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The Ubyssey Mar 4, 2010

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 Coming back the very next day SINCE 1918
MSfev
Commerce students:
why you'll soon have
to pony up
50,000
of these suckers!
PAGE 4
THURSDAY   ^%    J|
2010.03.04
WEATHER @ UBC
5 CLOUDY
6 SUNNY
7 CLOUDY
UBC BY NUMBERS
48 DAYS'TIL END OF TERM
4 DAYS SINCE THE WINTER
OLYMPICS ENDED
8 DAYS UNTIL THE WINTER
PARALYMPICS
NEWS BRIEFS
WHERE'S THE MONEY,
TRANSLINK?
The new TransLink SkyTrain service, the Evergreen Line, sits in
limbo as two of three stakeholders have committed to funding
the long-awaited project.
According to The Vancouver
Sun, the recently announced
provincial budget includes $302
million that will be put toward
funding the Evergreen Line,
which is supposed to link Vancouver, Burnaby, Port Moody
and Coquitlam.
The federal government has
also committed over $400 million for the project, but some
are concerned about where
TransLink's portion will come
from.
"What we have uncommitted is the TransLink portion of
the $400 million," Port Moody
Mayor Joe Trasolini told The
Province. "Clearly, you cannot
go ahead with a project when
one-third of the funds are not
committed."
Ken Hardie of TransLink's
media relations department
said that the company doesn't
know how it is going to raise
the money. The Metro Vancouver Mayors Council approved a
$130 million bailout for the transit company in October 2009.
SIX UBC SCIENCE PROFS RECEIVE
RESEARCH AWARDS
UBC has recognized six Applied
Science professors for their outstanding work in research and
scholarly contributions.
These include Electrical and
Computer Engineering professor Vijay Bharagava and
three associate professors of
the same faculty: Lutz Lampe,
Rafeef Abgharbieh and Jane
Wang.
The two other recipients
from the Faculty of Applied Science include Chemical and Biological Engineering associate professor James Feng and
Landscape Architecture associate professor Susan Herrington.
Applied Science Dean Tyseer
Aboulnasr is enthusiastic about
the awards. "We are tremendously proud of these six individuals and the outstanding work
that they are doing," she said.
A total of 23 professors were
awarded with UBC Faculty Research awards in 2009.
CRIME WATCH
FEBRUARY 23 At approximately 8pm, police caught two individuals breaking into a building
in the 2200 block of Health Sciences Road. Charges of break
and enter were recommended
and approved.
Police are reminding students
not to leave valuables in their
vehicles and never to leave their
personal belongings unattended
on campus. 2/UBYSSEY.CA/EVENTS/2010.03.04
MARCH 04, 2010
VOLUME XCI,   N°XLVI
EDITORIAL
COORDINATING EDITOR
Paul Bucci: coordinating@ubyssey.ca
NEWS EDITOR
Samanthajung: news@ubyssey.ca
ASSOCIATE NEWS EDITOR
Sarah Chung: schung@ubyssey. ca
CULTURE EDITOR
Kate Barbaria : culture@ubyssey.ca
ASSOCIATE CULTURE EDITOR
Jonny Wakefield: jwakefield@ubyssey.ca
SPORTS EDITOR
Justin McElroy : sports@ubyssey.ca
IDEAS EDITOR
Trevor Record: ideas@ubyssey.ca
PHOTO EDITOR
GeraldDeo :photos@ubysseyca
GRAPHICS ASSISTANT
Anthony Goertz: graphics@ubyssey.ca
PRODUCTION MANAGER
Virginie Menard: production @ubyssey ca
COPY EDITOR
Katarina Grgic: copy@ubyssey.ca
MULTIMEDIA EDITOR
Tara Martellaro : 7nulti7nedia@ubyssey.ca
CONTRIBUTING EDITOR
Ashley Whillans : awhillans@ubyssey.ca
Room 24, Student Union Building
6138 Student Union Boulevard
Vancouver, BCV6T lZl
tel: 604.822.2301
web: www.ubyssey.ca
e-mail: feedback @ubyssey. ca
BUSINESS
Room 23, Student Union Building
advertising: 604.822.1654
business office: 604.822.6681
e-mail: advertising@ubyssey. ca
BUSINESS MANAGER : Fernie Pereira
AD TRAFFIC : Sabrina Marchand
AD DESIGN : Chibwe Mweene
LEGAL
The Ubyssey is the official student newspaper of
the University of British Columbia. It is published
every Monday and Thursday by The Ubyssey
Publications Society. We are an autonomous,
democratically run student organization, and al
students are encouraged to participate.
Editorials are chosen and written by the
Ubyssey staff. They are the expressed opinion of
the staff, and do not necessarily reflect the views
of The Ubyssey Publications Society or the University of British Columbia. All editorial content
appearing in The Ubyssey is the property of The
Ubyssey Publications Society. Stories, opinions,
photographs and artwork contained herein cannot
be reproduced without the expressed, written
permission of The Ubyssey Publications Society
The Ubyssey is a founding member of Canadian University Press (CUP) and adheres to CUP's
guiding principles.
Letters to the editor must be under 300 words
Please include your phone number, student
number and signature (not for publication) as
well as your year and faculty with all submissions. ID will be checked when submissions are
dropped off at the editorial office of The Ubyssey;
otherwise verification will be done by phone.
"Perspectives" are opinion pieces over 300 words
but under 750 words and are run according to
space. "Freestyles" are opinion pieces written by
Ubyssey staff members. Priority will be given to
letters and perspectives over freestyles unless
the latter is time sensitive. Opinion pieces wil
not be run until the identity of the writer has
been verified. The Ubyssey reserves the right to
edit submissions for length and clarity. All letters
must be received by 12 noon the day before
ntended publication. Letters received after this
point will be published in the following issue
unless there is an urgent time restriction or other
matter deemed relevant by the Ubyssey staff
It is agreed by all persons placing display or
classified advertising that if the Ubyssey Publications Society fails to publish an advertisement
or if an error in the ad occurs the liability of the
UPS will not be greater than the price paid for
the ad. The UPS shall not be responsible for
slight changes or typographical errors that do not
lessen the value or the impact of the ad
CONTRIBUTORS
The force ofthe press is with Sam Jung, Ashley
Whillans, Sarah Chung, Katarina Grgic and Jonny
Wakefield. Though forced into the shadowy abyss
ofthe SUB basement, there is no question that
Philip Storey, Jon Dehouwer, or Justin McElroy
would ever surrender to the dark side of media
After receiving a strange message from Nicola
Gailtis which stated: "Help us Trevor Record,
you're our only hope," Ian Turner bravely set out.
Together with Sophie Gosselin, Pierce Nettling,
Goh Iromoto and Kasha Chang, they learned the
ancient art of creating a superb newspaper. Joined
by Austin Holm, Gerald Deo, Anthony Goertz,
Brendan Albano and Geoff Lister they set off to inform the members ofthe UBC community. Though
Keegan Bursaw, Michael Thibault and Kathy Yan
Li would toil in front of computer screens and over
papers,their comrades Paul Bucci, Tara Martel-
aro and Krittana Khurana could see a brave new
future emerging in the pages of their newspaper
Gone was the vast vacuum of empty space that
had previously filled empty pages thanks to Chibwe
Mweena.Rebeka Ryvola, Virginie Menard, Annika
Westphal, Vera Yang and Russell Hirsch. In its
place was a new hope, whose name would echo
around the university universe: The Ubyssey.
V      Canada Post Sales
Agreement
Number 0040878022
Canadian    printed on^100s%
University     'reeycled.paper
Press \__jQ
EVENTS
CLASSIFIEDS
• Price Reduced. 2005 Acura
TL fully loaded, 56,000 km. 4
doors, standard, white exterior, leather interior in good condition. $21,000. Contact ca/wn.
magic32@gmail. com.
• Gold's Gym, the leader in the
fitness industry is looking to hire
highly energetic, motivated fitness consultants for our UBC location. Base + Commission. Contact petestjean@goldsgymbc.ca.
CORRECTION
In the March 1 issue of The
Ubyssey, our front cover was
supposed to be all black, but an
unfortunate printing error turned
it blue. We apologize for any disrespect or confusion this might
have caused.
ONGOING EVENTS
UBYSSEY PRODUCTION • Come
help us create this baby!
Learn about layout and editing. Expect to be fed. • Every Sunday and Wednesday,
2pm, SUB 24.
MONDAY NIGHT COMMUNITY
MUSICS MEAL »Like to play music? Just want to listen? Looking
for a sense of community? This
is for all members of the UBC
community who want to have a
good meal and great conversation. All meals are home-cooked
and are vegetarian-friendly. • Every Monday, 6:30pm-8:30pm,
Chapel of the Epiphany (6030
Chancellor Blvd), for more info
e-mail revnathanwright@mac.
com.
THURSDAY, MAR. 4
SPARTACUS YOUTH CLUB CLASS
SERIES • The Spartacus Youth
Club presents their second class:
Independence for Quebec!
Marxism and the National Question. • 6:30pm, SUB Room 224,
more info attrotskyist_vancou-
ver@shawcable.com or call at
(604) 687-0353.
FRIDAY, MAR. 5
FREE FILM SCREENS AT UBC • A
free double bill of provocative cinema! Crime, directed
by and starring Gemini Award
winning Asst. Professor Tom
Scholte, is a gripping feature
length drama probing the social and psychological forces
that shape criminal behaviour.
Alyssa, a research-based fictional short film produced by
Dr Kirsty Johnston and UBC
students supports interprofessional education in cancer
care. Filmmakers on hand for
Q&A. • 7:30pm, Royal Bank
Cinema, Chan Centre, free
tickets, for more info call (604)
822-2678.
GENDER AND SEXUALITY IN LATIN
AMERICA: READING & DISCUSSION
SESSION ON "STORIES OF RACE,
GENDER AND CLASS" • The Liu
Research Group on Gender
and Sexuality in Latin America aims to contribute to ongoing discussions about Latin American gender relations,
sexual politics and feminist
theories by bringing together
graduate students, post-doctoral fellows and faculty interested in these issues. • 4pm-
6pm, Liu Institute for Global
Issues, 3rd Floor Boardroom,
refreshments provided.
MONDAY, MAR. 8
SMALL (MINING) IS BEAUTIFUL-
ENGINEERING TO ALLEVIATE GLOBAL POVERTY • The UBC Faculty of Applied Science is taking part in Celebrate Research
Week. Learn from the entertaining and engaging Mining
Engineering Professor Marcel-
lo M. Veiga. This talk focuses
on how engineering can help
alleviate global poverty. The
findings are a result of a six-
year project sponsored by the
United Nations. • 6:30pm-
8pm, Robson Square.
TUESDAY, MAR. 9
FOUR WAYS TO COMBAT CLIMATE
CHANGE* Presented by Mechanical Engineering Professor Robert L. Evans, this talk focuses on
energy use and its impact on the
environment-one of the most
important technical, social and
public-policy issues facing humanity today. • 6:30pm-8pm,
Robson Square.
WEDNESDAY, MAR. 10
AMAZING PAPER: THE HISTORY AND
ART OF PAPERMAKING • Most people take paper for granted. Learn
from Chemical and Biological Engineering Professor Mark Martinez paper's rich history and its impact on society, and understand
the manufacturing process with
an emphasis on sustainability. •
12pm-1pm, Kaiser 2020/2030.
FROM T0YTRAINS TO AIRPLANES:
ARE WE SERIOUS ABOUT SAFETY?
• From the onset of the industrial revolution until a few decades ago, safety was a topic of great importance. But
in recent years, we have become complacent, that is, until a tragedy occurs. Explore issues of public safety with Materials Engineering Professor
Anoush Poursartip. • 6:30pm-
8pm, Robson Square.
THURSDAY, MAR. 11
MAKING A DIFFERENCE IN OUR
WORLD • UBC Faculty of Applied Science graduate students' leading-edge research
is shaping and improving the
fields of health, search and
rescue, mining and more.
Our graduate students will be
showing off their research and
talking about the differences they are making. • 12pm-
6pm, Kaiser Atrium.
FUNDRAISER BANQUET* Oxfam
UBC is organizing the second
annual Hungry4Change banquet, an event that aims to
raise awareness of global food
insecurity and fundraise $4,000
to contribute to Oxfam Canada's efforts to address global
food insecurity. The banquet
will include live music, a silent auction... and of course
food! • 6:30pm, Heritage Hall,
3102 Main Street, $20 for students, for more info go to hun-
gry4change.rezgo.com/tour.
FRIDAY, MAR. 12
A CONCERT FOR HAITI • Come enjoy an evening of live music performed by unique local artists.
Proceeds will go towards supporting the ongoing medical relief
efforts in Haiti. • 6pm reception,
7:30pm concert, Graham House,
Green College, $20 tickets.
INKJET PRINTING—FROM DOCUMENT PRINTING TO TISSUE ENGINEERING • Explore with Electrical and Computer Engineering
Professor Konrad Walus the
innovative concepts in inkjet
microfabrication and its rapidly emerging possibilities. •
12pm-1pm, Kaiser 2020/2030.
WEDNESDAY, MAR. 17
IMAGINE Y0URARTS MAJOR 2010*
Attend the Imagine Your Arts
Major Fair! Join professors,
department advisors and student leaders for an amazing
opportunity to have all your
academic questions explored
and answered! Workshops by
Go Global, Arts Academic Advising, Career Services, and
Arts Co-op will be held from
Mar. 8-12. Learn about potential careerpaths, gaining work
experience before graduation,
studying abroad, and making
sure that all your choices are
right for your degree! Registration is now open. • 11am-
2pm, SUB Ballroom, for more
info, go to arts.ubc.ca.
TRANSPORTATION    L
CONSULTATION
(verb)
around campus. If it were up
to me, the buses would be located at
(Place)      SO that I COUld (phrase)
Now that the underground bus loop is no longer an option, it's spiralling time when we come
together as a community and brainstorm alternatives. We want your ideas about where to put
the buses and better ways to get around campus—on foot, by bike or whatever.
Join our month-long public consultation where the right folks are in the room to listen
and learn from you. Here are three ways to get involved:
1
ATTEND OR
PRESENT AT
THE IDEAS FAIR
2 TAKE THE
SURVEY
ONLINE
SUBMIT
A BLOG
POST
a place of mind
Campus
Community
Planning
Find out about events,
workshops, our survey and
more at planning.ubc.ca.
LSAT MCAT
GMAT GRE
Preparation Seminars
• Complete 30-Hour Seminars
• Convenient Weekend Schedule
• Proven Test-Taking Strategies
• Experienced Course Instructors
• Comprehensive Study Materials
• Simulated Practice Exams
• Limited Class Size
• Free Repeat Policy
• Personal Tutoring Available
• Thousands of Satisfied Students
OXFORD SEMINARS
604-683-3430
1-800-269-6719
www.oxfordseminais.ca
Events placed in the
paper are done for
free! So send us info
about any goings-on
you want the rest
of campus to know
about.
events@ubysseyca
U THEUBYSSEYc 2010.03.04/UBYSSEY.CA/NEWS/3
l\
EWS
NO MORE SEAT FOR INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS ON COUNCIL
The non-voting International Student Seat will cease to       doing this," she said. "It just seems odd that AMS is so
exist next year, after AMS Council voted in favour of get-       homogenous."
ting rid ofthe position Wednesday night.                                    AMS President Bijan Ahmadian also disagreed with
The motion required a two-thirds majority to pass, and       the Council's decision. "We're giving privileged access
did so with 16 votes for the removal of the seat and 8       to one group of students and not others," he said,
against. It was put forward by Arts Councilor Matthew           VP Academic and University Affairs Ben Cappellacci
Naylor. Many international students came out to voice       advocated for a change in the system. "We do need to
their opinions.                                                                             rethink the way that international students are represent-
Current international rep Brittany Perna was upset.       ed [on AMS Council]," he said.
"It was exceptionally unfair the way they went about                                                                      —Samantha Jung
EDITOR SAMANTHAJUNG»news@ubyssey.ca
ASSOCIATE SARAH CHUNG »schung@ubyssey.ca
Students peer over Apartheid Wall'
Israeli Apartheid Week wants to start conversation, not controversy
ASHLEY WHILLANS
awhillans@ubyssey.ca
From March 2 to 6, UBC's Solidarity for Palestinian Human Rights
(SPHR) will take part in the sixth annual Israeli Apartheid Week (IAW).
One of the largest organized
events of its kind, IAW will take
place in 40 cities worldwide, with
major events scheduled at universities across North America,
including at UBC.
As hosts of the event, SPHR
have organized guest speakers,
film screenings and demonstrations across campus to raise awareness about Israel, a country that
they believe, under international
law, is an apartheid state.
"We are trying to promote the
idea that Israel is indeed an apartheid state," said SPHR President
Omar Shaban. "This is what we
want students to know during Israeli Apartheid Week. We want
students to understand these issues more."
The club also created an eight-
foot high mock wall in front of
the Knoll to symbolize the West
Bank Barrier, otherwise known
by Palestinian opposition groups
as the Apartheid Wall.'
The real barrier, which Israel
began constructing in April 2002,
separates Israel and Palestine. The
United Nations Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs estimates that 50,000 Palestinians reside on the Israeli side
of this wall, reducing the ability for
some Palestinians to work or visit
family in the West Bank or Israel.
In addition to grabbing the attention of students, the mock wall
Israeli Apartheid Week makes itself known on campus. GERALD DEO PH0T0/THE UBYSSEY
was created to inspire dialogue,
explained Shaban.
"We want to give the impression that it is not controversial
to talk about the Apartheid and
the Apartheid Wall.'," he said.
"Students should feel comfortable talking about it in their classes, to their professors and with
their classmates."
Since its creation in 2005 however, the IAW has faced criticism,
and not all students at UBC are
pleased about the events taking
place on campus.
"It is an intolerant annual ritual," said Noam Gilead, President
ofthe UBC Israel Awareness Club
(IAC). "While SPHR bill it as an exercise in 'Palestine solidarity,' it
typically features expressions of
hatred against Israel and its Jewish citizens," he added.
Gilead also added that, in his
opinion, IAW is offensive, as it targets a particular group of people
defined by religion and citizenship and does so "with a false and
poisonous analogy" between Israel and apartheid-era South Africa.
"Israel Apartheid Week is an
offence," he said. "The very term
Apartheid incites hatred and
vilification."
Aware ofthe criticisms against
the IAW, Shaban defended the
event and club members.
"It is very natural we get someone who labels us as controversial, however I disagree with the
criticisms," said Shaban.
"In the end, the claim that we
use the term Apartheid' to inflame
people and invoke people is invalid. This is not what we do, we are
just trying to raise awareness about
the situation there," he added.
He also assured that the SPHR
does not condone actions that are
discriminatory in nature, does
not promote anti-Semitism and
has strict policies for members
We are trying to
promote the idea
that Israel is indeed
an apartheid state,
as per international
law.
OMARSHABAN
SPHR PRESIDENT
who break this policy.
Leaving the debate behind,
Shaban instead stressed the
purpose of the IAW, which is
to raise awareness and create
conversation.
"We think that this week is very
important in creating constructive dialogue on campus and it
is very important in promoting
the idea that students do have
the academic freedom to discuss
whatever they want to, as long as
they don't reach hate speech or
insight violence," he said.
"We believe that students at UBC
are well aware, know what's going
on and need this environment and
event to discuss the issues." tl
Over 700 votes ineligible
Senate race among those affected in ongoing investigation
SAMANTHAJUNG
news@ubyssey.ca
The "voting irregularities" referred to by the Elections Committee in a letter to media last
week could result in changes
to the Senate and Voter Funded Media races.
In a presentation to AMS Council on Wednesday, Elections Administrator Isabel Ferreras said
that Mark Latham, coordinator
of the continuous Voter Funded Media (VFM) contest, contacted the Elections Committee
on February 17, five days after
the results were officially certified at the AMS' Annual General Meeting.
Latham noticed that a significant amount of votes around the
end of the voting period came
from the same IP address.
Ferreras revealed that 731
votes in total were cast from a
single IP address from between
731 votes in total
were cast from a
single IP address
between 12:44pm
and 4pm.
12:44pm and 4pm on January
29, the final day of voting, something she referred to as "suspect
voters." She also noted that 18
of these "suspect voters" had ineligible student numbers. For
the most part however, the votes
of these "suspect voters" were
random.
When the 731 votes were taken out of the count, it was found
that while no AMS executive positions were likely to be affected, the results of the AMS VFM
contest, the successful referenda
question that changed the AMS
tuition policy and the Senate
race could be changed.
The Elections Committee, citing the ongoing investigation by
Forensic Data Reovery (FDR), did
not comment too much on the
matter. Ferreras said it has not
been determined whether a "reelection is feasible" at this point
in time, adding that decisions will
be made after FDR completes its
investigation, expected to happen
in the next week.
The university is also conducting their own investigation
through the Registrar's office,
as the Senate race direcdy pertains to them.
"We are very actively trying
to determine who [the person
or group that voted multiple
times] is and we are making progress," said UBC AVP and Registrar James Ridge, til
For more on this story, check
out our coverage at ubyssey.ca.
Investigation of student
death to take months
SAMANTHAJUNG
news@ubyssey.ca
The investigation into the death
of 20-year-old Silas Rogers could
take months, reported CBC.
Constable Lindsey Houghton
of the VPD said that they'll "be
looking at trying to obtain any
and all evidence, certainly looking to speak to people who may
have information."
Rogers, a third-year student in
Economics at UBC, died last Friday in a Vancouver hospital. He
was arrested for public intoxication in Whisder on the evening
of Tuesday, March 4 and placed
in a holding cell.
The RCMP said that he fell several times while in custody. Rogers was released and found unconscious in a UBC residence
about 23 hours later.
A media representative from
the BC Coroner's Office commented minimally on the issue, as it
is an ongoing investigation, but
did say that the length of time an
investigation takes depends on
the amount of information and
when the office obtains it. A report will be issued once an investigation is concluded, which will
include the cause of death and
the coroner's findings.
A celebration of Rogers' life
will take place on Thursday at Our
Lady of the Assumption Church
in his hometown of Saint John,
New Brunswick, according to a
memoriam on inmemoriam.ca.
A private family burial is to take
place at a later date.
The VPD declined to comment
further on the incident.
Rogers was an athletic individual. Aside from playing baseball,
he skied and participated in track
and field. He was a graduate of
Saint John High School and is remembered by friends and family
for his stand-up comedy and his
ability to make people laugh, tl 4/UBYSSEY.CA/NEWS/2010.03.04
HENRY ANGUS SAGA CONTINUES
$500 annual fee on the table as
Commerce students vote next week
Dean Muzyka: "This is plan B"
SAMANTHAJUNG
news@ubyssey.ca
Commerce students will vote
soon on whether they want to
pay an annual $500 building
fee that would pay for structural upgrades to the Henry Angus
Building.
Undergraduate students at the
Sauder School of Business will go
to the polls on March 11 and 12
to vote on the fee, which would
commence in September 2012,
and is set to conclude in about
3 5 years.
The fee would pay for the approximately $20 million that is
needed to pay for the second
phase of upgrades to the Henry
Angus Building.
Phase One ofthe building upgrades was completed earlier
this year. At a town hall meeting
on Tuesday, Sauder Dean Daniel
Muzyka informed Commerce students that when Sauder made the
initial plans for the building, it
was to be jointly-funded by students, in addition to the university and donors.
"[Donors] gave money on the
premise that the university and
students were going to be contributing somehow," explained
Muzyka.
The Commerce Undergraduate
Society (CUS) Board of Directors
voted in favour of holding the referendum at their meeting Monday evening. They also took an
official stance supporting the fee.
"Our control as students is saying, 'We demand a world-class
business school, we demand a
world-class degree, and we're
willing to pay for it,'" said incoming CUS President Connor
McGauley.
"Everyone sitting in this
room who is a [graduate] will
be affected."
Both the dean and CUS claim
that the source of funding needs
to be worked out immediately, as
the school is up for an accreditation review by the Association
to Advance Collegiate Schools of
Business (AACSB) in 2012. The
AACSB sets and monitors standards for business programs all
over the world.
"What is the reputation you
want from your school?" Muzyka asked students on Tuesday.
The dean has been visiting classrooms, pushing for the referendum to pass, before the CUS voted to hold the referendum in the
first place.
A HISTORY OF UPGRADES
According to a 2006 Ubyssey article, Sauder students voted in favour of funding both phases of
the project with a progressive increase in their student fees. However, the provincial government
argued that the referendum was
a initiative from the dean, rather
than a student referendum, and
vetoed the fee, as it did not align
with the two per cent cap on tuition. Sauder could no longer fully fund Phase One, even though
construction had begun. To resolve the crisis, UBC's Board of
Governors decided to take money from the General Purpose Operating Fund (GPOF) in October
PROBLEMS WITH FUNDING
Phase One is
completed.
The BoG
funds the
project from
UBC's General
Projects
Operating
Fund.
The BC
government
rules that the
fee increase is
illegal.
Renovations
begin as
scheduled.
Commerce
students vote
in favour of a
progressive
increase in
fees to pay
for it.
The Sauder
School of
Business
decides to
renovate the
Henry Angus
Building.
If you can't bill
willing students
through an increase
in school fees, how
do you fund Phase
Two? The answer
is increase student
society fees!
PHASE ONE
PHASE TWO
2007 at approximately $910,000
per year for 30 years.
UBC VP Finance Pierre Ouillet
said in a media briefing Wednesday that currendy UBC has "no
money" available to fund Phase
Two. To solve this, and avoid the
problem of the two per cent tuition cap, the CUS has agreed to
tack the $500 fee onto their student society fees should the referendum pass. There are also no
donors or government money attached to the project.
STUDENT CONCERNS
Incoming Board of Governors representative and Commerce student Azim Wazeer is concerned
that the CUS seems to have received their information solely
from the dean, and has not done
much of their own research.
"I would like to take it in good
faith that the dean's office is
giving us the best report on accreditation," Wazeer said, "but
as an elected official, as a governing body, we need to do the
due diligence."
Wazeer said that while the accreditation application is "a long
and complex document" he encouraged the CUS to conduct extensive research on the subject.
"It seems like there is an apparent, drastic and complete
change of this building," Wazeer
said. "Relating that back to our
accreditation, I feel it would be
quite harsh...for [the AACSB] to
screw us on this."
Commerce student Adrian
Pape echoed Wazeer's sentiments. "I think Dean Dan is very
good at crafting his responses to
avoid the underlying root issues,"
he said. "There are many questions left unanswered with litde
time left to address them and inform the student body."
"At the time of our last review
we ranked low on our building," he continued, "but now
with more than 50 per cent of
it complete, I don't think the
accreditors will mind if we put
things on hold until the business community and the provincial and federal governments
find funding."
Muzyka informed The Ubyssey that "there hasn't been another pot of money to put into
this," and that the building upgrades have been "respectful of
costs" and at a "minimal reasonable standard."
First-year Commerce student
Rafael Tovar does not find this
fee a concern. "We are at the risk
of losing our accreditation, and
that means our degree would be
valueless," he said.
"We all must vote towards the
referendum, and help the dean
help us." til
COSTLY BUILDING PROJECTS
SUB
The new $110 million SUB will
mostly be funded by students,
who committed to an $85 million investment in September
2008. This will come in the form
of a student fee, which began
in the 2008/2009 year at $20. It
is to increase by $10 per school
year, to cap at $110. The university is to fund the remaining
$25 million.
LADHA'S FUNDING
The approximately $3.5 million
Abdul Ladha Science Student
Centre was funded partly by a
donation from Abdul and Hanifa
Ladha. The other part is being
provided by Science students,
who, according to Board of Governors representative Michael
Duncan, voted last decade in
favour of an annual student fee
of $10. Of that total, $9 would
go towards funding the building,
and $1 would go to the university's General Purposes Operating Fund. The fee will conclude
when the building is paid off.
UNIVERSITY 0FT0R0NT0
A similar referendum is occurring at the University of Toronto. The Globe and Mail reported that students at the Scarborough campus will vote later this
month whether to add $280 to
undergraduate fees starting in
2014 that would pay $30 million of the costs of a $170 million aquatic centre. The provincial and federal governments will
pick up 56 per cent of the bill,
and the University of Toronto is
putting in $8 million.
The building is part of the
city's plans to host the Pan
American Games in 2015.
QUOTE THIS
Our control as
students is saying,
'We demand
a world-class
business school, we
demand a world-
class degree, and
we're willing to pay
for it.'
CONNOR MCGAULEY
INCOMING CUS PRESIDENT
I would like to take
it in good faith
that the dean's
office is giving us
the best report on
accreditation, but as
an elected official,
as a governing
body, we need to do
the due diligence.
AZIM WAZEER
INCOMING BOARD OF GOVERNORS
REPRESENTATIVE
Check out our ongoing coverage
of this and many other issues at
ubyssey.ca. 2010.03.04/UBYSSEY.CA/NEWS/5
COURTESY OF INTERCAMP
Climbing the mountain of adversity
MEGAN SARRAZIN
ntercamp
EDMONTON (CUP)-Frostbite
claimed Mark Inglis' legs as he
attempted to climb Mount Everest in 1982, and while he didn't
make it all the way up then, he
later became the first double-amputee to summit the mountain.
The life-long mountaineer
reached the summit after a 46-
day climb in 2006, despite having both his legs amputated below the knee.
"My real challenge over the
last 28 years of being a double
amputee hasn't been to learn
to walk or to run, to skate or to
climb," he told an audience in
Edmonton on Feb. 24. "My real
challenge over that time was to
learn how to think again—to really understand that a life has
to be about advantage and not
disadvantage."
Inglis lost several of his fingertips as a result of his 2006
climb, yet doesn't see his amputations as a disadvantage
and rather looks on the positive side—noting that he's "a guy
that's not going to get frostbite
anymore."
He also said that "there's only
one thing I really regret... It's really really hard to actively participate in road rage."
Joking aside, Inglis said climbing Mount Everest is "like the ultimate worst hangover, day in,
day out."
"You've got a bleeding nose,
heart aches, you're feeling nauseous...(Then) you notice you're
only halfway."
The only way he was able to
accomplish his goal of being at
the top of the world, he said, is
to keep focused.
"It's about doing exactly the
right thing everyday. And if
you don't, well actually, in two
months time you might not make
it to the summit on summit day.
And what's worse, you might not
make it home," said Inglis.
While he called the climb of
Mount Everest one of the hardest things he has ever done, he
said it wasn't the most rewarding. That, he said, has been the
work he's done through his organization, Limbs4All.
Limbs4All is an organization that Inglis started with his
wife several years ago to raise
money for some of the estimated 400 million disabled people
in the world, providing items
like rough-terrain wheelchairs
to countries such as Cambodia.
"Seeing the smiles on the faces of the people that get our
limb and wheelchair support—
because you know you have given someone more than just a leg
or a set of wheels—you can see
in their faces that you have given them opportunity and hope,"
said Inglis.
Although Inglis would climb
Mount Everest tomorrow, there
are two things that he said must
happen—he would need to get
funding and would also need to
know that his climb would make
a difference.
"I know I could do it ten times
better, but I won't. (Since) it is
a two-year project, I think I can
do so much more with those two
years. I don't have that many
more two-year blocks of time left
on this world, so I need to make
the most of them." va
Many to blame for
financial collapse
MEGAN SARRAZIN
ntercamp
EDMONTON (CUP)-There's
no single entity to blame for
the global recession—at least,
that's what Christopher Ragan
believes.
The McGill professor is currendy the Clifford Clark Visiting
Economist in the Federal Department of Finance. He said that a
little bit ofthe recession's blame
should go toward everyone involved, from consumers to banks
to government policymakers.
"The reason it [was] a global
recession is because [of] credit
markets in the globalized world.
Credit markets are global markets, so even though Canadian
banks were in fine shape, Canadian banks participate in global credit markets," Ragan told a
crowd at Grant MacEwan University in Edmonton on Feb. 24.
In a presentation that aims to
make sense of the global financial crisis, Ragan gave a step-by-
step explanation of the lead-up
to the recession and the effects
it has had on various countries,
particularly the US, as well as the
impact it has had on the global
market.
He told the crowd the first
hints of a crisis appeared in the
early 2000s with the dot-com
crash, which he explained as a
buildup of technology-related
companies that led to inflation
in asset prices. When the asset
prices deflated, the stock market
crashed, but to a smaller extent
than in 2008.
Shordy following the dot-com
crash were the terrorist attacks
of 9-11, which led to severe economic uncertainty.
"With that kind of uncertainty, people that ordinarily made
forward-looking economic decisions stopped making forward-
looking economic decisions—in
particular, firms stop investing,
firms maybe stop hiring," said
Ragan.
He said that with mortgage-
backed securities, an asset-
backed security that basically
states that if one fails to make
their mortgage payments, the asset that backs the loan (usually a
home) can be confiscated. This
looked attractive to banking institutions because itwas seen as
a relatively risk-free investment
with high monetary return as a
result of interest.
According to Ragan, in order
for this to be successful, there
was a need for both credit and
mortgages, which in turn meant
the need for an appealing housing market.
In order for consumers to purchases homes, he explained, it
was expected that they get mortgage-backed security, which inevitably affected the global market
by having more and more people
borrowing and going into debt at
a higher rate.
As more and more people went
into debt, their homes were taken
away as a result of their mortgage
backed securities and they were
forced into foreclosure.
In order for banks to recover some of the lost money, they
put thousands of houses on the
market, which Ragan explained
as, "house prices go down further, more people walk away
from their homes. More people
walk away from their homes, so
there are more delinquencies and
foreclosures. More foreclosures,
more houses go on the market
and so on and so on."
Thus, said Ragan, blame
should fall on everyone involved
for participating in the crisis as
it evolved.
"To me, this whole thing
happened because of a fantastic combination of events," said
Ragan. tl
THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA PRESENTS
SPORTandSOCIETY
Join us online or in person for provocative dialogues with Olympic & Paralympic athletes who have used
their celebrity to make a difference in the world—distinguished speakers will join in a panel debate.
<
z
5
8PM
'•*•
SPORT AND INCLUSION
Are Major Sporting Events Inclusive of First
Nations and Other Groups?
WANEEK HORN-MILLER - former Olympic alhlele,
activist, speaker and television personality.
SHARON AND SHIRLEY FIRTH are the first aborigine
women to be represented at the Olympic Games
VALERIE JEROME was a member of Canada's 1960
Olympic and 1966 Commonwealth Games teams.
CC
<
z
1(XM
SPORT AND CHALLENGE
Is Anything Possible?
RICK HANSEN - CO, O.B.O, Presicent and CEO of the
^ick Hansen Foundation.
DR. BRUCE MCMANUS - Professor, Department of
Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, at UBC
PAT JARVIS - former Paralympic a:hlete and member
of :he International Paralympic Committee,
UBC
a place of mind       THE GLOBE AND MAIL'
W
straight
cc
<
z
lOsPM __j\\^
5RT. LEGACY AND >
SPORT, LEGACY AND
SUSTAINABILITY Is it Worth It?
DR. BRUCE KIDD - former Olympic athlete anc
Professor and Dean of the Faculty of Physica
Education at the University of Toronto,
DR. JAMES TANSEY is a UBC expert on
sustainability, green business, carbon trading and
corporate social responsibility. He is tracking the
carbon footprint of 2010 Winter Games,
DEREK WYATT - elected Member of Parliament
in the UK, and Chair of the All Party Parliamentary
London 2012 Olympic and Paralympic Group,
TICKETS $10 available through Ticketmaster—www.ticketmaster.ca
ALL EVENTS AT THE CHAN CENTRE FOR THE PERFORMING ARTS
except
Peak Performance, a free event at SFU Harbour Centre. For more
information on Peak Performance visit: www.heartantllung.ca/peal!
PODCASTS featured at www.theglobeanclmail.com/intellectual-muscle
now available:
Sport, Ethics and Technology: Is High Performance Sport Inconsistent
with Ideals and Ethics? (keynote Richard Pound)
Sport, Peace and Development: How Can Sport Contribute to
Positive Social Change? (keynote Stephen Lev/is, Johann Olav k.oss)
More information:
www.communityaffairs.ubc.ca or www.ctancentre.com
Backstory
Nuuchaanulth Ceremonial Curtains and
the Work of Ki-ke-in
Bringing together contemporary ceremonial curtains
by Nuuchaanulth artist Ki-ke-in (Ron Hamilton)
and historical curtains from museum and
private collections in Canada and the United States.
January 17 to March 28, 2010
Ki-ke-in painting the thliitsapilthim of
Ha'wilth Nuukmiis of the House of
liwaasant, Opitsat-h, Tla-o-qui-aht,
winter 1988-89, Vancouver, B.C.
Photo: Haayuusinapshiilthl.
This exhibition is generously sponsored by
The Audain Foundation, and is presented with
the 2010 Vancouver Cultural Olympiad,
with support from the British Columbia Arts Council,
the Canada Council for the Arts and the
UBC Museum of Anthropology
MORRIS AND HELEN BELKIN ART GALLERY
The University of British Columbia I 1825 Main Mall I Vancouver I BC V6T 1Z2
Phone: 604 822 2759 I Fax: 604 822 6689 I Web address: www.belkin.ubc.ca
Open Tuesdayto Fridayl0to 5 Saturday ard Sunday 12 to 5   I   Closed holidays
Do you want to be part ofthe news team?
Help us get the rest of campus informed.
samantha JUNG | news@ubysseyca
U THEUBYSSEYc 6/UBYSSEY.CA/OLYMPICS/2010.03.04
OLYMPICS
TORCH TO RUN THROUGH UBC A SECOND TIME
The Paralympic Torch Relay arrives on the UBC campus on March
11. It is supposed to be on campus from 11-12:30pm. Like the Olympic Torch Relay, the university has planned to have a campus-wide
celebration with live entertainment and activities. Five torchbear-
ers have been selected to participate in the UBC leg of the relay.
—Samantha Jung
EDITOR SAMANTHAJUNG»news@ubyssey.ca
^JTJIJVVii.i'
ANTHONY GOERTZ GRAPHIC/THE UBYSSEY
Olympic venues: before and after
KATARINA GRGIC
copy@ubyssey.ca
In Beijing, there stands an indoor winter amusement park
known as "Happy Ice and Snow
Season." Inside, staring at a
20 metre high snow mountain sculpture, you would have
never guessed that this winter
wonderland-themed building
once held a massive Olympic
track, with thousands of spectators filling the now lonely
space.
China's Bird's Nest—unlike
our Bird Coop—has yet to serve
an athletic purpose. In Vancouver, three Olympic venues promised to fulfill a legacy well after
the short-lived 2010 Games.
Here are the proposed before- and after-lives of the three
Olympic venues:
VANCOUVER OLYMPIC CENTRE:
During the Olympics, the centre, located next to Queen Elizabeth Park, hosted curling events.
Post-Olympics, the centre
will function as a multi-purpose community centre, holding an ice rink, curling club,
library, preschool, field house
and offices.
RICHMOND OLYMPIC OVAL
For the Olympics, the Richmond
Olympic Oval held long-track
speed skating events.
Now that the Vancouver Olympics are over, the oval will function as a venue for badminton,
volleyball, indoor soccer, basketball, handball, floorball and
more.
Its multi-functional ice will be
used for international or North
American hockey, figure skating,
short track speed skating or
sledge hockey. It will also serve
as a 110m spike-proof sprint
track and 200m training track.
WHISTLER SLIDING CENTRE
Bobsleigh, luge and skeleton
events were held at the Whistler sliding centre during the
Olympics.
Now, the Sliding Centre will
be used to train Canadian national luge, bobsled and skeleton teams, as well as young aspiring sliding athletes, through
junior programs, tl
Back to grass at Lord and Buck Fields
ASHLEY WHILLANS
awhillans@ubyssey.ca
The asphalt and concrete that
covered the Lord and Buck
Fields during the 2010 Olympics will soon be removed and
replaced with grass.
The fields, located just south
of the Douglas Mitchell Thunderbird Sports Centre, were paved in
an agreement with VANOC to accommodate a media compound
during the Games.
In addition to being returned
to their original state, the fields
will also receive upgrades to their
irrigation and drainage systems.
This was due to a follow-up agreement that allows UBC to take control over the restoration project.
According to Kavie Toor, Associate Director of Facilities and
Business Development for UBC
Athletics and Recreation, these
irrigation upgrades will allow
for six additional hours of recreational use per week.
The fields, which are used primarily for rugby practices, will
remain closed until at least September to allow for the grass seed
to grow and setde.
Toor emphasized the benefit
of this temporary closure.
"Even though we had some
missed opportunities with field
time while there was gravel and
asphalt, we are coming out of it
with a better surface and a better playing venue than we had
before," he said.
"We are able to get more playing time out of it. In the long run,
itwas a benefit."
Construction at the fields is
set to begin in April. Trees will
be planted on the east side ofthe
pathway adjacent to Thunderbird Park as part ofthe upgrade.
Additionally, Thunderbird
Stadium will receive upgrades
beginning in April. The most
notable of these is a change in
the arena's surface from grass
to turf, tl
OLYMPIC BRIEFS
GOLD MEDAL HOCKEY
MOST-WATCHED PROGRAM
16.6 million viewers watched
the gold medal men's hockey
game last Sunday, making it the
most-watched program in the
history of Canadian television,
reported The Province.
Eighty per cent of Canadians
watched at least a part of the
game. The Olympic Closing Ceremonies placed second of all-
time, with 14.3 million on average tuning in to watch.
PARALYMPIC TORCH SETS OFF
FROM OTTAWA TODAY
The Paralympic Torch Relay began today on Parliament Hill in
Ottawa with a Torch Relay Lighting Ceremony.
Sixteen Canadians will be passing the Paralympic torch across
Canada between March 3 and
12, where 13 of them will represent their province or territory as ambassadors.
Many are former or current
athletes who have experienced
disabilities, such as Paralympic
gold-medal swimmer Chelsea
Gotell, who is representing Nova
Scotia, while others are strong
supporters for rights of people
with disabilities.
Arnold Boldt was the first
torchbearer in the ten-day journey across Canada. A torchbearer was selected to represent each
province at the lighting ceremony, including comedian and
broadcaster Rick Mercer represented BC, honorary President
of the International Paralympic
Committee Dr Robert Steadward
represented Alberta and singer
Justin Hines represented Ontario.
Other torchbearers include
Chantal Petitclerc, a five-time
Paralympian who will carry the
torch in Vancouver, and Ken
Melamed, the Mayor of Whisder, who will pass on the flame
March 8.
TWO TORCHBEARERS
IDENTIFIED FOR UBC LEG
Jim Milina from Comox Valley
will be one of the Canadians
participating in the Paralympic Torch Relay at UBC on March
11a day before the Paralympic
Games begin on March 12.
At 17, he was one of the youngest to become the BC freestyle skiing champion, but after breaking
his neck from a fall during a run,
he became quadriplegic.
Since then, he became the first
quadriplegic to climb Mount Kilimanjaro in Africa in 2002 and
has led a Rick Hansen Wheels In
Motion event.
George Hungerford, an Olympic rower, is another torchbearer who will carry the flame on
campus.
—Samanthajung & Sarah
Chung
Write some stories so
our news editors don't
die of exhaustion.
samantha JUNG | news@ubyssey.ca
THEUBYSSEYca 2010.03.04/UBYSSEY.CA/GAMES/7
GAMES
SUSC0MIC.COM, BY MICHAEL BROUND
SUDOKU
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CAMPUS CALL0SUM, BY PAM OLIVIER (NEXUS)
The dawn of public art and the popular opinion.
NEARLY SOLD OUT!
PREMIUM HOMES STILL AVAILABLE
UBC - WESBROOK VILLAGE  ENGINEERING A".
BCIT Engineering gives you
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Visit bcit.ca/engineering
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v     Get it right. 10/UBYSSEY.CA/CULTURE/2010.03.04
CULTURE
EDITOR KATE BARBARIA»culture@ubyssey.ca
ASSOCIATE JONNY WAKEFIELD »iwakefield®
SPROUTS RECIPE    CORRUPTED COCONUT OIL FUDGE
INGREDIENTS
1 1/2 cups coconut oil (comes as a
white pasty substance)
1 cup carob powder or organic cocoa powder
1 1/2 cups Rapadura, Sucanat or
honey
1 tsp vanilla extract
DIRECTIONS:
1) You will need two bowls for this
step. Liquefy the coconut oil by placing a bowl of the oil into a bowl of
hot water.
2) If using Rapadura or Sucanat
(whole dehydrated cane juice) blend
in a dry blender until it becomes a
powder.
3) Blend all the ingredients together in
a food processor or a blender on high
until the batter emulsifies.
4) Place the liquid in a large lasagna pan.
Let sit at room temperature or in your
refrigerator until the fudge hardens and
voila, a yummy vegan and raw treat!
—Jon Dehouwer
A little Fred Penner
Beloved children's musician to play the Pit tonight
PHOTO COURTESY OF FRED PENNER
JONNY WAKEFIELD
jwakefield@ubyssey.ca
If you grew up in Canada in the
early 90s, you probably remember Fred Penner, that nice man
who lived in a log and played silly songs on CBC. Oddly enough,
Fred Penner's Place will be at The
Pit tonight, as the lovable entertainer relives the tunes that
made him an icon for the now
college-aged kids who grew up
listening to him. The Ubyssey
spoke with Fred about his career, his songs, andjusthowhe
ended up playing The Pit.
UBYSSEY: How does one of Canada's most famous children's
entertainers end up playing in
a pub for a bunch of university
students?
FRED PENNER: (laughs) I've heard
about The Pit, I have friends who
have played The Pit, and I'm
wondering the same thing: 'what
on earth is he thinking? Are
you really gonna play The Pit?'
(laughs) It's an odd sort of thing
that's evolved here, because the
generation who first connected
with me are now the university
students. I receive pretty much
daily e-mails from that generation saying that they remember me from the early days. It's
really cool to reconnect. Some
are saying that they're going
into teaching because of me,
that they play guitar or write
songs because of me. There are
all these accolades that are coming to me at this point. And that's
so cool! I respond to e-mails, I
try to do it as often as possible.
But it's really neat to do something a little more direct by going to the university.
U: What's it like reconnecting
with the kids who grew up on
your show?
P: A couple of years ago I played
in Montreal at Gurt's Lounge
at McGill. It was out of sight!
This lounge holds maybe only a
couple hundred people at most.
When they heard I was going to
be there, this place was jammed
to the rafters! I was on stage
for about two hours, answering questions, singing songs,
sharing some of my philosophy
about this whole thing. This trip
that I've been on for 30 years is
a pretty intense journey about
making a difference in the lives
of people, of children, of families. And I think that's part of
what I bring to these events, it
become quite philosophical, and
often very emotional.
For a lot of the kids who are
coming to see me, I was part
of their lives in a very critical
time of life. And in some ways
I was a role model for them,
depending on their family situation. I may have been a father figure in some cases. Tears
have often been part of the
communication. There's such
an overwhelming sense of reconnecting with this guy. I'm
trying to be respectful of what
the audience is feeling, how
deeply they feel that they are
connected with me, and taking
that back to them. So Thursday
night is going to be a very interesting litde experiment at UBC.
U: Got anything special planned
for the UBC show?
P: I did Fred Penner's Place for
thirteen years out of Vancouver and Winnipeg. So there's always been such a powerful connection here. Taking it to UBC
at this point is a logical progression in many ways. I'm in the
midst of trying to write a song
for UBC. (laughs) So we'll see
where that goes.
U: What's your most recent tour
been like?
P: At this point my spectrum of
performance is quite vast, from
doing schools, to keynote addresses, to the colleges and public performance. It's all part of
the same basic spectrum, and
it's putting those pieces together when the touring happens.
I'm looking at this as about a
three-week tour that will take
me from BC to Ontario.
U: Do you enjoy playing more for
any particular audience?
P: I love performing. It's been
such a part of my life for so
long that I feel completely relaxed and comfortable when I'm
on stage. I guess the phrase is
you're only as good as your last
gig.' It's almost a Zen kind of
thing. I play to the audience that
is there at that time. I try and
give an open energy so that the
audience can contribute to the
energy ofthe performance.
U: Do you have a particular
message thatyou hope people
take from everything you've
been doing for the past few
decades?
P: I think the message is the value of music, and ultimately making a difference in the life of another human being through the
music and communication. I've
never been just a guy who gets
up on stage and sings a couple
of songs and tries to do something funny and it's over. It's
always been about something
much deeper than that, about
getting into the lives of the listener and planting a bit of a seed
that will hold on for a while, that
will make them think for a moment. I'll talk about my own family along the way, and things and
how music has affected thing
that I've done. Ultimately, the
message I want to leave is to
never underestimate your ability to make a difference in the
life of another human being. 2010.03.04/UBYSSEY.CA/CULTURE/ll
Discorder on the ropes
Magazine turns to local bands for fundraiser
JONNY WAKEFIELD
jwakefiel d@ubyssey. ca
Discorder has fallen on tough
times. The monthly music magazine from campus radio station CiTR is struggling due to
declining ad sales from local
music purveyors. Damn this
economy! If Discorder doesn't
find some cash soon, we'll be
seeing fewer magazines on the
stands.
Like any self-respecting independent publication, Discorder
has turned to their friends for
help. And so The Fundraiser was
born: an all out smorgasbord of
local musicians featuring Fanshaw, Apollo Ghosts, Boogie Monster andjapandroids in DJ mode,
all deployed strategically at the
Biltmore on March 5 to save the
publication.
The Ubyssey spoke with
Discorder Editor Jordie Yow about
the show and the future of the
magazine.
UBYSSEY: How has the Vancouver music scene come to your
aid?
YOW: One of the biggest things
is that all these bands are willing to play for free—which is a
really big deal for us. We're really pleased at that. These are
all bands that we love; we've
written about these bands in
the past. We're all big fans of
them, and they've been willing
to come out and play for free
to keep the magazine in print.
They recognize that Discorder
is providing a valuable service
for the community: we're the
only magazine in town that focuses entirely on local music.
That's our mandate.
Editor Jordie Yow keeps his hopes up. gerald deo photo/THE UBYSSEY
U: How have other parts of the
arts community helped out
Discorder?
Y: There's some really great stuff
that's been donated by local businesses. The Fringe Festival has donated a pass to everything at the
festival. A lot of local artists who
do work in Discorder who are just
getting their art careers started
will have their work available at
our silent auction.
U: One of the bigger bands at
this show arejapandroids, but
they're going to be DJing instead
of playing their songs. What's a
Japandroids DJ set like?
Y: People will have to come to
find out. We asked them to play
and they said "Let's do something different." They'll just be
coming off tour and they want
a break before they go on tour
again. Both the guys are really big music fans, and they'll
be playing later in the night so
they'll want to see people moving. It'll be a dance party, and a
good chance for people to hear
the musical tastes Japandroids
have when they want to party.
U: Why does the world need
Discorder?
Y: I think it's crucial in developing the Vancouver music scene.
Discorder provides a service:
we find bands in Vancouver. If
we're not finding them, there are
no other magazines that have
a mandate that go out and look
for them. If Vancouver's music
scene is to continue to be as good
as it is now, it's important that
someone is out there telling people what's happening. tl
CD REVIEWS
PHILIP STOREY pstorey@ubyssey.ca
BROKEN BELLS
SELF-TITLED
Some days I wake up from my
vegetative state of pop culture
boredom only to find that something miraculous has snuck up
on me. Broken Bells is exactly
that sort of miracle, so I'll just
start by saying that if you are remotely interested in indie music, then you need to get a copy
of their new self-titled album.
Seriously, rent it, buy it, steal it
from a friend, request it on the
radio, smuggle it across the border in your underwear or import
it from the moon. Just make sure
thatyou listen to it.
Broken Bells is the amalgamation of The Shins frontman
James Mercer and Brian Burton (aka Danger Mouse). I usually hate indie supergroups but
I guess sometimes I hop on the
hypocrite wagon just like everyone else. What makes this album
so good is that both Mercer and
Burton bring their very distinctive styles to the table. A lot of supergroups have musicians that
mostly sound the same, therefore you can't tell who is doing
what, or why you should care.
Mercer and Burton, meanwhile,
are so distinct from one another
thatyou can practically hear
them standing on different
sides of the room.
If you already like The
Shins, you should at least listen to this to tide yourself over
until their next album. If you
like Danger Mouse, then this
will be nothing different, as all
the man does is make good music with loads of other musicians. I wonder if he has some
sort of weird quality-compelling disease.
BLACK REBEL
MOTORCYCLE CLUB
BEAT THE DEVIL'S TATTOO
Once upon a time there was a
band (nay, a Parthenon of Gods)
whose name was so distinct that
they did the impossible and put
out a gospel rock album that
didn't suck. This album was
dubbed Howl by these unearthly beings— and thus my life was
forever improved.
Ever since that legendary time
I have been praying for the second coming, but alas, it seems
that it isn't in the stars. Sadly,
every time since then BRMC has
put out straight rock albums, and
Beat The Devil's Tattoo is no different. It certainly isn't bad, but
it's not the magic lighting strike
that was Howl— so I'm going to
be petty and say don't bother
with it.\3
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in general.
Therefore, you should
contribute to The
Ubyssey.
KATE BARBARIA
culture@ubyssey.ca
U THEUBYSSEYc
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Do you like comics?
Do you like to draw?
The answer to both of those questions is "yes."
Come draw for us.
virginie menard | production@ubysseyca
U THEUBYSSEYc 12/UBYSSEY.CA/IDEAS/2010.03.04
1
IN RESPONSE TO "ELECTIONS
COMMITTEE TO REPORT ON ELECTIONS
IRREGULARITIES' [MAR. 2, 2010]":
Y||l        ^*\l     |                                            Well, the fact that only the online portion
1   \J \J    %J-^%u U                                            was impacted isn't too reassuring since
only 12 votes were cast that weren't online.
—Kyle Warwick [Mar. 3}
DO YOU CARE?
WRITE US A LETTER
feedback@ubyssey.ca
EDITOR TREVOR RECORD»ideas@ubyssey.ca
BBFEegGISMIS
T6 SEE IF WE. WANT
TO F»* ThE BROKEN
KATHY YAN LI GRAPHIC/THE UBYSSEY
EDITORIAL
MOOSE + NICKELBACK = CANADA?
Forget the Robson street nightly celebrations. Forget the pavilions,
the medals and even our hockey win. Four days after the Olympics
ended, the one thing on everyone's mind is Nickelback, William
Shatner and giant inflatable flying beavers.
Yes, the Closing Ceremonies came and went on Sunday, leaving the
entire nation in a state of confusion. There was something for everyone to hate. If you weren't put off by Shatner rambling about making
love in a canoe, or the largest game of arcade hockey ever, then you
were one of those people who couldn't believe Simple Plan got to play.
The thing that disappointed us most about the ceremony wasn't
the stereotypical humour. We get what the organizing team—two Australians who organized the Opening and Closing Ceremonies for the
2000 Sydney Games—were doing. It was a send-up of people's perceptions of us, a giant in-joke about our national preoccupations. That
we can take a joke better than anyone.
The problem was that it was outdated. The Maple Leaf Forever,
sexy mounties and moose may still be part of our culture, but at this
point that culture has become heritage, not modern. And that heritage was from Eastern Canada—it has litde to do with BC. The closing
ceremonies were an episode ol Just for Laughs, only with a multi-million dollar budget. Which may explain the lack of funny.
Where were the jokes aboutyuppies wearing Lululemon, kayaking,
or Seth Rogen? You're telling me they could make jokes about pissing in the snow, but not about a guy with dreads who smokes pot?
In the end, what disappointed us most about the Closing Ceremonies was that in our final chance to show the world who we are and
what we stood for, we looked backward. All things considered, we'll
remember Neil Young...and try and forget the rest.
IT'S TIME TO TAKE ELECTIONS PROCESSES SERIOUSLY
The AMS Elections are currently being audited, marking the third
major elections bungling in as manyyears.
This year, someone was able to hack the system, voting hundreds
of times from the same IP address. Lastyear, itwas when Alex Monegro filed a complaint about Blake Frederick running a "slate" campaign. That year's elections committee decided to take away his presidency, which was returned to him when he appealed to student court.
Back in 2008, Alex Lougheed nearly lost his position when he voted
multiple times, an action he claimed was to point out the flaws in the
system. In all three cases, the results of an election would have potentially been radically changed due to a simple oversight.
It seems like elections shouldn't be as consistency flawed as the
ones the AMS holds. By themselves, these boondoggles might seem
like isolated and excusable mistakes. But they have become so frequent that it is clear that the AMS is not vigilant enough with their
elections process. No one should be able to vote more than once, and
once elections results are announced, students should be confident
that those results will not be suddenly and unexpectedly overturned.
Part of the problem is that the elections are held frequendy and a
new group of candidates and elections administrators are involved
each time. But these problems could be alleviated, if only slighdy, if
the AMS started working on their next year's elections far earlier.
The elections are one of the main efforts that the organization undertakes, and it's time to recognize this. We're not saying that future
elections candidates should start including "smooth elections process
next year" as part of their platform. However, as a basic courtesy to
the next year's batch of candidates, and to the students they serve,
they should try to make sure the transition doesn't include needless
elections debacles, tl
TOO SEXY
KASHA CHANG
& AUSTIN HOLM
toosexy@ubyssey.ca
HI TOO SEXY,
Since high school I've always entertained the possibility that I
might not be totally straight.
In changerooms I would always
be too shy to look up; I felt like other girls' bodies were a very tantalizing yet off-limits kinda thing. The
other girls always seemed to be
so comfortable lounging around
half-naked together, while I would
be very shy and trying hard not to
stare at them. I've also definitely had some crushes on girls in
my time.
The thing is, I've never had the
opportunity to find out if I am anything more than "bi-curious." Since
I've been old enough to have these
feelings I've been friends with almost purely guys. And from a
young age I've always been in relationships with guys too; I can really be friends with them better than
with girls, because I'm rather boyish myseff. I've had some great relationships (and am in one right
now, with a boy), but this has never allowed me to try other things...
[or] other sexes. I go through these
phases when I am okay with only
having ever been with guys, because I like them, and am attracted to them, but I also go through
phases where I really just want to
know whether everything else is
just a fantasy, or I really am bi. It
can be really frustrating and confusing and scary and all that crap.
My boyfriend is aware of this,
but he's really laid back and just
says, "as long as I can watch..."
with a laugh. I don't think he understands how confusing this is
for me. My question (after that
long explanation) is: is it right to
want to try stuff with a girl just to
see how I really feel about it? How
would I ever let people know that
I was open to that? I've only ever
been in serious relationships, so
I don't know what to do to just
have a fling. I don't want to hurt
anyone (my boyfriend or any girl)
but I can't get over this craving either. I just like girls.
—shygirl
HI SHYGIRL,
Thanks foryour whopper of alet-
ter. Let's dive right in.
First of all, how does anyone
ever know what their sexuality is?
We'll give you a hint: It's usually
not through experience. Sexuality
can and does evolve over time for
a lot of people, but many of us also
have seemingly inborn identifications that lead us toward a sexual persuasion. As beings capable
of self-analysis, we have the freedom to define our innate urges in
ways that make the most sense to
us. Your sexuality isn't the sum
of your experiences, Shygirl. It's
more about what and who make
your temperature rise, your breath
quicken, your heart go thumpity-
thump and, perhaps most impor-
tanfly howyou choose to interpret
and label those responses.
Some heterosexuals will go their
entire lives without having a same-
sex experience, because they just
don't feel the need. They call themselves straight, and they are. The
inverse is true for many lesbian and gay folk, many of whom
identify as attracted to members
of their own sex even as young children. They identify as queer, and
they are. At the same time, some
gays and lesbians who have had
heterosexual encounters also continue to identify as queer, and they
are. Those who identify as heterosexual but make out with people
of the same sex at parties? They
can stillbe straight, if they want to.
For bisexuals, things can be a
bit more complicated. From your
letter, though, it sounds like your
bi-curiosity (or, as we'd prefer to
call it, latent bisexuality) is pretty
firmly established and you at least
want to try engaging in sexual activity with a girl. And that, Shygirl, is
really all that counts. There's nothing wrong with being "just bi-curious," it doesn't mean that you
shouldn't try out same-sex shenanigans, that those experiences
wouldn't be valid, or thatyou're in
some way just a poseur-bisexual.
With that in mind, don't stress
about whether or not you're a
"true" bisexual or not. Bisexuals
can be attracted to either gender
to varying degrees. As un-PC as it
is to say, sexualities are just labels.
These labels can be useful for rallying people around rights issues
and organizing social gatherings,
but in day-to-day life, all that really
matters is who you're attracted to
because of who they are as a person, not based on some nebulous
concept of their gender (which is
also just a label). You're into a guy
because he has really nice eyes,
a great sense of humour and so
forth, not just because he's a guy.
Bottom Une: We're attracted to
people, not their gender. If some
of the people you're attracted to
for their many different attributes
also happen to be girls, we suppose you could call yourself bisexual. What you call your sexuality is all about what has value to
you, Shygirl, not about fitting into
someone else's concept of what
your sexuality should be. That's
for you to decide.
Finally, a word about your boyfriend. We think it's great that
you've been open with him about
the fact that you're questioning
your sexuality. And we also think
it's great that he's at least open
to letting you explore with girls
while maintaining your relationship with him. That said, it's not
so cool that the caveat on that exploration is that he gets to "watch."
Given thatyou're trying to figure
out what makes sense to you and
define your sexuality more clearly,
another person fetishizing that experience is the last thingyou need.
We're as in favour of crazy
group sex as the next person, but
there will be plenty of time for that
once you've got things more sorted out. Explain to your boyfriend
that you need to do this on your
own ifyou're going to do it at all,
not because you want to exclude
him, but because it's your sexuality you need to define, not his. As
for whether it's "right" to involve
yourself with a girl when you're not
sure ifyou're bisexual, just be upfront. There are many people in
your position, Shygirl, and we're
sure they'd be happy to do some
sexploration with you. tl
Confused? Horny? Like prank
e-mails about phony sex problems?
E-mail us at toosexy@ubyssey.ca
or go to ubyssey.ca/ideas/.
STREETERS
WHAT DID YOU THINK OF
THE OLYMPIC CLOSING
CEREMONIES?
MOHAMMAD ASKARP00R
Engineering 1
I liked them because they didn't
go overboard like China, who
spent over 200 million dollars
on their ceremonies. They just
went nice and simple...[The Canadian stereotypes] is where
they made their mistake. They
should have fixed that and made
it more towards that Canada is
multicultural, instead of all the igloos and ice and things like that.
JENNA MAASKANT
Engineering 1
I actually thought it was really funny how they made fun of
how they messed up the torch. I
thought that was good, I like that.
It kind of shows that we don't take
ourselves too seriously, which
I think is a good thing in some
aspects.
JORDAN HANNAM
Arts 2
I liked them...but I kind of
thought they were a little car-
toonish. The floating beavers
and floating moose weren't really my thing. I liked when they
had Michael J. Fox and William
Shatner talking.
ALLISON PERRY
Arts 2
I didn't really like any of the
bands except for Michael Buble.
I thought there were more people
who were famous internationally than actually in Canada, which
was kind of interesting, I guess.
I liked the beginning where they
were making fun of the torch,
that was clever. It showed we
can laugh at ourselves, tl
Coordinated by Krittana Khura-
na, Chibwe Mweene and Tara
Martellaro. 2010.03.04/UBYSSEY.CA/IDEAS/13
PERSPECTIVES
INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS:
THE SLAVE DRIVERS OF UBC
PIERCE NETTLING
Contributor
It has come to my attention that
your AMS Council has chosen to
limit the democratic expression
ofthe most important people on
this campus: International students like me.
If you fall within the category of a domestic undergraduate
student, your eight-digit student
number is not very valuable compared to mine. You see, I'm an
international student, which is a
valuable commodity. Yes, there
are two types of students in Stephen Toope's world, and only
one matters to him.
I'm the resources that multinational corporations plunder
in Southeast Asia. Except it gets
even better: Unlike local students or ore deposits, I am virtually limidess. Like the women of
Manila who made your clothes,
I'm driving myself forever into
debt clinging to a dream, so
that one day you can have a
better life. I personally created UBC, out of my own undying
compassion and love for you
and your city. The comfortable
lifestyle you are able to lead is
only a result of my anguish and
determination.
I jest, but international students make this place and your
diploma world-renowned without
actually doing anything to make
UBC worthy of such a name. The
university ranking systems—this
university's open addiction—is
based on a few criteria. I apologize, butyou're probably not one
of those factors (I am).
In the eyes of the ranking
scheme, the university international students have chosen to attend must have hired important
people (professor citations) who
somehow are able to carry out
excellent research (library size,
funding, and graduate students).
This is how UBC is ranked and
fluctuates yearly. 'Quality teaching' or 'students from Burnaby'
do not enter into the formula. I
mean, why should they? You're
really not that important.
Keeping this formula in
mind, a reasonable person like
you would conclude that international students are important. You would most likely wager, if you were the betting sort,
that I'd at least have some form
of representation within the student body.
Having a
permanent voting
representative on
Council in our
make-believe
student government
shouldntbethat
big of a deal.
Having a permanent voting
representative on Council in
our make-believe student government shouldn't be that big of
a deal. Sadly, your stonewalled
AMS Council adamandy believes
otherwise. I know you're not like
our council. You would never bite
the hand that feeds, that's not the
global citizen I taught you to be.
The AMS Council can continually deny my existence on this
campus and believe we're not
worthy of a seat on Council. As
they represent 15 per cent ofthe
student population who voted,
that is within their right. Therefore, as a good and trusty student
slave who knows his place, I will
obey their decision for now. However, I know that very soon, my
flock will outnumber the AMS's
whip, til
CANADA AND ITS OLDER
BROTHER TO THE SOUTH
NICOLA GAILITS
Contributor
Average number of drunken
screams of "Oh Canada?" Five,
on a bad day. I worked both day
and night shifts in a bar and
restaurant located in the central hub of the action during
the Olympics.
Working on the Granville
strip was what I believe to be
an amazing disaster. Days when
Canada won gold, or any day it
wasn't raining meant seeing
huge crowds of street performers, spontaneous dance groups,
sloshed revelers and the police
that followed, keeping Vancouver in check.
Throughout the weeks of the
Olympics, the tension between
the US and Canada was constant. I often heard angry yells
of "fuck the US" on the streets.
I was once almost caught in the
midst of a fight when one man
declared that the US was going
to win gold in hockey. A Canadian near him flipped out, throwing his hat across the bus and
yelling at him. The man got up
and started to fight with the Canadian. The scuffle quickly ended when, like a true Canadian,
the man apologized for starling
the fight and said he respected
the man's opinion, although he
disagreed with it.
Putting aside individual taste,
the hockey games were the main
event of the Olympics. Our bar
filled up two hours before the big
matches even started, with everyone camping out on their seats,
ordering pitcher after pitcher. Canadian goals brought the crowd
to their feet, hugging and high-fiv-
ing strangers. Even Latvia got the
whole place chanting when they
faced off against Russia and lost,
though not without putting away
a few goals. And then silence.
After each hockey game, the
restaurant emptied out completely within minutes. The climax was clearly this Sunday's
game. The extent of American
support I saw Downtown that day
was one customer yelling "Go
USA" when I served him, and I
joked that we'd throw him out.
In the height of Canada's gold
medal over-time win, the restaurant froze for ten minutes while
servers, cooks, bartenders and
hostesses celebrated with the
sea of customers clad in Canadian colours inside.
It's astonishing how quickly
one can feel embraced by the Canadian way. One of my American
friends, who has only been here
five months, was fully decked-out
in Canadian colours, cheering on
our side for the gold medal game.
I say "our side" even though I myself have dual citizenship with the
States: the side I should cheer on
was never in question. tl
CANADIAN IDENTITY
SOLIDIFIED THROUGH SPORT
SOPHIE GOSSELIN
Contributor
As long as I've been studying
Canada and its history, I've been
taught about its infamously tenuous identity. How a sense of solidarity and unification has been
sacrificed in favour of diversity
and inclusion. How defining itself by its lack of singular identity was paradoxical and impossible. And those lessons always
stuck with me, to some extent. I
truly believed that the sacrifice
had been made and there was
no going back. I was taught to
not take our country seriously.
I mean, really, our national animal is the beaver. A flat-tailed
rodent?
But no longer. In the past
weeks I have seen more Canadian
pride demonstrated in the streets
of Vancouver than in the rest of
my life put together. And it's not
just the athletes who benefit from
this astonishing show of support.
It manifested itself in the shop
windows on Robson, fluttered on
the backs of cars down Granville,
and was displayed without shame
on the crowns, necks, backs and
warm hands of Vancouverites
everywhere. We all enjoyed and
embraced it.
So what does this sudden, unexpected and arguably unprecedented shift in the strength of
Canada's national feeling mean?
Have we finally embraced our
country for what it is, stripped
away our masks of modest
politeness and overcome the
paradox?
The Opening Ceremonies certainly seemed to demonstrate as
much. I saw absolutely no lack of
identity there. Despite being a
young country (sevenyears away
from our 150th birthday—we're
practically still teething), there
seems to be no lack of history,
of culture, of belonging. Yes, it is
diverse. But it also works. There
is cohesiveness. We are experienced in the ways of setding in,
not just in the land, but in the people as well. And we have found
ways to make it work. That can
be seen in the abundance of maple-leafed flags decorating every
manner of doorstep and sweater-wearer. We are the bearers of
that message.
And I have come to realize that
the beaver really is a proud and
noble creature. After all, what
other country can claim to have
a national animal that can take
down several trees in a single day
using only its teeth? I dare you to
name even one aside from our
humble beaver,
What remains to be seen is
whether this newfound national pride will persist now that the
Games are over, or if it will simply fade into the wilderness with
the imported snow.
So put on your red mittens and
look out for falling trees, boys and
girls. You're in Canada now. va
I11RAVELCU1S
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U THEUBYSSEYc 14/UBYSSEY.CA/IDEAS/2010.03.04
LETTER
IT'S ALL ABOUT THE MONEY
We live in the age of deception
where things we take for granted are really the money-making machines.
Take, for example, the cancer
industry. Almost every day I see
or hear some advertisement asking us to donate money so we can
find a cure for cancer. You will
never hear them talk about preventing cancer. You will never
hear them talk about the chemicals in our environment or the
chemicals in our foods which are
cancer-causing. It's always "let's
find a cure."
I've read several reports that
estimate the price of treating a
cancer patient is worth upwards
of $750,000. With those kinds
of profits, do you think the cancer industry wants to see more
prevention?
Let's look at the oil industry.
Why is it that every year we see
new advancements in cars, yet
the fuel efficiency of engines really
hasn't improved much since its
inception? We've seen huge advancements in cell phones over
the past ten years.
We've seen computer technology develop at an astonishing rate. Yet, more fuel efficient
engines seem to baffle us. On
Youtube, you've probably seen
people running cars on all sorts
of alternative energies. Why do
these technologies never seem
to reach the average consumer? Could it be that the oil industry stands to lose trillions
of dollars?
Or how about the mutual fund
industry? Every mutual fund
company promises to make you
money. But how many of these
mutual funds actually make their
clients money in the end? From
my own experience, five to ten
per cent at the the max.
If you doubt those numbers,
just ask anyone who's invested
in mutual funds if they walked
away with more money than they
started. I can give you an endless list of people who have lost
money in mutual funds but I'd be
hard pressed to find more than
a few people who have come out
ahead of the game. Remember,
mutual funds get paid whether or
not they make you money. They
gamble, or should I say invest,
with your money with no costs to
them. If they lose, it's your money, not theirs. Come to think of
it, I can't think of a better business to be in than mutual funds.
So the next time I hear about
"green" initiatives, am asked to
donate to cancer or get an offer
to invest my money, I'll say "no
thanks."
—Ethan Chan
HAVE YOU WITNESSED
CRUELTY TO ANIMALS
IN A LABORATORY?
,F YOU'RE TIRED OF SEEING
ANIMALS IN LABORATORIES SUFFER
AND HAVE INFORMATION
THAT"WILL LEAD TO SANCTIONS
AGAINST A UNIVERSITY
OR CONTRACT LABORATORY,
PLEASE CALL OR TEXT
604-551-3324
blowthewhist«eonanima.crue»ty@yahoo..
BLOW THE WHISTLE!
CALLS WILL BE TREATED CONFIDENTIALLY
** 2010.03.04/UBYSSEY.CA/IDEAS/15
You can sit and read
You can sit and think
You can sit and stink,
or stand and be counted
It's all clean
—Terrill Stanton
GOH IROMOTO
Contributor
Terrill Stanton has worked as
a custodian at UBC since 1974.
He arrived here almost by accident—he was supposed to go to
SFU to work as a subcontractor
but he missed the bus. Terrill
called his boss, who told him
to try UBC.
Thirty six years later, he has
finally hung up his dustpan. Prior to leaving at the end of February, most of his life revolved
around the SUB; his wife works
as a custodian in the Life Sciences Building and a lot of his closest friends—also custodians—are
within a few kilometres of where
Terrill started work every morning at 7:30am. Lastyear, I had the
opportunity to spend a day with
him as he worked in the SUB.
Terrill had a pretty standard
routine. After his morning coffee, he walked over to the Pit to
finish off what was leftover from
the nightshift's work. "It's just
not as pukey as it used to be," explained Terrill's co-worker, Tim
Ryan, as they began to mop the
beer-stained floors. Based on the
messes they find in the morning,
it seems like the campus was
wilder 3 5 years ago.
"When there's parties, there's
parties...but they're not as quite
as often, not as many nights.... I
don't know, maybe people are
putting more time into studying
I guess? Maybe since it's because
tuition's gone up..."
It's just not as
pukey as it used to
be. When there's
parties, there's
parties, but they're
not quite as often,
not as many nights.
TIM RYAN
JANITOR
But still, when students get
drunk, they seem to never
change. Terrill described the
common woe of post-party night
bathrooms. "The worst is when
you have to clean up a 'Stacker.'" That's the name they give
to the multi-layered phenomenon, which includes a layer of
excrement, covered with a layer
of toilet paper, then some vomit, a layer of hand towels, and finally another layer of excrement
to finish it off.
Terrill and Tim chuckled as they
explain it. "We figured out that
someone had to have propped
themselves along the walls of the
stall," Terrill says, "to be able to
get high enough to add that finishing touch."
His first break began at 9:3 0am,
when the SUB is just beginning
to fill up with the streams of student traffic. The custodians meet
back in their small lounge tucked
behind a quiet hallway perpendicular to the Deli. The room's
lined with old posters and photos, which have remained unchanged for years.
One of the photos shows a
young Terrill—a fewpounds lighter with thick brown hair—brandishing a big smile. Even in the
morose setting ofthe lounge, all
these years later, you can still tell
it's the same guy: friendly, positive, patient and hardworking.
"I like to keep busy," he said.
He managed to avoid getting
dragged by the monotony of the
job this way. "It's the Janitor's
Philosophy you know... .You have
Its all clean
Goodbye, Terrill Stanton
TOP: Terrill sweeps up debris
outside the SUB.
MIDDLE LEFT: Cleaning products
inside the Janitorial closet. After years on the job, Terril has
become extremely knowl-
edgable on the topic of which
cleaners to use for every type
of stain.
MIDDLE RIGHT: Terrill Stanton.
BOTTOM: Terrill cleans up inside
a SUB bathroom.
GOH IROMOTO PHOTOS/THE
UBYSSEY
to get used to the students' mess.
If you stay angry, you won't last.
All these young people, it's their
first time away from home. What
do you expect?"
Sitting across the table, Tim
added, "One guy's mess, is another man's living."
As Terrill made his daily
rounds of the SUB's three main
entrances, he revealed the underground information network of
custodial workers around campus. They're more comprehensive and often faster than any of
the usual news sources that cover the school.
If you want to know
information around
campus, sometimes
custodial's the best
way to go.
TERRILL STANTON
JANITOR
"If you want to know information around campus, sometimes
custodial's the best way to go....
People talk to us, then we talk to
each other."
As lunch approached, Terrill
made constant note of the time
on his watch. According to Terrill, management sets very specific time slots for their breaks and
reprimand staff who don't follow the system. People constantly monitor the custodial staff's
breaks by walking back and forth
in front of their lounge around
lunch and other designated slots.
"Management is draconi-
an," Terrill says. "Things have
changed. The management since
the Piper era are not friendly
now....There's no trust, there's
too much intimidation...[and]
the situation on campus just isn't
nice anymore."
Even though management
helped improve the quality of
equipment and health, the combination of staff cut-backs—there
used to be 22 custodians covering
the SUB, SRC and Aquatic Centre,
a number that's been cut in half—
and the general atmosphere was
enough to convince Terrill to say
goodbye to UBC.
"I have good friends here...but,
it's the atmosphere around....My
personal boss, she's a really nice
lady and really good to work with,
but it's the people above."
Terrill spent the rest of the
afternoon cleaning the bathrooms at the SRC and SUB. He
propped the recognizable "Closed
for Cleaning" sign outside the
door and isolates himself in the
washroom with the conflicting
aromas of highly potent chemicals and the sweet scent of urine.
After years on the job, he
knows every chemical mixture
needed for every type of stain
and has become a technical expert in his craft. "It's not like digging ditches," he said.
He's also collected an unimaginable amount of funny, sad and
dirty stories. At an engineer party once, one student "took a crap
on the middle of the ten-foot table." Another time, for ayear or
two actually, "the Masturbator"
habitually left an adult magazine,
a pack of cigarettes and some
matches in a bathroom stall. Terrill just laughs them off: the Janitor's Philosophy, tl
Editor's note: in the interest of full
disclosure, it should be noted that
this article was written and set
to be published lastyear, however, due to an editorial oversight,
it was reviewed by a representative from CUPE 116 before publication. Due to pressure from the
union, and after hours of debate
between the writer, Mr Stanton,
and members of The Ubyssey's
editorial board, the decision was
made to suspend the publication
ofthe article. Now that Mr Stanton has retired, we felt that it was
important to run the article. 16/UBYSSEY.CA/ADVERTISEMENT/2010.03.04
what's
UBC CELEBRATE RESEARCH WEEK - MARCH 5-I4, 2010
JOIN US FOR THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA'S ANNUAL CELEBRATE RESEARCH WEEK.
From artistic interventions, critical dialogues on forestry policy and practices, and the science and ethics behind
elite athletic performance to CBC's Award winning Quirks &Quarks Annual Question show, UBC's Celebrate Research Week
welcomes the community to participate. Most events are FREE and open to the public, students, faculty, staff and schools.
For a complete listing of all events visit www.celebrateresearch.ubc.ca @UBCComAff
FRIDAY MARCH 5
Sport and Inclusion: Are Major Sporting Events Inclusive of
First Nations and Other Groups?
8:00pm-9:30pm
Former Olympic athlete, activist from the Kahnawake Mohawk
Territory Waneek Horn-Miller shares her journey to the Olympics and
how she helps others achieve their dreams. She is joined in a panel by
former Olympians Shirley and Sharon Firth from the Gwich'in Nation
and Valerie Jerome.
Tickets $10. www.chancentre.com
The Chan Centre for the Performing Arts, 6265 Crescent Road
CRIME and ALYSSA: An Evening of Provocative Cinema
7:30pm-10:30pm
These two films provide a powerful showcase of arts-based research
that manages to be both thought provoking and deeply moving.
Filmmakers in attendance. Free. Everybody welcome.
More information at www.celebrateresearch.ubc.ca.
Royal Bank Cinema, 6265 Crescent Rd
2010 Most Exceptional Escapades In Science High School
Student Conference
9:00am-3:00pm
The Michael Smith Laboratories annual Scientific Conference designed
for high school students. This event showcases various scientific
pursuits, including the opportunity to engage in hands-on activities, as
well as interact with prominent scientists.
Dr. Joanne Fox, 604-827-3911, www.bioteach.ubc.ca/highschool-
conference-2010
Michael Smith Laboratories, 2185 East Mall
SATURDAY MARCH 6
Multidisciplinary Undergraduate Research Conference (MURC)
9:30am-5:30pm
This 9th annual conference showcases the exemplary contributions of
undergraduate research to the UBC community and beyond.
To register www.uro.ubc.ca/share/murc
Jubilee Room, Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, 1961 East Mall
MONDAY MARCH 8
Small (Mining) Is Beautiful - Engineering to Alleviate Global Poverty
6:30pm-8:00pm
How can engineering help alleviate global poverty? Learn how from Professor
Marcello Veiga as he presents "Small (mining) is Beautiful." The findings are
a result of a six-year project sponsored by the United Nations. Free.
www.apsc.ubc.ca/celebrateresearch,
Robson Square, 800 Robson Street
Forestry in Society: Comparing the UK & BC Experiences
2:00pm-7:30pm Open House/Poster Competition/Lecture in
Sustainability
Mr. Tim Rollinson, Director General of the UK Forestry Commission will
look back at the UK experience in responding to the changing needs of
society and our responses- as well as look forward to the challenges
coming over the horizon. Free. Everyone welcome.
2424 Main Mall
Quirks & Quarks Question Show
7:30pm-9:00pm
Each year, Quirks & Quarks solicits questions from you, the listeners,
and the community. Ten of the best questions have been pre-selected
and will be answered on the show by UBC experts in each area. Join
host Bob McDonald live at the Chan Centre. Tickets are free.
Tessa Vanderkop, 604.822.5675, www.chancentre.com
Telus Theatre, Chan Centre for the Performing Arts, 6265 Crescent Rd
UBC
a place of mind
w
TUESDAY MARCH 9
Mental Health Research Matters: Free Public Talk
7:00pm-9:00pm
A free public forum on the latest directions and discoveries in mental
health research with three of the Lower Mainland's leading experts.
Featuring Drs. Jehannine Austin, Raymond Lam and Christian Schutz.
Registration is free but space is limited.
Ashley Biggerstaff, reseduc@cw.bc.ca, www.cfri-training.ca
Chan Centre for Family Health Education, 950 West 28th Avenue
Four Ways to Combat Climate Change - Making a Difference
Lecture Series
6:30pm-8:00pm
Energy use, and its impact on the environment, is one of the most
important technical, social and public-policy issues facing humanity
today. Learn from Professor Evans the "Four Ways to Combat Climate
Change." Everyone welcome. Free.
www.apsc.ubc.ca/celebrateresearch
Robson Square, 800 Robson Street
The Killam Discussion - Can Environmental Science Save the Earth?
5:00pm-6:00pm
The inaugural Killam Conversation focuses on the capacity of
environmental science to effect robust change among those setting
policy. Is there a Two Solitudes existing between the scientific community
and those tasked with decision-making? Everyone welcome. Free.
Dr. Rhodri Windsor-Liscombe, rhodri@intercriange.ubc.ca,
www.celebrateresearch.ubc.ca
Robson Square, 800 Robson Street
WEDNESDAY MARCH 10
Peak Performance: The Path to Exceptional Athletic Achievement
ll:00am-5:30pm
Join leading experts from around the world for an afternoon focused
on hot topics in the scientific, ethical and psychosocial complexities
underlying competitive sports and the challenges athletes face in
reaching peak performance. Everyone welcome. Free.
Leah Lockhart, 604-806-9853, Leah.Lockhart@hli.ubc.ca,
www.heartandlung.ca/peak
Segal Centre, SFU Harbour Centre, 515 W. Hastings St
New Ways to Communicate Climate Change
- Speaker Panel & Public Dialogue
5:30pm-7:30pm
Distinguished speakers with unique expertise in climate change
communications and behaviour change, will focus presentations
on perceptions of climate change and community-based solutions.
Everyone welcome. Free.
www.calp.forestry.ubc.ca, picswrkshp@gmail.com
Rm 1500, SFU Segal Graduate School of Business, 500 Granville St.
Amazing Paper: The History and Art of Papermaking
12:00pm-l:00pm
Most people take paper for granted. Learn paper's rich history and its
impact on society and understand the manufacturing process with
emphasis on sustainability. Free. Everyone welcome.
Kaiser 2020/2030, 2332 Main Mall
Sport and Challenge: Is Anything Possible?
8:00pm-9:30pm
Rick Hansen delivers a keynote address on where we have come and
what the future holds for people with disabilities in sport. He is joined
by Dr. Bruce McManus and Pat Jarvis (former Paralympic athlete and
member of the International Paralympic Committee).
Tessa Vanderkop, 604 822-5675 — Tickets $10, www.chancentre.com
The Chan Centre for the Performing Arts, 6265 Crescent Road
L    psq
CELEBRATE SS  RESEARCH
From Toy Trains to Airplanes: Are We Serious About Safety-
Applied Science Making a Difference Lecture Series
6:30pm-7:30pm
From the onset of the industrial revolution until a few decades ago,
safety was a topic of great importance. But in recent years, we have
become complacent—until a tragedy occurs that is. Explore with
Professor Poursartip. Everyone welcome. Free.
Robson Square, 800 Robson Street
THURSDAY MARCH 11
Celebrating the Image
All Day - March 11 to March 14
UBC Visual Art students showcase a series of works produced in our
digital courses. Using various media the works attempt a response
to the question: What is an image today? Come and be a part of the
artistic intervention at Robson Square!
www.celebrateresearch.ca
Robson Square, 800 Robson Street
Let's Talk about Marijuana and Teens (a CIHR Cafe Scientifique)
7:00pm-9:00pm
Why do more youth in British Columbia use marijuana than anywhere
else in Canada? What are the health and social effects? Join in the
discussion at the CIHR Cafe Scientifique. This event is free, but space
is limited.
Stephanie Coen, 604-827-4058
RSVP to Stephanie.coen@nursing.ubc.ca
Juliet's Cafe, 1905 Cornwall Avenue
Inhuman Conditions: On Cosmopolitanism and Human Rights
12:00pm-l:30pm
This is one of two public lectures (also see March 12th) on the
very idea, as well as the social, cultural and political elements, of
cosmopolitanism and human rights, by noted political theorist,
Professor Pheng Cheah. Free lunch with RSVP.
Carmen Radut, ccfi@interchange.ubc.ca
604-822-8638
UBC Green College Coach House,
6323 Cecil Green Park Road
Patient -Centred Care is More than Medicine
5:00pm-6:00pm Reception in foyer
6:00pm-7:30pm Presentation, Q&A
Together with health system professionals, Sauder School of Business
researchers are developing innovative approaches to improve the
patient experience. This is a free event. Pre-registration is required by
March 8, 2010.
Jessie Lam, 604.822.8399, www.sauder.ubc.ca
Robson Square Theatre, 800 Robson Street
FRIDAY MARCH 12
Global Health & Community - Based Involvement
6:00pm-8:00pm
Please join us for several thought provoking presentations focusing
on the ethics and impacts of global health and community-based
involvement. Full refreshments will be provided. Free.
Please RSVP to ghealth@interchnage.ubc.ca.
More information at www.celebrateresearch.ubc.ca
Room C225, Robson Square, 800 Robson Street
SUNDAY MARCH 14
Time Being - A Speculative Documentary on Time
2:30pm-4:00pm
This new film by Chris Gallagher is an epic journey that takes one
gently down the stream of consciousness to reveal the puzzle that is
time. Everyone welcome.
Tickets will be available in advance online and at the door. For more
information: www.vifc.org/home
Vancity Theatre, 1181 Seymour Street
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