42-High times?
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Halt in the growth of smal
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58- Othello villain
59- Picasso contemporary
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61-In of
62- Rhythm
63- Truman's Missouri birthplace
64-Shade trees
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66- Omit in pronunciation
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2-Hawaiian greeting
3-Label anew
4-Knot in wood
5-Italian sausage
6-Hilton competitor
7-Top-flight
8-Aviation pioneerSikorsky
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10- Island Ferry
II- Having the form of a cylinder
12-Crude cartel
13-Driving peg
21-Animation frame
22-Dutch painter Jan
26-At the present time
27-Orgs.
28-Grounded fleet
29-TheCompany
30- Mozart's" kleine Nacht-
musik"
31-Canines
32- Bed-and-breakfasts
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34-Scheme
35-Cries of discovery
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39-Foot digit
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47-Stinging plant
49-Like a smokestack
50-Me too
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53- Remove water from a boat
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56-Camaro model
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THE TRUTH
IS OUT THERE.
Write for news
news@ubysseY.ca
REZ Night @
UBC Bookstore
November 20,5pm - 7pm
EVERYONE WELCOME!
Great discounts- free food - tunes
EXPLORE YOUR CAREER OPTIONS
Discover the full-time and part-time
programs that will help you advance
your career.
Wednesday, November 20
5-8 pm
Burnaby Campus
3700 Willingdon Avenue
Get a head start. Explore online now.
bcit.ca/biginfo
It s your career.
Get it right.

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