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The Ubyssey Sep 20, 1963

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Array THE UBYSSEY
our
patience
Vol. XLVI
VANCOUVER, B.C., FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 20,  1963
48
No. 4
NOT ONE, BUT TWO tow trucks go to work on unregistered cars in C-lot Thursday afternoon. Parking czar Sir Ouvry Roberts has handed out warning tickets and posted notices,
but dozens of cars were still illegally parked.   Trucks will  be used  regularly from   now.
Politician - student urges
$100  graduation tax'
Fort girls
want better
protection
Fort Camp girls' president Donna Morris Thursday demanded more lighting and better patrols in the camp area.
She has also cautioned girls not to go out alone on
campus  after dark and  to  stay away from  the  beach altogether.
Her remarks followed a story in The Ubyssey that told
of seven indecent advances on girls in the past year.
"The story in The Ubyssey
should have convinced everyone of the potential danger of
the beach area," she said. With
only one stairway down the
near-vertical cliff, anyone
caught down there would be
trapped.
"We hope the administration
will be able to get more lights
in the pathways leading from
the campus to the dorms."
UBC students should pay a
graduation tax, Chris Thomson, fourth-year student and a
Conservative candidate in Burnaby, said Wednesday.
He said students should pay
a tax of $100 a year, over and
above actual tuition fees.
It would be repaid at $100
a year for the four years fol-
Engineers men of letters,
cameraman assures us
Weeeeeeel! the Engineers finally did it.
They did something too big for Ubyssey to photograph.
The engineers, plus three bags of slake lime, plus 300
feet of string, plus 400 plastic cups, built themselves three
huge letters on the library lawn. They spelled out EUS.
After first surveying the 20 by 30-foot letters and laying
down the string, each engineer took a cup of lime and spread
it over a small section of the letters.
An EUS spokesman said they didn't use a machine because, by using engineers, they encourage group spirit.
lowing graduation, said Thomson, a political science and
economics major.
He told a Burnaby meeting
that $100 a year from the approximately 14,000 students at
UBC would give the university
an extra $1.4 million a year.
"In other words, $1,400,000
would be available to the university as a yearly revenue
which would be above and beyond a government subsidy.
"The money would provide
UBC and other B.C. universities with better facilities and
top-grade faculty members," he
said.
It   would also  pay  some of
the   cost   of   educating   young
Canadians who get their educa-
Continued on page 2
SEE: THOMSON
GIRL GRABBED
"Two years ago I saw a girl
returning from dinner, about
7 p.m., grabbed by two men and
hauled toward a car on the
highway.
"Her scream attracted the
attention of a group of Fort
Camp boys who helped her. The
The two men escaped to their
car and got away.
"I don't know if the incident
was reported or not," she said.
The Ubyssey interviewed
several girls from both the
Fort Camp dorms and the new
women's residences. Almost all
admitted having heard "strange
noises" outside their residences.
"The place sounds like a
jungle some nights," said one
girl, who asked that her name
not be used. She also told of an
incident involving her roommate in the Fort dorms.
BOWLER HAT
"One evening she went, by
herself, for a walk along the
beach. When she came back she
told me she had seen a 'funny
little man' running around the
beach wearing nothing but a
blue bowler hat.
"I don't think she reported
the incident to either the don
or the police."
Another girl, a fourth year
Arts student, told The Ubyssey
she and several other girls had
seen a man lurking in the brush
along a short cut from the
Buchanan building to the Fort
Camp residences.
"We were always in a group
so we didn't think too much of
it and didn't report it until we
were later warned by the Dean
of Women."
RCMP Sergeant Doug Thompson told The Ubyssey his job
is made much harder by girls
too embarrassed to report incidents or who report them hours
or even days later.
DONNA MORRIS
. . . more protection
RED - LIGHT
TOURISM
Page 2
Loomis men
crammed in
UBC library
Two men were in UBC's
library studying plans for
Vancouver's biggest robbery
as students crammed for
their final exams this year,
Vancouver police court was
told Thursday
Prosecutor Stewart Mc-
Morran said two of three
men involved in the May 19
$500,000 Loomis robbery borrowed a book on extradition
treaties April 17.
"They thought obviously
the thief would leave the
country and go some place
where extradition would not
be possible," McMorran
said.
But Douglas John Brown,
a former Loomis employee
already convicted in the
theft, was arrested in Brazil
—a country that has no extradition treaty with Canada
—and deported anyway.
McMorran testified Thursday at the trial of two other
men being held in connection with the theft.
UBC library loan desk officials said the two men must
have read the book inside
the building.
They said the general public can use UBC books as long
as they are not taken out of
the building.
Appearing in court Thursday   were   John  Grant,   31,
contractor, of 6536 Kempson,
Surrey, and Jerry Raymond
Continued on page 2
SEE: LOOMIS Page 2
THE        UBYSSEY
Friday, September 20, 1963
TOM   D'AQUINO
. . pleasure capital
BONNIE   ERICKSON
. . . supply and demand
RRI4N WAUJVCE
. . . Outstrip supply
Red  light  tourist  boom
Souvenir hunters cheered
for new  pleasure capital'
By GRAEME MATHESON
Want to make the tourist
trade boom?
Legalize prostitution in Vancouver.
That's what a capacity Brock
THOMSON
Continued from page 1
tion here  and then leave  for
the U.S., said the youthful Conservative.
"There would be only a few
who would not gladly pay for
their university degree," he
added.
Thomson is the second youngest candidate ever to run in
B.C.
Thomson also took a swing
at labor.
He followed Vancouver
Center Communist William
Stewart who preached more
wheat sales to Russia and
Paddy Neale, the New Democrat, who promised medicare
and education grants.
"They are promising you
something for nothing," said
Thomson.
That's mathematically impossible, the economics student
added.
Thomson was howled down
by the audience.
"You should be thankful to
the corporations and businessmen—they're paying your salary.
LOOMIS
Continued from page 1
Peterson, 33, laborer, also of
Surrey.
They admitted before Magistrate Gordon Scott, they
took part in the May 19
weekend robbery.
McMorran said Brown told
Grant he felt the security
system of the Loomis company was such it would not
be too difficult for him to get
the money out.
The prosecutor said that
because it would be obvious
it was an inside job, the arrangements had to be made
for Brown to get to a 'safe"
country.
The stolen money was to
be kept in B.C. and at a later
opportune time Brown's
share would be transported to
him.
Hall crowd decided Thursday.
They overwhelmingly carried a
Debating Union resolution "Resolved that prostitution should
be legalized in Vancouver."
Speaking for the affirmative,
Tom D'Aquino said: "Vancouver would become the pleasure
capital of the West."
But negative speaker David
Buchanan disagreed.
Buchanan replied: "We would
find ourselves a little island
of prostitution, attracting degenerate males from everywhere."
D'Aquino accused the opposition of "sinning quietly".
He said: "If prostitution was
legalized, the psycopath would
no longer roam Granville St.,
bag of candies in pocket."
Negative speaker Brian Wallace pointed out that it would
aggravate unemployment by
attracting these degenerates.
FLAT 5
Glenn McDonald
Quartet
TONIGHT & SATURDAY
SUNDAY NIGHT
Tom Baird Trio
Student Rates
75c Sun. Only
3623 W. Broadway
RE 8-6412
Next Week: Elinor Collins with
the Don Thompson Trio.
And, he said, demand would
far outstrip the supply of available ladies.
But the second speaker for
the affirmative, Bonnie Erickson refuted him: "Supply and
demand would balance by attracting more prostitutes, too."
She said the legalized ladies
could form unions and become
respectable.
She visualized a great new
industry with some name like
"Bonanza Brothels".
Miss Erickson wore a rather
frigidly blue dress to the debate.
Classics Department professor C. W. Elliot moderated the
debate.
From the floor came: "It
seems to me that these days
one need no longer pay for the
pleasure."
And Professor Eliot replied:
"Where?"
Legalize prostitutes,
but watch rolling pins
We'd better not use prostitution as a tourist attraction, or
we'll be clubbed to death by
rolling pins.
That's the verdict of Harold
Merilees, director of Vancouver's tourist bureau.
He was commenting on a
debate at UBC where it was
decided that legal prostitution
would be a boon to the tourist
trade.
"Wives make most of the decisions on holiday travel," he
said,   "the rolling pins  would
surely come out pretty fast.
"The women would level off
at any town that legalized prostitution."
Merilees said he didn't know
of a single city where he had
ever heard of prostitution being legal.
"It's damn nonsense," he
said, "this is ridiculous."
Finances probed
DENMARK (CUP)—The Student Council of the University
of Copenhagen has made a
study of the finances of Danish
students. '
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WILL GO UP IN PRICE SHORTLY.
BIRD  CALLS  75c
Totem 'Grad Book' - $2.50; Totem 'Campus-Life'-$3.00 Friday, September 20, 1963
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 3
KAY McCORLEY . . . beauty with beasts
Beauty infiltrates
Sir Ouv's army
The traffic department is not all beast.
Working in Sir Ouvry Robert's traffic office is pretty 21-
year-old Kay McCorley, a former beauty queen from Australia. ,
"We aren't all bad here," her
boss Traffic Superintendent
Cece Paul said happily.
Unfortunately, she is monopolized by Paul and Sir Ouvry
Roberts. She has few dealings
with students.
Miss McCorley won a beauty
contest sponsored by a Brisbane department store before
she left Australia.
She is working her way
around the world with a girl'
friend.
Men in Vancouver are just
like men anywhere, she says.
"Men are all the same.
"It's just a matter of how
you take them."
She enjoys basketball, squash,
and swimming, but prefers
surfing in the "big surf" of
Australia most of all.
Vancouver, she says, is ideal.
The fair-skinned Australian
beauty will be leaving here
soon on her way around the
world, so get to the traffic office soon.
She has been here since November.
Jail terms
protested
AUSTRIA (CUP) —The Na.
tional Union of Austrian students has protested the imprisonment in Italy of three Austrian students.
The trio were sentenced to
five years for their part in
a demonstration which involved setting off various explosives and Molotov cocktails.
La mon tag ne sera ici pour
la semaine Quebecoise
Par RICHARD SIMEON
Maurice Lamontagne, leading spokesman for French Canada in the federal cabinet, will
be keynote speaker for UBC's
French Canada week, Nov.  4
to 8.
French Canada Week officials are hopeful Quebec Premier Jean Lesage, and possibly
// you have no sticker,
you re stuck with C-lot
If you haven't already got an A-lot sticker you won't
get one now.
Sir Ouvry Roberts, head of traffic and parking, stopped
issuing A-lot stickers Tuesday after 1,500 cars were registered for the lot.
Anyone registering a car after this date must park in B
or C lots.
Unafreud
Guilt complex?
Not Sir Ouvry
By ANN BURGE
Sir  Ouvry Roberts,  the   genial  "most hated  man  on
campus" doesn't blame himself for UBC's traffic problems.
"There are two causes of the
problem — and they are both
outside my jurisdiction," the
traffic czar said Thursday,
smiling happily.
"The first major cause is the
main gateway on university
boulevard. I have no control
over the situation there.
"And the second cause is the
junction at Forty-first and Marine, where two lanes converge
into one.
"Again, there isn't a thing I
can do," he said.
The responsibility for the
off-campus roads rests with
the provincial government.
"We are considering several
confidential solutions to the
problem, but only the government can act on them," S i r
Ouvry said.
"And who can say when a
government that isn't really a
government will act?"
But Sir Ouvry has one not
so pleasant solution of his own
to the traffic problem.
If you are one of the rare
people who dutifully stay home
and study Friday nights, you
can easily arrange to have lectures on Saturdays, bright and
early.
"Then," said the beaming
traffic czar, "the traffic isn't
bad at all."
Students abroad
AFGHANISTAN (CUP) —
Afghanistan has sent 970 students abroad to study during
the past 12 years.
other Quebec   cabinet   ministers will be able to attend.
FCW is intended to promote
understanding and cooperation
between English and French-
speaking Canadians, said Mike
Akerly, chairman of the committee.
"The need for understanding
is getting more and more important today, especially for
students in B.C. who are so
far removed from Quebec," he
said.
The week features French-
Canadian speakers, entertainers, panel discussions and an
art exhibition.
Father William Collins, o.f.m.,
of Montreal, will speak on religion. Jean-Guy Pilon, literary
editor and critic for CBC,
Montreal, will discuss culture.
Entertainment will be supplied by Quebec's folk-singing
Franciscan priest, Pere Bernard.
Other French-Canadian experts are expected to answer
invitations soon.
Student delegates from Laval, Montreal, and Sherbrooke
universities will bring the student viewpoint to UBC.
They will participate with
UBC professors and students in
panel discussions discussing the
main speeches.
"We will have a keynote
speaker at noon, and a panel
discussion at 3:30 p.m. every
day," said Akerly.
Cal uses housing service
to rout discrimination
BERKELEY (CUP)—Students can stop discrimination
in University of California's listed housing by reporting discriminatory practices to the housing service, a law professor
here says.
The housing service investigates claims of discrimination in student housing, says Professor Sho Sato, chairman
of the Chancellor's Committee on Discrimination.
Last year, the UBC Alma Mater Society, established a
housing service here after The Ubyssey disclosed discrimination in student housing.
IN POINT
VOTE THE
FULTON
TEAM
PURDY
CAMPAIGN  PHONES:
MALKIN
261-3174 or 266-2377
BROOME
PROGRESSIVE   CONSERVATIVE
-■^i THE UBYSSEY
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the university
. yuar by the Alma Mater Society, University of B.C. Editorial opinions
expressed are those of the editor and not necessarily those of the AMS
or the University. Editorial and advertising office in Brock Hall, CA'
4-324:!, after 5 p.m., CA 4-3245. Member Canadian University Press.
Winner Canadian  University Press trophies  for general
excellence, news photography, editorial writing
FRIDAY,   SEPTEMBER   20,   1963
wmmmmmm
Sometime Socreds
We would like to put in a word for the government
that gets some things done.
We read in the August edition of B.C. Government
News about all the nice things our Social Credit government has done for the province of B.C.
We saw that' in the last fiscal year, the Socreds spent
$13.6 million caring for the mentally ill, $31.9 million on
hospital services, and $24 million for social assistance.
On our fine natural resources, Mr. Bennett spent
$22 million caring for our forests and our fisheries and
our agriculture.
We saw where they pumped $83 million into highways and railways to help our beautiful province's progress.
And we saw where Mr. Bennett gave away $15.1 million in his fine homeowner grant.
We could almost feel B.C. surging forward.
Then we went down the list to the grants to universities and colleges. Well, we thought, here's where the
big figures are. If they spend more than $40 million on
sick people, and more than $20 million on resources,
then they surely must spend even more on healthy young
minds, B.C.'s most important natural resource.
We saw the total amount spent on all higher educational institutes in B.C. was a mere $16.2 million.
Of that, $11 million is the entire capital and operating grant to UBC.
Well, we thought, no wonder some people said UBC
starved last year. No wonder the best government we've
ever had in the last 11 years could manage to give up
only $370,000 of a requested $1.7 million operating grant
last year.
We understand. Obviously, a government working
so hard for the province's progress can't throw money
down the drain. Not when there are highways to build,
and bridges, and power dams, and homeowner grants, and
mental hospitals and forests and fish, and progress and
more progress to achieve.
We hope that all UBC students will see the advantages of building things and worrying about people to
run them later. s
And we hope that on Sept. 30, every student will
get out there and vote for the party that gets some things
done.
For Chris  sake
Well, we should have known better than to support
a university kid who suddenly decides to turn politician.
We go along with students who decide to be foresters
and engineers and doctors and lawyers and scientists.
We even like to see students turn into (shudder)
college professors.
But politicians., We're ashamed of ourselves.
The first thing Chris Thomson does when he turns
21 is turn politician. Then his first campaign promise is
to boost UBC fees $100 a year with a subtle plot he calls
a graduation tax.
Just to prove he's a politician, he graduates this
year, and he won't be around to have to pay the tax.
Now, Chris, we realize that as a university-trained
man, the first thing you think you should do as a candidate is be honest with the people.
Sure, tell them it costs money to support universities. But let them, pay for it, Chris.
Please don't forget your old friends at university,
buddy.
And Chris, before you make any more promises, why
don't you consider coming back. We need you here, paying your fees, more than we need you in Victoria.
EDITOR,- Mike Hunter
Editors
Associate Keith Bradbury
News Dave Ableti
Managing George Railton
City Mike Horsey
Photo Don Hume
Sports -J Denis Stanley
Critics    Bob McDonald
Ass't City _- Richard Simeon
Ass't News Tim Padmore
Senior  Donna Morris
SenWr' lilll TOaorMii *Cc*«n
Authorized as second class mail
by Post Office Department, Ottawa,
and for payment of postage in cash.
REPORTERS AND DESK: Tom
W a y m a n, Roger McAfee, Ann
Burse, Ron Riter, Kathy Tait, Lorraine Shore, Clint Pulley, Alan
Donald, Brian Sung, Dick Ablett,
Terry Kilborn, Mike Atchison,-John
Kelsey, Lionel Wood, Ron Rempel,
Karen   McConnachie,   Janet  Mathe-
"Coffee-drink 110 and Sex._320.   And   your   majors?"
* ,       * ' ' , ^a
ELECTION  BACKGROUND
B.C.'s poll-happy premier
trying for biggest record
By KEITH BRADBURY
William Andrew Cecil
Bennett will go down in history as the poll-happy premier.
He's called more elections
and he's called them faster
than any other government
leader in B.C.'s history.
Even if he never gets another vote in his life, he will
hold claim to three records
—the significance of which
may be somewhat dubious—
but records, nevertheless.
1. He called four elections
—in 1953, 1956, 1960 and
1963. It's enough to beat out
the previous record holder,
Sir Richard McBride, who
called three—in 1906, 1908
and 1912.
2. The five elections since
1952 (including the one that
brought Bennett to power)
constitute some sort of a record in that there has never
been five elections in any 11-
year period in the past.
**•    V     T*
Bennett headed the shortest legislature in the province's history elected in
June, 1952, and dissolved in
March, 1953, and since then
has establised himself a believer in the short term.
The facts emerged along
with some others from a
check of political records following Bennett's surprise
election announcement last
month.
The pattern has been one
of short terms with elections
called whenever they suit the
premier himself. They have
been followed by the short-
.?. est notice of election allowed
^Me*M<t!JW;V."---.	
MR. BENNETT
... a premier event
His first term in office was
less than a year long in
1952-53, because his minority
government Was defeated.
His second term lasted
from 1953-56, a year shorter
than the average four-year
term of previous B.C. premiers, and two years short of
the five-year maximum allowed.
When Bennett decided it
was time for a new election,
in 1956, he casually mentioned it in a radio broadcast.
The   broadcast  was exactly
38 days before election day
— the minimum time allowed.
V  v **•
His next term lasted from
1956-60. This time he made
the announcement of dissolution at a home-town meeting in Kelowna. Again 38
days' notice.
The la"st one, of course, has
been a three-year term. This
time 39 days' notice.
Political scientists say
there are two possible explanations for the short-term
approach.
Either Bennett calls ^an
election when he feels it is
best or else when he is
scared.
"It's obvious he doesn't
work on a schedule," said
one.
They said the short notice
is simply a means of gaining
political advantage. The
shorter the campaign period,
the shorter time the opposition has to make its case for
the public.
No other premier has apparently tried the short-term
approach of Bennett, although
returning officials in Victoria said many other premiers
have given the least notice
they could of an impending
vote.
T*   V   V
There's a record Bennett
doesn't hold yet — and its
probably one he wants someday to have.
He's still a year and a half
short of holding office for
the longest period of any
premier.
The record is 12% years—
again- held by McBride. Friday, September 20, 1963
THE       UBYSSEY
Pago 5
BACKGROUND
Meeting college challenge:
A B.C. student federation
By RON RITER
A federation of B.C. university students is in the
planning stages.
Student councils of UBC
and Victoria College are
moving to meet the challenge
presented by the system of
universities and junior colleges envisioned in the Macdonald Report.
The first meeting of the
proposed federation will be
held in late October, after
Notre Dame University has
elected a student council.
Representatives from
UBC, Victoria College and
Notre Dame will then meet
to discuss structure, function
and constitution of the organization.
The matter will then be
discussed by the individual
councils and the founding
conference will probably be
held in January, 1964.
The purposes of the proposed federation are to:
• Create a united front
among B.C.'s institutions
of higher education.
• Permit intensification of
non-partisan political activities supporting higher
education.
• Give students a voice in
the development of intercollegiate athletics.
Independent
Student Council
• Influence and aid in the
establishment of independent student councils at
new universities.
• Present co-ordinated support for such groups as the
Higher Education Promotion committee (HEP).
• Develop an inter-collegiate academic program of
speeches, conferences, seminars, special events and
artistic functions.
DR. JOHN MACDONALD
... his challenge
UBC's AMS president Malcolm Scott said Thursday
Larry Devlin, his counterpart at Victoria College has
been very receptive to the
idea of the federation.
Help out
the fledglings
One of its major purposes
will be to aid fledgling student councils at new universities.
"There are going to be a
lot of 'instant universities',"
Scott said, "and a danger
that administrations will
form 'company union' student governments.
"The federation would
help them find their feet before someone sweeps them
into a predetermined pattern."
Aid from the federation
would include advice on
creation of a student council,
press and the drafting of a
constitution.
Organization of B.C. students will permit large-scale
support of higher education.
"We want to create a favorable public image for higher education," Scott said,
"and continue the work of
the Back Mac campaign.
"The   co-ordination of stu
dents all over B.C. will be
invaluable."
Scott   describes  the  movement as the coming of age of
student government in B.C.
"Organizing our own program of inter-collegiate athletics, for instance, will give
us something more than an
extension of the PE department," Scott said.
Laying the
groundwork
Although   UBC   is   laying
the groundwork for the federation,  Scott said UBC cannot do the job alone.
"We don't want to create
student governments in our
own image," Scott said.
"It's imperative that Victoria College and Notre
Dame share in the basic
structure."
The beginnings of the regional organization will not
be large or elaborate.
The federation's headquarters and presidency will
rotate between the three
founding institutions, and
will not entail a large staff
or complex bureaucracy.
Money for three new buildings to round out a five-unit
fine arts complex is available
if UBC can find matching
grants, President Emeritus N.
A. M. MacKenzie said Thursday.
Speaking at the opening of
the new Frederic Wood Theater, President MacKenzie said
money for a new music building and museum of man and
art gallery up to half their
capital cost are available from
the Canada Council.
The   new   theater   received
Stickerless cars stuck
in sticks of B-lot
The student pay-lot in the corner of B-lot officially opens
Monday.
"We haven't been charging students to park there this
week," said Sir Ouvry Roberts, head of Traffic and Parking.
"We were not ticketing students for parking in the wrong
lot, or for parking without stickers, so it seemed unfair to
charge those who parked in the pay lot because they had
no stickers.
"But beginning Monday, if you haven't a sticker, you
have to pay," he said.
More theater money
available - - MacKenzie
approximately $2.5 million
from the Canada Council.
The gala opening of the new
theater was attended by Dean
N.S.F. Chant representing President John Macdonald.
Also at the opening were
Professor Emeritus F. C.
Wood, after whom the theater
was named, W. J. Dorrance, representing the Canada Council.
C. T. Taylor from the Department of Education, and G. G.
Woodward, from the Community Arts Council.
UN  strongest yet,
laws Curtis says
The United Nations is stronger today than at any time in
the past, Dean George F. Curtis said Thursday.
Speaking to a UN club meeting, he said the new countries
believe strongly in the United
Nations.
"They have swelled the
membership of the UN to 111
in the last few years, without
any increase in the size of the
Security Council," he told more
than  100  students.
John Grant, of the Extension
Department, said the UN has
failed to help solve major crises.
He said the large powers do
not use UN peacekeeping machinery, but instead decide the
result on their own.
"In cases like the Cuban
crisis, the UN has failed," he
said.
Professor Geoffrey Davies
said supporters of the UN
should not be deterred.
"World diplomacy has recently changed from the traditional power politics to a fast-
playing jet-age diplomacy," he
said.
But the weaker nation can
now enlist the moral support
of the world through the United Nations, he added.
Television school
TAIWAN, FORMOSA (CUP)
— A home study television
school has been established
here to supplement a shortage
of classrooms.
HEALTH PLAN BENEFITS
FOR ONLY
$6.50 A YEAR!
Until September 30th, 1963, all students eligible for
care at the University Health Service may obtain the
special M-S-l plan which covers most kinds of medical
and surgical care not available on campus.
This is the fourth year of this popular plan - and dues
for single students are $6.50.
A Family Plan is now available, for $15.00 a year,
to provide a plan of medical care for spouses and children
under 21.
This will cover you from October 1st, 1963 to September 30th, 1964.
CLOSING DATE IS SEPTEMBER 30, 1963
GET THE DETAILS NOW AT THE ACCOUNTING
OFFICE IN THE ADMINISTRATION BUILDING
HOURS: 9:00 A.M. TO 4:00 P.M. MONDAY TO FRIDAY
SPONSORED BY THE BOARD
OF GOVERNORS AND YOUR
STUDENT COUNCIL Page 6
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, September 20, 1963
n- -^ *<*»;<■'- '&*» *«■%>-- ^M»tt,r^,:-,^y^^ «^«**sm«f r "^^?,iswwfe.■... r£
Centre gets second unit
Seating for 400, all with a view, a bright new Freddy Wood feature
Lectures aid appreciation
A series of lectures to
augment the new Freddy
Wood Theatre productions
is part of UBC's 1963-64 evening; class program.
The program, consisting of
five lectures and a final symposium for appraisal and analysis, is designed to provide
the playgoer and serious students of the theatre with an
intensive background to the
plays and their authors.
All sessions will take place
in room 102 of the Frederic
Lasserre building commencing at 8 pjm.
On Sept. 24, following the
inaugural performance of
Julian Slade and Dorothy
Reynolds Musical Salad Days,
Sydney Risk, drama supervisor for the UBC extension department   and   Dr.   Welton
Marquis, head of the UBC
department of music, will
give the first lecture.
Second lecture in conjunction with theatre department's    student   production
The Dog Beneath the Skin.
by Christopher Isherwood
and W. H. Auden, will be
conducted by J. A. Lavin,
UBC department of English,
on Oct. 29.
Metro Theatre  Centre
opens full house season
The Metro Theatre Centre,
temporarily located at 4th
and Arbutus, will ipen its
season Sept. 24 with the Vancouver Little Theatre Association production of Agatha
Christie's mystery drama The
Hollow, directed by John
Parker.
The Centre's first half of
a two part program will in
clude plays by Shakespeare,
Tennessee Williams, Noel Coward, Moliere, Maura La-
verty, Elmer Rice, Richard
Gordon and Ted Willis.
Tickets priced at $1.25,
$1.50, $1.75 and $2.50 are
available at Modern Music.
Subscription member ships
are also available.
THE INQUISITION
NOW!
The
Sherwood
Singers
A new folk trio from Los
Angeles, singing their hit
record " Jellycoal Man"
and uh . . . others.
TOM DRURY
From Salt Lake City,
"Home of the folk singers"
student prices Monday to
Thursday.
Sept. 30, Oct. 1 & 2
RETURN
ENGAGEMENT
Edward  Albee's
The
Zoo
Story
Starring — Derek Rolston
and Michael Rotherey
A fun-filled story about a
New York boy and his
dog.
Oct. 3,4,5
The
Stan Getz
Quartet
The most popular of today's Jazz Groups.
Sundays, 8:30
Hootenanny
THE INQUISITION
Official opening of the new Frederic Wood Theatre took
place Thursday evening.
Professor Emeritus, Frederic G. C. Wood, in whose
honor the theatre is named, officiated at the ceremonies.
President Emeritus N. A. M. MacKenzie, who assisted Mr.
Wood in the opening of the original army-hut Freddy Wood
in 1952, also presided in the opening ceremonies.
The new theatre is the second unit of the University's
Centre for the Fine Arts which was made possible by a
grant from the Canada Council.
Total cost of the theatre was $598,758 with half the construction costs, or about $250,000 being put up by the Council.
Capacity of the new theatre is 400, less than the lavish
Queen Elizabeth Playhouse but exceeding by about four
times the capacity of the old theatre. Three classrooms with
a capacity of 50 each are included as well.
Prime feature of the new theatre is two revolving inner
stages for handling complex stage sets.
Freddy  Wood   presents  a   fine  foyer.
Fresh tossed production
Opening   production   in   the   new   Frederic   Wood
Theatre is the English musical Salad Days.
The comedy ran for seven years in London and three
months in Toronto and made its debut at UBC Thursday
evening to a sold out house.
Directed by John Brocking
ton and conducted by John Emerson the cast includes a host
of Vancouver leading ladies
and gentlemen. UBC graduates
Marguerite Stanlow, Bill Buckingham and John Sparks as
well as undergraduates John
Wright, John Brighton, Alan
Scarfe and Roger Kennedy are
featured along with Yvonne
O'Sullivan, Dean Regan, James
Johnston, Marjorie LeStrange,
former folknick Karen James,
and Mildred Franklin.
Settings are by Aristides
Gazetas, who designed the
Henry IV sets for last year's
Shakespeare production and
also the fantastic world of
Never-Never Land for the
Vancouver International Festival's production of Peter
Pan. Costumes are by Jessie
Richardson, and choreography by TUTS-lite and man
of Spring Thaw fame Dean
Regan. Lighting is by faithful UBC standby Norman
Young.
Performances  of  this  in
augural production run until
Oct. 5 with a special student
production Sept. 24. Regular prices are $2 while tickets for the student production are going quickly at $1.
Tickets for the five-play season are available to students
for $3. Other plays on tap
are Hedda Gabler by Henrik
Ibsen; Shakespeare's Taming
of the Shrew; Jean Genets
The Balcony; and the annual
student production, The Dog
Beneath the Skin by Christopher Isherwood.
Castings
Where has Anti gone?
Find out this afternoon by
reading for the theatre department's student production of Sophocle's Antigone.
Try-outs to be held from
3 to 5 p.m. in room 112 of
the new Frederic Wood Theater and 7:30 to 10:30 p.m.
in the auditorium. Friday, September 20, 1963
THE
UBYSSEY
Wood is birth of a life
Page 7
The new Frederic Wood
Building received a warm welcome to the world of theatre
yesterday at noon.
John Mason Brown, a slender, unassuming, grandfather-
image and eminent New York
drama critic, delivered the inaugural address in connection
with the opening of the new
theatre in fine Shawinian tradition.
"The opening of your new
theatre," he told some five
hundred theatre buffs, "is the
birth of a new life in the world
of drama."
'But it also presents a great
new challenge," he added.
"You are on the offensive,
now," he told UBC's Theatre
Department. "You have no alibis for bad productions with
this new theatre."
"Theatre faces its most serious challenges in the forms of
the mass communication media," he said, "yet, television
is not to be condemned. I am
all for some trash. It is the
spinach of the artistic diet."
'Your new theatre," he said,
"is proof that wood can be
turned into stone and yet re-
JOHN MASON BROWN
. .. today's theatre
main   the   most   human   of
humans."
He defined a New York the-
Engraving show
highlights gallery
The art of the engraver and lithographer—ranging from
Pieter Brueghel to Toulouse Lautrec—can be seen at the
Vancouver Art Gallery until Sept. 29.
Thecollection entitled, Recent Accessions of Prints and
Drawings, has been loaned to
Vancouver by the National
Gallery of Canada.
The examples cover a period
of about 400 years and show
how ideas and styles differ accordingly to national characteristics and change through
the centuries.
The earlier prints show aspects of what is known as reproductive engraving done by
one artist after the work of
another, which before the days
of photo-mechanical methods,
was the only way in which an
artist could publicize and disseminate his work.
Earliest work in the present
collection is an engraving by
Pieter van der Heyden of Pieter
Brueghel's painting, The Last
Judgment, published in 1558
by Jerome Coecke.
Other works are by Lautrec,
Manet, Feininger, Villon, Picasso, Vlaminck, Matisse, Appel,
Sugai and Kokoschka.
Weekend show
a potpourri of
art in action
Ten noted artists can be seen
in action at the Vancouver Art
Gallery tonight and tomorrow.
Seven techniques of art will
be demonstrated to the general
public from 7 pm to 10 pm this
evening and from 1 pm to 4 pm
tomorrow afternoon.
The potpourri of talent will
include Reg Holmes and Don
Jarvis, painting; William Koo-
chin, clay modelling; Gerald
Carter, carving; Peter Ochs,
assembly; Cleve Foster, graphics; Robert Weghsteen, ceramics; Fred Peter, design; Don
Babcock, stained glass, and
Karl Stittgen, jewellery. Admission is 75 cents.
Star studded
Symphony
The 34th season for Vancouver's symphony orchestra
will open October 20 with
Tossy Spivakvesky, violinist.
Ten regular Sunday afternoon concerts and the same
number of Monday evening
performances are scheduled
for the orchestra this year.
A host of school concerts, university concerts, out-of-town
performances and other miscellaneous programs will also
be given during the 1963-64
season.
Jazz slate
fine fare
This weekend the Flat Five
is presenting the Glenn McDonald Quartet, featuring
Alan Neil on piano, Bob
Whitmer, bass, Blaine Wik-
jord, drums, and the leader,
Glenn McDonald on tenor
saxophone.
Next week, Sept. 27 and 28,
the Flat Five hosts "Vancouver's First Lady of Jazz",
Eleanor Collins, backed by
the Don Thompson Trio. It is
Eleanor's first performance
since her tremendous success
at the Vancouver Jazz Festival this summer.
The Don Thompson Trio
is appearing this weekend at
the Cellar. The Cellar has
recently reopened under the
new management of Bill
Wight.
atre, in contrast to Freddy
Wood, as "a building erected
on a small plot of ground, as
close to as many of the same as
possible, which unless air conditioned, will often shed audiences as readily as it does plays
and playwrights."
His second, more serious
definition was, "A theatre is
the miraculous effect upon the
audience within the building;
of a vision seen through the
giant window of the stage."
"Never turn your backs on
a new theatre form," he warned the Theatre Department.
He continued to say that today's theatre is experiencing a
much needed rejuvenation in
the form of a new school of
playwrights, 'the theatre of the
absurd."
"These new young authors
are attempting to face up to
the enigma of man's dignity in
a world of dissonance and disharmony," he said.
"Thees men have found a
new release for a starving theatre."
"I cannot deny the power of
this form of abrasive writing,"
he said.
thespians
Brendan Behan's The Hostage opens Oct. 2 as the premier
production of Vancouver's new
repertory company the Playhouse Theatre Co.
The play, which ran for 452
performances in London and a
year in New York, will be directed in Vancouver by John
Hirsch, artistic director of the
Manitoba Theatre Centre, and
designed by Michael Johnston.
Opening Oct. 31 is Noel
Coward's Private Lives, directed by Jean Roberts. The Boy
Friend, a musical comedy by
Sandy Wilson, will start Nov.
14. Shakespeare's Julius Caesar
will be directed by Mavor
Moore in January to mark the
anniversary of Shakespeare's
birth. Desmond Scott will direct
Harold Pinter's The Caretaker
in February, and William Ball
will direct Brandon Thomas'
Charley's Aunt.
Catholic  Journal offers
$4,000 in literary contest
RAMPARTS, the National Catholic Journal, has announced
awards totalling $4,000 for original poetry and short stories.
Manuscripts in the short story contest must be received by
'Ramparts', published at 1182 Chestnut Street, Menlo Park,
California, by October 1, 1963. The deadline for poetry manuscripts is January 1, 1964.
There are no restrictions on topics, said 'Ramparts' publisher,
Edward M. Keating.
Poetry manuscripts must be at least 500 lines—of one poem
or a group of poems. Short stories must be from 3,000 to 7,000
words.
MAGAZINES AT LOW
STUDENT RATES!
TIME
1 year  $4.00
21 weeks $1.87
2 years  $8.00
LIFE
1 year    $3.50
6 mos.      $2.50
2 years   $6.75
MACLEAN'S
1 year     $1.50
2 years   $3.00
LE MAGAZINE
MACLEAN
1 year    $1.00
2 years   $1.50
THE NEW YORKER
6 mos.     $3.75
1 year     $5.00
ATLANTIC MONTHLY
8 mos.     $3.50
READERS' DIGEST
1 year     $2.97
HOUSE AND HOME
1 year     $4.50
SPORTS ILLUSTRATED
1 year  .   $5.00
2 years   $8.50
NEWSWEEK
1 year     $3.50
34 weeks   $2.75
2 years   $7.00
THE FINANCIAL POST
1 year     $4.00
(reg. $8.00 yearly)
PLAYBOY
1 year    $6.00
ESQUIRE
8 mos.  $2.00
ART NEWS
1 year   $5.75
FORTUNE
1 year     $7.50
ARCHITECTURAL
FORUM
1 year     $3.50
Subscriptions to all magazines,
STUDENT PERIODICAL AGENCY,
P.O. BOX 717, ADELAIDE P.O.,
TORONTO 1, ONTARIO
Please send the above underlined magazines to:
NAME _....
ADDRESS	
CITY 	
ZONE   PROVINCE 	
Payment enclosed Q    Bill me □     Renewal  □
SPORTY AND WARM
From the casual selection ... at
ftckarfo & JarUh  tj/lenA Wear
786 GRANVILLE STREET
* Vancouver's finest menswear shop * Page 8
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, September 20, 1963
MOVIHOI
British Columbia today is enjoying the greatest boom in the history
of any province in Canada. And the greatest years are still ahead.
Keep B.C. moving forward by re-electing the government that puts
progress ahead of platitudes - the government that gets things done.
Your vote for Social Credit on September 30th is a vote for the
policies that have brought British Columbia to the threshold of its
greatest years. Be sure with your vote. On September 30th, mark
your ballot for British Columbia's future. Vote for your Social
Credit candidate.
Giant diversion tunnels for the Portage Mountain Dam Project are nearing completion.
The mighty Peace River will be turned from its course in a few weeks, while the 600 foot
high dam is constructed. Your Social Credit Government's two-river hydro policy will
guarantee British Columbia the continent's greatest pool of low-cost available power.
[•••
,m"
r
I
Throughout B.C. modern highways and water crossings present a striking new image of our
Province to tourists and residents alike. In the next seven years, 50% more first class highway
mileage will be constructed.
prosperity,  i lie impact ui nert tuiiaLiuLiun ouu imtji-
ment is already apparent in our economy.
■ or hospital projects now under
on ... 20 more in the final plan-
ss. Your Social Credit Govern-
iiiuml u pledged to work for a national
health insurance plan which embodies no
new taxation load and respects the traditional doctor-patient relationship, in cooperation with the Federal Government.
Forestry this year, under progressive
Social Credit natural resource policies, will contribute more than $800
million to our economy. In the next
seven years your Government plans
to increase even that figure by 50%.
Terrific success of the B.C. Ferries system, and its growth from two ferries two
years ago to 19 today, is evidence of Social Credit Government leadership in opening
up your Province.
Site of Mica Dam on the Columbia River. The Social Credit Government is working to bring our people the lowest-cost power in
Canada. Rate reductions of $5 million each year will be made over
the next seven years, reflecting the economies realized through
public development of our vast hydroelectric resources.
Magnificent new Simon Fraser University will open to students in 1965 ... a cornerstone
in your Social Credit Government's plan to make higher education available to more than
20,000 new students throughout the Province in the next seven years.
1961 and 1962 both broke all records for economic growth.
This year is proving to be even better. Under Social Credit
Government, British Columbians enjoy the highest average
weekly wages and salaries in Canada.
FORWARD
SOCIAL CREDIT.
SEPT. 30
PUBLISHED BY THE BRITISH COLUMBIA SOCIAL CREDIT LEAGUE Friday, September 20, 1963
THE
UBYSSEY
Page 9
On universities
MALCOLM   SCOTT
. . . hep on HEP
$1 million
in grants
offered
The Canada Council has announced it will offer a record
$1 million worth of grants to
senior students in 1964-65.
The money will be distributed in 500 scholarships and
fellowships. Scholarships will
be awarded candidates working
for the doctorates, with others
going to junior applicants working toward their masters degrees.
Canadians and residents of
Canada, who will be continu
ing their studies here will be
given    first     consideration
Amounts will range from
$300 to $4,500 plus travel expenses.
Applications must be received before the deadlines, some
as easly as Nov. 1.
Any qualified candidate may
receive further information
from the Scholarships Section,
Canada Council, 140 Wellington Street, Toronto.
Parties pushed
for platforms
UBC students, faculty and alumni want straight answers.
And they are going after all
political   parties   to   get   them
before  Sept. 30.
The student Higher Education Promotion (HEP) committee, the Faculty Association,
and the Alumni Association
have sent a list of seven questions to all party headquarters
asking for a complete statement of their policy on higher
education.
They are also planning a
joint advertising campaign in
B.C. newspapers.
V i ct o r i a   College  student
council    agreed    Thursday   to
help in the campaign.
They have pledged to talk to
candidates and help finance
the program.
AMS President Malcolm
Scott said the Victoria Alumni
Association is also likely to
come in on the campaign.
"We aim to get every party
committed so they can't go
back on their word if they are
elected," said George Boechler, HEP chairman.
Seven  questions  asked
Enrolment
hits 26,000
BERKELEY (CUP)—A record number of students are expected to register this year on
the Berkeley campus of the
University of California.
The enrolment, estimated at
about 26,100, will top last
year's figures by four per cent.
Nepalese
prefer English
NEPAL (CUP) — English
will remain the language of instruction in Nepal university
and colleges until Nepali is
developed enough to replace it.
This is expected to take
some time.
The questions:
• What will be your schedule
for the establishment and expansion of colleges and technical institutes throughout B.C.?
• What cost-sharing formula
with municipalities will you
introduce to allow the rapid
formation of regional colleges?
• Will you set up an independent University Grants Commission (not merely an Advisory
Board),
—to survey annually the needs
of the various institutions
—to present and publish a combined request for funds to
the Legislature
—to allocate the funds made
available by the Legislature.
• What will you do to aid able
students in areas remote from
universities, colleges and technical institutes, to reduce their
living and transportation costs?
• Will you extend the present
system of scholarships to students with high academic
standing?
• How will you provide for
the urgently needed expansion
of post-graduate facilities and
fellowships?
• Will you introduce a formula for long-term financial
aid to Higher Education
—which   will   enable   institutions  to plan ahead  intelligently
—which recognizes the increasing  number   of  students   in
B.C. and the increasing cost
of educating each student.
The   questions  reflect   questions raised by UBC president
John  Macdonald  in   his blue-
Where's  Black?
OTTAWA (CUP) — Police
here are investigating the mysterious disappearance of Sidney Black, 23. He has not been
heard from this year.
Frosh fit to be tied
- - that's what happened
VICTORIA (CUP)—Twelve freshettes were fit to be tied
here during registration week—and they were.
They were kidnapped by upperclassmen and taken 15
blocks from campus. Then the upperclassmen made them
walk downtown tied together singing the college drinking
song.
Another group of frosh, however, were prepared for
the antics of upperclassmen. When the girls were kidnapped
and hauled away to Ten Mile Point, there were frosh waiting to rescue them.
print for  higher .education   in
B.C. produced last year.
The advertising campaign
will cost up to $5,000. "We aim
to reach everyone in the province who can read," said Boechler.
The advertisements will appear in all papers in B.C. next
week.
The student Higher Education Promotion Committee has
already started a long-term
campaign for higher education.
Students will talk to faculty
and administration officials,
invite candidates to the university, and prepare a brief on
higher education.
The Alumni Association is
conducting a two-week crash
program to enlist the support
of candidates all over B.C.
The Ubyssey is
looking for you
The Ubyssey is trying to
find where you are between
10:30 and 11:30.
We can only leave papers
at a few points, so we are
now looking for the places
most students gather.
Until we do, the papers
may be a little hard to find,
but bear with us.
AUTHOR'S  AGENCY
Bring your manuscripts, stories,
articles, books, songs, poems.
Free advice and help. Toronto,
New York, Hollywood sales contacts. 1065 B. 17th Ave. TR 6-
6362.
WORSHIP ON CAMPUS
EVERY SUNDAY AT
St. Timothy
Lutheran Church
Pastor H. Fox, CA 8-8166
11:00 Worship
10:00 Bible Study
Hut L4 — East Mall
THE CLARKE & STUART CO. LTD.
U
Field
rr
Store
4508  W. 10TH  AVENUE
(Next to I.G.A. Store near Sasamat
SPECIAL STUDENT PRICES ON
Brief Cases — Slide Rules — Drafting Supplies
Study Lamps — Fountain Pens — Ring Books
Thesis Paper — Acco Binders — Duotang Covers
Biology Paper
NTER
RATERNITY
FALL
RUSH
REGISTRATION
A.M.S. OFFICE
ENDS TODAY
OUNCIL
4 P.M.
NO COST OR
OBLIGATION Page 10
THE
UBYSSEY
Friday, September 20, 1963
TIM   HOLLICK-KENYON
. . starting to roll
Student pay lot
opens Monday
Cece Paul, traffic superintendent, said Thursday a
student pay lot at Agronomy
Road and Main Mall will
open at 7 a.m. Monday.
The lot is intended for use
by students who only occasionally drive cars to
school. Charge is 50 cents a
day.
Vic faculty
nix anti-
calencfar
VICTORIA (CUP) —Faculty
members here think the Students' Report is iniquitous.
The report is otherwise
known as the anti-calendar
which destroys the rosy picture of courses painted in the
administration's calendar.
"It's iniquitous but that's
academic freedom," said one
staff member.
Another said: "They treaded
the path between insult and
grovelling very nicely."
Professors added smugly,
however, that the student who
attends lectures is the final
judge of their quality, not the
editors of the report.
Most prominent faculty
members, however, won't comment on the anti-calendar.
GRAZ, AUSTRIA (CUP) —
Delegates from the nationalist
Ring of Liberal Students walked out of the last session of the
Central Committee of the National Union of Austrian students.
On election
Alumni wheels
start to move
The wheels have begun to move in the alumni association's plan to educate candidates on higher education.
"The initial results are very
positive," said association director Tim Hollick-Kenyon.
But he cautioned against undue optimism. "On the face of
it," he said, "they're all for
education."
Many grads have written in
asking for information on
grants, Hollick-Kenyon said.
In addition, 45 UBC graduates are running in the election.
They make up 21 per cent of
the candidates.
SURVEY NEEDED
"The people running are educated people," Hollick-Kenyon
said.
"The Alumni Association
constantly speaks of the needs
for higher education," said
Hollick-Kenyon.
For five years, said Hollick-
Kenyon, the Alumni Association has stressed the need for
an expert survey of B.C.'s higher education needs. 	
He said they first pushed for
a royal commission but the
government refused.
So for two years the organi-
ity organizations and 12 official B.C. contacts, generated
local interest in bringing ;n
an outside expert to survey
the problem.
NEW PHASE
With the completion last
spring of the Macdonald Report, said Hollick-Kenyon, the
Alumni Association began a
new phase in its fight for a
future for higher education in
B.C.
It held six regional conferences on the report.
UBC president, John B. Macdonald, attended two of these.
Housing  apes
tortoise
Housing administration is
moving  Friday.
And they're taking their
house with them.
The hut on the main mall is
being moved to Orchard Road
directly behind the new Education Building.
Temporary offices will be set
up in Dr. Gordon Shrum's office
in the Common Block from
Sept. 20 to 23. Telephone Local
798.
BIRD CALLS LISTINGS
Late corrections in the student
Telephone Directory listings
will be accepted
up to 12 noon on Friday,
in the Publications Office,
North Brock.
No Change will be made
in original listing - corrections
will be listed at back
of Directory.
R. L FRISBY,
Co-ordinator of Publications
conferences,    said     Hollick-
Kenyon.
The snap provincial election
this fall came at the end of the
current phase of the Association's.
The Association's Brock Hall
office began Sept. 3 producing
the eight-page letter with which
they are contacting every candidate in the province.
Hootenanny fans
get their chance
There'll be a hootenanny
tonight.
The event, sponsored by
the Varsity Christian Fellowship, at 7:30 in Brock, will
feature student talent and
group singing. All are invited.
Harry Robinson, main
speaker at Inter-Varsity pioneer ranch camp this summer, will speak briefly.
Name changed
LONDON CUP) — The University College of North Staffordshire has received royal
consent to change its name to
the University of Keele.
Double Breasted Suits
Converted to
Single Breasted
Slacks Narrowed
UNITED TAILORS
549 Granville St.
IMM«<««««<W««
ST. JAMES' CHURCH
Gore Ave. and Cordova St.
ANGLICAN EPISCOPAL
SUNDAYS
7:30 a.m. — Low Mass
8:00 a.m. — Matins
8:30 a.m. — Ixiw Mass
9:30 a.m. — FamilyMass
11:15 a.m — High Mass
7:30 p.m. — Solemn Evensong
Daily Mass — 7:15 a.m.
\ Confessions — Saturday 7-8 p.m.
and 8:30-9 p.m.
DYNAMIC
The B.C. Legislature needs these dynamic, able younger
men; Pat McGeer, Art Phillips, Bill Rathie.
RESPONSIBLE
These men have proven themselves in responsible roles
in their own professions; Pat McGeer, Art Phillips, Bill
Rathie.
FAR-SIGHTED
The future is more than just physical progress, it's also
equipping young people to meet the future. The far-
sighted men for B.C. are McGeer, Phillips, Rathie.
PAT
McGEER
Dynamic and imaginative,
one of the most effective members of the legislature, uniquely equipped to tackle B.C.'s
most deeply-rooted problems.
ART
PHILLIPS
Able, energetic, with a brilliant career in the financial
world. Art Phillips has demonstrated a bold and responsible
approach  to business.
BILL
RATHIE
Far-sighted and realistic. Bill
Rathie will fight for Vancouver's needs right on the floor,
of the legislature, restore equitable provincial-municipal relations.
ADVANCE POLL  INFORMATION
'    LOCATION: On the west side of Cambie Street,
north of 12th Avenue.
DATES: September 26th, 27th, 28th.
HOURS: 1 p.m. to 9 p.m. daily.
ELIGIBILITY: Use the advance poll if you will be
out of town on Election day. ^
SEND IN THE TOP TEAM
VOTE LIBERAL
McGEER, Patrick
X
PHILLIPS, Arthur
X
RATHIE, William
X
For information and transportation, phone AM 6-7177 (Kerrisdale); TR 4-9411   (Main Street);
Published by the Vancouver- /
Point Grey Liberal Campaign *
Committee. Friday, September 20, 1963
THE       UBYSSEY
Pag* 11
Advance poll
on three days
Students who will be out
of the province on election
day—ha—can vote anyway.
An advance poll wil be
held three days nex tweek
at the office of deputy registrar of voters Ken Morton—
at the old normal school at
Twelfth and Cambie.
It will be open from 1 p.m.
to 9 p.m., on Thursday, Friday and Saturday.
Student who will plan to
vote for candidates in their
home ridings can fill out an
absentee ballot at any polling station in the province
on election day, Sept. 30.
Mackenzie
River ripe
for growing
A UBC professor has returned to campus with a vision of
the north.
Dr. Vladimir Krajina spent
the summer in the Mackenzie
River delta region.
He says it could become one
of the major vegetable-growing
areas of the country.
The biggest obstacle, he said,
would be the cost of transporting vegetables to the outside
world.
"The soil in the area is quite
suitable for the production of
vegetable crops," he said.
Dr. Krajina said, while the
growing season is short, there
is almost continuous daylight
during the summer.
Krajina and two grad students spent two months roaming a 6,400-square-mile area
mapping bio-climate zones, collecting soil and plant specimens.
A second team of UBC
scientists, from UBC's geography department, spent three
months in the same are.
They reached the delta by
navigating a freight canoe
1,000 miles down the Mackenzie River from near the Great
Slave Lake.
Dr. Krajina's team, from
UBC's biology and botany department, reached the area by
plane.
'Professors fault'
Bookstore denies
overprice charge
By JOY BRADBURY
UBC bookstore prices aren't out of line with downtown
prices
PERTH (CUP) — A Malayan
student delegation has arrived
here to begin a goodwill tour
of Australia.
Bookstore Manager John
Hunter said this Thursday to
charges the bookstore overprices its textbooks.
"I've never seen anything
cheaper downtown in the same
edition," he said.
"The bookstore has no control over cheaper editions. We
order the editions the professors ask us to. It's strictly up to
them."
Asked by The Ubyssey why
bulk ordering didn't lower
prices below competition
prices, he said bulk doesn't apply in the book trade.
"Six hundred books cost the
same per book as two books,"
Hunter said.
CHEAPER
In many cases, he said, textbooks sell more cheaply in the
bookstore than in downtown
department stores.
"I had a geology student
come to me last year who had
paid $13.50 and $17.50 for the
two textbooks he ordered
downtown. The same editions
in the bookstore sold for $9.50
and $12.50," Hunter said.
He said he had no control
over the policy of charging up
to 50 cents more than the price
printed on the book cover.
"We are forced by American
publishing houses to order
through their Canadian distributing centers.
<"These centers price the
books. We must accept this."
Hunter said shipping costs
and the exchange rates, are responsible for the higher prices.
He said the UBC bookstore
would bypass the distributing
centers if it could but is prevented.
IMPORTED
"We get books much faster
from publishing centers in
Switzerland or Germany where
we oan deal directly with the
publishing house.
"That way we are not slowed
by middlemen." He blamed the
publishing houses for any delay in shipping books to UBC.
Professors are required to
have their orders for the fall
session ready by the end of
March when the bookstore
orders its stock.
He said publishing houses
often  refuse to print or bind
ARE YOU LOOKING FOR A CHURCH ?
What does a University Student want from his or her Church?
Who knows . . .? But if you are looking for a place of worship
which combines a rare simplicity with a lack of dogmatism,
and above all, an opportunity to have perennial and topical
questions freely and unashamedly discussed, then perhaps
ST. ANSELM'S ANGLICAN is the church you are looking
for . . .
ST. ANSELM'S CHURCH
half a mile inside the University gates
on the south side of University Boulevard
Services each Sunday at 8:00 a.m.,  11:00 a.m., 7:30 p.m.
additional   books   until   their
schedule is free.
"It makes it hard for summer
students," Hunter said.
UBC bookstore orders all
books for the extension department, correspondence courses,
and winter and summer sessions.
Festival  boycotted
WEST GERMANY (CUP) —
West German students have refused to attend the communist-
run World Youth Festival at
Helsinki.
Things are just rectic
at Victoria, er, College
VICTORIA (CUP)—The following appeared in the first
edition of the University of Victoria newspaper, The Martlet:
The University of Victoria Players' Club has already embarked on another big year, perhaps the most rectic in its
history.
It was not explained.
FULTON
ON  CAMPUS
FRIDAY, SEPT. 27
Inserted by the UBC Conservative Club
i**>*r* **0» i«» «k»i .m «■»..
■^Uii»* >«ilWii.m»W»mm»W «—»' mmi     n—Dii
Tickets still available in AMS ofifce in Brock Hall
FROSH RECEPTION
WITH DAVE BROADFOOT AND
BRICK HENDERSON'S ORCHESTRA
Frosh - $2.50 per couple
Others - $3.00 per couple
SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 21-ARMOURIES-8:30 P.M.
<m*
mm
MM
nnnnrinrimnrtnnnnnnr^^
l
%
NEEDS SLACKS
The above statement is obvious, but the
implication is far-reaching. Our slacks do
more than merely fulfill a need. They provide
comfort and a neat appearance at an attractive price.
Gay Blade Hipsters       $6.95 to $15.95
Gay Blade Continentals $10.95 to $22.50
THE GAY BLADE
SHOP
FOR YOUNG MEN     '^i
545  GRANVILLE  STREET      MU   1-9831 Page 12
THi
UBYSSEY
Friday, September 20, T963
French - English
Student split
threatens NFCUS
French-English differences
dian student unity.
AMS president Malcolm Scott
said Thursday the coming year
will make or break the National Federation of Canadian
University Students.
"This is a crucial year for
NFCUS because of tension between English and French Ca-
nation members," he said.
Both French and English
members want to restructure
NFCUS, but there will be differences over areas of emphasis, Scott said.
Scott said that both believe
the group should act as a pressure group on the federal government.
"But there will be problems
over what we wish to emphasize and what they want," he
said.
Will UBC retain membership
in the federation?"
"I foresee no likelihood of
withdrawal this year," Scott
said.
"The decision won't be made
until we've had our say at the
conference and see how it
works out," he added.
But AMS first vice-president
Jim Ward said this national
conference may be the end for
NFCUS.
"If the French Canadian delegates withdraw," he said,
"then I'd favor UBC's withdrawal.
"NFCUS would no longer be
may mean the end of Cana-
national   if  the  French   withdrew."
A delegate to the recent
NFCUS seminar in Guelph,
Ward said the association
should be nation-wide or nothing at all.
He also lodged complaints
about the selection of delegates to the Edmonton congress.
"They are likely to be biased
in favor of NFCUS whether it
remains national or not," Ward
said, "because they are all student councillors or NFCUS representatives."
Two French - Canadian students will be on campus this
weekend to discuss the forthcoming NFCUS conference.
They are Jean-Pierre Bour-
dois, French editor of Campus
Canada and NFCUS associate
secretary, and Jacques Girard,
ex-editor of Le Quartier Latin,
University of Montreal's student newspaper.
"They'll meet our delegates
to discuss resolutions to be submitted to the conference," Mr.
Scott said.
UBC's delegates to the national conference in Edmonton
are Malcolm Scott, Ken Leitch,
Chris Hansen, Mike Davies and
Frank Millard.
It will be held Sept. 29 to
Oct. 4.
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NEWSWEEK, 34 weeks  2.75
NEWSWEEK, 1 year   3.50
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LIFE, 6 months  ...*....  2.50
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LIFE, 1 year  3.50
LIFE, 2 years, k  6.75
MACLEAN'S, 1 year _ 1.50
HARPER'S, 14 issues   4.20
ATLANTIC MONTHLY, 7 issues 3.68
SPORTS ILLUSTRATED, 1 year  5.00
SPORTS ILLUSTRATED, 2 years 8.50
PLAYBOY, 8 months 3.50
PLAYBOY, 1 year  5.00
PLAYBOY, 2 years,   9.00
FORTUNE, 1 year   7.50
ARCHITECTURAL FORUM, 1 year .... 3.50
HOUSE AND HOME, 1 year 3.50
ART NEWS, 1 year   5.75
ESQUIRE, 8 months  2.00
4.00  READER'S DIGEST, 1 year   2.97
CHATELAINE, 24 issues   2.50
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TV GUIDE, 66 weeks  7.17
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STUDENT MAGAZINE AGENCY
Send orders to: 7360 Ostell Crescent, Montreal 9, Quebec
NAME	
ADDRESS 	
CITY UBC COURSE
AMS first vice-president Jim
Ward says he favors withdrawal from NFCUS if
French-Canadians pull out.
Mail  system
eases enrolment
VICTORIA (CUP)—The unofficial count of students enrolled here is 2,052.
It is generally considered
that the registering by mail
of most upper-classmen greatly
eased the administration's burden.
Now only the queues of
course - changers remain to
plague the registrar's office.
We were lucky - -
beer strike averted
Thursday's last-minute settlement of the brewery workers' dispute has saved UBC
from its worst disaster since
the Georgia closed.
The Ubyssey surveyed 50
persons Thursday, just before
the strike was called off, to
see what would happen if the
taps  went dry:
The concensus: We're lucky
there won't be a strike.
"Major economic disaster!" is
how fourth year forestry student Byard Palmer summed up
his reaction to the threatened
strike.
Mike Vaux, Arts 3, bellowed:
".It's atrocious. What will the
world come to, atrocious!"
Two first year engineering
students, Jim Mitchell and John
Brodie told the interviewer;
"How would we know anything about beer? We're not
twenty-one yet."
Asked for his opinion, one
student mumbled something
about Christian Temperance
Union and refused to give his
name.
And fourth year engineering-
physics   student  Bob  Parsons,
Alma Mater Society
OFFICIAL NOTICES
Application*
EDITOR - CAMPUS CANADA
Applications now being accepted for editor of the
NFCUS National Magazine, Campus Canada.
Address letter of application to AMS Secretary,
Brock Hall, stating experience, proposals, etc.
Eligibility forms required — applications close
Sept. 24.
Chairman, Special Events Committee
Applications now being accepted for chairman of
Special Events Committee. Address letter of application to AMS Secretary, Brock Hall, stating
experience, etc. Eligibiliity forms required ■—
applications close Sept. 24.
leadership Conference
OCTOBER 4, 5, 6
CAMP ELPHINSTONE
APPLICATIONS AVAILABLE AT AMS OFFICE —
perhaps typical of the cheerful
drinkers before the impending
catastrophe said:
"I even like the cork."
Since  the   closing   of   the
Georgia several new spots have
become popular, the survey revealed.
Week-nights the Dufferin
door swings wide for the campus tipplers. Fridays and Saturdays the Cecil calls, and at
the other end of town the Fraser Arms foams with beer and
cheer.
Join the millions of smart, young
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days. Odor can't form. You
don't suffer from chafing or irritation—or that feeling of bulk.
Tampax is invisible, unfelt, in
place. You aren't even aware
you're wearing it.
Is Tampax safe for you? Certainly! It was invented by a doctor for the benefit of all women
—married or unmarried,!
active or not. It consists J
of highly compressed sur-pi
gical cotton, enclosed!
within a smooth-as-silk container-applicator. Remember that
for every Tampax user there had
to be a first time.
Tampax comes in your choice
of 3 absorbency sizes (Regular,
Super, Junior) wherever such
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Invented by a doctor	
now used by millions of women
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Please send me in plain wrapper a trial pack-
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mailing. Size is checked below.
(    )  REGULAR (    ) SUPBR (    ) JUNIOR
Name...
(Please print)
Address,..
Oty...
..Prov u-«»> Friday, September 20, 1963
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 13
New look for UBC's new
arena is captured by Ted
Ross's camera. Skates, sticks
and rocks symbolize some of
the activities available to
students during the winter.
V.L: Page  14
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, September 20, 1963
STEPHENS' LISTER  REALLY BLISTERS-S-S-S
<Q4'
JwS%.,
Vw ;       $
"■'**S|S«fS';f,«'iis^
Speed ace races
Lister, Coke truck
By IAN CAMERON
The car isn't exactly Morris, nor is the driver exactly
a sweet old lady who drives it to Sunday school once a
week.
Instead, the car is a Lister
Corvette and the driver, Bill
Stephens, one of the fastest
young drivers in the Pacific
Northwest.
Bill has been racing for four
years and has won almost every race he has entered. When
he started, in a Porsche Super,
he was labelled a novice. He
placed second in that first race
and the novice rating was forgotten.
He switched to a Porshe
Super 90, and won every race
(in his class) he drove. The
same thing happened during
his third season, driving a
Porshe Normal.
At the 'beginning of this sea
son, he made the big jump
from 100 horsepower and 110
mph to 400 horsepower and
180 mph. His Lister Corvette
is one of the fastest cars in
the world.
With it, he entered five races
over the summer, and made a
better showing than any other
driver in the Northwest scoring
two firsts, a second, a third,
and one dnf (did not finish).
The dnf came in his last
race at Kent, Washington,
when he hit some water in a
turn at 130 and spun out.
Total  damage—$700.
Cost him $5000
Even when you don't wreck
your car, racing is not a cheap
hobby. As a matter of fact, it's
one of the most expensive pastimes going. Bill figures each
race costs about $100 for the
car and, if the race is away
from home, about $60 for personal accommodation.
Most of the expense for the
car goes into gas and tires.
Each set of tires, for instance,
costs $340. While the car cost
him $5,000, he has spent considerably   more   on  modifica
tions, including six carburetors
and extensive work on the aluminum body.
Bill, a fourth year Arts
student, is the only active veteran sports car driver on campus, although there are others
who race in the novice classes.
Now twenty-two, he bought
his first sports car, an MG-TD,
when he was 16, and started
racing   two years later.
His biggest win to date is
the Rose Cup Race at Portland, Oregon.
SPORTS
EDITOR: D*nU StanUy
Get your feet dampened;
join revamped Aquasoc
For people who wish to surf, scuba or skin dive,
opportunity knocks.
The Aqua (as in water) Society is preparing for a
new year of frolicsome activity by electing its new executive.
They are president Harold Baird (224-9853), vice-
president Harry Swain (224-9069), treasurer Dennis
Steeves (261-8772), secretary Janet Matheson (224-9079),
diving officer Guy Walters (224-5274) and public relations officer Joanne Skilleto (224-4265).
Those interested in joining the club should contact
one of the above.
FATHER DAVID BAUER puts
his 1964 Olympic Hockey
team under the scrutiny of
the public every day at the
new Arena.
Kent on Sept. 24?
Speaking of his future plans,
Bill says, "I hope to become a
professional when I graduate
next year."
"I am going to sell, the Lister Corvette this winter, and
after I graduate, I'll look
around for the fastest car I can
afford and try and make a
name for myself further
afield."
When asked why he doesn't
just go down and ask some of
the bigger teams in the U.S.
to give him a ride, he replied,
"Those teams don't give rides
unless you have a name."
Up to this point, Bill has
been    sponsored    by    various
companies connected with the
automobile world, so racing
hasn't cost him as much as it
might have. Conversely, he
hasn't made much out of it,
either.
About his immediate plans
he says, "I would like to race
at Kent on Sept. 24, but I don't
think the car will be in shape
by then. That r4ace will be one
of the biggest sports car races
ever held  in North   America.
Some of the biggest  name?
from Europe will be there. "I
wouldn't have a chance against
these people but it would be
Continued on page 15
SEE: STEPHENS
Sports need
reporters
There are still a few beats
Which need reporters in the
sports department.
Beats still open include Soccer, Rugger, Men's Grasshockey and a multitude of club
activities.
Desk men are needed for
Thursday and Monday. Anyone interested should contact
Denis Stanley, Sports Editor,
at the Ubyssey office in North
Brock Basement.
Sports Club PROs are asked
to inform the Sports Editor of
any activity which they would
like publicity on.
MELBOURNE (CUP)—Australian student debaters have
won nine out ten matches on a
tour of Philippine universities
IN POINT
VOTE THE
FULTON
TEAM
jt.
... %V^ f
PURD
CAMPAIGN  PHONES:
MALKIN
261-3174 or 266-2377
BROOME
PROGRESSIVE   CONSERVATIVE Friday, September 20, 1963
THE       UBYSSEY
Page  15
Birds Eye View
By ROGER  McAFEE
The suggestion made in
this column the other day regarding the possible future of
Canadian University ice
hockey was met with scorn
by one of UBC's oldest cricket players.
Sneering "professionalism
in university sports" and
limping from a mashed foot
sustained, somehow, in a
cricket game, the venerable
head of UBC classics department apparently thought we
meant university hockey players should be subsidized
through  hockey scholarships.
This is definitely not what
we had in mind, so we hope
that both Dr. McGregor's
mind and foot are now eased.
Our point was that if good
young hockey players want
an education and also a professional hockey career he
should be able to get one.
Today the demands of the
NHL make it almost impossible for him to get an education. If he goes to university
the pros won't even look at
him after he's through.
If, on the other hand, university hockey was good enough the pro teams might begin looking to the university
teams for material and the
student-hockey player could
have both an education and a
career.
V        •!• V
UBC'S new skating and
curling rink is now open and
business seems to be brisk.
Students wishing to skate and
not owning skates need not
fear the rentals skates the
arena has on hand.
Unlike most skate rental
outfits, the UBC one gives you
an excellent pair of skates for
only 35 cents. Even the laces
seem to be ok—so far.
The ice surface is in good
shape and it is scraped and
flooded half way through the
skating period. And the place
isn't jam-packed. T h e r e's
room to move.
The only beef is that it costs
50 cents to skate at night
which seems a bit too much
considering UBC students put
up a quarter of a million
bucks to build the thing.
Seems to us a reduced rate
could be instituted, perhaps
in conjunction with a block
ticket deal.
Looks like the UBC ice
hockey Thunderbirds are going to ibe losing a lot of talent
this year. Father Bauer moves
to the Olympic team and
takes with him four of the
Birds top ' men: McDowell,
MacKenzie and O'Malley and
Broderick.
However there is still some
top hockey talent left in some
of the players who tried out
for the Olympic team and for
one reason or another decided
not to play for it.
Since the Birds do not open
their season until after Christmas, there's no need for panic
—yet.
Students guard profs
FRANCE (CUP) — Student
guards will protect the faculty
of the Institute of Physics and
Chemistry in Paris against
OAS terrorists.
malcolm McGregor
. . . what, professionals?
Rugby practise
There will be further tryouts for the Varsity Rugby
team on Saturday, 21st, 12:30
at Wolfson field.
The executive would like to
see all those who turned out
for Thursday's practice plus
anyone else who would like to
play.
STEPHENS
Continued from page 14
fun to try anyway. Besides,
there's   a  $10,000 first prize."
Bill has a few opinions on
the type of track he likes to
race on. "Westwood is a much
better circuit for small cars,
but Kent is definitely better
for the big ones."
"At Westwood, I have to take
most of the corners between
30 and 70 mph. At Kent I go
through some of the corners
in a full drift at 130 and better. This is not only better for
the driver, but more enjoyable
for the spectators."
As proof, Bill has a lap time
1.4 seconds off the course record at Westwood.
By the way, if you're wondering how one of the future
champions of the racing world
spends his time in the summer,
think back to the day in July
when you were passed by a
Coke truck on that fast corner
at Broadway and Alma, the
driver was Stephens. Feel
better now?
If you want to see the car
we've been talking about, go
to Club's Day where the car
will be part of the UBC Sports
Car Club's display.
UBC to leave
WCIAA in  64
Have teams, won't travel, can't afford it.
That seems to be the philosophy underlying the decision of the Men's Athletic Committee to withdraw from
the Western Canadian Inter-Collegiate Athletic Association
next year.
"The main reason for our
break with the WCIAA was
the tremendous costs we have
had to hear," said UBC Athletic Director Bus Phillips
Wednesday.
The problem of costs might
have been worked out if the
other members of the WCIAA
(Alberta, Saskatchewan and
Manitoba) had permitted UBC
to draw up money-saving
schedules. Those other members showed no willingness
for such  a scheme.
Action was finally taken on
the controversial issue Wednesday when MAC decided to
keep UBC out of the WCIAA
next year and play as an independent.
The   decision   ended   UBC's
five-year association with the
WCIAA. Before that, UBC
was a member of the Evergreen Conference.
In the spring of 1965, MAC
will survey the '64 season and
then decide to:
• Rejoin the WCIAA and
accept a five-year commitment to the Association,
or
• Rejoin the Evergreen Conference, or
• Remain as an independent.
These    are    the   three    R's
which will decide UBC's athletic future.
Meanwhile, Phillips has sent
feelers out to 35 American colleges in Washington, Oregon,
Montana and Idaho to create
a 1964-65 schedule.
NICKEL IN WORLD MARKETS... JOBS FOR CANADIANS
How Canadian Nickel helped England's Hovercraft get off the ground
Hovercraft went into service last year in England, where they were invented and built. These strange craft
actually ride on a cushion of air and, after take-off, are completely free of contact with the ground or water.
Making the Hovercraft a reality called for great skill and the use of the finest materials. And, in this latter
regard, Canadian nickel helped. Why nickel? Because it is strong, durable, corrosion resistant. Nickel is used
in the Hovercraft's transmission system and hydraulic and fuel pipes; nickel-containing steels are used in the
general structure, and heat-resisting nickel alloys are used extensively in the engines. The growth of nickel
markets at home and abroad helps strengthen Canada's economy and helps provide jobs for Canadians.
THE INTERNATIONAL NICKEL COMPANY OF CANADA, LIMITED
55 YONGE STREET, TORONTO Page 16
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, September 20, 1963
'tween classes
Cheering tryouts
next week
on
Cheerleader tryouts for Frosh and upper year co-eds, all
next week, education gym, noon.
Seven Queen
finalists named
Frosh orientation committee has announced the selection of seven finalists for
Frosh Queen.
One of them will be
crowned Frosh Queen at the
reception dance Saturday.
The finalists are: Wendy
Brown, Musa Linke, Brenda
Whitley, Mary-Beth Steele,
Kay Phillips, Diana Charles-
worth and Marney Lucas.
The finalists were selected
from 14 candidates originally
chosen.
Hair dryer
strike
dries
up
The great hair dryer strike
has been averted.
Fort Camp dons told their
female charges last week no
hair dryers were to be allowed
in rooms and coiffures had to
be coiffed in the laundry
rooms.
The dons blamed housing
director John Haar for the
ruling.
But Haar said Thursday he's
not to blame.
"We've issued a statement
that no electrical appliances of
any type are to be used in the
huts.
"However in all permanent
buildings we have no objections at all if the girls use
small, portable plug-in dryers.
"Apparently a foul up in
communications between this
office and some of the new
dons has caused the trouble,"
he said.
The girls said they would
have taken their hair dryers,
lined up near the Fort Camp
huts and blow them down—if
the problem had not been settled.
Comedian to top
frosh reception
Comedian Dave  Broadfoot
will entertain at the frosh reception in the Armory on Saturday.
Broadfoot starred in The Best
of Spring Thaw at the Vancouver International Festival in
June. He has appeared on the
Ed Sullivan Show and at the
Blue Angel in London.
VARSITY DEMOLAY
Varsity Demolay Club will
hold an organizational meeting
Tuesday, 12:30 in Bu. 225
Elections will foe held.
•I"     *t*     T*
UNITARIAN CLUB
The Unitarian Club invites
anyone interested to hear the
Reverend A. Phillip Hewitt
speak at 12:30 Tuesday in Bu.
102. Topic will be Rational Re-
ligion for Contemporary
People.
V •!•  **•
GYMNASTIC CLUB
All gymnasts are asked to
turn out for a Gymnastic Club
meeting Thursday, Sept. 26 at
12:30 in Rm. 216 Memorial
Gym.
v •*• v
CHRISTIAN SCIENCE
First weekly testimony meeting of the Christian Science
Organization will be held today in Hut L-Y at 12:40.A11 are
welcome.
•J.    3p    fp
FINE ARTS DEPT.
Peter Swann, Oxford University, England, will lecture
on "Four Centuries of Tradition and Revolt in Chinese
Painting, 1350-1750" at 12:30
noon in LA. 104 today.
*P •!* •*■
UNIVERSITY CLUBS
COMMITTEE
All clubs must be represented
at a meeting on Monday in Bu.
217 at 12:30 for the allocation
of Club's Day space.
•*• *r *r
VARSITY CHRISTIAN
FELLOWSHIP
Weekly meetings resume today at noon in Bu. 106. The
speaker is Rev. Harry Robinson.
Everyone is welcome.
V *T*    V
SQUASH CLUB
Important Squash Club
meeting Monday, Sept. 23, 12:30
noon, in Bu. 225 to elect executive and to decide on playing
facilities. All interested please
turn out.
•*•  V  •!•
JUDO  CLUB
Practice in Apparatus Gym,
Monday, Sept. 23, at 5:30. All
executives please attend.
•3p •** v
COMMUNIST CLUB
Hear Vancouver Centre Communist candidate, Ron Forkin,
on Tuesday, Sept. 24, Bu. 205
Topic to toe '.'B.C. Youth and
Provincial Politics."
*v •¥• •*•
BOOSTER CLUB
First meeting of the year
will be held Monday, Sept. 23,
in Bu. 203 at noon. New members welcome.
•J*  •»•  V
INTRAMURAL MANAGERS
Meeting Friday, Sept. 20, at
12:30, Rm. 216, Memorial Gym.
Ex-UBC student Ron Forkin,
Communist candidate in
Vancouver Centre, speaks in
Bu. 205 Tuesday noon.
Campus Canada
needs editor
Applications are open for
the position of editor of Campus Canada, the NFCUS national
magazine.
Interested persons should inquire at the AMS office.
Freshette  draws blank
in registration prank
VICTORIA (CUP)—A freshette here signed on the dotted
line because an upperclassman told her to.
The upperclassman said: "Are you expecting any scholarships or bursaries? Sign here, here and here.'"
It was a blank cheque.
Mrs. Tucker retires
as Chronicle editor
Mrs. Fran Tucker believes in playing it safe.
She is resigning after editing
the Alumni Chronicle for four
years.
"I thought I would resign
before the Alumni Executive
decided I was too old for the
job, and fired me," she said.
She is not too old to stay
on the editorial board of the
Chronicle, though.
Youthful-looking Mrs. Tucker and her grey poodle were
familiar to all students connected with publications.
She helped transform the
Chronicle into an interesting
record of campus events.
The Chronicle supported the
Back Mac campaign, and in
its most recent issue, carries a
feature article on the Action
Week.
It is the last issue edited by
Mrs. Tucker, who is a UBC
graduate.
New editor of the Chronicle
is Miss Elizabeth Norcross.
EUS gives
frosh party
The Engineers will hold a
pep meet for frosh next week.
It sounds suspicious, but the
whole thing is approved by
the Frosh Orientation Committee as a part of the first-year
program.
It will feature the winning
skit of the engineers' own pep
meet.
There are two perfomances:
Tuesday and Wednesday noons
in the Auditorium.
Experienced lady, reference,
look after children my home,
fenced yard. Marie Dinesen, 2211
W. 10th, 736-5381.
T^it^on^T^ ^fltjraitg.
NCORPORATED   2**>    MAY    1670.
Ceeffia at Granville Open Daily 9-5:30   Friday 9-9       Phone   MU 1-4211
I went completely, utterly mad
in the new collegierine shop!
What a way to go! It starts as soon as you set foot in The Bay's
newest third floor shop. As you whirl from flamboyant sweaters to
gorgeous fur fakes, from sportsy suedes to sophisticated date
dresses, you feel this heavenly madness coming on. You'll want
one of everything from jewellery to a knit coat, from knee socks to
turtle neck shells. Give in to it soon . . . prices are so reasonable
for college or career budgets, in the just-opened Collegienne Shop.

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