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The Ubyssey Jan 28, 1986

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THE UBYSSEY
Vol. LXVIII, No. 33
Vancouver, B.C. Tuesday, January 28,1986
228-2301
Norman MacKenzie dies at 92
By DALBIR TIWANA
Norman Archibald MacRae
MacKenzie, UBC's president from
1944 to 1962, died Sunday at about
2:30 p.m. at the Health Sciences
Centre Hospital. He was 92.
Dr. MacKenzie became one of
Canada's foremost international
lawyers before the Second World
War. He continued to teach while
president at UBC, continuing a
tradition he set when president of
the University of New Brunswick
from 1940 to 1944.
"Everybody respected him as a
man and as an administrator,"
geography professor emeritus J.
Lewis Robinson, who was appointed by MacKenzie in 1946, said
Monday. "Anyone in the university
could know and talk to him."
Robinson remembers him as a
"wonderful human person" who
would wander around the university, in old clothes, talking to people.
"He knew everybody's name,"
said Robinson. "He remembered
your name; he remembered your
kids' names."
Dr. MacKenzie, the son of a
Presbyterian minister, was born
Jan. 5, 1894 in Pugwash, N.S.
Educated at Pictou Academy in
Pictou, N.S. from 1906 to 1909, he
went to study at Dalhousie and
Harvard universities, St. John's
College and Gray's Inn in London,
England.
He served in the Canadian Infantry during the First World War.
Wounded once, Sgt. MacKenzie
emerged as the only survivor of his
platoon. His bravery earned him
the Military Medal and Bar.
He served as an advisor to the International Labor Office in Geneva
from 1925 to 1927. He then taught
international and Canadian constitutional law at the University of
Toronto until 1940.
Dr. MacKenzie chaired the War
Information Board in Ottawa while
resident of the University of New
Brunswick. In 1944 he became administration president of UBC,
starting an 18-year-term which saw
significant growth, development
and recognition for the university.
UBC chancellor Robert Wyman
was a student at UBC during Dr.
MacKenzie's term. Wyman
remembers him as "an inspiring
figure to the students. . . (he made)
a great contribution to education
and to the community right across
Canada."
Dr. MacKenzie, though retired in
1962, remained active in the university's affairs. He was appointed to
the Canadian senate in 1960 by
Prime Minister Lester Pearson and
was enrolled as a Companion of the
Order of Canada in 1969.
He received many honors and
awards which included honorary
degrees from 22 universities around
the world.
Dr. MacKenzie was extremely
popular with students.
He is survived by his wife,
Margaret MacKenzie, son Patrick
and daughters Susan and Sheila.
He was "an outstanding person"
who will be "missed by the (Canadian) community and by the university itself," said Wyman.
A memorial set vice for Norman
MacKenzie will be held in the armouries at 2:30 p.m. on Fri., Jan.
31. Friends are invited for
refreshments in the auditorium of
the Asian Centre following the
ceremony.
Scholarships tax
UBC aid office
WHO COOKIED UP this chipper little poll, cries man doctoring poll results. If any candidates are in the general
oreo, I hope they aren't jarred by the numbers, opines yuppy on right. But the candidates with lots of dough
don't want all their eggs in one biscuit so they stay well away. Pretty crummy puns, smarty pants.
Inquiry puts abortion law on trial
By DEBBIE LO
When Janet was a student at the
University of Toronto in 1968, whe
became pregnant despite her use of
contraceptives.
She paid $300 — a full month's
rent — to get an abortion.
Janet felt no pain until she arrived home. And for the next week,
although the pain was so intense she
felt like "dying," she could not
seek medical attention for fear of
arrest.
Testimonials like Janet's were
told Saturday at a Speak Out for
Choice tribunal which put the
Canadian abortion laws on trial.
About 350 people, mainly women
listened quietly and attentively to
two hours of testimonials at St. Andrews Wesley United Church.
The women said they used coat
hangers, knitting needles, ball point
pens and silver pills to perform procedures on themselves because they
were unable to get safe, affordable
and legal abortions.
Theresa Kiefer, a spokesperson
for Concerned Citizens for Choice
on Abortions, said the tribunal idea
was selected to illustrate the trial
women go through when seeking
abortions. A jury of six community
members including former member
of parliament Grace Maclnnes,
United church minister, Ken
Wetherspoon and B.C. Federation
of Labor president Art Kube presided over the public trial, the first in a
series to be held across Canada.
Elenor, a woman who had two
abortions despite using contraception, said: "Women should control
reproduction, not only limit it."
She said each time she became
pregnant her partner deserted her.
When she went to have an abortion
her physician lectured her on her
morals and said the painful operation she endured and the discomfort
she felt after did no compare to his
three-day ordeal operating on her.
Many women said their doctors
delayed referrals to hospital boards.
Abortions are usually performed
only up to the twelth week of
pregnancy and medical evidence
suggests that with each additional
week the danger of surgical complications increase.
"It was pathetic," said Right to
Life president Betty Green.
See page 2: WOMEN
By NANCY CAMPBELL
Smart UBC students got a
Christmas present worth up to $600
from the Social Credit government
in December but students at Simon
Fraser University will have to wait
until the end of February for theirs.
The "present" is the little-known
Post-Secondary Scholarship
voucher. The confusing award, announced in August but (surprisingly) poorly publicized since then, has
been a bureaucratic nightmare for
the student financial aid offices at
both universities.
"We're beseiged by questions,"
Byron Hender, UBC awards and
financial aid director, said Monday.
"The registrar's office is
swamped."
Hender estimates UBC students
will claim about $1.4 million from
the government. His figures are
based on the following criteria:
• a full-time equivalency pool of
18,000 students
• the top 10 per cent of students
receiving $600 each for a full
academic year's study
• the next 20 per cent of students
receiving $300 each
• 80 per cent of the students
receiving vouchers using them with
the  rest   being  graduates  or v not
A. Parity leads cookie poll
Duke's cookies is doing its part to ensure the AMS
executive elections are held in good taste.
Duke's is holding a cookie poll at its SUB concourse location this week. They are hoping to increase voter turnout to the AMS elections from six
per cent last year to nine per cent this year as well as
sell cookies.
The poll features a blackboard displayed at
Duke's. Students can cast a vote for the candidate of
their choice every time they buy a cookie, with the
results updated every hour.
"The candidates originally wanted to be different
cookies," said Mathew Cololugh of Duke's. "But
everyone wanted to be chocolate chunk, no one
wanted oatmeal."
When some of the candidates came by, they were
jockeying for the best placement on the board and
each wanted their name displayed most prominently—perhaps with a bit of colored chalk or
having it written "just so".
They   were   also   concerned   that   the   cookies
representing them be the best. No undersized ones
would do.
One of the candidates was heard to remark that his
opponent had beat him to "the cookie bookie" and
bought himself a lead in the poll. But any evidence to
back this allegation was consumed.
A popular candidate in Duke's poll is A. Pathy. At
last check, Pathy was well ahead in the presidential
race with 37 votes. The closest candidate had 24 and
the lowest 11. Said Paul Nelles, history 3: "I think A.
Pathy says it all."
Said Kim Austin, nursing 4: "I've never voted in
the AMS elections. Basically I'm not familiar with
what's going on." She said that she would probably
not vote in the election.
Duke's said there has not been an increase in
business due to the cookie poll. At peak hours, handing out the forms takes time away from business.
Duke's will have their board up all week long.
If A. Pathy wins . . . well, that's how the cookie
crumbles.
returning to school.
But the figures used by UBC are
not easily transferable to other institutions as the value of the
voucher, which is not explicitly
stated on the form, depends on the
See page 8: AWARD
UBC students
can vote now
More students will be able to vote
in Thursday's Vancouver School
Board elections following a B.C.
provincial court decision Friday
relaxing voter eligibility restrictions.
To vote, tenants now must be 19
years old and a Canadian, British,
or other Commonwealth citizen by
Jan. 30 1986 and they must have
been resident in Vancouver since
Jan. 1, 1986.
The old rules said anyone not 19
years or older on Nov. 17, 1984, or
not on the current property owners
list would be ineligible to vote.
If voters fulfill the new requirements, but aren't on the voters
list, they can sign an affidavit
before voting.
"Most 19 to 21 year olds are
renters, not owners of properties,
therefore, before the court decision
the vast majority of students were
effectively disenfranchised," Duncan Stewart, AMS External affairs
coordinator, said Monday.
With the successful challenge, the
new criteria for eligibility will allow
many students to vote in the upcoming school board elections," he
said, adding students in residence or
on the university endowment lands
are still not eligible to vote.
Derek Creighton, a lawyer for the
city of Vancouver who worked on
the case, said the decision saves the
city and the province from the
possibility someone would have the
election declared invalid. That
would have meant a new trustee
with powers to levy taxes would
have been appointed.
He called the verdict a "victory
for democracy."
"It certainly helps young people,
especially tenants," he said. Page 2
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, January 28, 1986
Women call for abortion rights
From page 1
She said the women who
testified, although believable,
behaved like children when they obtained abortions, adding the women
should have concentrated on finding help instead.
"If they had any capability, or
any real friends, why didn't they
ask their friends to help them?
The women said the federal
government has a responsibility to
repeal section 251 of the Criminal
Code, which makes abortion illegal.
They said that even today there is
no perfect birth control method.
"It is the responsibility of society
to provide services and resources
necessary so women can have the
freedom of choice," said Kube.
Marguerite, an 80-year-old
grandmother who has had seven
abortions, the last one 30 years ago,
said abortion is "not that terrible if
it is done properly."
She said she was lucky to have a
doctor nearby who was sympathetic
and willing to perform abortions
for her when she faced unwanted
pregnancies. Her doctor later had
his license revoked, she said.
Green said the women giving the
testimonies seemed to have no concern about the rights of the children
they had conceived.
Said Marguerite: "Just because
you are against something doesn't
give you the right to decide for
everybody else."
CCCA spokesperson Kiefer said
the national campaign organized by
a subdivision of the national advisory council is distributing letter
forms which demand that current
anti-abortion laws be repealed. Letter forms have been made available
to UBC students through the
women students office so they can
also participate.
Capilano college instructor and
Lion's Gate hospital abortion
board chair Hilary Clark, who
testified, said she supplies information on abortion to two or three of
her students who come to ask advice each year.
Clark said students have to
become more active in the right-to-
choice campaign because many of
the women currently fighting are no
longer of child-bearing age.
Pat   Davitt,  a member  of the
women's collective which started at
Simon Fraser university in 1968,
said the collective then operated a
campus underground abortion
referral network. She said they
would receive four to six requests a
month for abortion information.
"It was very stressful," she said,
adding there were only two places
to refer people. Both doctors charged exhorbitantly high prices of $500
to $1500 for an abortion.
CCCA formed in 1978 says currently 80 per cent of all Canadians
are pro-choice. The group's
demands include repealing all anti-
abortion laws and legalizing free
standing abortion clinics. The Alma
Mater Society and the graduate student society both endorse the aims
of the CCCA.
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Home-made dinner
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Presents
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Series by Rabbi Mordechai
Feuerstein
THE GET:
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APPROACH TO
DIVORCE
WEDNESDAY
29 JANUARY    12:30
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Wednesday 5 February
Israel Diaspora Dialogue with Ami
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p.m. 1053 Douglas Cresent
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AFTER THE B.A
A Forum
An opportunity for Arts Undergraduates to meet
with notable graduates of programmes in which
they are now enrolled.
Keynote Speaker:
Dr. David Strangeway, Ph.D.
President, UBC
Panelists:
Mr. Donald Hudson, BA '52
President, Vancouver Stock Exchange
Ms. Diana Millen, BA '70
D. Millen & Assoc. Ltd.
Mr. Murray Budd, BA '61
Vice Pres., Merrill Lynch Canada Inc.
Mr. Ray Williston, BA '40
Chairman & Pres., B.C. Cellulose
Thursday, January 30th
5:00 p.m.
Cecil Green Park
6251 Cecil Green Park Rd., UBC
Sponsored by: Arts Undergraduate Society
Faculty of Arts
UBC Alumni Association
FOR VERY BEST
SANDWICHES
with Daily Specials
Also
Fresh Pastries
Sausage Rolls
Samosas
Chicken Pies
IN SUB LOWER LEVEL
Open daily 7:30 a.m. - 6:00 p.m.
JOIN
THE UBYSSEY
ROOfTI 241K
d'f,{
Service*
(sur#viss)n. 1. work done for others
2. helpful or useful action 3. benefit,
advantage 4. friendly help 5. Kinko's
kinko's
5706 University Blvd.       222-1688
M-Th 8-9 F 8-6 Sat 10-6 Sun 11-6
DUTHIE
BOOKS
ANNUAL
S? SALE m
JAN. 30,31, FEB. 1,2
20% OFF ALL STOCK
AND
SELECTED SPECIALS
• Selected bestsellers and 1985 hardcovers: 30% off
• Slightly less than fresh: Art, Photography, and
Architecture books: 30-70% off
• Penguin hurts: 50% off
• Remainders: also 20% off
The Mammoth Hunters: Reg. $25.95/Sale: $17.50
China's Food: Reg. $55.00/Sale: $35.00
The World of Robert Bateman:
Reg. $50.00/Sale: $35.00
4444 W. 10th Avenue — 919 Robson Street
Manhattan Books & Magazines — Arbutus Village Square
1089 Robson Street
Sunday Feb. 2 at W. 10th Ave. and
both Robson St. locations only
12 p.m.-5 p.m.
NOTE: Special orders, reservations, and magazines
at regular prices Tuesday, January 28, 1986
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 3
York cuts South Africa investments
TORONTO (CUP) — York
University has become the second
university in Canada to withdraw,
all investment funds from companies with holdings in South
Africa.
York's All University Pension
Committee, consisting of campus
unions,   management   and   ad
ministration representatives voted
to withdraw, within one year, the
estimated $8 to $9 million it has invested with companies dealing with
South Africa.
Almost all York money linked to
South Africa was contained in a
$180 million pension fund. Investments since 1984 include Alcan,
Cominco, Chase Manhattan,
De Beers, Consolidated Mines,
Falconbridge, Hudson's Bay Mining and Smelting, IBM, Seagram's
and Xerox — all linked to South
Africa.
York followed McGill in
withdrawing investments to protest
against apartheid policies of South
Africa. The University of Toronto
decided in December, 1985 to divest
only from Canadian and U.S. companies that failed to adhere to the
federal government's code of conduct for operating in South Africa.
The York decision was made during a 45-minute closed discussion
and must be approved by the pension fund board of trustees said a
member of the pension committee,
faculty rep Robert Drummond:
"My suspicion is that they'll probably go along with it."
The vote count is secret but
Drummond said a "large majority"
of the six or seven members present
voted in favour of divestment.
Dissenters claimed divestment is not
the most effective way of pressuring
the South African government to
change its racist policies, he said.
The motion was brought to the
committee by The York University
Divestment Committee, a nine
month-old group of students, faculty and staff.
YUDC chair Dave Himbara lauded the pension committee's decision
and how it was made.
"This has been the friendliest and
smoothest divestment mounted
anywhere to my knowledge," Himbara said.
Pressure stresses students
_ Steve engler photo
WICKED WEEDEATER just got carried away, severing pissed-off physical
plant person's patella and neighbouring limbs. "Now I'll just have to crawl
around and eat those damned leaves," growled malevolent midget. Meanwhile, small chuckles were heard from falling leaves, now free to rot in
peace.
By KAREN GRAM
Canadian University Press
Overcrowded classrooms and entry quotas cause intense anxiety
among students, and when compounded with financial stress often
lead to breakdowns, said a UBC
counsellor.
Margaretha Hoek, assistant
director of Women's Students Office at UBC, said more students are
seeking counselling because of the
fierce competition involved in
entering a faculty and maintaining
good grades.
"Being on campus is much more
competitive than it used to be,"
said Hoek.
Once students have been accepted, the pressure to achieve is
compounded by financial worries
such as unemployment.
"The safety net of work isn't
there anymore. The job market is so
tight people are realising they can't
just glide through.to a job."
Hoek   said   she   has   noticed   a
ALRT  doesn't  help   students
By KAREN GRAM
Vancouver Bureau Chief
Canadian University Press
Vancouver's new rapid transit
system is a shining example of how
the government neglects students,
the Canadian Federation of
Students (Pacific) chair charged
Monday.
"ALRT is very limited in the way
it serves students," said Terry
Hunt. "If the government had done
more thorough planning instead of
choosing what was the greatest
mega project, it could have served a
lot more people.
The Advanced Rapid Transit
system, dubbed Skytrain by the
provincial government, goes
nowhere near either Vancouver
university despite the fact students
represent a large portion of public
transit users.
Nearly 25,000 students travel to
and from the University of B.C.
each day and 10,000 attend Simon
Fraser University.
Yet those students must endure
inadequate bus service while others
speed to their destination in no
time.
Brian Sentance, a third year computing science major at SFU, said
he must take three buses to get to
school each day. It usually takes an
hour and he said he has learned to
expect poor connections.
"You have to be prepared to
sprint for the SFU bus in the mornings," said Sentance. If he misses it,
a half hour wait is required for the
next bus. Sentance said evening
connections are even worse.
"The connecting bus always
takes off just as we're pulling in at
night."
Sentance said the Skytrain is not
feasible for him. "The Skytrain is
Dalhousie starts food bank
HALIFAX (CUP)—Dalhousie
student council is organising a food
bank to feed students who don't
have enough money to feed
themselves.
"We've already received some
distress calls since we announced
the food bank would be starting,"
said Reza Rizvi, Dalhousie student
council vice-president. "This
should show those people who say it
isn't needed that they are wrong."
The council gave out meal tickets
to three students who came to the
offices looking for food last week.
Many students are broke because
the Nova Scotia student aid department still has not processed all the
loan applications, Rizvi said. The
student aid department computerized this year and is several months
behind.
"The student I saw today just
found out he didn't set his loan but
at   this   point   he   said   he   cared
enough about his education to go
without food in order to pay for tuition," said Rizvi.
The Science Undergraduate
Society at UBC ran a food bank for
all students in SUB concourse last
week.
Meanwhile at Simon Fraser
University, a food bank, organized
by two Catholic campus groups,
has been operating since December
1984. The two groups placed boxes
for tinned food in all campus retail
food outlets and put money tins in
the pubs and restaurants.
Terry Fowler, a member of the
student society, said money collected from the tins is used to fill in
gaps in food donations. "We have a
special problem getting protein —
we get spaghetti but not spaghetti
sauce," she said.
Fowler said students needing
food have included married
students with families, single
parents and international students.
not dependable right now. If it's
delayed, I have to wait a full hour
because the SFU bus from that station only runs once per hour."
Even if he did connect properly,
he wouldn't save much time, and
would still have to transfer twice,
Sentance   added.   "It's   just   not
worth it".
Ruby Legaspi, a second year
linguistics major at SFU, lives just
two blocks from the Skytrain terminal but finds it too inconvenient
to use because of the poor connections with the SFU bus.
"The Skytrain appears to be
single-minded towards Expo," she
said.
UBC student Mike Blackstock
(applied science 1) spends two hours
a day in transit from his North Vancouver home. He said the Skytrain
is not much use to him.
"I'd like to see it go at least to the
North Shore but that doesn't look
possible. It's a waste of money as
far as I'm concerned."
UBC nursing student Donna Lee
spends 45 minutes travelling to and
from the university. She said she
doesn't think the Skytrain is a waste
of money, "but it's not useful for
everyone."
But B.C. Transit has no intention
of putting a rapid transit line to the
universities because of the high cost
involved and the lack of a right-of-
way.
"The economics of it are just
horrific," said Vanco'uver Mayor
Mike Harcourt who, along with all
the municipal mayors, sits on B.C.
Transit's board of directors.
"We have no plans whatsoever to
put in lines to the universities," said
Harcourt.
Burnaby Mayor Bill Lewarne
said he thought the interconnecting
buses served students very well.
Phase one of the Skytrain cost
$854 million to complete. Vancouver residents pay for it through
a transit levy on gas and sales taxes.
Riders pay $1 per trip.
significant increase in stress related
problems among her clients in the
past 18 months. She attributes that
to cutbacks in financial aid and
university funding, and unemployment.
A report on stress recently released by UBC Students for a
Democratic University pinpoints
the problems.
Students with financial problems
are forced to take on heavier course
loads so they can finish earlier thus
reducing their costs, the report
states. Unfortunately, excessive
course loads add to the stress and
increase chances for failure.
Statistics from the Student
Counselling and Resources Centre
show only half of first year students
can maintain a full load and pass all
their courses.
Furthermore, large classes and
fewer tutorials mean students can't
get the individual support or encouragement they need.
Dorothy Goresky, a physician at
Student Health Services, said the
university system no longer encourages collective learning and
overworked faculty simply allow
isolated students to sink or swim.
"Instead of being an atmosphere
where students can relax and learn
their stuff, they are forced into a
competitive atmosphere not conducive to studying," said Goresky.
The stress that competition
causes often translates into physical
disorders such as chest pains,
headaches, shortness of breath, abdominal pains, diarrhea, and
backaches, Goresky added.
Dr. Robert Hewko, of the UBC
Psychiatric Unit, said students he
sees for stress complain of memory
and concentration impairment and
deteriorating grades. They
displayed such symtoms as insomnia, lack of appetite, and frequent
suicidal thoughts — common
depression indicators.
Hewko said he sees far more
emotionally distressed students
around Christmas and year end. He
never sees students who are doing
well academically.
"Problems begin when (students)
hit exam periods and discover to
their horror that they can't put it
together anymore. The hardest hit
are those whose self esteem is based
on their academic performances
and have few outside interests."
Hewko recommends students
reduce their course load, go out,
and do some free reading. He said
the more isolated students become
the harder it is to cope.
The Students for a Democratic
Unviersity say the university can
reduce student stress by limiting
class sizes and offer more workshop
and seminar style courses with more
discussion and student involvement.
"The university administration
must understand that classes
shouldn't be larger than 60 students
and they should have associated
tutorials and seminars. These aren't
frills that should be the first to go
when government funding declines:
they are basic requirements for learning which should be maintained at
all costs."
Kaplan raps de Havilland
sale to American company
For the price of one of its Seattle-
built aircraft, Boeing is buying the
de Havilland Aircraft Company
from the Mulroney government,
Robert Kaplan said Monday.
Kaplan, solicitor-general in the
Trudeau government, now Liberal
justice critic, told a crowd of 30 de
Havilland should be sold responsibly to the private sector.
"It's easy to privatize a company
if you don't care what the terms
are," he said. "We never thought
of giving the company away."
Kaplan defended the Liberal
government's investment in the
aerospace industry.
"A country our size can't do
everything living beside a country
that can. Our only hope is to be
selective. We chose the aerospace
sector. I don't think it was a false
start for us," Kaplan said.
Because Canada has the second-
largest air fleet in the world, the
Trudeau government thought it
reasonable to invest in the Canadian aircraft industry, said Kaplan.
Selling de Havilland to non-
Canadian interests — instead of offering shares in it to the Canadian
public through the stock market —
is wrong because the government
had already made its investment in
the aircraft company, he said. "The
company was profitable every year
except during the recession."
"The de Havilland Aircraft
Company will be sold on Friday,"
Kaplan said after his question-and-
answer session with students.
Kaplan represents York Centre in
Ontario, where the de Havilland
plant is located.
"I'm not going to be happy if de
Havilland goes bankrupt and
everybody loses their jobs," Kaplan
said. "My riding executive is made
up of people from that plant; so I'm
committed to its success no matter
what."
The speech was sponsored by the
UBC Liberal club.
KAPLAN . . .fears flying Page 4
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, January 28, 1986
N.A.M.
Dr. Norman Archibald MacRae MacKenzie led the University of
British Columbia through the dramatic change and growth of the
post-war years, helping to shape the university we know — an institution of world-class standing.
Few of his calibre remain today to help guide us.
Statesman, soldier, academic, diplomat, lawyer, administrator
— he was all of these and more. In covering the story. The Ubyssey
found he was above all a warm, caring human being remembered
with deep affection by the people whose lives he affected.
He was noted for his unassuming wardrobe and uncanny skill of
remembering the name of everyone he met. Despite his attire, he
was once voted Canada's best dressed man in educational circles,
an honor which gave him much amusement but no new clothes.
MacKenzie's ideals, expressed 40 years ago, seem very current.
He felt university went beyond learning for profit. He said power,
opportunity and wealth could indeed be based on a university
education but those goals are not enough.
MacKenzie often urged graduating students to start their careers
with several years work in developing countries.
We were unable to print a photograph of Dr. MacKenzie in this
issue but if we had you would see a warm hearted, intelligent man
who cared about people.
We regret the passing of such a good person and offer our condolences to his friends and loved ones.
AMS elections: Be still my foolish heart
ww-
■d\
' ;,\ .V v ■ i s <;
In an affluent world, success is not working
Many students, after years of
dedicated studies, are consumed
with despair when they find their
career ambitions dashed in today's
insane job market. Young people,
eager to work and finding no meaningful work, feel rejected, hurt,
bewildered, depressed, rebellious
and ultimately listjess and self-
destructive.
What is the best attitude to take
toward work? "Work" is usually
understood as people's efforts to
produce goods or services for the
exchange economy in return for
various benefits. The benefits work
can provide are a livelihood, comforts, prestige, power, diversion,
social contacts, self-esteem and for
some, self-realization.
Your work ties you to society,
you are told. Society expects you to
fit in and contribute your share.
Take whatever paying job comes
along and do not question it. It is
there to satisfy a demand. Hang on
to your job, because you may not
find a better one. Work hard. Work
fast. Work long hours. Take full
credit for being a productive
member of society. Only by increasing productivity can we keep up
with the Japanese, only by keeping
up with the Japanese can we capture world markets, only by capturing world markets can we afford a
good life. Be ambitious and aggressive. Success in life depends on
a successful career. It's up to you to
leave your mark or end up
unemployed, a useless parasite.
The value of your work is
measured by what you are paid.
Therefore, learn a skill, a
marketable skill. Get into business
administration, get your hands on
the computer. Fill your mind with
hard data. The future belongs to
technology. Technology may
eliminate jobs, but it also creates
jobs for those who know how to
work with technology. Don't worry
about the unemployed, your work
has nothing to do with other people's lack of work. If the
unemployed cause trouble, that just
creates jobs for prison guards,
lawyers and social workers. Social
problems, environmental problems,
all problems can be solved by fantastic new materials coming out of
chemistry labs.
These promptings of popular
wisdom are powerful, and there exist strong social pressures and incentives to get us to work. Still,
some people listen to a different
drummer. They think that, as long
as their getting work means that someone else has no work, they do
not want it. Success means, to
them, to have done a lot of joyous
living rather than climbing a corporate career ladder and amassing
stockpiles of stuff. They do not
want to leave their mark upon the
already pockmarked face of this
earth. They do not want jobs in industry and care little for most products of industry. Nothing new that
industry is likely to produce can
compensate them for the loss of one
more lake, one more forest, one
more   wildlife   species,   or   open
Expo: a credit to social priorities
Get your party hats out folks, Expo 86 is right around the corner.
For five months we are going to indulge ourselves, and try to forget
about all the problems facing this
province. We will forget about the
direct correlation between cuts to
social programs and the financing
of Expo. If you're like like me you
won't have any trouble forgetting
about the plight of the single
mother or that of the homeless
mental patients that walk our
downtown streets at night. Without
sounding too snobby, I hope they
can keep such people away from the
fair. Not only do they project the
wrong image, but I think I speak
for most of us when I say "they just
don't belong."
I have heard people complaining
about the timing of Expo. These
people say that for three years the
Socreds have systematically and
perniciously ravaged the needy of
this province, all the while secure in
the knowledge that the complacent
B.C.   voters   would   not   hold   it
THE UBYSSEY \
January 28, 1986
The Ubyssey is published Tuesday and Friday throughout
the academic year by the Alma Mater Society of the University of British Columbia. Editorial opinions are those of the staff
and are not necessarily those of the administration or the
AMS. Member Canadian University Press. The Ubyssey's
editorial office is SUB 241k. Editorial department,
228-2301/2306. Advertising 228-3977/3978.
The doore came up with a crash. Stephen Wisenthal hit the brakes and Lise Magee secured the
chains. Dan Andrews gazed down anxiously as the bobbins screeched up the ramp. Then Camile
Dione, Svetozar Kontic and Steve Woo were al! over it with hooks and straps. Dalbir Tiwana winched
it up the gNson for Karen Gram to hit the knot while Jeffrey Kibble slid back the hatch Most of it fell into the pounds, but Wendy Morrison had to kick a few down. Joel Silverman tied up and Ian Robertson,
checked the heads and foots. S«eve Neufeld took two turns and Colin Jerome flicked the hook. At two
hundred Nancy Campbell set the strain and David Ferman slacked the throttle. Kenneth Sallitt engaged
the plotter and spired glumly at the fischlupe. Bob Freeman warmed his hands on the heat exchanger.
"Bunko?" suggested Debbie Lo. All hands glared, started sharpening up and thought coffee.
against them come election time.
Some say that Expo is a patented
election gimmick, like BRIC shares,
designed to ameliorate the hostile
electorate just in time for the next
election. Leave it to a small group
of radical, misinformed
malcontents to invent such a story.
You'd think the Social Credit had
some sort of hidden agenda or
something, huh. Why do people get
so defensive when they hear that
Expo is going to lose 300 million
dollars? Anyone knows you can't
throw a decent party these days for
under 200 million, and expect the
right people to show up. Yes, it is a
lot of money, but nothing is cheap
anymore.
I am happy and thankful that the
Social Credit are a party of
substance and not image. Why
simply give money to people when
you can construct buildings, bridges
and highways? These are the kinds
of concrete things we can point to
with pride, and say "that's what my
government did for me". Expo 86
will stand as an eternal monument
to those thoughful and inspired individuals who had enough sense to
realize that in 1986 what we needed
most was a party.
Dean Meyerhoff
5 unclass.
space, unpoisoned air and peac and
quiet. They, too, want a good life.
But instead of producing and consuming superfluities, they choose a
life of creative leisure. And why
not? Why not let those who value
the beauty of nature, friendships,
art and contemplation live for these
things? Is the belief, in the face of
overproduction and unemployment, that hard work has merit not
exactly like believing, in the face of
overpopulation, that having lots of
babies has merit? Have we forgotten the original promise of
technology, and its excuse for inflicting on us pollution, ugliness
and monotony, that it would largely
relieve us of the need to work?
Have we not learned that products
of technology usually have harmful
side effects? Are not some of the
greatest stupidities in the world today justified in the name of job
creation? Are most hardworking
people not fools who miss out on
many joys of leisure, and also
thieves who steal other people's
work?
The time is ripe to ask, not simply
"How can we get jobs?" but "Do
we want jobs at all?" Why work if
three percent of Canada's labor
force feed all of us and produce a
huge surplus, and another twenty
percent can easily provide enough
goods and services for everyone's
creature comforts?
I think the greatest need in our
society today is not to create work,
but to provide a guaranteed
minimum income for all those who
want to opt out of the labor force
and live a sane and frugal life of
creative leisure. A great number of
jobs in our society today are not
really worth doing, and many will
soon be done better by machines.
"Work" as the touchstone of a person's social worth needs to be
replaced by the wider concept of someone's social role - the multitude
of value-enhancing ways a human
life can interweave with other lives
and contribute to a richer social
fabric.
Jurt Preinsperg
philosophy
Now hear this:
end the shame
When as much fuel has been added to the fire as has been lately in
the case of the Lady Godiva ride, it
is a risky business to make a move
that does not set off an explosion.
Enough has been said, both rational and irrational, on either side
of this debate to lay out all the pros
and cons. The problem is that that
is neither here nor there when words
fall on deaf ears. It takes something
more to bring about an understanding or a willingness to bend.
With this in mind, I add my voice
to those of many others to ask once
more that an end be put tri this
event which causes such offense.
June Lythgoe
director:
office for women students
Arts faculty urged
to back Sikh chair
I would like to congratulate the
editors of The Ubyssey for printing
the article, "Indian Lobby
Threatens Chair", (Ubyssey, Jan.
21). Until now, the UBC student
body has been relatively unaware of
this issue.
The attempt by the Indian
government to stop any promotion
of Sikh ideals is deplorable as is the
Canadian government's apparent
willingness to go along. However,
the burden of trying to convince Ottawa that Canadian citizens should
come before the Indian government
should not  be  left  to the Sikhs
alone. Everyone will benefit from
the establishment of a chair of Sikh
Studies. Such a chair will help non-
Sikhs develop a better understanding of the Sikh way of life. This is
especially important in Vancouver,
which has Canada's largest Sikh
population. Therefore, I strongly
urge those in the arts faculty,
especially the dean, to take a more
active role to stop the inevitable
demise of the Sikh studies chair at
UBC.
Lakhbir Singh
science2 Tuesday, January 28,1986
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 5
Pay tribute to women 9s work, not their bodies
It hardly seems necessary to add
yet another comment to the already
considerable polemic surrounding
the Lady Godiva ride. However, the
number of letters published in the
recent editions of The Ubyssey, the
Black Plague and the engineering
NEUS letter demand repudiation.
Unfortunately, much of the
debate regarding the ride has been
limited to the exchange of epithets
and has either ignored the central
issues or dealt with them in a
particularly facile manner.
I would like to begin by dispelling
some favoured illusions. Opposition to the Godiva ride is not
limited to a small, extremist group
of fanatics. It has been expressed by
a broad spectrum of groups and individuals both within and without
the engineering faculty. And it has
been expressed by both men and
women alike.
The ride may indeed be part of
the engineering tradition. It may be
a source of pride and comaraderie
Let Lord, Lady
ride together
tall, naked, proud
I would like to suggest to the
engineering students that if the
genuine purpose of the Lady
Godiva ride is to promote a spirit of
camaraderie and a sense of pride in
their faculty, then their purpose
would be far better served by choosing a Godiva from the EUS.
Perhaps one of the women
engineering students who so strongly support the ride would wish to
volunteer.
Or, better yet, in the interests of
equality, how about a Lord and
Lady Godiva ride? Then both a
male and a female engineering student could enthusiastically represent their faculty in this annual
event, riding tall, and naked, in the
saddle — all the while feeling proud
to do so.
Jeanne Ensminger
plant science 3
amongst some engineering students.
It is not, however, faithful to the
tradition of Lady Godiva, a tradition of social protest against inequity and social injustice.
Nor is it, in any way, a tribute to
women and their achievements, as
the authors of the 'Godivacide'
(The Ubyssey, Jan. 21) letter have
argued. If the engineers who favor
the Godiva ride were truly interested in honoring women, they
would select an individual who has,
in the course of her life and work,
made a substantial contribution to
society and pay tribute to that work
— not to her body. I would be more
than happy to offer a list of can
didates and of speakers who would
address the matter.
With respect to the perverse notion that opponents to the ride have
identified it as the source of all that
is evil, one can only say that such an
idea is utterly preposterous.
To my knowledge, not one person has suggested that an end to the
(IIIIVA:
JUST
GEERS
HAVING FUN
OR SOMETHING
MORE SINISTER?
Beefcake mocks sexuality
In response to the letters from
Douglas Dang and James Pfaus
(Ubyssey, Jan. 17) on how there is
no comment about the "leering and
laughing" at male "beefcake"
strippers during ladies night at The
Pit, I for one find it offensive that
this goes on, as I find the so-called
Godiva ride offensive.
At the public meeting on stopping the ride, one of the speakers
pointed out how difficult it is to
describe sexism to someone who
hasn't experienced it or thought
about it much. It may be even more
difficult to define how similar
phenomena might adversely affect
men, especially as men do not suffer in the same way from
discrimination or violence because
of their sex. However, I feel that
most men have probably suffered at
some time or other because they
didn't quite conform to the current
male stereotype.
My opposition to strip shows
does not stem from any religious or
conservative belief that public nudity or Sexual amusement are wrong.
In other words, I'm no prude. But I
think that such events make a
mockery of people's sexuality,
something that is very important to
many of us. These issues are not
trivial: either men or women learn
to respect each other or the conflict
over sexism continues. I urge
students and others to seriously
consider whether they want to be a
part of such degrading spectacles.
Gus Bell
graduate studies
CASC offers coffee
It appears, from letters that have
appeared in The Ubssey (including
the one from 16 women engineers
Jem. 21), that there are some
misconceptions about the CASC
campaign against the Lady Godiva
Ride/Peeping Tom Parade.
Yes, we think the event is sexist.
No, we don't think that all
engineers are sexist, nor do we think
that sexism is confined to the
engineering faculty.
Provoke laughter, not anger, pain
On the evening of January 16 I
attended the public meeting for
those who oppose the parading of
"Lady Godiva". I attended with a
great vested interest, as a woman. I
almost hesitate to add my letter to
the host of others published in The
Ubyssey. It seems to me that all the
publicity amounts to little more
than foreplay for 'the big event',
and feeds into the engineers' appetite for attention and power.
However I will join the chorus.
The recurrent argument of those
in favor of the ride appears to be
based on freedom of expression.
Well let's slip into reality for a
minute. Freedom is relative and
total freedom is anarchy. Many of
us, gladly or not, relinquish
freedoms so that we may all live a
better life — for the collective good.
We no longer have the freedom to
drink and drive and consequently
butcher innocents on the road. We
pay taxes to provide for others less
fortunate. We are in fact our
brother's keepers. We can no longer
go on believing that we exist in
isolation of each other.
For the last six years of my stay at
UBC. I have witnessed this debate
over Godiva and have seen and
shared the anger and sadness of
women. It saddens me beyond
belief that the men of engineering
cannot recognize the pain they inflict and bring it to an end. The
debate should have ended long ago,
but then attention is a reward too
tempting to torego, even at the ex
pense of others. This precious
media event sustains the engineering reputation that not only will
boys be boys but that they are also a
force to contend with. Power. The
threat of reprisals and violence
serves to keep us in our place. I feel
equally repulsed by the UBC administration whose empty words of
disapproval and lack of any real action permits the continuing prostitution of not only my sex but my
campus. It is doubtful that the Lady
Godiva ride would have ever been
permitted to reach the status of a
tradition outside the pearly gates of
UBC. I just urge those involved
and those in support to reevaluate
your actions and reasoning.
Engineers, why not try to succeed in
being clever. Why not provoke
laughter rather than a very real concern in your fellow and women
students.
Stephanie Malahoff
nursing 4
There is a strong association between the event and the public's
perception of engineers and unfortunately, some people have interpreted the campaign as an attack on
engineers themselves. This is not
our intention.
So we invite all students, but
especially students in engineering,
to come and have coffee with us
and by-pass some of these
misunderstandings. We've booked
a room in for Thursday, Jan. 30,
12:30 p.m. to 2:30 p.m. in Scarfe
204: let's talk!
Meredith Woods
law 3
Walter Reimann
agriculture economics 4
Godiva ride would constitute or bring about an end to sexist
discrimination and violence in
society. What they have argued is
that the ride expresses an attitude
towards women which is degrading,
objectifying and unacceptable.
That the ride is conducted with a
complete lack of respect for women
can be demonstrated with the
following example: Two years ago I
had the misfortune of walking out
of the UBC Bookstore and into the
midst of the Godiva parade. The atmosphere was one of aggression
and excitement that verged on
hysteria. More than 30 engineers
were running frantically after the
mounted prostitute with their
cameras (most equipped with
telephoto lenses) aimed at her body,
I have no doubt that those
photographs, which only further
objectified the woman, adorned
many a wall.
Before closing this letter, I would
like to make reference to the
anonymous letter which appeared
in the Black Plague Jan. 20, albeit
with the condemnation of its
editors, and the cartoon, "Agent
'89," that appeared in the
NEUSletter.
The former begins with "You
sluts who lay in the gutters with pox
infected vermin" and continues
with a litany of insults and
obscenities. The latter abounds with
anti-homosexual comments and
pornography and suggests that opponents of the ride would be more
than pleased to see Lord Godiva as
an addition to an already repugnant
display of exploitative attitudes.
Both of these features trivialize
opposition to the ride and betray a
profound ignorance of feminist
theory. More importantly, they express a violent hositility to women
and to supporters of the feminist
cause, which has only ever been the
equality of women.
In any other context, such
literature would be classified, under
the Charter of Rights, as the promotion of hatred against an identifiable group. Need we remind
university students that freedom is
freedom only in so far as it does not
impinge upon the rights and
freedoms of other individuals?
Rosalind Morris
anthropology 4
Engineers reject ride
Fast to help the hungry
Today many students on campus will skip one of the three meals a
day the nutritionist say we should have. If they're like me they'll miss
these meals because they forgot money for their lunch or are too
busy to eat.
Others may miss the meal voluntarily in order to lose weight but
some might miss it involuntarily because their budgets don't stretch
that far.
Tomorrow, Jan. 29, I plan to miss a meal, not because I want to
lose weight or have no other choice but because I hope to help the
hungry. I want to help those who are in need of food both in Vancouver and in Ethiopia by skipping a meal and donating the money I
would have spend on the meal to support relief organizations.
Inter-Varsity Christian Fellowship is sponsoring a day of fasting
through which it hopes students will choose to miss one meal and
donate the food funds to hunger relief programs run by The Food
Bank, The Salvation Army, Union Gospel Mission and The United
Church in Vancouver as well as the Mennonite Central Committee.
There will be a donation booth set up in SUB between 8:30 a.m.
and 4:30 p.m. Wednesday. Information about the specific programs
being contributed to will be available at the table.
Join us in missing a meal tomorrow and helping those who usually
have no choice in doing so.
Philip Hills
education 4
After seeing the word "engineer"
thrown around in varying tones
these last few weeks, I would like to
clear up some common misconceptions:
1. Most engineering students do
not fit the "We're obnoxious and
proud of it" image promoted by the
EUS and friends. They do not participate in the EUS's image promotion events such as the Godiva Ride.
Like most UBC students, they are
indifferent to what they see as
trivial matters. Because they do not
go around showing off, they do not
contribute to the overall image of
engineers on this campus.
2. You can't spot an engineer by
his or her red jacket. Only about
15-30 per cent of engineers wear a
red jacket on any given day. A wide
cross-section of engineers wear red
jackets, so it is not possible to judge
their attitudes and beliefs by the
jacket alone.
Those who promote the Godiva
Ride are not evil or sexist — just ignorant. They think it's only
harmless obnoxious fun and a good
way to get people involved with the
"engineering spirit". But they are
insensitive to the fact that it does
offend some people, not to mention
degrading to the image of the
university and engineers in general.
They are also mistaken if they think
such events are necessary to stir up
the masses of "deadbeat" engineers
who don't show their support. The
masses never asked to be stirred.
If the EUS believes most of their
members are so supportive, they
can drop their $18 student society
fee for a year and see how many
people will pay it voluntarily.
Dennis Lo
applied science 2
The Ubyssey reserves the right to
edit for grammar, brevity and taste.
Much as we love hearing from you,
we will be sadly disappointed if you
do not submit your letters typed,
triple-spaced, on a 70-character
line. Letters will be published as
soon as space permits but the process may be slowed down should
they contain sexist, racist or
homophobic copy. Proper identification of letter writers is required
at the time of submission in order to
reduce the number of fake letters.
This means you, Alpha Delta Phi. Page 6
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, January 28,1986
VOTE in your AMS elections this 1
The AMS president coordinates
the day-to-day activities of the
society, chairs student council
meetings, acts as a liaison between
council and the AMS full-time
staff, and is a non-voting member
of every AMS committee. She or he
sits on the Alumni Association's
board of directors.
The AMS vice-president chairs
the AMS budget committee, acts as
signing officer and as the liaison
between council and undergraduate
societies. She or he is responsible
for maintenance of the AMS code
of procedure.
The AMS external affairs coordinator informs council of UBC's
relationship with other organizations, such as the Canadian Federation of Students and about government policy changes affecting
students.
The AMS finance director draws
up the society's annual budget and
manages the cash flow. She or he
monitors and assists AMS subsidiaries with their budgets, and
often assists the AMS business office with club and undergraduate
inquiries.
The AMS director of administration chairs and directs the student
administrative commission, which
is responsible for SUB maintenance
and administers campus clubs. The
DOA sits on the management
boards of the Aquatic Centre and
Thunderbird Winter Sports Centre.
PR ESI
Michael Dean Jackson sat forward on the seat: polite, sincere,
and a little bit nen'ous.
Jackson disagrees with the ideas
put forward by the petition for a
better Ubyssey. "The Ubyssey is a
student newspaper which is supposed to provide alternative views."
There would be no point in trying to
produce alternative views under an
editorial board, he said.
"I think the Ubyssey is a good
paper for presenting students with
the issues around them. For many
it's the only source of information
they have." Jackson said.
He is in favour of boycotting
South   African  owned  goods  on
campus, and divestment. "I'm fully
in agreement with UBC divesting
from any company with a lot of
money in South Africa."
Jackson opposes all fee increases
and would appeal to the board of
governors and put pressure on the
provincial government to stop
them. "Barring that, the only step
is to go to the federal government."
he said.
Jackson wants to keep the AMS
out of debt, but considers student
interests as being very important.
"I'm for making money as much as
we have to but I want to see that
student interests are catered to."
"I'm very much in favour of turning SUB back into a place for
students" he said.
Jackson said the Godiva Ride the
recent attention given to the godiva
ride has turned the event into a
"circus". He said he is against the
ride being held in the centre of campus, but said he would approve of
the ride if it was limited to the
engineering section.
"If it is an EUS function, in
keeping with EUS functions it
should be held in private."
Jonathan Mercer is a super
salesperson and loves the job of
selling himself.
Mercer said the organization who
anonymously circulated the petition
for a better Ubyssey is cheap.
"They should have informed the
Ubyssey" he said.
He said the Ubyssey should spend
more time on campus activities like
Homecoming Week. "We don't
put enough coverage at the campus
level," he said.
Mercer said that boycotting
South African owned products is a
moral question and any decision
needs to be thoroughly researched.
He would also like to get more stu
dent response on the issue.
He trusts the university to make
the "right decisions" on divestment.
Mercer said if elected, he will
take the AMS board of governors,
presentation, which opposes tuition, to Victoria, the federal
government and local members of
parliament.
"A lot of people are afraid to try
things, but I'm not. The roads have
been open for so long. Why haven't
people taken them?"
I'll be there not as Jonathan
Mercer but as Jonathan Mercer of
the AMS." he said.
Mercer said if students go to the
AMS and complain about SUB turning into a shopping mall, then
they'll stop it. "The only thing that
bothers me is not being able to walk
from one end of the main concourse
to the other."
He would like to see more control
over businesses coming into SUB to
sell on the concourse because some
of them are inappropriate."
He said the AMS is an operation
which ceases to exist unless it makes
a profit. "All the money goes back
into services and we provide services as cheaply as we can."
Mercer said the Lady Godiva ride
is an issue between the women opposed to the ride and the engineers.
"I don't mind it going on," he
said. "Just as long as the engineers
respect the protesters and the protesters respect the EUS's right to
hold the ride."
VICE
PRESIDENT
Nindy Duggal has a warm and
friendly mannei. He thought
carefully about each answer and
took the questions seriously.
Duggal said neither the AMS nor
any other organization should have
control over the Ubyssey. "The
Ubyssey is a good paper but it
should emphasize some of the intellectual and top evel departments
the university has to offer. If the
community sees this they will give
more credit to UBC," he said.
He said the AMS should research
the problem of divestment and
economic boycotts of South Africa,
and then take action.
"If the other big universities can
agree on making a stand then UBC
can too."
Duggal said if the university
needs an increase to maintain a
standard of education then they
should do so. "At the same time
they should provide burseries for
students who can't afford it and
differential fees for those from the
interior.
"The only way to stop the increases is to unify the student body.
If they talk as one voice, they will
be listened to."
Duggal said if students see the
AMS as being too business-like,
then they should tone down the
business end. "What people are
asking for is a balance between a
business and a student services
organization, but in order to provide services they need a profit."
Jamie Collins doesn't like the no
smoking policy in The Ubyssey office. He got away with smoking
anyway) But otherwise he was quite
comfortable answering questions,
as though he'd heard them all
before.
Collins said saddling an editorial
board on a paper where people are
working hard on a volunteer basis
would be difficult.  "I don't like
reading about Nicaragua either but
if people don't like what's in The
Ubyssey, then they should come
down and write for it," he said.
"I don't drink South African
wines, but I do drink Carling
O'Keefe beer," said Collins. "It's a
Canadian beer made by Canadian
workers. I'm sure that if the
students on campus were more active and wanted the university to
divest and refused to drink Carling
O'Keefe products, they'd see a
greater response."
Collins said a four per cent tuition increase isn't much but when
applied to one of the largest tuition
fees in the country, the effect is
detrimental to students.
"As usual I'll probably help write
the AMS presentation to the board
of governors and I'll probably pay
it" he said. I'm always keeping student interests foremost in what I'm
doing".
"I agree with a lot of students
that the main concourse should be
kept free. I don't want to see any
more retail outlets on the main concourse.
"It would be nice if we could get
a credit union in the TCU space.
Money from that goes to the bursary fund," he said. "If students
didn't want food or beverages we
wouldn't be making money at it."
He said these profits supplement
the money raised by student fees to
pay for a host of student services
like Joblink, CITR, The Ubyssey,
and Speakeasy.
DIRECTOR OF F
Rebecca Nevraumont sat forward
with concentration, questioned me
on my choice of questions, tapped
her foot throughout the interview
and thought carefully before
answering all questions.
She said the Alma Mater Society
having control over The Ubyssey
causes a conflict of interest since so
much of what The Ubyssey reports
on are AMS activities.
Nevraumont supports the campaign to inform students about
South Africa, making them aware
of the choice they are making when
buying their products.
She said that she believes in protecting an individual's rights and
that by boycotting we are doing the
very thing the South African regime
is doing.
"The four per cent tuition increase is something everybody anticipated,"  she said.   "Some attempt should be made to organize
some kind of protest that would
make news."
See page 11
Chris Friesen phoned the interview in from a World University
Service of Canada conference in Ottawa. I think he forgot it was 7 a.m.
in Vancouver.
Friesen said an editorial board
would bypass the whole idea of a
student paper. "It's up to individuals to write for the paper," he
said.
"On the whole the paper has improved a lot from last year. They
sensitized the students to Lady
Godiva and South African issues."
Friesen said an informational
campaign should be carried out so
that students better understand the
issue of South Africa. "A lot of
students won't even know what
apartheid is" he said.
"Then the decision should be
passed on to the students through a
referendum."
He said the board of governors
should first disclose their investments and then follow the example of McGill university which
divested in November.
"It's been proven that universities that divest and reinvest in
North American companies in fact
increase their dividends" he said.
As much as Friesen dislikes the
See page 11
Kyle Kirkwood doesn't like
editorial boards. He says he likes
The Ubyssey but sometimes finds
the articles slanted. "It isn't always
a newspaper. Sometimes it's more
of an editorial," he said.
Kirkwood says "why not" to
South African divestment and a
boycott of South African owned Tuesday, January 28, 1986
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 7
¥ednesday, Thursday, and Friday
STORIES BY
MARY MCALISTER
GORDANA RASIC AND
DEBBIE LO
PHOTOS BY
JEFFREY KIBBLE AND
DAN ANDREWS
DENT=
Each of the candidates was asked
the same four questions:
1. What is your view on the petition for a better Ubyssey? (a petition was anonomously circulated
last term asking for more control on
the material going into the Ubyssey)
What do you think of the Ubyssey?
2. Where do you stand on UBC
divesting from South Africa and the
boycott of South African owned
products from campus?
3. What is your view on the four
percent fee increase? What are you
going to do to stop fee increases?
4. SUB seems to be turning into
a shopping mall. How can the AMS
remain responsible with students'
money but keep the interests of
students in mind? Are you interested in making money or lobbying student interests? The presidential candidates were also asked if
they approve of the Lady Godiva
ride taking place on campus.
Blair Longley has curly hair and
is both relaxed and personable. He
has a good sense of humour but is
quite serious about his 'real' solutions to student problems.
Longley says The Ubyssey is controlled directly under the AMS.
"It's a newspaper club rather than a
paper in its own right," he said.
He said The Ubyssey should
establish itself as a separate society
to increase independence of the
paper.
Longley said he doubts economic
boycotts of South African companies will be effective. "We're
wasting a lot of valuable time and
energy dealing with something
14,000 miles away when we've got
lots of problems at home," he said.
Longley has discovered what he
believes to be a solution to tuition
fee increases. He said there are tax
credits available to use for
registered political activities.
"We can make the most effective
protest against increases by using
those tax credits to create
bursaries," he said.
As AMS president he would be in
an effective position to promote
this opportunity, he said.
The AMS needs to maintain
financial integrity, said Longley.
"It needs to be run as a successful
business," he said.
"It's only on that basis that we
can have the funds to lobby and apply political pressure to do the
things that we need to do," he said.
Longley said he does not approve
of the Godiva Ride per se but said
the UBC calendar under the
academic freedoms section allows
students the freedom to express
their opinions even if the opinions
are abhorrent.
W
Mb-
Simon Seshadri didn't like the interview questions but settled
himself down on the couch in the
Ubyssey office and answered them
anyway.
Seshadri says the Ubyssey should
cover more campus oriented issues.
"The paper should circulate a
survey to see what the students like
and dislike about it and act upon
it," he said.
He says that UBC divesting from
South Africa is no longer an issue
since the university is already taking
steps in that direction.
He agrees more with an informational campaign than a complete
boycott of South African owned
products.
"If students know that products
are South African but still want to
buy them then they should be allowed to," he said.
He was ambivalent on the tuition
increase next year. "A four per cent
fee increase is not bad. It's equal to
the cost of living," said Seshadri.
"But right on the heels of 30 per
cent increases, it's too much."
He said that students should let
the board know their views on the
increases.
"Contrary to popular belief the
AMS does not turn a profit,"
Seshadri said. "When it comes to
priorities like how much should be
put into the services like CITR and
the Ubyssey, that's another question."
He says congestion in the main
concourse is caused by student
groups as well as outside organizations.
"If you look at the number of
outside organizations coming in it's
quite low. I see them as student services, like the print sale and the
plant sale," he said.
Seshadri said as a student he is
not offended by the Godiva Ride.
"I do not fird the event sexist,"
he said adding lie knew the ride offended some people on campus.
Richard Fitzpatrick slouched forward in his seat, answered the questions succinctly, and didn't attempt
to expand on his views.
He believes The Ubyssey can be
improved with more student event
coverage and less on things like
U.S. news.
He does not think a complete
boycott of South African products
is   a   good   thing.    "I   wouldn't
boycott Carling O'Keefe for example," he said. Carling does not have
a big per cent of investment in
South Africa and it would hurt
more Canadians than South
African businessmen."
"If a company owned 100 per
cent interest in a South Africa company then a boycott is fine," he
said.
On the proposed four per cent
tuition fee increase next year, Fitzpatrick said the University has no
choice since they do have to run the
budget. However, he said he hoped
to work on increasing government
funding.
As to commercial outlets in SUB,
he said, it would be his position to
provide funds if that is what council
decides.
Fitzpatrick said the SUB mall is
fine right now and those concerned
about it should lobby the vice president and coordinator of external affairs.
ADMINISTRATION
I NANCE
Martin Cocking put down the
copy of the Ubyssey he had been
reading, leaned back thoughtfully,
and said the petition against an
autonomous Ubyssey is "a load of
B.S."
"The Ubyssey should be independent; students, executives in
particular, when they read bad
press launch off into an attack on
the Ubyssey."
He said people in a political position should expect bad press on occasions.
Cocking said he thinks the
university should divest from South
Africa. And the AMS should take a
definite stand one way or another
and stop being "wishy-washy about
it."
"I don't agree with the poster
campaign that says the students
should choose themselves whether
to buy South African products or
not," he said. "We have an obligation as leaders to say this is right or
wrong, and I myself think it's
wrong."
Cocking said the four per cent
tuition fee increase is really a board
of governors problem, but student
council can stand up and say "we
don't like this," and lobby against
it.
"I mean four per cent this year,
ten per cent last year, it's getting
ridiculous."
He said council should tell the
provincial government, "Victoria,
this is not enough funding. Cocking
said he will get in :here and push the
board of governors to action.
"One person can make the difference," he said
The student union building shopping mall is a relevant issue for
Cocking since he is responsible for
the activities in :he building. He
said student services run on deficit
budgets and are financed by the
AMS; therefore, money has to be
raised to keep the services going.
Cocking wants to improve the
He wants to refurbish the lounge
sofas, increase conversation areas,
improve lighting outside for safety,
and cut prices at AMS food outlets.
Cocking's main goal is to increase services while decreasing
costs. See page 11
products. "It makes sense. Certain
political figures have used boycotts
of this sort before and they worked
well," he said.
Kirkwood said he would approach the board of governors, the
provincial government and the
federal government to try to get
transfer payments through. "They
need to spend more money on
university funding; instead they
spend it on highways," he said.
He isn't bothered by the AMS
making a lot of profits as long as
the money is coming back to the
students, through jobs in the Pit
and at the pool. "Those jobs can
help them get through university,"
he said.
&&&!-, "■ -t A
Carol Pedlar is uniquely honest
about her abilities and views — she
said what she doesn't know she will
find out.
Pedlar said a lot of the stories in
the Ubyssey are biased. "I would
like to see the other points of view
presented but if the AMS gets a
hold of it, it won't be objective"
she said.
Pedlar said she doesn't know a
lot about the South African issue.
"Of course I don't agree with apartheid but I've heard that boycotting
South African products hurts the
black workers," she said.
"I think the fee increase sucks,"
Pedlar said. She wants to work with
the federal government and start a
letter writing campaign to protest
cutbacks. "Hopefully the Socreds
will be defeated in the next election
and we'll get a better government".
Pedlar said student interests
come first. "The AMS should cut
down on the booths in the main
concourse but not get rid of them
entirely," she said.
George Stubos disagrees with the
Ubyssey on certain things.
"It seems quite skewed to the
left," he said. "I don't know how
many people take it seriously. A lot
of people who write for the paper
seem to have a negative attitude
toward the AMS."
Stubos said divestment is a wise
thing to do. "McGill decided to
divest and I think we should too."
He also agrees with the idea of
boycotting South African owned
products. "As a gesture I think the
AMS should do it." he said.
Stubos said the four per cent increase keeps up wilh the current inflation rate but added students still
have a tough time paying fees.
"What are we getting back for
the increase? More T.A.s? I plan to
look into that extensively."
He said there haven't been any
complaints about the sales in SUB
main concourse. 'I don't see a
reason to make it an issue. Are we
also going to stop letting groups
have displays? I doubt if it's really
annoying anybody."
Stubos said he has the best interests of students in mind. "We are
running a million -dollar corporation where the profits go to
students."
EXTERNAL Page 8
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, January 28, 1986
Award results delayed
From page 1
nature of the institution it is
negotiated at (college or university),
the length of the study term for
which it was awarded and the
period for which it is being used.
Almost two months of computer
programming was required before
the UBC awards office would forward a near-complete list of winners to Victoria. "Things got done
at the expense of other office programs," Hender said, noting the
ministries of education and, universities, science and technology have
not yet offered to directly defray
the costs incurred at UBC for administering the program.
But at SFU, programming is not
yet complete and winners will likely
not be determined until mid-
February. "The program is a lot
more complicated than we thought
it would be," David Crawford, student awards assistant director, said
Monday.
By the time programming is complete at SFU, results for four
semesters (SFU uses a trimester
system) must be compiled, beginning with the fall 1985 term, the first
period covered by the program.
Using UBC's calculation
methods, SFU students should
receive almost $350,000 in
disbursements under the program
each semester.
Accurate figures were not
available at press time as both
ministries could not be reached for
comment.
Hender says many colleges have
not yet completed their lists of
a^ward winners.
Scholarships were awarded to the
top 30 per cent of students, using a
faculty   and   year   scale,   on   the
following basis:
Top 10 per cent:
2 semesters 1 semester
College/institute$400 $200
University $600 $300
Next 20 per cent:
College/Institute$200 $100
University $300 $150
Students must re-enroll in 60 per
cent of a full undergraduate course
load at a B.C. institute, college or
university within 18 months of the
award date (April 1985) to qualify.
Vouchers must be validated at the
Registrar's office which then forwards them to Victoria. Cheques
are mailed directly to students.
Hender is hopeful that the program will be a success. "We've had
lots of enquiries. We think the vast
majority of students who got a
voucher are using them."
Problems compounding the program currently include the late
release of the vouchers and the
absence of an award figure on the
form mailed to students.
According to the brochure accompanying the voucher, the
scholarship program is "designed
to support and encourage those
students who demonstrate a per-
NOW OPEN
TYPE YOUR OWN
RESUMES, ESSAYS,
ETC. ON A
WORD PROCESSOR
AMS CUSTOMER OPERATED WORD PROCESSING CENTRE
DROP-IN AND GIVE IT A TRY!
Lower Level of the Student Union Building
across the hall from Tortellini's
ONLY $5.00 PER HOUR
PLUS 10c PER PRINTED PAGE
Open Mon. to Fri. 9:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.
FRIENDLY ASSISTANCE
ALWAYS AVAILABLE
sonal dedication to scholastic
achievement." Scholarship money
will be exempted from the student
loan assessment if it is less than
$600.
Students enrolled in the spring
and summer sessions at UBC will
also be eligible for the scholarship.
Students attending UBC year-round
and staying in the top 10 per cent
will be eligible for a $900 award.
The award cannot be negotiated
for study outside B.C. "The logic
behind this is to encourage students
to stay at B.C. institutions,"
Hender said. But students from
outside B.C. who study in this province can receive the scholarship as
there is currently no method to
remove them from the eligible pool
determined by the computer program.
PANGO PANGO (UNS) — Hairy
puce blorgs on this tiny island
kingdom watched in wild wonderment as vice ridden blorg Talkathon
Merciless bought enough fancy
cookies to sink a small doctors office.
"Oooga booga ooga wooga,"
cried the assembled blorgs. "We
love webbed feet."
4
UBC
(E-X-C-E • L- L-E-N"7!^) ^r
Ihe  eateri
1 FREE BUR6ER
THE GOOD DEAL IS YOUR LEAST EXPENSIVE BURGER IS FREE WHEN
TWO ARE ORDERED. THIS APPLIES TO BEEF 6 TOFU BURGERS ONLY.
AND ISNT VALID FOR TAKE-OUT OR ANY OTHER COUPON.
ENJOY YOUR BURG AND HA VE A NICE DA Y!
3431 WEST BROADWAY
738-5298
DO YOU HAVE ASTHMA?
If you have asthma, you might be interested in
volunteering for a research study on the effect
of a combination of 2 inhalers (Atrovent &
Berotec) on breathing tests in asthma.
The study involves coming to V.G.H. for
breathing tests on 6 separate days for about 4
hrs. each. Volunteers will be compensated
$50.00 for each day.
If interested, call V.G.H. Lung Function Lab,
875-4830 (and ask for Nancy Gibson) for further information.
& 3& ft* m
HONG KONG CHINESE FOODS
5732 UNIVERSITY BLVD.
(One block from campus in the Village)
■T^t
Mon.-Fri. 11:00 a.m.-10 p.m.
Sat., Sun. & Holidays 4:00 p.m.-9:00 p.m.
224-1313
^——■■"—————-— ELECT
NINDY DUGGAL
FOR
AMS VICE-PRESIDENT
EXPERIENCE:
• Club's Commissioner, Student Administrative Commission 1985
• Special  Projects  Commissioner,  Student  Administrative Commission
1986
• Chairperson, Rick Hansen "Man In Motion" Fundraising Committee
1985-86
• Treasurer, Student Leadership Conference Committee 1985
• Member, AMS Budget Committee 1985
• Charity Coordinater, Science Undergraduate Society 1985-86
• Member, United Way Committee 1985
• Chairperson, Scholarship Committee of the Phi Gamma Delta Fraternity
1984-86
GOALS:
• To provide firm and fair leadership to all the student groups of UBC
• To increase student unity throughout the campus community
 _VOTE JAN. 29, 30 & 31	
■/
NEW
RETURN POLICY
On Course Books
• Course books bought for
Second Term courses may
be returned for full refund
any time up to January
31st (the ten-day rule has
been eliminated).
• Books must be unmarked
and in saleable-as-new condition.
• Returns will NOT be accepted without the original
SALES RECEIPT.
After January 31st all sales of
course books will be NON-
RETURNABLE.
REMEMBER
to keep your receipt.
BOOKSTORE *
THE THUNDERBIRD SHOP
SECOND SEMESTER SUPER-DUPER
STARVING STUDENT SIDEWALK SALE
STARTS TUES., JAN. 28
PRICES SLASHED ON SUBSTANDARD, FLAWED & DISCONTINUED LINES OP
CLOTHING, GIFTWARE & CARDS
QUANTITIES LIMITED        NO REFUNDS OR EXCHANGES       ALL SALES FINAL
Lower Level
Student Union
Building, U.B.C.
Hours: Mon.-Fri.
8:00 a.m. 7:00 p.m.
Sat. 10 a.m.-5:00 p.m.
Telephone: 224-1911
Visa & Mastercard
Accepted Tuesday, January 28, 1986
THE    UBYSSEY
Two big wins for hoopsters
Page 9
By STEVE NEUFELD
With two consecutive victories
this past weekend, it is quite evident
that UBC coach Jack Pomfret's
basketball team has jelled into a
respectable unit.
UBC's solid team effort on Friday against the number 4 ranked
Lethbridge Pronghorns yielded no
less than four UBC scorers in double figures. They outlasted the
prairie visitors by a 66-61 margin.
Leading by a slim 31-29 at the half,
UBC continued to outplay their op
ponents as Colette Pilloud and Andrea Belczyk collected 13 points
each. Veterans Joanne Devlin and
Nadine Fedorak split another 22.
"Intensity seemed to be the key in
the win. Our kids wanted the ball
and the game more than the other
team," said Pomfret.
Saturday night Nadine Fedorak
scored a career high 26 points as the
'Birds defeated the sixth ranked
Calgary Dinnies by a score of 73-64.
Fedorak shot a sizzling 77% from
the field. Heads up play from UBC
point guard Lynn Clark in breaking
up a Calgary press resulted in many
layups and close range shots for
Fedorak and the rest of the
Thunderbirds. As well, a combination of steals and layups devasted
Calgary and allowed UBC to improve their Canada West record to
3-2, good enough for third place.
UBC travels to Calgary and
Lethbridge this upcoming weekend
for return matchups against these
two squads that should go a long
way to determining the Thunderbirds' chances for making one of
four league playoff spots.
Quinn, Toneff win 5 km run
WEST/EAST MALL RUN
Men's 5 km
1. Paul Quinn, Beta 22:36
2. Seamus Parker, Mech II 22.57
3. Peter Lewis, Geology 23.05
4. Al Nielzen, Grad Studies 23:07
5. Paul Heintzman, Regent College 23:22
6. R.Zap-Gilje, EUS 23:37
7. Stephen Chu, EUS 23:48
8. Nick Smith, Forestry 24:01
9. Andy Zalkow, ZBT 24:08
10.  Rob Hasegawa, Science 24:19
Women's 5 km
1. Janine Toneff, EUS 26:43
2. Susan Barr, Family & Nutr Sc 29:12
Men's 3 km
1. P. Nielsen, Rowing 10
2. Brian Nemethy, P.E. 10:
3. Paul Rapp, Superox (EUS) 10:
4. Ross Langford, Rowing 10:
5. Cat Merry, MM P.E. 10:
6. Jeff Christian, 3rd Salish Alumi 10:
7. Steve Gustavson, Beta 10
8. Jack Bryson, Science 10:
9. Geoff Hvenemann, Sigma Chi
10.  Doug Harris, Roma
GROUSE MOUNTAIN SKI CHALLENGE
RESULTS - Thursday. Jan. 23. 1986
Woman's Novica
1. Geraldine Hennessy, Kappas 67:36
2. Josephine Steenken, Nursing 68:93
3. Mary Potter, Nursing 87:68
4. Kirsten Mawle, Nursing 89:19
5. Nadine Thomlinson, Alpha Delta Phi 105:26
6. Rosemary Lillico, Education 106:00
Man's Novica
1. Eldon Wong, Commerce 75:50
2. Bruce Gammat, Nursing 76:98
3. Jeff Baturin, Phi Delta 90:08
Woman's Intarmadlata
1. Andrea Gould, Phrateres 63:74
2. Patricia Dunn, Gage 63:85
3. Leslie Dye, Kappas 64:89
4. Ann Sellens, Gamma Phi 66:17
5. Rachel French, Nursing 67:56
6. Carolyn Daubeney, P.E. 67:87
7. Holly McLeod, P.E. 69:21
8. Linda Wilson, Phrateres 74:94
9. Michelle Debienne, Alpha Delta Pi 76:70
Man's Intarmadlata
1. Carey Wong, Kappa Sigma 57:14
2. Daman Forster, Fiji 58:10
3. Pat Doyle. Alpha Delts 58:87
4. Calum McCauley, Ski Club 58:98
5. Paul Quinn, Betas 59:46
6. Bernie Struck, Alpha Delts 60:25
7. David Jackson, Betas 60:34
8. Robert Andrews, Ski Club 61:00
9. Tony Bell. Education 61:70
10. Chris Brown, Fiji 62:30
11. Timothy Newton, Kappa Sigma 62:70
12. King Cheung Lan, Science 66:80
Woman's Open
1. Martina Rust, Ski Club 56:10
2. Wendy Duffy, Ski Club 56:98
3. Sara MacDonald, Gamma Phi 57:77
4. Heather Wilson. Nursing 58:46
5. Karen Downing, P.E. 60:24
6. Linda Dermer, Nursing 61:67
Man's Open
1. David McEachern, Fiji 48:36
2. David Greig, Roma 49:12
3. John Falck, EUS 49:46
4. Michel Lavigner, Fiji 49:91
5. Scott Lowes, Ski Club 50:89
6. Dave Ure. Sigma Chi 51:22
7. lan Thornton, Education 52:5B
8. Todd Donnelly, Fiji 53:08
9. Stewart Hayashi, Fiji 53:20
10. Gordon Newman, Phi Delts 53:58
11. TimHooten, Fiji 55:50
12. Sean Yoshida, Ski Club 56:50
13. Ron Kline. Kappa Sigma 57:20
14. Doug Ford, Fiji 57:65
15. Ron Wizinsky, Georox 58:25
16. John Crowley, Fiji 65:78
DR. ROMANIE M.
STUART
is pleased to announce
the opening of her practice of optometry in
association with DR.
CYRIL CHECHIK at
Suite #50
1687 West Broadway
Vancouver, B.C.
Hours: Mon.-Sat.
9 a.m.-6 p.m.
by appointment
Tel: 733-5911
AT A GLANCE
NOON RUNS
Fri., Jan. 31 Triumf Road Run
SUB Plaza Race Center
12:30 p.m. 3.8 km, 5.2 km
SPECIAL EVENTS
Thurs.. Feb. 13 The Centipede Championships
SUB Plaza Race Center
12:30 p.m. 3 km course
TOURNAMENTS
Feb. 15-16 Sub 6 ft   Basketball Tournament
War Memorial Gym
10 a.m. - 4 p.m.  (men only!
RACQUET SPORTS
Sutherland Tennis Grand Prix
US Open - Doubles Tournament
Armoury and Tenn«s Bubble
Fri. 6:30-11:30 p.m.
Sat., Sun., 8 a.m.-11:30 p.m.
CO-REC PROGRAMS
Thurs., Feb. 13 Broomball Tournament II
drop in
Feb. 3-7
Fri., Sat.,
Feb. 7-9
Feb. 3 7
Varsity Volleyball
Despite their number one ranking, the Thunderbird men's
volleyball team face another tough
hurdle in their quest for their first
Canadian Interuniversity Athletic
Union title since 1983. This
weekend, they will travel to Saskatoon to compete in the Canada
West tournament at the University
of Saskatchewan. There, they will
play against the #2 ranked Saskatchewan Huskies Saturday night at
8:30 p.m.
Women's varsity
soeeer force tie
The UBC women's soccer team
held a strong Premier division team
to a 1-1 tie Sunday in Richmond.
After conceding a goal early in
the first half, it was up to UBC to
come back and tie the game. The
Richmond squad packed their
defense into their 18 yard box in an
effort to hold the lead but UBC still
narrowly missed several scoring
several chances.
With ten minutes left in the
game, a long chip from team captain Kathy Bockhold met the head
of striker Irene Cultum, who struck
a diving header into the back of the
net.
Next Sunday, UBC meets Fraser
Vale in league play in Coquitlam.
Men
MW
ML
Pts
Saskatchewan
6
0
12
UBC
6
1
12
Victoria
3
4
6
Calgary
2
3
4
Alberta
1
5
2
Lethbridge
0
5
0
Women
MW
ML
Pts
Victoria
6
1
12
Saskatchewan
5
1
10
Calgary
4
1
8
Lethbridge
2
3
4
UBC
1
6
2
Alberta
0
6
0
BURIED
CHILD
By Sam Shepard
Directed by Robert Garfat
JAN. 28 — FEB. 1
CURTAIN: 8 P.M.
Student Tickets $4
¥   Box Office - Room 207 ¥
¥   Frederic Wood Theatre +t
Dorothy Somerset Studio
University of British Columbia
Res. 228-2678
'i
SCUBA DIVE
Join UBC's Scuba Club for
low-cost courses, rentals, gear
purchases, charters and activities.
Next Introductory Course Feb.
Aqua Society
Lower Floor, Student Union Bldg.
228-3329
8«<««y»«ct«^«»»w^c»»w»w«»»ww»w»»»w»'M«
■>*>»»»-■»>
If you like It rough, tough,
down and dirty then what
you want to do with your
life Is write sports. Let ex-
Ubyssey sports editor and
current Sun staffer Scott
fTkDooaW tell you all about
It at our sports seminar,
noon. Wed. In SUB 241K.
n
vs JERRY RUBIN
-v   "The Debate of the Decade"        ,^?**v,
SAT FEB. 8       ^ "
ORPHEUM
Networking 7 pm
r Great Debate 8 pm
Yippie vs Yuppie
Questions 9-11 pm
RESERVE YOUR
I TICKETS NOW
All VTC/CBO outlets, Eaton's, Woodward's, Mall tnfb Centres, AMS UBC or charge
by phone 280-4444; Common Ground, Healthy Gourmet, Banyen & Duthie Books
U.D.C Thunderbird
Winter Sports Center
6066 Thunderbird Blvd. - UBC Campus
228-6121
TRY
CURLING
ICE TIME AVAILABLE
DURING THE WEEK ~
AND WEEKENDS TOO
* EASY TO LEARN RULES    * REASONABLE RATES
* A GREAT WAY TO MEET PEOPLE AND SOCIALIZE
* LICENSED LOUNGE OPEN SEVEN DAYS A WEEK
* SPACE AVAILABLE FOR:
-WOMEN'S DAY TIME PLAY
-MIXED MALE AND FEMALE LEAGUES
-MEN'S TEAMS
-SENIORS CURLING
Rental Brooms Available for just $1.00
Interested? Call Sharon or Paul at 228-6121 to Book Ice Time
GET SMASHED!
BUCHANAN
BADMINTON TOURNEY
FEBRUARY 1-2
REGISTRATION^  JANUARY 20-24
Room '66'
LOWER SUB CONCOURSE
information 228-6688
Prizes donated by:
Block Knight o^
L/fuC MA£wcm&... &o aood sbovhI ' Page 10
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, January 28,1986
%&W{2z#0f
TODAY
JSA/HILLEL
Hot lunch, noon, Hillel house.
MARANATHA CHRISTIAN CLUB
Bible study, noon. Brock 304.
JSA/HILLEL
Israel diaspora dialogue, 8 p.m., 1053 Douglas
Crescent.
ISMAILI STUDENTS ASSOCIATION
Committee    meeting,    noon,    SUB    213,    all
members please attend. Tutorials, Brock Hall
350.
UBC DANCE CLUB
Dance practice, noon, SUB partyroom.
CAMPUS CRUSADE FOR CHRIST
Lecture: "The antropic principle — evidence for
God's existence", M. Horner, noon, Angus 110.
CAMPUS CRUSADE FOR CHRIST
Debate: "Did Jesus really rise from the dead?",
M. Horner (CCC) vs M. Reimers (PhD. student,
math), 7 p.m., IRC 2.
UBC WOMEN'S CENTRE
Wqpen's self-defense,  register Brock 203, 7
p.m.
UBC ENTREPRENEURS CLUB
Industry and small business development films,
everyone welcome, noon, Angus 426.
DANCE HORIZONS
Rehearsal, 6-8 p.m., SUB partyroom.
CUSO
UBC   development   education   series,   primary
health care - case studies from the third world,
7:30 p.m., International House.
CHINESE STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Beginners' Mandarin conversation class, noon,
Buch B317.
UBC SAILING CLUB
Membership drive, noon, SUB 58.
CHRISTIAN SCIENCE ORGANIZATION
Weekly meeting — testimonies of healing, bible
readings, you're invited, noon, SUB 211.
COALITION AGAINST SEXISM ON CAMPUS
Petition table, noon-2:30 p.m., SUB foyer.
WEDNESDAY
JSA/HILLEL
"The get-the Jewish approach to divorce" with
rabbi M. Feverstrin, noon, Hillel House.
CAMPUS CRUSADE FOR CHRIST
Debate: Which way is true? Reps from Islam,
Hinduism, Christianity and Buddhism debate this
question, 7 p.m., IRC 2.
COALITION AGAINST SEXISM ON CAMPUS
Petition table, noon-2:30 p.m., SUB Foyer.
GRADUATE STUDENT SOCIETY
Music night, featuring James Hill, 8:30-11 p.m.,
Graduate student centre, Garden room lounge.
UBC SAILING CLUB
Membership drive, noon, SUB 58.
DANCE HORIZONS
Rehearsal, 8-10 p.m., SUB Partyroom.
BALLET UBC JAZZ
Registration for unlimited winter classes, you
may take any or all of the classes offered for only
$45, noon, SUB 208.
UBC ANARCHIST CLUB
Film:   "Carry  Greenham Home"  plus speakers
from Greenham Common, noon, SUB 211.
JSA/HILLEL
Dinner, 5:30-7 p.m., Hillel House.
AMNESTY INTERNATIONAL
Carl Rosenberg speaks on:"Human rights in
Chili", noon, SUB 205.
THUNDERBIRD RUBGY
UBC hosts the Vancouver reps in McKechnie
cup action, 7:30 p.m., Thunderbird stadium.
THUNDERBIRD VOLLEYBALL
UBC hosts the B.C.OIympics club team at 8 p.m.
in War Memorial gym. Top quality volleyball.
INTEGRITY IN ACTION
Lecture: "the new phase in womanhood", guest
speaker: Susan Maranda, noon. Buch B221.
AMNESTY INTERNATIONAL
Speaker, noon, SUB 205.
UBC ANARCHIST CLUB
Resistance at Big Mountain: Navajo and Hopi
land struggles, slides and speaker, noon, Buch
A204.
ISMAILI STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Indoor soccer, 3:304:30 p.m., Osborne gym F.
STUDENTS FOR A FREE SOUTHERN AFRICA
Meeting on divestment, noon, TA union office,
upstairs in the armouries.
PROGRESSIVE CONSERVATIVE YOUTH
Bzzr garden, 4-8 p.m., SUB 212.
UBC DANCE CLUB
Practice, noon, SUB Partyroom.
THURSDAY
COALITION AGAINST SEXISM ON CAMPUS
Petition table, noon-2:30 p.m., SUB foyer.
CAMPUS CRUSADE FOR CHRIST
Prime time meeting — special guests: student
mission advance, noon. Brock Hall 302.
CHINESE CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP
Group bible study, all welcome, noon, Scarfe
209.
CHINESE STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Intermediates' Mandarin conversation class,
noon, Buch B317.
UBC SAILING CLUB
Membership drive, noon, SUB 58.
BALLET UBC JAZZ
Registration for unlimited winter dance classes,
you may take any or all of the dance classes offered for only M5, noon, SUB 208.
CHINESE STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Chinese painting class, 4:30, Asian centre 604
GREAT LAW TRIALS ON THE SILVER SCREEN
"Judgment at Nuremberg", 12:25 p.m.. Law
building 101.
UBC PERSONAL COMPETING CLUB
Nominations for exec positions accepted, all interested please attend, noon, Hebb 12.
UBC DANCE CLUB
Dance lesson, noon, SUr ballroom.
ISMAILI STUDENTS ASSOCIATION
Badminton night, 5:30-6:30 p.m., Osborne gym
B, one court.
FAMILY AND NUTRITIONAL SCIENCES
Special low calorie (light delight) dinner,
4:30-6:30 p.m.. SUBWAY.
FRIDAY
BALLET UBC JAZZ
Registration for winter dance classes, you may
tak any or all of the classes offered for only $45,
noon, SUB 208.
COALITION AGAINST SEXISM ON CAMPUS
Petition table, noon-2:30. SUB foyer.
MARANATHA CHRISTIAN CLUB
Bible and government class, 7 p.m., SUB ?
CHINESE STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Beginners' Cantonese conversation class, noon,
Buch B317.
UBC JAPAN EXCHANGE CLUB
Broomball, 11:45 p.m.-12:45 a.m.. Winter sports
center.
UBC SAILING CLUB
New members wanted, noon, SUB 58.
ASTRONOMY AND AEROSPACE CLUB
General meeting, new people always welcome,
5:30 p.m., room 142 Astronomy and geophysics
building.
DANCE HORIZONS
1986 program "Two sides to the wind". Tickets
$6, 8:30 p.m.. Centennial theatre. North Vancouver.
THUNDERBIRD FIELD HOCKEY
UBC hosts an indoor women's field hockey tournament featuring the best club teams from the
lower mainland, 6-11 p.m., the Armouries.
PSYCHOLOGY STUDENT'S ASSOCIATION
Bzzr garden, 4-7:30 p.m., Buch lounge.
UBC SPORTS CAR CLUB
Novice rally, 6:30 p.m., old bus loop, in front of
new bookstore.
STUDENTS FOR PEACE AND MUTUAL
DISARMAMENT
Simon Rosenblum: "the cruise missile, star
wars, and Canada", noon, SUB 205.
UBC DANCE CLUB
Old bronze dance practice, noon, SUB partyroom.
Snatch the gonfalon! Or even
victory from the jaws of defeat! Or,
better yet, learn how to write
sports, not cliches! Scott
McDonald, former Ubyssey sports
communist extraordinaire and current Vancouver Sun reporter will
give a seminar on sports writing for
jocks and other people interested in
this fascinating field (or rugby field,
even). Come to SUB 241k (The
Ubyssey office) Wednesday for a
guaranteed good time. He shoots,
he scores!
Dance Horizons present their
1986 "Two sides to the wind" with
music by Cevin Key of Skinny Puppy, and Randy Raine Reusch.
Choreo. by Lola MacLaughlin and
Mauryne Allan. 8:30 p.m. at the
Centennial theatre, North Vancouver. Tickets $6 at the door or at
the AMS box office.
The Vancouver-Richmond
Association for Mentally Handicapped People needs volunteers for a
variety of fun and rewarding experiences. We offer opportunities
for people interested in working
with children, teens, and adults on
a one to one basis or in group programs. Training, support, and lots
of fun and recognition is assured.
Call 263-1931 for more information.
FACULTY OF BUSINESS
UNIVERSITY OF ALBERTA
Edmonton, Alberta
MASTER OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
MASTER OF PUBLIC MANAGEMENT
Are you interested in an MBA or.MPM degree?
Students from all faculties are invited
to discuss the MBA and MPM programs
offered by the Faculty of Business, University of Alberta
with
Professor Rodney Schneck, Associate Dean
in
214 Brock Hall, 1874 East Mall
Monday, February 3, 1986
from
9-12 noon and 1 - 4 p.m.
Stand Out and Be Counted
Suki's Advanced Hairdressing School is now accepting models for our advanced cutting classes. 16-35,
male or female — // you 're interested in creative,
high-fashion haircuts our teachers want you to have
the style of the 80's which suits you best.
We're open Monday to Friday, 9-5. We'd love to see
you, so give us a call, 738-0519.
$5.00 Cut $20 Color $30 Perm
"Remember It's The Cut That Counts"
Suki's Advanced Hairdressing
School Int'l Ltd.
3157 Granville St., Vancouver, 738-0519
Our Art Director is also interviewing hair models with potential for
photographic and demonstration work.
THE CLASSIFIEDS
RATES: AMS Card Holders - 3 lines, 1 day $2.50; additional
lines, 60c. Commercial — 3 lines, 1 day $4.50 additional lines, .70c. Additional days, $4.00 and .65c.
Classified ads are payable in advance. Deadline is 10:30 a.m. the
day before publication.
Publications Room266, S.U.B., UBC, Van., B.C. V6T2A5
Charge Phone Orders over $10.00. Call 228-3977.
5 - COMING EVENTS
AUSTRALIA-NEW ZEALAND FILM-
NIGHT Feb. 4. Planetarium. Camping
(Kontiki) Adventure Tours/Biking. Pre-
registration (S3) only at ANZA TRAVEL,
201-1754 W. Broadway, Vane, 734-7725.
CAN A HUMANIST make more sense out
of the Easter Story than a fundamentalist?
Find out tonite, 7 p.m., IRC 2.
VAN. C.S.F. PRESENTS "Nutritional
Management of Depression" by Janice
Berg IM.Sc. Human Nutrition) Feb. 1st, 8
p.m., A130 — Langara College. Admission:
$5. Students: $4.
11 - FOR SALE - Private
AIR JORDANS: 2 pairs, sizes 9 & 10, brand
new, never worn, still in boxes, $80/pr.
obo. Ken C, 224-9083 after 6 p.m.
20% OFF USED BOOKS (floor models) from
now until 4th April when the "Prop" will
close for 5 mths. while the manager buys in
Europe. Proprioception Books, 1956 W.
Broadway. 734-4112. Open 2-6, Mon.-Sat.
Park in rear betw. Maple & Cypress.
40 - MESSAGES
PREGNANT? 731-1122
Free tests—confidential help.
70 - SERVICES	
GOT A PROBLEM? Need to talk? Drop by
Speakeasy on SUB Concourse or ph.
228-3700. Confidential, anonymous.
85 - TYPING
20 - HOUSING
INEXPENSIVE   ROOM   &   BOARD   $350
(double occupancy). $400 (single). Includes
a VCR, TV, sauna, laundry facilities Et use
of IBM Computer. 222-4470. Ask for Ian.
25 - INSTRUCTION
PRIVATE INSTRUCTION in vocal and keyboard performance. Professional European
artist gives supplementary training re: style
and performance practices. Call: 687-7377
Eva. Location? Your Choice.
30 - JOBS
STUDENTS' DELIGHT. Earn $400-$1000
per month, part-time working from your
home. Call Mr. Morgan, 687-3927.
JOB HUNTING? Our intensive one-day
job search skills seminar will get you results!
Only $85 including complete manual. Call
Advanced Communications Network for
details, 684-6845.
35 - LOST
WORD    PROCESSING    SPECIALIST.    U
write, we type theses,  resumes,  letters,
essays. Days, evgs., wknds. 736-1208.
EXPERT TYPING: Essays, t. papers, fac-
tums, letters, mscpts, resumes, theses.
IBM Sel II. Proofreading. Reas. rates. Rose
731-9857, 224-7351.
GEETECH WORD PROCESSING. Student
rates. Fast turnaround. 7 days-24 hrs.
Kingsway/Fraser. 879-2027.
WORDPOWER —Editing, proofing Et word
processing professionals. Xerox copies,
student rates. 3737 W. 10th Ave. (at Alma)
222-2661.
PROFESSIONAL TYPIST. 30 years experience. Student rates. Photocopier.
Dorothy Martinson, 228-8346.
TYPING FOR YOU. $1.00per page, double-
spaced. Call Marlene at 736-4675 anytime.
WORD WEAVERS - Word Processing
(Bilingual) Student rates. Fast turnaround.
5670 Yew St. at 41st. Kerrisdale 266-6814.
TERM PAPERS & ESSAYS. Minimum
notice. 222-4661, Mon.-Fri. 12-5 p.m. only.
FAST. ACCURATE TYPING. Student rates.
All types of typing jobs. Fraser-Kingsway
area. Paula, 873-2227.
PROFESSIONAL TYPING: Electronic typing
25 yrs. exp. Theses, mscpts., reports,
resumes, statistical. 271-6755 Richmond.
TYPING & WORD PROCESSING. Reasonable rates. 261-2337.
SOFT SOLUTIONS word processing:
papers, theses, reports, mscpts., resumes,
mail lists/labels. Days, eves., wkneds.
731-1252.
BROWN LEATHER WALLET, Friday, Jan.
24th, 2:30 to 3:30 p.m. in S.U.B. or between S.U.B. and Law Building. Bill Coller,
731-5506.
LOST JAN. 20: A 6 ft. black mohair scarf
near Sedge Et Bus Stop Cafe. Please phone
Jo Ann, 228-8631.
Student Rates $1.50/pg. db. sp. text
Theses - Equations - Reports
All work done on Micom Word Processor
FAST PROFESSIONAL SERVICE
JEEVA'S WORD PROCESSING
201 636 W. Broadway
876 5333
Eves., Sun.-Thurs. only 939-2703 Tuesday, January 28, 1986
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 11
EXTERNAL From page 6
four per cent tuition fee increase, he
says we have to be realistic, because
without the increase the four per
cent would be cut back somewhere
else in the university. "Ideally I'd
like to see more money" he said.
Friesen said a study should be
done on the allocation of space in
SUB. "It is a student union
building and students should have a
say in it". His idea is to have a
questionnaire in the Ubyssey to get
feedback from students.
VICE From page 6
Realistically, the increase will go
forward and we should consider
ourselves lucky it is only four per
cent, she said.
Nevraumont feels the SUB shopping mall is annoying to a lot of
students. "It impedes progress
through the SUB," she said. "They
should book a room upstairs where
interested people can go and find it
without having it bother people
who aren't interested."
"A lot of the services are becoming unnecessary and it is turning
more into a business concern," she
said.
ADMIN. From page 7
services within the building, and
develop a five year plan for painting
the building and other repairs.
If you don't keep up preventive
medicine you'll be hit with a big bill
all at once," he said.
BLAIR T.
LONGUEY
PRESIDENT
of ihe AMS
Experience: None
EXCEPT
WITH AMS
executives' inaction!
What would you do if you had a
proposal that saved students or
their families 6- friends hundreds of
dollars on tuition, presented the
program to and had it endorsed by
the AMS, and then found the
AMS executive interfering with the
Council's directive to help
publicize the program? AMS executives do not have veto power
over Student Council decisions!
As president of the AMS, I intend
to make sure that Student Council
decisions are respected and implemented.
bE"     Jamie Collins
for
AMS Director of Finance
• AMS Director of Finance (85-86)
• Student Rep., B.C. Student Loans Appeals
• AMS Committees —Budget, CPAC, Renovations
• SUB Project Administrator (83-84)
• Assistant Director of Finance (82-83)
VOTE WED.-THURS.-FRI.
You won't get to graduation
without one.
PROFESSIONAL PROGRAM
IN
CHILD CARE
SCHOOL OF CHILD CARE
—offers a B.A. in Child Care which provides academic study
and field work practice
—prepares students to work as practitioners with children,
youth and families with special needs, i.e., social/emotional
problems, mental handicaps, and delinquent behaviour
—requires 12 units of university credit for application
—deadline for applications is MARCH 31
Apply to
Admission Services,
University of Victoria,
P.O. Box 1700,
Victoria, B.C. V8W 2Y2
Rent it.
By the day, week, or month.
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534 West Pender, Vancouver, Rentals 683-2237
WE DELIVER
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Send a message to your
sweetheart in The
Ubyssey VALENTINE'S
DAY special message
issue. Feb. 13th. $2.50
for 3 lines. Deadline for
ads Feb. 10th, SUB Rm.
266.
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MMH Page 12
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, January 28, 1986
Jekyll, Hyde weekend for 'Birds
By COLIN JEROME
The men's basketball 'Birds
played like two different teams last
weekend. Friday saw them play one
of their most miserable games of
the season as they lost an 85-82
decision to the number five ranked,
previously unbeaten University of
Lethbridge Pronghorns. Saturday
saw the same 'Bird team explode
against the number seven ranked
/,
University of Calgary Dinosaurs for
an impressive 91-77 win.
Lethbridge dominated the game
from the opening tip. They scored
fourteen unanswered points behind
the slick shooting of forward
Jerome Ell to take an early 28-13
lead. The 'Birds out-rebounded the
Pronghorns 33-17 but had to play
"catch-up" for the rest of the
game.
UBC's 6'4" forward Ken Klassen
managed 24 points on the evening,
but the 'Birds veteran triggerman
had trouble inside. He shot 55%
from the floor compared to a
season average of 64%. Kevin Hanson, a 6' guard, played a strong
game, making six steals and scoring
fourteen points. The always consistent Paul Johansson played an
outstanding game for the 'Birds. He
(
( SPORTS )
'"''' V" w*. V"^ pd!d-i , '
— time less photo
YA6BA DABBA DOO yellsi highflying UBC astronomy PhD undergoing moonskiing trials in Astronaut Training
201. Tests were held in remote northern wilderness community said to be inhabited by UBC sports staffers and
cruise missiles in summer. Devastating effects of sitting on unfriendly warheads are exhibited by space cadet.
Ski 'Birds fly down the hill
VARSITY SKIING
By WENDY MORRISON
The Thunderbird ski team had
another successful weekend in the
Northwest Collegiate Ski Conference meet at White Pass,
Washington. The men's team won
the overall combined alpine-nordic
title while the women won the giant
slalom.
The men swept the first three
giant slalom positions. Stu Gairns
posted fastest time of 1:16.94,
followed by Ken Stevens and Dave •
Buckley. The women captured the
first two positions of the event.
After a close first run, Wendy Morrison and Susan Hagen posted the
fastest second run times in a one-
two finish ahead of Pacific
Lutheran's Melle Christoffersen.
In the slalom, the Thunderbirds
were not so consistent. Gairns and
Stevens were first and second and
Andrea Jaegli was fourth in the
women's race but there were some
spectacular crashes.
"We have to ski more consistently and have everyone finish our
races if we want to win the Regional
Championships at Whistler in
February," said UBC coach
Gairns.
In the nordic events, the men's
team improved over last weekend's
results. In the 3 x 10K relay they
were nipped out of second place by
Kent Murdock of Washington on
the last leg. SFU dominated the
nordic events again, winning the
relay and placing first and third in
the 15K Open race. John Lineen
won for the third consecutive time
with 46:01.
UBC's best finisher was
Gerry Furseth in 50:48, followed by
Alan Wilman in 9th and Gairns in
10th.
Gairns' finish was good enough
to give him the Skimeister (best
overall skier in alpine and crosscountry) title. Wendy Morrison also
won the women's skimeister
honours, finishing 14th in the 10K
open behind Barb Lang of SFU and
fellow Thunderbirds.
TRACK AND FIELD
By JOEL SILVERMAN
Event rescheduling, injuries and
poor accomodations plagued the
track team at the Golden Bear Invitational in Edmonton this
weekend.
The field events' schedule was
changed and athletes did not have
proper warm-up time. But several
were able to attain their national
standards that qualifies athletes for
the CIAU's. Tami Lutz placed first
in the highjump with a leap of
1.78m. Also in the women's HJ,
Heather D'Oyley made standard by
jumping 1.68m. Jim Gamlin equaled his personal best jump of 2.04m.
He also qualified himself for nationals with this fourth place jump.
In the triplejump, Kevin Godden
proved he is again a threat for a
medal at CIAU's with his leap of
14.22m. Rookie longjumper
Malcolm McNeight impressed by
making standard by jumping
6.85m.
A rash of injuries hindered
several performances. Most notable
among them was Bob Dalton whose
35.44 sec. 300m was a result of a
troublesome achilles tendon.  Pete
Sharpf, whose groin pull had
hampered training in the week prior
to the meet bounced back to help
the 4x800m and 4x400m teams
qualify for the CIAU's. "Peter's injury required deep massage in order
to get him ready for this weekend,"
said team therapist Kristine Chapman.
VARSITY RUDDY
It was physical rugby at its best
Saturday afternoon but unfortunately it was the UBC Thunderbirds who were on the losing side in
both the rugby score and the
physical side.
Vancouver Island Reps "Crimson Tide" rolled over UBC enroute
to a 33-7 victory and their second
consecutive McKechnie Cup (symbolic of B.C. Rugby Union
supremacy). And there was no denying that the much larger Tide
players captured the often unseen
but extremely crucial battle in the
trenches as well to make their victory easier. It was this battle, commented UBC coach Barry Legh
after the match, that was the difference between the 33-7 result and
a much closer 17-6 game in Victoria
the previous weekend.
"There's no question that on
rugby skills alone we are very competitive with Vancouver Island. But
they are an older team who are a
group of individuals that are willing
to do whatever is necessary to win,"
said Legh.
"The kind of tactics used by
them in the game are the subtle, unseen ones designed to throw you off
your game. Bult it's up to the
referee to call those infractions,"
said Legh.
duplicated Klassen's numbers for
scoring and rebounding.
For UBC it was a game of missed
second chances. By half-time, they
had cut the 'Horns lead to 45-39.
During a frustrating second half,
Lethbridge continued to
demonstrate crisp passing and hot
inside shooting from 6'1" guard
Brent Maxwell who led the 'Horns
with 34 points. UBC's frustration
culminated in two technical fouls
charged to head coach Bruce Enns
when he argued over general controversial calls. The 'Birds battled
back for a 60-60 tie, but turnovers
gave the 'Horns the ball and the
game.
"We had our chances. Thank
goodness for tomorrow," said
Enns. UBC   did   everything
against a bewildered Calgary team.
They out-shot the 3-0 Dino's 54%
to 49%, and grabbed an amazing 48
rebounds compared to Calgary's
15.
Klassen made a complete turn
around. His powerful style under
the basket resulted in 40 points and
nine rebounds. Johansson was there
again for the 'Birds with 23 valuable
points. "You have to give credit to
my team-mates. They did a great
job giving me the ball inside," said
Klassen.
The Dinosaurs could not break
UBC's tough defence. Most of their
baskets came from the seventeen
foot range, while the 'Birds scored
inside and outside the paint. The
'Birds were hot, stretching their
lead to as much as twenty points.
The 1-4 'Birds meet the
Dinosaurs again, next Friday in
Calgary.
W     L   F A   Pts
Victoria 5      0   409    352 10
Lethbridge       3     2   409    409  6
Calgary 3      2   398     399  6
Alberta 2     3   398    409 4
Saskatchewan   1      4   377    388  2
B.C. 1      4   381     415  2
Roller coaster
ride for 'Birds
By SVETOZAR KONTIC
Watching the UBC hockey club
one wonders whether the imposters
or the real team will show up for the
game.
This weekend in Brandon the imposters showed up on Friday night
getting whipped 11-5 by the Bobcats. On Saturday evening the real
team showed up winning 4-3 behind
a strong defensive performance.
"It was the worst game I have
seen a UBC team play in my five
years here," said a despondant
UBC coach Fred Masuch of his
teams performance on Friday night.
That night Brandon scored on its
first four shots on net and led 6-1 by
the end of the first period. UBC
outshot Brandon 19-12 in that
period and goaltender Ray Silvey
was lifted in favour of Carl Repp.
Once again key offensive stars on
the opposing team spelled the doom
of UBC. Tim Lenardon, the leading
scorer in the league and Jim
Mollard, second leading scorer
simply ran over the 'Birds. Mollard
scored seven points in the one game
while much of UBC's lineup has little more for the season.
"We put the Coflin line out to
check these guys and take care of
them. They were supposed to do the
job but they scored three of the first
six goals," said Masuch.
In the second game UBC went
back to its checking style of hockey
where they have been most successful this season. Keith Abbott
scored a pair of goals including the
winner with only 52 seconds left.
"We stayed close to people and
checked them — we played ugly
hockey. I'm getting tired of people
telling me about playing free wheeling, free skating, open style hockey.
We did that on Friday night and
look where it got us. In order for
this team to have any success we
have to play a disciplined, defensive
brand of hockey," said Masuch.
The 'Birds throughout the season
have slipped back and forth between sloppy pond ho. key and
sound checking hockey. The results
as displayed by this weekends action and a 7-13 record have been
worse more times than better.
"There are still some players on
this team who have got to realize
that the only way this team is going
to win is through man on man play.
We are not as good as team as we
were last year at this time," said
Masuch.
UBC's next action is this
weekend on the road against
Lethbridge. Though the Pronghorns are in last place UBC cannot take them lightly as every victory is hard earned for the 'Birds.
W     L   GF      GAPts
Alberta 18 2 132 70 36
Manitoba 13 7 111 88 26
Calgary 13 7 109 92 26
Saskatchewan 12 8 99 78 24
Brandon 9 11 113 120 18
UBC 20 7 13 77 14
Regina 4 16 66 123 8
Lethbridge 4 16 66 123 8
Women swimmers
sail past opposition
By IAN ROBERTSON
The UBC women's swim team
continued its winning ways Saturday by thrashing the University of
Puget Sound 70-25. The Birds were
led by veteran Kim Austin with wins
in the 200m breaststroke, 200m
backstroke and the 200m freestyle.
Other winners included Pauline
Martin (50 freestyle), Anne Martin
(100m freestyle) and Sandra Mason
(200I.M.).
"The women's team has been improving all year. With this momentum they should have no difficulty
winning the national title," said
head coach Ken Radford.
The men's team couldn't keep
pace with the women, suffering a
54-41 loss to the UPS Loggers.
UBC had an opportunity to overtake the sprint oriented Loggers go
ing into the final relay, but were
unable to pull off the come from
behind victory.
"I was very pleased with the effort the men's team gave, especially
after being down early in the
meet. Men's team captain Geoff
Grover was instrumental in keeping
the confidence level high," said
Radford.
Dave Young led the way by winning all three events he entered, while
Bruce Berger (200m backstroke)
and Rob Traynor (200m
breastroke) rounded out the list of
men's winners. Pat Smith and Andrew Huige posted season best
times and Ian McMillan swam an
inspirational 800m freestyle.
The 'Birds next action is Friday
at home against University of Victoria.

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