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The Ubyssey Oct 1, 2009

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 LAJMARAJMA SINCE I918
Dalai Lama visited UBC this weekend.
Page 5 & 7
Dalai Lamarama!
^THEUBYSSEYca
YOUR STUDENT NEWSPAPER IS PUBLISHED EVERY MONDAY AND THURSDAY • VOLUME 91, NUMBER IIX • ROOM 24, STUDENT UNION BUILDING • FEEDBACK@UBYSSEY.CA
Oops.
AMS PRESIDENT
BLAKE FREDERICK
"The SUB Renewal
Committee has decided to
include Properties Trust...
due to the fact that the Board
of Governors has said that
we cannot build the SUB if
that is not the case."
$85 MILLION OF YOUR MONEY
The project has the largest
investment of student funds
in the history of UBC, with
students contributing $85
million in student fees to
the $110 million project.
DOUBLE TALK
Despite such concrete
terms, UBC and the AMS
are using different language
to describe the agreement.
After a year of negotiations, the project to build
a new SUB, known as the
SUB Renew Project, is to
be managed by UBC Properties
Trust, according to VP Students
Brian Sullivan. The project has
the largest investment of student
funds in the history of UBC, with
students contributing $85 million in student fees to the $ 110
million project.
"The SUB Renewal Committee
has decided to include Properties Trust on the governance
chart that we're working with
right now," said AMS President
Blake Frederick, though he admitted it "is due to the fact that
the Board of Governors has said
that we cannot build the SUB if
that is not the case."
The AMS has been in negotiations with UBC since last
year over the level of control
each party has over the project,
which was approved by students
through a referendum in April
2008.
The AMS had argued for many
months that they should retain
exclusive control of both the architect selection process and the
project manager. As of now, both
parties are going ahead under
the assumption that Properties
Trust will be the project manager, and the AMS will choose
the architect.
MHPM, a project management company which has been
advising the AMS during the consultation process, will continue
to advise the AMS on how the
project should proceed.
"[MHPM] will work with the
AMS as their client...but they will
work with Properties Trust as the
project manager," said Sullivan.
Despite such concrete terms,
UBC and the AMS are using different language to describe the
agreement.
"I'd say that both parties
are quite encouraged that we
have   agreed   on   an   overall
AMS loses power
play to UBC
SUB Renew Project to be managed
by UBC Properties Trust, architect
to be chosen by AMS
PAUL BUCCI
feedback(?>ubysseyca
governance structure for the
management for the project,"
said Sullivan.
Frederick spoke differently:
"Council hasn't voted on Properties Trust being the project
manager."
In addition, Frederick also
asserted that despite having
Properties Trust as the Project
Manager, the AMS still has
control over the specifics of the
project.
"UBC knows that we are going
to be presenting an accountability agreement that reassures
us that Properties Trust will be
involved in the project under our
terms. They agreed to that. So we
are very confident that they are
going to accept the accountability
agreement," said Frederick.
The SUB Renew project has
also influenced the controversial
debate surrounding the construction of an underground bus
loop. Students argued that the
proposed moving of the grassy
knoll outside of the SUB in order
to build the bus loop was a clear
affront to the opinion of students
on campus.
"The official position of the
AMS is that we oppose the construction of the underground bus
loop," said Frederick.
The AMS conceded to allow
the bus loop to move forward, as
long as they were able to build a
SUB over top of it, according to
Frederick.
So what does this all actually
mean?
"We are all confident that we
have a project," said Sullivan.
"It's going full steam ahead."
said Frederick.
The AMS is now going to
choose an architect for the project through a series of consultations with students over the next
few months. They are scheduled
to have selected one by January
2010. ^
—with files from Samantha
Jung and Stephanie Findlay
VP STUDENTS
BRIAN SULLIVAN
"We have agreed on...[a]
governance structure for
the management for the
project."
ACCOUNTABILITY | FREDERICK
"Properties Trust will be
involved in the project
under our terms. They
agreed to that. So we are
very confident that they
are going to accept the
accountability agreement,"
said Frederick.
BUS LOOP | FREDERICK
"The official position of
the AMS is that we oppose
the construction of the
underground bus loop."
2009-10*01
WHAT IS HE SO HAPPY ABOUT?
■ NEWS    BRIEFS
UBC GETS MORE MEDIA PLAY THAN
FRASER INSTITUTE
The Fraser Institute, a conservative think
tank that conducts international and local
educational reports, the most famous being its annual "report card" of BC schools,
can't beat UBC for media play. But it's not
as far behind as you would expect.
Even though the organization only
has a very limited amount of money and
persons at their disposal, a recent survey
has showed that they rank as one of the
top quoted institutions in virtually all
Canadian media outlets, but especially in
the Vancouver Sun. In total numbers, UBC
still ranks highest with almost double the
amount of quotes, but in relation to resources available, the university has some
catchinguptodo.
The success is being attributed to the
Fraser Institute's extensive media program, which provides for a continual barrage of cut-and-paste ready press releases,
special public events and social media
advertising.
TWITTER APPRAISED AT $1 BILLION
Five major companies will be investing a
sum of $100 million into the micro-blog-
gjng website Twitter in its second round of
funding, bringing Twitter's total funding to
$155 million this year. The new funding
gives Twitter a value of $ 1 billion.
The site has more than 45 million users
worldwide. The investors include Institutional Venture Partners, Spark Capital
and Benchmark Capital as well as Insight
Venture Partners and T Rowe Price—two
new additions to Twitter's investment
opportunity.
Although Twitter use has grown exponentially since its creation in 2006, there
is still uncertainty about how profit can be
gained from a social networking firm.
UBC ACCOUNTS FOR FIVE PER CENT OF
BC'S ECONOMY
UBC President Stephen Toope had a message last week for all those politicians who
want to cut funding in education—the
institution makes up five per cent of the
province's economy. The workforce being generated, employed or educated at
UBC provides a bonus of $ 10 billion every
year to the provincial economy, putting
the institution above oil and gas mining
operations.
The study, conducted by Walter Sudma-
nt, UBC's director of Planning and Institutional Research, found that apart from the
$1.9 billion that directly flows into local
businesses because of university spending, it is the "dissemination of knowledge"
that provides the biggest influx into the
economy.
UBC RECEIVES THE LARGEST DONATION FROM A FINANCIAL INSTITUTION
UBC Learning Exchange and UBC Faulty
of Medicine received $2.17 million from
HSBC Bank Canada in support of their
community initiatives in Vancouver's
Downtown Eastside (DTES).
The donation to be received over the
next seven years, will enable UBC Learning Exchange to bring more UBC student
volunteers into inner-city schools and
non-profit organizations to continue offering free educational resources to DTES
residents.
Additionally the money will be used to
support the UBC Faculty of Medicine for a
world class addictions research program
in the Downtown Eastside in partnership
with St Paul's Hospital.
The sum is the largest ever received by
the UBC Learning Exchange.
"We applaud this exceptional commitment by HSBC Bank Canada to community
engagement and mental health," said UBC
President Stephen Toope. "Through this
gift, 'the world's local bank' will make an
important positive impact here in BC and
around the world." vl 2/UBYSSEY.CA/EVENTS/2009.10.01
OCTOBER I, 2009
VOLUME XCI,   N° IIX
EDITORIAL
COORDINATING EDITOR
Paul Bucci: coordinating@ubyssey.ca
NEWS EDITOR
Samantha Jung: news@ubyssey.ca
CULTURE EDITORS
Kate Barbaria & Trevor Record:
culture@ubyssey. ca
SPORTS EDITOR
Justin McElroy : sports@ubyssey.ca
IDEAS EDITOR
Trevor Melanson : features@ubyssey.ca
PHOTO EDITOR
GeraldDeo :photos@ubyssey.ca
PRODUCTION MANAGER
Kyrstin Bain :production@ubyssey.ca
COPY EDITOR
Katarina Grgic: copy@ubyssey.ca
MULTIMEDIA EDITOR
Tara Martellaro : 7nulti7nedia@ubyssey.ca
Room 24, Student Union Building
6138 Student Union Boulevard
Vancouver, BCV6T lZl
tel: 604-822-2301
fax: 604-822-9279
web: www.ubyssey.ca
e-mail: feedback @ubyssey. ca
BUSINESS
Room 23, Student Union Building
advertising: 604-822-1654
business office: 604-822-6681
fax: 604-822-1658
e-mail: advertising@ubyssey ca
BUSINESS MANAGER : Fernie Pereira
AD TRAFFIC : Sabrina Marchand
AD DESIGN : Isabel Ferreras
LEGAL
The Ubyssey is the official student newspaper of the
University of British Columbia. It is published every
Monday and Thursday by The Ubyssey Publications
Society. We are an autonomous, democratically run
student organization, and all students are encouraged
to participate.
Editorials are chosen and written by the Ubyssey
staff. They are the expressed opinion of the staff, and
do not necessarily reflect the views of The Ubyssey
Publications Society or the University of British
Columbia. All editorial content appearing in The Ubyssey
is the property of The Ubyssey Publications Society.
Stories, opinions, photographs and artwork contained
herein cannot be reproduced without the expressed,
written permission of The Ubyssey Publications Society
The Ubyssey is a founding member of Canadian
University Press (CUP) and adheres to CUP's guiding
principles.
Letters to the editor must be under 300 words.
Please include your phone number, student number and
signature (not for publication) as well as your year and
faculty with all submissions. ID will be checked when
submissions are dropped off at the editorial office ol
The Ubyssey; otherwise verification will be done by
phone. "Perspectives" are opinion pieces over 300
words but under 750 words and are run according
to space. "Freestyles" are opinion pieces written by
Ubyssey staff members. Priority will be given to letters
and perspectives over freestyles unless the latter is
time sensitive. Opinion pieces will not be run until the
identity of the writer has been verified. The Ubyssey
reserves the right to edit submissions for length and
clarity. All letters must be received by 12 noon the day
before intended publication. Letters received after this
point will be published in the following issue unless
there is an urgent time restriction or other matter
deemed relevant by the Ubyssey staff.
It is agreed by all persons placing display or classified advertising that if the Ubyssey Publications Society
fails to publish an advertisement or if an error in the ad
occurs the liability of the UPS will not be greater than
the price paid for the ad. The UPS shall not be responsible for slight changes or typographical errors that do
not lessen the value or the impact of the ad
CONTRIBUTORS
Get your Samantha Jung half-price today only. She
dices, slices and makes you a better person. Sarah
Chung is on special too, and we've got a special deal
on Roel Moeurs. Betty Zhang is two dollars a pound,
and every Vinnie Yuen comes with a complimentary
Christine Wei at no extra charge. Shawn Li is certified
organic, Michael Thibault tastes great in soups or pasta,
and Matthew Willis is clinically proven to reverse the
effects of aging. We've got a fire sale on Kasha Chang
-no discernible scent or your money back-and a fresh
shipment of Austin Holm just arrived. Bryce Warnes
is available in six designer colours, and Paul Bucci's
chrome finish will add pizzazz to any kitchen-provided
you polish him weekly with the new and improved
Samantha Jung formula. Kate Barbaria, Trevor Record,
and Gerald Deo are now available in starter bundles.
(Trevor Melanson sold seperately) Pick up a new Kyrstin
Bain while you're at it and get 25% off your first down
payment on Katarina Grgic We're sad to report that Tara
Martellaro is no longer available, but a cheaper, more
efficient model—Raien Waraghi-goes on sale next week
Grace Clao and Steven Chua now sold in bulk. Stock
up before the holidays! But before you do, boost your
immune system with Anthony Goetz: Guaranteed to rid
you of Greg Ursic, Nicole Fisher, and in special cases,
Christina Kwon. Arrive before 9 PM and take home a
complimentary Slap Chop™
V      Canada Post Sales
Agreement
Number 0040878022
Canadian    printed on^100s%
University     'reeycledpaper
Press \!_\Q
EVENTS
ONGOING EVENTS
You bring the food—we'll waive the
fines. • Pay your UBC Library fines
with food instead of cash! All borrowers with library fines are eligible for
waived fines. For every non-perishable
food item donated, $2 will be waived
to a maximum of $20 per borrower. •
Sept 21-0ct. 4
Away We Go • The UBC Film Society
presents the comedy Away We Go.
Couple Burt and Verona are simultaneously expecting a child and searching
for the perfect place to raise a new
family while navigating around the geographical and familial hurdles thrown
into the world around them. Rated 14A,
98 min. • Runs until Oct. 4, 7pm-9pm,
Norm Theatre, SUB.
Moon • The UBC Film Society presents the refreshingly artistic science-
fiction film Moon Rated PG, 98 min.
• Runs until Oct 4, 9pm-\\pm, Norm
Theatre, SUB.
SUNDAY, OCT. 4
Women's Rugby • Come out and
watch our team battle it out on the
field with the Lethbridge Longhorns,
our 2009 conference rivals. • ipm-
3pm, Thunderbird Park, adults: $10,
children, senriors and visiting students: $5 (six and under free), UBC
Students: $2.
Piano Concerto • Chan Centre and
the Vancouver Recital Society present
pianist Murray Perahia A perfect outing
with that special someone in your life.
• 3pm, Chan Shun Concert Hall, $85,
more info at chancentre.com.
UBC Veggie Club and Liberation
BC: Vegan Thanksgiving • A free
talk by Vegan Outreach head Jon Camp,
followed by a buffet-style vegan meal.
All are welcome! • 3pm-6pm, SUB
206/207, $5.
The Moon of Letting Go • Join
renowned writer and celebrated storyteller Richard Van Camp with his friends
Ivan Coyote and Gregory Scofield as
Camp launches his latest short story
collection. • 7pm-9pm, First Nations
Longhouse Great Hall, free
If you have an event you want listed
here, e-mail us at events&ubyssey.
ca. This means you, campus clubs.
CORRECTION
On Monday, September 28, in the
news brief titled "UBC journalism school
student wins $42,000 award," we said
that the award was given only to four
students in Canada per year. It should
read that this year 4 awards were given
out, but in 2008 12 were given out. The
Ubyssey regrets this error
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HARD
solution, tips and computer
programs at www.sudoku.com
#50
su|do|ku
© Puzzles by Pappocom
UBYSSEY.CA: THE CLOG, ARTIST PROFILES, STREETERS, PODCASTS
CiTR plays
sweet music all
night long
On Thursday, October 1 at 6pm, CiTR Radio begins a
24-hour marathon of live local music. Thunderbird Radio
Hell, your weekly dose of live music on CiTR hosted by
Ben Lai, is celebrating its 20th year on CiTR 101.9FM
with one band on the hour, every hour. The 24-hour
marathon will end with a free party at the Ukrainian
Hall at 805 E Pender St on Friday night, featuring Dylan
Thomas, What's Wrong Tohei? and Twin Crystals. Doors
open at 8pm, and bands hit the stage at 9pm.
STEVE LOUIE PHOTO/COUKTESY OF CITR
u
DREW BARRYMORE
HAS DIRECTED A WORK OF
PURE GENIUS."
AIN'T IT COOL NEWS
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SAD THAT WE ONLY
HAVE 8 PAGES TODAY?
SO ARE WE.   _
ADVERTISE WITH THE
UBYSSEY, AND HELP US
BRING YOU THE CONTENT
YOU WANT TO SEE.
ADVERTISING@UBYSSEY.CA AMS' 8 step plan for SUB Renew     J
5
I FALL 2007
I Preliminary student
consultations
APRIL 2008-SEPTEMBER 2009
Negotiating an agreement with UBC
FALL 2009
Selecting architects and
preliminary design
2009.1 0.0 l/UBYSSEY.CA/NEWS/3
2012-2014
Construction begins
MARCH 2008
Student referendum
OCTOBER-AUGUST 2009
1 Developing a detailed space program
WINTER 2009-SUMMER 2011
Design development
8
2014
Building opens
News
Axe throwing, chopping and socializing
Forestry gets their logger sports practice space reinstated
ISPOTLIGHT
The Forestry Undergraduate Society's logger sports team happily practice at their new field three times a week on the south side of campus, gerald deo photo/the ubyssey
SAMANTHA JUNG
news(?ubysseyca
Forestry students will no longer have
the axe fall far from the tree—UBC
Athletics have finally come through
with their promise to provide a
practice space for their logger sports
team.
Tensions built in April 2009 when
UBC Athletics removed the team's
logger sports field at the southwest
corner of the athletic fields in April
2008 to put in a baseball diamond.
Athletics said that a new field was in
the works, and that it would be completed in five months, but a year later
the team was still left in the sawdust.
Melinda Morben, former Forestry Undergraduate Society (FUS)
president who restarted the logger
sports team in 2007, was displeased
with Kavie Toor, associate director of
Facilities and Business Development
for UBC Athletics.
"It seems as though [Kavie] is annoyed every time I manage to get a response from him," said Morben at the
time. "He doesn't seem to care that we
have thousands of dollars of gear and
students waiting to use the field."
Toor told The Ubyssey lastyear that
poor soil conditions, cold weather
and management issues contributed
to the delays in completion.
"I was surprised to hear the [complaints] last year," Toor said. "Much
of it was that there were no new
updates, we were still constructing
[and] there were still some delays."
Kit Burke, representative for FUS
logger sports, said he received the
e-mail in July announcing completion of the space, and some concrete proof through photographs in
August.
"I'm totally sympathetic to them
for taking a long time," said Burke.
The new logger sports field is located
in Thunderbird Park beside the
Doug Mitchell Thunderbird Winter
Sports Centre.
Burke believes that the delays in
reinstatement of the field did not
cause the sport to fall out of favour
among his peers.
"It's one of those things that
people always come back to," he
said. "The people who originally
got logger sports going, got a fire
under our arse, [graduated] so
[they] never really had a logger
sports field beyond the one that we
had over there."
The logger sports team practices
three times a week on Sunday afternoons and Tuesday and Thursday
evenings. Burke added that the
sport was a "pretty specialized kind
of thing," considering the fact that
only about ten people come out to
practice.
For Burke, he's just pleased that
the team can gather once again.
"Logger sports isn't about competition, it's about hanging out and
geting to know people in your faculty," he said. "There's only 500 of
us—you'll [find] someone you like."
"It's a really good social thing." tl
Deans vie for superiority at annual Dean's Debate
BETTY ZHANG
Contributor
On Tuesday, the deans of seven prestigious UBC faculties gathered by the
stage at the Norm Theatre, shaking
the rain from their jackets and chatting amicably amongst themselves
before going head-to-head in the
third annual AMS Dean's Debate.
According to AMS VP Aclministra-
tion Crystal Hon, the event was first
held two years ago by former VP
Administration Sarah Naiman. Its
intent was to show students a different side of their respective deans, and
to determine that lingering question
from Imagine Day: who has the better
degree? Hon pointed to her purple
tights and said "Arts, of course."
A number of other students would
beg to differ. Second-year pre-pharma-
cy student Jennifer Nguyen held up a
"Simon Says" sign on blue paper as
Dean of Science Simon Peacock took
the mike first. He spent three minutes
or so defending what he believes is
the "coolest faculty"—since science is
all about "cool discoveries" and "cool
people" like the Nobel Prize winner
on staff in the science faculty.
Associate Dean Kathryn Harrison offered a more extensive use
of language in her description of
Seven deans battled it out in front of an enthralled audience at the Norm Theatre on Tuesday afternoon, shawn u photo/the ubyssey
the importance of Arts. Personal
fulfillment, professional success and
contribution to society are just some
advantages of an education that focuses on the human condition. She
also offered impressive statistics: the
average instructor rates a 4.2 out of 5
on teacher evaluations, and the typical salary of an Arts grad is no less
than that of a Commerce grad.
The director of the school of Human Kinetics showed spectators the
"sexy element" of his faculty—he
busted some dance moves upon the
request of a student in the audience.
Sauder students gave a half-hearted
cheer as Dean Brian Bemmels gave
students impressive statistics. The
average salary of a Sauder BComm
graduate is $47,000, and 91 per cent
of the grad class of June 2009 were
employed by August.
When Dean of Applied Science
Tyseer Aboulnasr stepped up to the
podium, the entire midsection of the
theatre exploded with cheers and applause. With references to engineers
from Mr Bean to Jimmy Carter, Tyseer
Aboulnasr had the audience laughing.
The rebuttal portion of the debate
saw Peacock "taking the low road"
with insults to every faculty. "Those
who can't teach, teach PE," he said,
before proceeding to compare Sauder
graduates to "7-11 night managers."
When asked who "won" the debate, students across faculties agree
that the dean of Applied Science
had it "hands down." The energetic
crowd of Engineering students explained that they came to the debate
to support their "awesome dean."
The debate ended on a friendlier note as the deans unanimously
agreed that to truly prepare ourselves for the future, the faculties
have to help each other out and work
together, ti
After the DVD
Dr Nasiopoulos talks
tech to students
GERALD DEO PHOTO/THE UBYSSEY
VINNIE YUEN
vyuen@ubyssey.ca
"I chose video and image processing from the beginning, because it
was new and nobody else was doing it," said Dr Panos Nasiopoulos,
"I wanted to do something new."
That was the kind of attitude
that propelled Nasiopoulos to
develop DVD technology. Nasiopoulos brought the world the DVD
after completing his Bachelor,
Master's, and PhD in Electrical
and Computer Engineering at
UBC. And after developing the
video processing technique, he
returned to UBC.
He currently teaches an undergraduate course in Digital Design
and a graduate course in Multimedia Systems in the Electrical and
Computer Engineering Department at UBC. He is also the director
of the Master of Software Systems
program, designed to give software
knowledge to students with degrees
not in computer sciences.
Daikin, a company with an
advanced software division, was
approached by Toshiba to help
develop the software prototype
for the DVD. Daikin's team from
Japan moved to San Francisco
to build the software and Nasiopoulos was offered the position
of Chief Technology Officer. For
months, Nasiopoulos flew to San
Francisco every morning for work
and flew back to Vancouver in the
evening. He was made president
of the DVD division of Daikin US
I in 1999.
Nasiopoulos was heavily involved in building the DVD software
and player after the first proposal,
deciding exactly what it would be
comprised of, how it would work
and how it would interact with
consumers. He explained that the
DVD player is like a small computer, in which the movie is like
an operating system. The software
they designed not only allowed the
player to play DVDs, it also allowed
studios to create DVDs.
Besides the technological aspects, Nasiopoulos had to convince
Hollywood studios and the rest
of the world that the DVD was a
good technological investment. Although not easy at first, once others
began to see how the DVD could
revolutionarize the distribution
of film and video, the technology
spread like wildfire.
When asked why he chose to
come back and teach, Nasiopoulos said, "I did what I did and was
extremely successful and I don't
think I can repeat it. It was a good
run."
Nasiopoulos is currently conducting research on high dynamic
range video, which aims to capture
much better contrast and produce
| more lifelike images, vl   6/UBYSSEY.CA/CULTURE/2009.10.01
Distant Worlds
W fiiufiTtih. W
IVANCOUVER   INTERNATIONAL   FILM   FESTIVAL
THURSDAY, OCTOBER 8
ORPHEUM THEATRE 8PM
Arnie Roth conductor
Nobuo Uematsu composer
UBC Opera Ensemble
www.ffdistantworlds.com
Presenting the Canadian Premiere of a unique anu u» y
performance of Nobuo Uematsu's award-winning music
from FINAL FANTASY! This extraordinary concert features
state-of-the-art video projected on screens to showcase the
game's most memorable and thrilling sequences, with music
performed live by the Vancouver Symphony Orchestra, with
Grammy" award-winner Arnie Roth conducting. This concert
will also feature the North American premiere performance
of the FINAL FANTASY VII Main Theme. -
Tickets online at vancouversymphony.ca
or call VSO Customer Service at 604.876.3434
VANCOUVER
SYMPHONY
ORCHESTRA
ubyssey shameless giveaway-
Pick up FREE tickets to the
show in sub 23
cmcouver
/ Chamber Choir
JON WASHBURN, CONDUCTOR
A World of Music
PREMIERE
Sir John Tavener & Peter Berring
8pm • Saturday, October to, 2009
Chan Centre for the Performing Arts
STUDENTS ONLY $10!
(Anyone 26 or under, and
all students with valid ID)
1 hour before concert at the
Chan Centre box office,
service charges extra'
Two world premiere performances - Sir John Tavener's Miroir des Poemes
for choir, two string quartets and bass is based on the beautiful French
poetry of Jean Bies. Hervor, Maiden King is a choral opera by Icelandic-
Canadian composer Peter Berring; a Tolkein-like story based on an old
Norse saga. Special guests: the Borealis and Lafayette String Quartets!
Join us for a pre-concert talk at 7:15pm
604.280.3311   ticketmaster.ca     www.vancouverchamberchoir.com
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THE UBYSSEY
LITERARY CONTEST
UP TO 1500 WORDS
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MUSIC. THEATRE. FILMS. BEER.
Pick your poison with The Ubyssey culture team.
The Ubyssey's VIFF preview
Best and worst ofthe 2009 Vancouver International Film Festival
SECTION MEETING
MONDAYS AT NOON.
EMAIL KATE & TREVOR AT
CULTURE@UBYSSEY.CA.
The 2009 Vancouver International
Film Festival, beginning October 1,
offers 377 films from 70 countries.
To prepare you for the opening weekend, The Ubyssey has waded diligently
through the morass of indie flicks to
deliver a list of must-sees and bombs.
GET YOUR ASS THERE
Eatrip
(75 min, Japan, dir. Yuri Nomura)
Shameless admiration of food has
never been such a delight. Don't
expect a fast-paced culinary adventure—Eatrip instead delivers a humbling respect for the art of harvesting
and creating the delicious necessity
of life. The routine action of eating is
exposed as the unifying ingredient to
friends, family and celebration. Journey through the Tokyo fish markets,
self-sustaining farm communities
and a Japanese tea ceremony in the
feel good movie ofthe festival.
—Nicole Fisher
The Moroccan Labyrinth
(90 min, Spain, dir. Julio Sanchez Veiga)
The Moroccan Labyrinth (El Labeiinto
Marroqui) opens a window to a topic
relatively unknown to North American viewers: the role of Morocco in
the Spanish Civil War. You won't find
the sort of vivacious, exotic colours
used in travel agencies' posters here—
it contains something far bleaker.
The documentary features interviews with Moroccan war veterans
and footage from the Civil War era,
contrasting over-glorification of propaganda films to impoverished reality
that the former combatants must face
daily. The elderly men's grim faces
are literal translations of the director Julio Sanchez Veiga's forewords:
"[They were] the only soldiers, who
when they reached victory, only received defeat." Those willing to delve
into the history known only to few will
appreciate this fine documentary.
—Christina Kwon
65_REDROSES
(71   min,   Canada,   dir.   Nimisha
Mukerji & Philip Lyall)
UBC film MFA Nimisha Mukerji and
Philip Lyall document the tribulations of Eva, a sufferer of cystic fibrosis. The Vancouver resident is at the
height of her illness at age 23. Online
she connects with two similar cystic
fibrosis patients, who provide support to one another as they embark
on a battle they must win. 65_RE-
DROSES demands that bravery, love
and friendship are instilled into
every fortunate moment of life.
—Nicole Fisher
Sweet Crude
(93 min, USA, dir. Sandy Coffi)
A half century of free-handed petroleum extraction has turned the Niger
Delta into one of the most polluted
places on the planet. Director Sandy
Cioffi examines how decades of failed
attempts to achieve reparations
by peaceful means has radicalized
some protestors and demonstrates
what happens when oil interests are
threatened in a post 9/11 world.
The subject matter is riveting and disturbing, and innovative editing exposes
media spin at its most malevolent
—Greg Ursic
MIDDLE OF THE PACK
Beyond the Game
(75 min, Netherlands, dir.Jos de Putter)
When Gary Larson drew a cartoon
in 1995 where a nerdy kid's parents
dream of a high paying gaming career, he surely never dreamed that
one day gamers would actually be
paid more than accountants.
Jos De Putter examines the tribulations ofthe World of Warcrqft masters,
like a Chinese gamer whose parents
tried to beat him into med school, and
the nomadic stress of living out of suitcases and rarely seeing the sunlight.
But alas—there aren't enough of
these moments. The narrative is
weak, the editing is sloppy and the
trash-talking Machiavellian villain
dynamics that made 2007's gaming
film The King of Kong so engaging are
completely absent here.
—Greg Ursic
The Empire State Building Murders
(73 min, France, dir. William Karel)
In a clever homage to film noir director William Karel, The Empire State
Murders tells the story of the rise
and downfall of a fictional mobster
through the use of interwoven classic
films clips—Key Largo and Young Man
with a Horn among others—with "interviews" of a cast of "thugs" including
Mickey Rooney and Ben Gazzara.
Inventive and entertaining, Empire
would have been a great short, but the
story rapidly becomes convoluted and
runs about 30 minutes too long.
—Greg Ursic
For a Son
(98 min, France, dir. Alix de Maistre)
After a decade of waning hope, Catherine and her ex-husband welcome
their missing son with open arms
but something doesn't quite seem
right. Despite solid acting, this Gallic tale—equal parts thriller and
drama—never quite hits its stride on
either level, and is deliberately paced
(i.e. slow). The biggest problem is the
film's climax, or more appropriately
lack thereof, which will leave you
scratching your head.
—Greg Ursic
PHOTOS COURTESY OF VIFF
Island of Dreams
(83 min, Japan, dir.Tetsuichiro Tsuta)
Island of Dreams is not packed with
dense symbolism and indecipherable
messages; it almost resembles Hayao
Miyazaki's old animations in its
straightforwardness and simplicity.
It follows Alan, a young garbage
collector who works at an artificial
island made of garbage who moonlights as an eco-terrorist. The actors'
dramatic responses are intensified
by orchestral sound effects reminiscent of 1930s silent films, and it is
shot entirely in black and white. This
is contrasted against the modern
theme, and is surprisingly powerful in evoking emotions that people
generally choose to ignore for their
convenience.
The ending is predictable, and Alan's motives seem unfounded to the
cynical. But Island of Dreams is not
just for the children of Al Gore. Even
ifyou're on the verge of becoming an
eco-cynic, you might find something
to love.
—Christina Kwon
FILMS TO AVOID
The Agony and Ecstasy of Phil Spector
(100 min, UK/USA, dir. Vikramjayanti)
A music producing legend, a vibrant
young actress and a murder; how
very Hollywood. The scandal drags
on through Los Angeles courts to Phil
Spector's living room. But it mocks
Spector while simultaneously feeding
his ego, which brings into question
the source ofthe film's financing.
The most interesting aspect of the
film was the decision against using a
narrator, but words scrolled across
the screen in broken sentences convincing us of the low budget and lack
of innovation. This pitiful autobiography compromises the reputation
of the film festival.
—Nicole Fisher
Crackie
(94 min, Canada, dir. Sherry White)
If you've ever wondered why Canadian films have a bad reputation,
look no further. The opening scene
for this odious piece of celluloid—
about a poor, motherless teenager
growing up with a cantankerous
grandmother in small town Newfoundland—fittingly features a shot
of a massive garbage heap. Rife with
cliches, poorly written, badly acted
and wrist-sfittingly depressing, there
isn't a single redeeming feature in
Crackie. tl
—Greg Ursic 2 0 09.10.01/UBYSSEY.CA/IDEAS/7
WRITE US
A LETTER
Our web comments are broken, but we care about
what you have to say, so tell us the old-fashioned
way! Write to feedback@ubyssey.ca (E-mail is old-
fashioned by this point, right?).
ISEX   COLUMN
TOO SEXY
Dear Too Sexy,
I am writing to draw attention to a
little-publicized but rampant problem
in the world today Daily, millions are
denied that which is right, and left to
suffer on their own because of this
plague that has befallen our civilization. Left unchecked, it could lead to
an uncontrolled decline in population
and, at worst, the end of our race.
I am writing, of course, about
dildos. For generations now, women
have been circumventing the natural
order of the world by using these
"scabs" of the phallic world instead
of finding a warm-blooded male to
meet their needs. What's more, these
perverse contraptions provide an unnatural experience that no male can
hope to simulate, including endless
readiness, ridiculous dimensions,
pocket handiness, and impossible
vibrations and/or contortions. Such
abnormal stimulation is a detriment
to men everywhere as well as our
race as a whole. The desires that
women aim to indulge with their
plastic monstrosities are meant to
and should be filled by men.
I hope you will join me, Too Sexy,
in boycotting and actively protesting
dildos while campaigning for their
replacement with their proper flesh-
and-blood counterparts. This madness must end.
—Concerned Over Cock Karma
Dear COCK,
Thanks for your letter. COCK, we
hate to break it to you, but you're a
dick. Also a pussy and an asshole.
And although we're generally in favour of all three of those things, we
don't mean to compliment you.
Dildos offer many wonderful dimensions and sensations. Although
that may make you feel emasculated
and useless, that's entirely your own
issue. Finding dildos threatening is
tantamount to finding masturbation
threatening, and that, COCK, is an
issue indeed. Masturbation and sex
aren't equivalent. People masturbate when they want to get off alone,
whether that be due to exploratory
urges or a simple need to cum before True Blood finishes downloading. People have sex when they want
to connect with another person, if
only for a short time. Unless you're
absolutely incapable of having
decent sex—so much so that you'd
make people feel that they would be
better off alone—you've nothing to
fear from a mere dildo, regardless of
how high on the Richter Scale it can
jiggle-
See, COCK, the search for prospective sexual partners is propelled by
several things. Among these things
is attraction to physical features like
eyes, style, the XXX factor, intellectual
engagement, compatible values, entertaining conversation, and being able
to performing a rocking "Total Eclipse
ofthe Heart" on karaoke night. People
tend to have these things. Dildos do
not Dildos don't tell jokes. Dildos
don't have political opinions. Dildos
don't meet up with you after class to
screw in the private SUB bathroom. I
know it may be hard to believe COCK,
but even you have more personality
than the most high-tech frick stick. So
don't worry about how many phoenix
feathers you've got in your wand, just
let the magic flow.
If you're still feel like you can't
beat 'em, we recommend joining
the cyborg revolution and buying
yourself a vibrating cock ring. Your
prospective partners may find your
robocock slightly more seismic when
you're exploring their fault lines. You
know what we mean.
KASHA CHANG
S> AUSTIN HOLM
toosexy(?ubyssey.ca
Finally as much as it may come
as a huge shock to you, COCK, not all
women want to have "real" sex with
your "proper" warm-blooded douche-
self. Women whose sole sexual attraction is to other women still sometimes
desire penetration, and for this they
use—guess what?—dildos and vibrators, as well as a plethora of other sex
toys. They aren't "replacing" the cock,
COCK They aren't compensating for
the lack of, or actively edging out, prospective male mates. They simply have
no inclination to pursue you and your
undoubtedly awesome man meat.
Also, in pre-orgasmic or sexually-
fearful women, self-initiated experience with fingers and toys can
familiarize them with the sensation
progression of their own orgasm,
making them more receptive to the
advances of others, and healthier sexually overall. You see COCK? Dildos
aren't always "scabs." Sometimes
they're just laying infrastructure—so
thatyou can go back to work.
If we've failed to convince you,
don't fret, COCK. Fortunately for you,
you're not alone in your hate-on for
dildos. Until recently, dildos and
other sex toys were illegal and branded obscene in the state of Texas. In
February of '08, Texan lawmakers
argued that dildos should remain
outlawed as to "discourag[e] prurient interests in autonomous sex and
the pursuit of sexual gratification
unrelated to procreation." Congratulations, COCK! You're not the only
one who thinks "autonomous sex" is
a bad idea! After all, if God wanted orgasms to be for anything other than
procreation, then he'd have made
them all fun and whatnot—right?
That's a wrap, folks. Send your
inebriated epistles to toosexy@ubys-
sey.ca. We promise to be nicer to you
than we were to this COCK. tl
■■STREETERS
What do you think of the Dalai Lama?
Dave Harvey
Arts5
"I think that
instead of looking
to an acidic hermit
from Tibet we
should maybe, I
don't know, look
to our elected
leaders.Jhe Dalai
Lama is not a
policy maker so I
don't know how
effective he can
be...We're responsible for taking
that message and
transforming that
into action."
Joy Escobedo
Arts2
"I think he's a very
good leader....He
leads by example...
The fact that he
has followers
without force says
a lot.lt says that
you don't need to
be all action; you
can get a lot done
by just talking to
people."
Bojana Luckevich
Arts3
"Through peaceful
means there are
only so many
things you can
do to advance a
cause.The Dalai
Lama is pretty
powerful in his section of the world
because so many
people.Jisten to
him, but as far as
things that would
change anything
in a real political
sphere.there's less
he can do."
Wendy Hsu
Arts3
"He's a good
spiritual leader....He
doesn't necessarily have to take
action to make a
change or difference in the world...
like what he's doing with the world
peace summit
right now."
Liz Locke
Arts5
"I think there are
different ways to
promote peace
and his is more of
a passive action
one, so you're
not going to see
very much radical
action from him,
which is kind of
what his message
is....His message
isn't for everyone
but I think that the
people it does
reach really are
affected by him.."
ANTHONY GOERTZ GRAPHIC/THE UBYSSEY
-Coordinated by Tara Martellaro with photos by Chibwe Mweene
We've heard it before, Lama
On Sunday, the Dalai Lama came to UBC, where he spoke in front of
12,000 people at the Chan Centre. As would be expected, his audience was
an easy one. He regurgitated their already held opinions with non-controversial one-liners. What he didn't offer were real solutions, unless you
think that embracing the concept of the whole world as "We" (his words) is
going to sell peace to Kim Jong-il and the other card-carrying Bond-villains
of globalization.
Look, he's an alright guy with pretty good intentions. We're not denying
this. He's certainly not doing the world any big disservice. But for all the
attention he gets, which is a lot, it'd be nice to see Mr Gyatso say something
that's not entirely obvious. Instead, he spews fluff. He acts less like an
intellectual, and more like Oprah or Bono. Okay, he's nowhere near as annoying as Bono, but the point stands: his advice lacks substance.
Now, some have praised the Dalai Lama for the very thing that we are
criticizing: the simplicity of his message. They see him as symbolic. The
problem is, he's preaching to the converted—especially here in Vancouver—so what exactly does he accomplish by being symbolic? Perhaps being
model for a set of abstract ideals, but it's hard to define in tangible terms.
He's not fixing any problem, nor is he mobilizing masses, as, let's say,
Gandhi did.
Ultimately, people listen to him because of who he is, not because of
what he's saying. Do a bit of research and you'll discover that he's held
some pretty naive positions. The guy's not exactly pro-choice. Not to
mention his condemnation of masturbation, oral sex, anal sex and consequently homosexuality—though admittedly, he says these things are only
wrong from a "Buddhist" point of view. Nonetheless, these views, which
he holds personally, are problematic, and we're not afraid to say it. Hell, in
many ways, the average UBC student is more enlightened than this guy.
So then, why did 12,000 of us show up earlier this week? Perhaps we
just wanted to say that we were there, that we saw the man-cum-reincarnat-
ed-leader, flesh and blood, tl
UBC shows AMS who's daddy
It's not clear who controls the construction ofthe new SUB. It's complex and
still developing, but here's the Cole's Notes version:
Many, many months ago, the AMS, with much bravado, said that UBC
would have no control over the architect and no control over the project
manager. No sir. This was a student project, pure and simple, and if UBC
didn't like that fact—despite putting $25 million of their own money into the
project—well that was just too bad, gosh darn it. Student solidarity!
Well, months passed. UBC didn't budge on its demands. Deadlines of
some importance for getting this giant building began to draw near. And the
AMS caved.
Today, UBC Properties Trust (better known as the notoriously private
construction and real estate arm ofthe university) is the project manager
for our new student union building. They will oversee the financial solvency
of the project, how it integrates with the rest of the campus, and anything
else managery they deem fit. AMS President Blake Frederick has (and will)
prattle on about how this really means nothing, how students still control the
project, and how Properties Trust can be ignored at anytime, but make no
mistake about it: there was a negotiation, and the AMS lost.
Is this bad for students? Not necessarily. We don't know the full details of this
arrangement yet, for starters. As well, buildings managed by Properties Trust
generally come in on budget and on time. There's less risk with them involved.
However, if one thing has been made clear on this, it's that UBC runs this
campus, and if they care about having something done their way, it will probably happen their way. Not that this should surprise anyone. But it's a handy
reminder that next time an earnest student politician talks about getting the
university to bend to student demands, a healthy dose of skepticism is warranted. Or a better attack strategy, tl 

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