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The Ubyssey Nov 4, 1976

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Array I He Udimci
Vol. LIX, No. 21    VANCOUVER, B.C., THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 4, 1976
228-2301
Single ballot
has AMS yes
The student representative
assembly Wednesday approved a
single ballot referendum asking
students to approve a reduced $5
fee increase Nov. 16, 17 and 18.
Last week's motion to split the
ballot into four separate ballots
was declared invalid by an Alma
Mater Society subcommittee
Monday.
Included on the ballot will be The
Ubyssey, CITR radio, intramurals
and AMS services. If the
referendum passes, allocations to
the newspaper, radio station and
intramurals will no longer come
from the AMS general budget.
The SRA cut the allocation for
the AMS discretionary budget to $1
from $2.25 and hiked the CITR
allotment to $1 from 75 cents.
The Ubyssey will get $2 per
student per year and intramurals
will get $1 per student per year, if
the fee hike is approved.
Council turned down a $1
allotment to the newly established
women's committee but agreed to
fund the committee part of the $1
general AMS levy.
The SRA reduced the $1 AMS
general levy because the fees
requested for the other groups
would be non-discretionary and
would free the money they
currently receive from the general
discretionary budget.
In separate referenda to be held
at the same time, students will be
asked whether they want to join the
B.C. Students' Federation and the
National Union of Students, by
paying a $1 per student per year
levy to each group.
There will also be referenda
requesting a $2 increase in
women's athletics.
In other business, the SRA
rejected a motion to suspend seven
undergrad society and student
senate representatives who have
not attended SRA meetings.
The original motion said the
seven reps should not be allowed to
vote at SRA meetings until they
are reaffirmed by their constituencies. Instead, council
decided to send letters to the heads
of the undergrad societies
requesting them to either approve
or disapprove the reps' actions.
Short Pit inquiry
seen by official
—matt king photo
NEW TOY for faculty, gleaming jungle jim adorns top of posh Faculty Club at north end of campus.
Economical toy, ideal for frisky PhDs to gambol about on between teaching assignments, unfortunately
came too late in year — cold weather will soon confine profs to cigars and port in downstairs lounge.
Murray gives up vote, keeps seat
By STEVE HOWARD
Liquor Administration Branch
official J. E. Warren said Wednesday the LAB inquiry into the
operation of the Pit could be over
by Wednesday.
A discussion will, be held Wednesday between Warren, RCMP
Sgt. Al Hutchison, Alma Mater
Society president Dave Theessen
and one other AMS council
member.
"We'd like to sit down and
discuss the problem between the
three parties concerned," Warren
said.
Warren said the others have
discussed it "but nobody's had our
thoughts on the matter.
"We want to see that the (liquor)
permit isn't abused at any time."
Warren said he wants to talk
again   to   Hutchinson   before   he
Rick Murray, a non-student
sitting as student representative on
the UBC board of governors,
Tuesday gave up his vote on the
board.
The board voted in a closed
session of its regular meeting to
take away Murray's vote but to
allow him to keep his seat on the
board. The action, proposed by
Murray, will allow him to attend
the one remaining board meeting
before his term expires.
Murray said after the meeting he
gave up his vote because UBC law
student Roger Schiffer threatened
to get a court order invalidating all
board decisions where Murray
voted.
Schiffer claims Murray should
resign his seat on the board
because the Universities Act
prohibits non-students from sitting
on the board. Murray was an
engineering student when elected
to the board but has since taken a
job with the Vancouver city
engineering department.
And Schiffer has said that
because Murray is sitting on the
board illegally the courts might
rule all decisions where Murray
voted invalid.
"There's no point in having
board decisions dragged into this
thing," Murray said Wednesday.
He said it does not matter that he
is no longer voting because board
votes are seldom tied.
"The fact that I'm not voting
won't affect anything that comes
before the board," he said. "We
usually manage to come to a
consensus before voting."
Murray has refused to resign his
position despite a ruling by an
Alma Mater Society lawyer that he
should. The student representative
assembly voted confidence in
Murray Oct. 6.
Board member George Hermanson said Wednesday Murray
should    have    resigned,    but
Murray's decision to give up his
vote was proper because of the
possible challenge to board
decisions.
"It doesn't appear he should vote
if his status is in question," he said.
"I think the proper thing to do
would have been to resign when he
realized he wouldn't be a student."
"My feeling on this doesn't apply
directly to Rick. The status of a
student must be clarified."
Hermanson said the board
should make a ruling to cover
future cases like Murray's.
Moe Sihota, SRA external affairs
officer, disagrees. "Rick shouldn't
have given up his vote. He's there
to represent the students and part
of that is voting for the students.
"It's the  principle  that's   important. Students are being denied
See page 2: MURRAY
MURRAY . .. ponders while other board members vote
doug field photo
comments about specific
recommendations the LAB has
about the operation of the Pit.
Warren said university pubs
generally are not a source of
trouble, and the unfavorable report
from Hutchinson about the Pit was
a surprise to the LAB.
"Everybody (at the LAB) was a
little shocked when we got this
report," Warren said.
He said Hutchinson's report is
the first of any size he has received
about the UBC pub.
Warren's investigation is the
result of a report sent to LAB
general manager Vic Woodland by
Hutchinson.
"I think we'll resolve it on
Wednesday," Warren said. "I felt
Mr. Theessen wrote a very
responsible letter."
Last week Theessen wrote the
LAB a letter outlining proposed
changes in Pit operation designed
See page 7: AMS
Old boys seek
community pub
for UBC gates
Plans are in the works for a
neighborhood pub just outside the
UBC gates.
But don't hold your breath — it
will be at least a year until it opens,
if it opens at all.
Former UBC fund raiser Vian
Andrews and former Alma Mater
Society president Gordon
Blankstein said Wednesday they
want to put up a pub near the gates
on West Tenth.
But Andrews said when he went
to city council to ask for the
referendum among local residents,
which is necessary under the law,
he was told there could be no vote
before April.
Council made the decision
because a similar referendum last
March on a neighborhood pub at
Tenth and Sasamat failed to gain
the required two-thirds majority.
Andrews said he would like to set
up a pub at the site of an abandoned gas station across the street,
but it may be sold before he and
Blankstein begin looking for a site
to lease next January.
If the referendum is approved,
See page 2: PUB Page 2
THE       UBYSSEY
Thursday, November 4, 1976
SRA backs women's c'tee
A women's committee was
finally established Wednesday by
the student representative
assembly, a month after it rejected
setting up a group to replace the
defunct women's office.
The original vote led to the
resignation of Dave Van Blarcom
as SRA president and split the
SRA, but Wednesday's vote was
opposed only by engineering rep
Steve Creed. The vote was supported by 12 members and four
abstained.
But the SRA approved a vote to
remove a $1 fee for the women's
committee off the Alma Mater
Society fee referendum Nov. 16,17
and 18. Instead, $1 will be included
in the referendum for general
revenue and the committee will
receive its funding from the
general budget.
The fee levy was changed after
several members said a lack of
student support for such a committee would hurt the chances of
the fee referendum.
The new committee replaces the
women's office collective, which
dissolved after the SRA and
student administrative commission decided to eject it from the
office in SUB which it had occupied
for several years. The decision led
to a bitter debate in SRA which
culminated in an acrimonious
Murray vote goes
From page 1
their representation and vote on
what is definitely the most important part of the decision making
process (at UBO."
Sihota also said that by agreeing
that Murray give up his vote, the
board is going against what the
SRA has decided.
"The board is openly defying
what the SRA has decided. I think
Pub could open
by September
From page 1
he said, the pub could be open the
following September or October.
A spokesman for the City of
Vancouver licencing department
said Wednesday they had many
enquiries about the area near the
gates, but he added that no applications will be considered until
next April or May.
The neighborhood pub closest to
campus is Jerry's Cove, which
opened earlier this year near
Fourth and Alma.
we should have canned Rick in the
first place, but we didn't and now
the board has done it for us," he
said.
Sihota said the board should
allow the SRA to appoint an interim student member to vote in
Murray's place.
Murray said he remained on the
board because the act is so vague
that lawyers can't seem to decide
whether he should be there or not.
"The board got conflicting
opinions. If it were clear that I
shouldn't be there, I wouldn't be
there," he said.
Murray said an interpretation of
the act would have to be made to
prevent the same situation from
occurring again.
"This type of thing shouldn't
happen again," he said.
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meeting Sept. 29 and led to Van
Blarcom's resignation.
But the committee finally got a
lease on life after newly-elected
arts rep Fran Watters told the SRA
that an informal women's committee currently has 25 members.
And a survey of campus women
has shown so far that about 95
women are interested in actively
participating in such a committee,
Watters said.
Discussing the fee levy for the
committee, Van Blarcom said the
old women's office was hurt by the
fact that it had to devote much of
its energies into ensuring they
would have funding each year. But
if the new committee had
guaranteed funds from a fee levy,
it would be free to set up programs
for women in a more effective way
that its predecessor.
The SRA must provide money to
back up its decisions, and "put'
money where our hearts are."
The committee will establish
programs to aid and organize
women and to eliminate remaining
forms of discrimination on campus. The survey will determine
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Thursday, November 4, 1976
THE        UBYSSEY
Page 3
Tuifion fee hike ef $300 seen
Tuition fees will increase to $750
per student next year, Moe Sihota,
Alma Mater Society external affairs officer,  predicted Tuesday.
Sihota told a forum in SUB on
tuition fee increases the provincial
government will force UBC to
increase tuition fees by $300 a
student if it does not increase the
university's operating grant
significantly in 1977-78. The forum
was one of a series leading up to
National Student Day, Nov. 9.
Deputy education minister
Walter Hardwick has indicated
B.C. universities will get little or no
increase in their operating grants
next year.
Sihota said the university will be
forced to look to tuition fees for
additional revenue to cover salary
increases and general operating
costs.
•'This would bring tuition fee
costs to $750 per student, a level
that will have a drastic impact on
enrolment. Students just can't
afford this amount," he said.
Karen Bryson, a B.C. Student
Federation staffer, said tuition
fees restrict the accessibility of
post-secondary education.
"The most important aspect of
this discussion is that tuition fees
play a role in deciding who will be
attending university," she said.
"If tuition fees rise, the inequity
already present in society will also
increase." Increased tuition fees
would restrict education to the
rich, she said.
Bryson said that increasing
tuition fees area national problem.
'Fees have been raised in Nova
Scotia, New Brunswick, Ontario,
Manitoba and Alberta. We're
next."
Sihota said students cannot
afford the increase in fees because
the saving power of the average
student during the summer is
about $1,300. Subtract $750 for
tuition and only $550 is left for all
other expenses including housing.
"Tuition increases are not
justified because the earning
power of students has not kept up
with the rate of inflation," Sihota
said.
The other alternative is to take
out a student loan, but in spite of an
increase in demand for loans the
money actually available has been
cut back, he said.
"Also, if a student can't find a
job in the summer he or she is
ineligible for a loan. This is not
fair."
Bryson questioned whether
tuition fees are justified at all.
"In the past tuition fees have
Don't stay home
on Nov. 9—AMS
By KATHY FORD
If you were planning to use
National Student Day as an excuse
to stay home Tuesday, it won't
work.
The Alma Mater Society is not
asking UBC students to boycott
classes because that would be
futile, Moe Sihota, AMS external
affairs officer,  said Wednesday.
"Students probably wouldn't
boycott their classes anyway," he
said. "And if they did, what purpose would it serve? We think it's
more important that students
come out and show their concern."
The AMS has planned a series of
discussions for Tuesday. The first,
about tuition, will be held from
noon to 2:30 p.m. outside SUB.
Sihota said former housing
minister Lome Nicholson and
National Union of Students field-
worker Eddie Able will speak at
the forum.
Representatives from the UBC
administration and the department
of education will also be present.
Sihota said tuition fee increases
are currently a major issue on
campus.
A debate about student unemployment will take place from 2:30
p.m. to 4:30 p.m. with Sihota, a
B.C. Federation of Labor rep, and
a B.C. Students' Federation rep.
The third forum is an open
discussion about the quality of
education at UBC. Pam Willis,
AMS teaching and academic
standards committee chairwoman,
and George Hermanson, Anglican
chaplain and board of governors
member, will moderate the
discussion.
Sihota said all forums will be
held outdoors at the south end of
SUB. If it rains they will take place
in the SUB conversation pit.
'All we are asking of students is
that they come out and show their
concern for these issues. We would
]Bke students to donate two hours of
time on Tuesday," he said.
"We have two main reasons for
request.  First,  many press
iple will be here. All three TV
.works will have cameras out
e, and there will be reporters
all the major radio stations
newspapers. So if we get a
turnout,  it  will   have  a
found impact on them.
other   reason   is   that
student days have been
e in the past. On Oct. 27,
1965 there was a national student
day, and about 3,500 UBC students
got together and marched downtown.
"Their main issues were curbing
tuition fees, student representation, and student loans. By 1968, all
their demands had been met."
Sihota said many other
universities have planned activities similar to those planned for
UBC.
But students at Carleton
University in Ottawa are
boycotting classes. University of
Manitoba students will skip classes
in the morning and attend a rally
with Manitoba premier Ed
Schreyer as a main speaker.
In Edmonton, University of
Alberta students' classes have
been cancelled. They will march to
the legislature.
University of Victoria students
are also going to the legislature.
They will present a set of demands
about the quality of education to
the government.
The BCSF is also going to
present a list of student concerns to
the provincial government. NUS
has obtained a meeting with the
federal cabinet to push for an
inquiry into the role of post-
secondary education  in  Canada.
The BCSF is currently circulating a petition demanding an
inquiry be held. They will send it to
all universities and colleges in
B.C., Sihota said.
been justified on the grounds that a
university education would provide
the holders with increased employment opportunities and higher
incomes."
The   value   of   a   degree   has
seriously decreased, she said.
"Can students come back to the
university when they can't find a
job and ask for their tuition fees
back?" she asked.
Sihota said students should
decide how the fees are
distributed.
There should be students on the
budget   committee  to  allocate
— matt king photo
A DEFACED TREE, a loafing student and thou . . . after long day of
academic blathering, two students rest 'neath spreading boughs and
chat near giant flowerpots at Sedgewick library.
money to areas where it will
benefit students directly, such as
teacher training programs, he
said.
"It is an opportunity for students
to get out and illustrate their
concern; a good turnout will
produce a strong reaction."
Staff laid off
by trustee
at McGill U
MONTREAL (CUP) — The
administration trustee in charge of
the defunct McGill student society
laid off the entire maintenance and
security staff of the student union
building Tuesday.
G. S. Kingdon said he laid off the
staff because of "economic considerations" and dissatisfaction
with the building's lack of
cleanliness.
Most of the staff have accepted
job offers from the cleaning firm
brought in to replace them, but will
lose several benefits they had
while employed by the student's
society. Staff will also have to work
an extra day, bringing their work
week up to 48 hours, and will lose a
raise promised them last July by
the students' society.
.Staff members also said they do
not know if they will be kept on by
the company after their initial trial
period or rehired when the company's contract expires next May.
Night security personnel were
replaced when their firm was
underbid.
Commissionaires are hired by
the administration to patrol the
rest of the campus. Their use in the
student union building ensures it is
"hooked into the whole campus
security setup," said Kingdon.
Workers questioned Kingdon's
statement he laid off staff because
of economic considerations
because the contracting company
will charge the university for
profits as well as wages.
"It's no good, but what can we
do? He (Kingdon) runs the place
like a dictator, he consults with no
one," one worker said.
Kingdon, an administration-
appointed trustee who took over
the affairs of the students' society
in mid-September, has since announced a number of cost-cutting
measures, including a demand that
student-funded clubs operate on a
break-even basis.
Club representatives drafted a
resolution to the McGill senate last
Thursday demanding that Kingdon
release $35,000 from the society's
contingency fund, which they said
is necessary to improve the
building.
Kingdon was appointed after a
students' committee set up to
administer society duties following
the society's collapse last
December disbanded and stopped
distribution of club and building
funds.
Trident protester tells story of fast
By TED DAVIS
Jim Douglass, leading opponent of the
Trident nuclear submarine system, goes to
trial in Seattle today, two days after finishing a
30-day fast in Washington, D.C.
Douglass and eight others face charges of
trespassing on and destruction of government
property stemming from an Aug. 8 fence-
cutting protest at the Trident base in Bangor,
Wash.
At least 10 550-foot Trident subs, each with
408 nuclear warheads, will be stationed at the
nuclear base when the project is completed.
Looking very thin and worn after his fast, in
which he lost 34 pounds, Douglass spoke briefly
to a handful of students Wednesday in the SUB
ballroom before leaving for Seattle.
Douglass said he and fellow tasters Bob
Schneider of San Francisco and Sister Mary
Alban of Toronto were arrested once during
their fast for demonstrating without a permit.
During the one night they spent in jail they
were the only white prisoners there, Douglass
said in an interview after his talk.
"The black guards joked that they didn't
know there were laws which allowed whites to
be arrested," he said. "And conditions were
just atrocious."
One of the purposes of the fast was to appeal
to president-elect Jimmy Carter and president
Gerald Ford to renounce the use of first-strike
nuclear weapons such as the Trident system.
Douglass said Ford and Carter "were certainly aware of the fast occurring and of the
concern behind it, but they both chose to make
no formal public response."
But he called the fast successful because it
drew wide support from across Canada and the
U.S.
Douglass said there were at least 100 persons
fasting in four Canadian and eight American
cities and countless other people in both
countries meditated and held vigils outside
American consulates in support of the fasters.
"It brought together communities across an
international border in deeper resistance to the
nuclear arms race," he said.
"The connections brought a deeper hope for
future work in the Trident campaign and to the
whole struggle against nuclear arms."
Douglass also said the whole fast was conceived and planned within two weeks of its Oct.
3 starting date and that the three fasters had
barely known each other before that time.
He said the fasters held constant vigils
outside the campaign headquarters of both
Carter and Ford and outside the White House.
"The police also vigiled (sic) with us, in a
different way," he said, referring to his arrest
and the constant threats of arrest the fasters
faced. Page 4
THE        UBYSSEY
Thursday, November 4, 197Sm Thursdi
Another day,
another SRA
mind change
Flip flop.
The student representative assembly has flip flopped
again — this time the right way.
On Wednesday night, the SRA voted to set up a
women's committee as a special committee of the SRA.
One short month ago, the same SRA voted against
establishing or supporting any sort of women's committee.
At that time, SRA members said there wasn't any
need for a women's committee. What would it do? they
asked. Why can't it be a club? they wondered.
But all that's history. The SRA finally realized a
month later that women's liberation is not a club, but
something that is necessary on this campus.
But the battle isn't over yet.
In order for a women's committee to get off the
ground, it needs money. The women who worked in the
previous women's office in SUB spent much of their time
and energy desperately trying to raise money for the
programs they wanted to put on.
On Wednesday night, the SRA turned down a motion
to put the women's commmittee on the ballot of the
upcoming fee referendum to receive a non-discretionary
budget of $1 per student per year.
Instead, they decided to ask for a $1 per student per
year levy to be added to the Alma Mater Society's
discretionary budget.
Out of that money, they said, the women's committee
will be allotted some money to run programs and provide
other services.
All we can say now is, we're watching closely. Now
that the SRA has approved the committee, it had better
put its money behind its motions — and come through with
money for the women's committee.
AIM S0H8H
TO PROVE THKL
LDS..flUllL
WA CONQUER Ml
Letters
Attention student representative
assembly.
Okay, you've done it! You've
closed the Pit, closed the Lethe,
cancelled all functions in SUB.
But what have you really accomplished besides pouring out
bundles of dough to pay off bands,
besides making Pit employees lose
wages, besides enraging students,
besides making fools of yourselves?
Sure, I suppose you've cut down
vandalism on campus but who's to
say it won't return once the Pit
reopens?
Come on, get your heads out of
the sand! Prohibition was done
away with in the 1920s and the
immorality of drinking went out
with Wacky Bennett. Even young
Billy isn't so naive as to try to
return to the good old days.
Why are you cutting out hard
liquor and bottled beer when you
can get just as pissed on draft?
Why are you taking out 100 seats
when people already arrive early
and stay all night so that they won't
have to wait three hours to get in?
Pit closure
big mistake
All this seems rather ironic if for
no other reason than that the Alma
Mater Society is crying for more
funds and that the Pit's profits are
way up over last year.
But what's this I now hear about
plans to turn the Barn into an
English pub? I thought we were to
be denied our brew or that it was
going to be made more difficult to
get? Or at least that's what your
changes at the Pit seem to indicate.
It seems rather erroneous,
doesn't it, to take it away with one
hand and to give it back with the
other?
Get with it, gentlemen. Even I
know that two negatives — closing
the Pit and cutting back service —
don't make a positive. And as for
adding one more — the establish
ment of a pub in the Barn — well
that's nothing but a fuck up.
Why not admit that your plans
are a flop and take a little more
realistic action? Reopen the Pit:
retain bottled beer, hard liquor and
the same number of seats.
Establish some rules: don't
serve drunks and throw out
anybody who persists in being an
asshole.
As for preventing vandalism in
the rest of SUB and outside, lock
the doors between the Pit exit and
the rest of SUB after 11 p.m. and
drag the campus cowboys out of
their cozy coaches and put them on
constant patrol around SUB from
10:30 p.m. on.
Unless we are made to develop
healthy drinking habits (whatever
that means) and respect for
university property (be it only
because the local fuzz is watching
and will beat you severely around
the head and ears if you don't), you
haven't a hope in hell of accomplishing a thing.
Ron Wills
law 1
Schwarz not real fascist
As an eyewitness to the events of
Oct. 14,1 might comment on David
Fuller's account Why fascists have
no right to speak.
Fuller speaks of "the 30 plainclothes RCMP present;" there
were certainly four officers
present and there may have been
two others who took no part in the
affray. Either the police are
remarkably adept at disguising
themselves as known students and
teachers or Fuller is exaggerating.
When the bullhorn was seized, 10
minutes into the lecture period, one
of the two offices concerned
displayed his identity card on
request; I did not see anyone
physically threatening "one
African student with a gun" as per
Fuller.
With the chairman's indulgence,
the black protester with the
bullhorn had been reading a
prepared text in a dull, monotone
voice. The audience, which had not
asssembled to hear this speaker
was becoming visibly impatien
with this "resolution" that seeme
so far from resolution.
As for the statement tha
"earlier, the police seized and ton
up our placards," the protester
deposited their untorn placard
against a wall before the tall
began and they were still there
undamaged, when the talk b;
Harry Schwarz ended.
It would be self-delusion to clain
that the disruption of Schwarz
talk was a great victory for the Ai
Hoc Committee for etc., etc.
By shouting and by banging the!
desks, the two dozen protester
antagonized neutral listeners an
appeared ridiculous. A few seeme
to realize this, after some of th
members of the audience hat
moved away from them, and the;
abandoned the protest.
Peter Moog!
history professo
AMS courageous, not bamboozled
I was surprised that Stefan Mochnacki could begin
with the premise that the administration engineered
the threat to close the Pit, and then reach the conclusion that the student representative assembly was
gullible.
If the administration was out to get Pit revenues,
then the Alma Mater Society has anticipated this
move in the only way possible, and thereby "bamboozled" the administration.
Look at the scenario: SRA sits back and waits for
the Liquor Administration Branch to remove the
AMS licence. All the student protesting does no good,
because the LAB has deemed students incompetent to
run their Pit, and because there is no appeal
procedure.
Enter the administration, heroes. They are able to
open the Pit under their licence, because they are
"respectable," and, at the same time, they turn the
Pit into a money machine to caver the $100,000 food
services deficit.
Instead, SRA and the student administrative
commission demonstrated in strongest terms, the
only terms, that the AMS is concerned with satisfying
the authorities that the Pit is being run by a
responsible group.
The effect is to completely undermine any grounds
for giving the administration control of student pubs.
AMS has shown decisive and courageous leadership, the like of which has not been seen for a'very
long time.
If, after this awesome display of good faith and
responsibility, the LAB should still elect to give the
, administration control of student pubs, then all hell
should break loose.
David Van Blarcom
arts representative,
student representative assembly
THE UBYSSEY
NOVEMBER 4, 1976
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the
university year by the Alma Mater Society of the University of
B.C. Editorial opinions are those of the staff and not of the AMS
or the university administration. Member, Canadian University
Press. The Ubyssey publishes Page Friday, a weekly commentary
and review. The Ubyssey's editorial office is in room 241K of the
Student Union Building. Editorial departments, 228-2301;
Advertising, 228-3977.
Co-Editors: Sue Vohanka, Ralph Maurer
"Sue Vohanka!" cried Marcus Gee, and Doug Field said
"Gesundhelt," so Ralph Maurer clicked his heels and saluted Deb van der
Gracht and Paul Vanderham, who bravely stuck their fingers in a
prominent dike. "It's too aryan here," said Ted (Sheik of Araby) Davis,
blinded by the reflection from Steve Howard's ponytail. Heather Walker
agreed, and closed the window while Kathy Ford stole Charlie Micallef's
chocolate maltese. Matt King watched Doug McMullin develop, as Chris
Gainor said, "That's not what aryan means, ho, ho, ho!" Verne
McDonald wouldn't give a wooden Jan Nicol for the masthead's syntax,
but as Shane McCune pointed out, syntax Is what you pay to the
church. .   -
OnSe
the sti
establis
mittee.
The i
In re
med f re
part of
the basi
general
jecuves
In tlw
rumors
writing
concerr
centre.
First,
discrim
only wi
the rea
The i
Doug K
and otl
them, c
stops.
Little
Obvio
politica
reform!
women,
affee tec
produci
One r
of the !
could tl
senate,
groups
sity.
I
Of
I wis!
Harry 5
Firstl
would d
is that c
that is l
be supp
ment w
people.
Howe
construi
premise
governr
violent
dividual
very go
the sarr
Using
treme ii
to the c(
at Cans
racists
educatii
oppress
would b
their ct
Indians
attend i
Apart
Ad Hoc
the Aza
their o'
absurd
abandor
To pa
warz ca
racist i
words v
inexacti
is no mi
Howe\
Franco,
be prou I, 1976
Thursday, November 4, 1976
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 5
Women need a
room at UBC
of their own
By FRAN WATTERS
and LORELEE PARKER
On Sept. 29, a group of women approached
the student representative assembly to
establish their status as a women's committee.
The reception was definitely negative.
In retrospect, we feel this largely stemmed from a pervading unwillingness, on the
part of many SRA members, to recognize
the basic need for a place for women, plus a
general misconception of what our objectives entailed.
In the hopes of dispelling these and other
rumors and  misunderstandings,  we  are
|writing this article to outline the primary
concerns and objectives of the new women's
centre.
First, it's generally recognized that
discrimination against women exists — not
only within the campus, but also outside in
the real world.
The reports — administration president
Doug Kenny's, the status of women report
and others — are compiled, people read
them, committees are struck, and there it
stops.
Little is actually changed.
Obviously, there's a need for a large,
politically active group to pressure for
reforms. Past experience has shown that
women, because they are the ones directly
affected, are the ones directly interested in
producing change.
One reason we wanted to be a committee
of the SRA was that the women's centre
could then have the necessary links with the
senate, the board of governors and other
groups to effect change within the university.
I am
Joefs
opinion
speaker,
impatiem
it seemet
3nt that
I and tore
>rotesters
placards
the talk
ill there,
talk   by
l to claim
ichwarz's
or the Ad
etc.
ging their
irotesters
mers and
iv seemed
ne of the
:nce had
and they
;er Moogk
professor
Off campus, we would have contacts with
interested parties, such as the B.C.
Students' Federation, the National Union of
Students and the Vancouver Status of
Women, which deal with other aspects of
women's problems on a wider scale.
Second, women's organizations do exist on
campus. There are women in law, the
nursing undergraduate society women's
extramurals and others. However, contact
between them is minimal.
Because each is so divorced from the
others, it's difficult for women to locate the
facilities they want, although they may
actually be provided.
Granted, other organizations do attempt
to be central catalogues, but because they
are not devoted solely to women — who are,
after all, 50 per cent of the campus
population — they do not have all the
available services listed and they themselves are not always approachable.
Such a federation of women's activities
would be an exchange of mutual support,
information and publicity. Furthermore,
this federation would be a substantial
political force.
For example, the referendum on women's
extramural athletic fees is fast approaching, yet who but the athletes are
aware of it? Such a co-ordinated effort of
campus women represents a substantial
voting block with the potential to not only
support this and other women's issues, but
to carry them.
Third, we want the women's centre to be a
physical and supportive structure in its own
right for women as individuals and as
people.
Such a gathering place would provide:
• a comprehensive resource centre,
providing magazines, books and other
material about women's issues throughout
North America;
• a compiled catalogue of services
available,   such   as   rape   and   abortion
counselling, on and off campus; and
• eventually an accessible, supportive
centre for actual counselling services.
As a place for women and issues, we
would publicize special concerns, distribute
information aboutour activities and sponsor
events.
Many women are interested in developing
skills not readily available.
We plan, therefore, to hold workshops and
seminars on assertiveness training, self
defence, basic car maintenance and
creative writing.
The list goes on and on — films about
women, feminist folksingers, women's
dances, sports events, poetry readings,
speakers, beer gardens. . . .
There is a definite cultural gap at UBC —
there just aren't many events that pertain to
women as women. The centre would be a
general gathering place for women to come
and relax, talk and have access to
women with similar concerns and probl
To conclude, the new women's centre1!
be   a   lobbying   group,   and   coordinate
centre  and  a   support  centre   providing"
services  and  events  for  women  as  individuals.
It would be a place for women, it would
cater to women's political and personal
needs, with ideas and support generated
from women.
Fran Watters and Lorelee Parker are
members of the Ad Hoc women's committee.
Watters, arts 4, is also an arts representative on the student representative assembly.
Letters
Of Harry Schwarz,  freedom of speech and childish name-calling
)ut the
irsity of
he AMS
liversity
nentary
K of the
18-2301;
eld said
d van der
ers in a
y) Davis,
jr Walker
Micallef's
as Chris
'* Verne
s syntax,
/   to   the
Jt
I wish to make several points concerning
Harry Schwarz and freedom of speech.
Firstly, the crucial premise of those who
would decry Schwarz as a fascist and racist
is that one becomes such by doing anything
that is not destructive, anything that could
be supportive, even indirectly, of a government which maintains the oppression of a
people.
However, Schwarz' detractors also
construe broadly in the extreme this
premise, so that one, who opposes such a
government by the most effective nonviolent means possible open to an individual, can be viewed as supporting that
very government because he and they sit in
the same parliament.
Using this premise and a similarly extreme interpretation, one could easily come
to the conclusion that, let's say, all students
at Canadian universities are fascists and
racists because they subscribe to the
educational institutions of a society which
oppresses its native Indians. All students
would be fascists and racists, regardless of
their concern for the situation of native
Indians, simply because of the fact that they
attend university.
Apart from the fact that members of the
Ad Hoc Committee for the Just Struggle of
the Azanian Peoples would be hoist with
their own petard, the above premise is
absurd in its application, and should be
abandoned.
To paraphrase a famous quotation, Schwarz cannot be classified as a fascist and
racist in the extreme acceptance of the
words without some risk of terminological
inexactitude. The mere use of such slanders
is no more than childish name calling.
However, using tactics with which Hitler,
Franco, Mussolini and Papadopolous would
be nroud to associate themselves, the Ad
Hoc committee denies and prevents the
exercise by Schwarz of his right of freedom
of speech.
David Fuller then has the further impudence to turn around and criticize the
university administration and the police for
attempting to curtail his freedom of speech.
If Fuller believes that he has the right to
deny Schwarz' free speech, he has no right
to complain about a denial of his own such
freedom. I believe the term for similar
behavior is 'hypocrisy.'*
The Ad Hoc committee's denial of Schwarz' freedom of speech is based upon their
belief that the correctness of their view is
beyond doubt. This arrogant belief in infalli-
SRA despotic not democratic
We are appalled by the student representative assembly's recent decision to
cbse the Pit. We challenge their authority to
make such decisions on behalf of the
students before putting it to a general vote.
This is not a privilege that has been extended to students on behalf of the university but a facility demanded by the student
population, in a building built by the
students, for the students.
The SRA's actions in this matter are
despotic rather than democratic.
Do these people really represent the
feelings of the student body? Their job is to
represent and compromise, not to bend all
the way then turn around and attack the
very students whose rights are on the line.
As for the pizza parlor, one would have to
be totally naive to think that people are
going to have a pizza and one beer and go
home. How many of these pizza parlor
patrons will turn into vicious vandals and
drunken drivers?
We assume that the reason these prohibitions are being implemented was the
debacle known as Undercut. Why is the only
place in SUB still serving this "firewater" in
the same room where the original event took
place? This points out the hypocrisy involved in the decision making process.
Since   we    have    been    attending    this
university, being no guardian anmttpur-
selves, we have noticed no '^pjgiahtly
outrageous acts of drunkenness or vandalism.
It would seem to us that the only misuse of
the Pit was by the management who failed
to take the initiative in providing adequate
security.
With respect to these arguments on
drunken driving, we believe they are increasing drunken driving. There will always
be those individuals who attempt to
navigate motor vehicles while intoxicated.
The point is most of the residence students
will now have to drive to off-campus
locations to have a few social drinks or the
alternative — go for a greasy pizza. Ask the
RCMP how the accident rate is after the
next month has passed.
Shouldn't we close the faculty club too?
This is only another example of the SRA
bending over for the administration. If the
SRA has become more puritanical than the
Liquor Administration Board, can we be
saved? One way or another let's hear your
voice. Let's hear everybody's voices. Don't
let this clique run your life.
Jim Cleghorn
commerce 3
Bill W'hitaker
education 4
bility rests solely in faith, not reason. It is no
more than a belief.
Freedom of speech exists particularly so
that reasonable people may hold and express differing views. It is intended to
prevent situations in which people claim
that their view is the only correct one, and
act to suppress other views. The Ad Hoc
committee denies not only Schwarz'
freedom of speech, but also the validity of
all freedom of speech by their actions.
It is my submission that the name calling
that has occurred would be an exceedingly
juvenile matter, were it not for the fact that
a significant interference with freedoms of
information, discussion, opinion and speech
has taken place.
I wish to dissociate myself from all people
purporting to speak f^gjIWtudents of-UBC
who assert that Schwarz is a fascist or a
racist, or who arrogate to themselves a right
to interfere with freedom of speech.
Francis Barnett
law 3
The Ubyssey welcomes letters from all
readers.
Letters should be signed and typed.
Pen names will be used when the writer's
real name is also included for our information in the letter or when valid reasons
for anonymity are given.
Although an effort is made to publish all
letters received, The Ubyssey reserves the
right to edit letters for reasons of brevity,
legality, grammar or taste.
Letters should be addressed to the paper
care of campus mail or dropped off at The
Ubyssey office, SUB 241 K. Page 6
THE       UBYSSEY
Thursday, November 4, 197SJR  Thursda
Ali the nudes
fit to print
Patrick Britten and his Nude
Garden Party want you!
Britten is trying to organize a
city-wide nude social club and to
push the idea he will hold a
communications workshop from Mrff|(f
10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Nov. 8, 9 and
10 in Lasserre lounge.
The NGP, which at one time
was a registered federal political
party, advocates changing the
world into a nudist's paradise
with no wars or weapons. Britten
has been working for his idea of
Hot flashes
a   Garden   of  Eden  on  earth  for
seven years.
He describes the UBC
communications workshop as a
''talk-in, think-in, laugh-in,
feel-in, be-in, mad-mouth and
receptive void."
invited   to   come   and   get  some
culchah.
For those who think a wind
symphony is the rustling of
leaves in a breeze, the UBC wind
symphony will hold a free
concert to enlighten you noon
today in SUB auditorium.
All   the   unwashed   masses are
Borrowing books will be
forbidden at UBC on
Remembrance Day, Nov. 11.
All libraries, except maybe the
law library, will be shut.
The law faculty has not yet
reached a decision on the legality
of closing its library, but a
decision is expected shortly.
Eager students wishing to
study in a foodless and bookless
environment may do so at Brock
Hall.
Tween classes
TODAY
CHINESE  STUDENTS'
ASSOCIATION
Dr.  Wally   Chung   on   the   history of
Chinese  Canadians,  noon,   Bu.   104.
CCCM
John 5trathdee sings songs of
liberation, Lutheran Campus
Centre.
INTERVARSITY  CHRISTIAN
FELLOWSHIP
Missionaries    from    Malaysia    speak,
noon, Chem  250.
WARGAMERS
French column meets British line
in  a  Napoleonic  battle,  noon,  SUB
2 16.
RED  CROSS
One-day    blood    clinic,    10   a.m.   to
3:30  p.m.,  SUB  215.
PRE-VET
Tour   and    discussion   of   the   sheep
unit,  noon,  MacMI   160.
SIMS
Group     meditation     and    advanced
lecture,  noon,  Buto  297.
KUNG   FU   MY  JONG  CLUB
Practice,  b   to   7  p.m.,   Place Vanier
ballr oom.
EAST   INDIAN
STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
General       meeting,       noon,
International  House 402.
SQUARE  DANCING
Practice,  noon, SUB  212.
GAY  PEOPLE
Dance  rally,  short business meeting
and  badminton,  noon, SUB  211.
THE NEWEST RYE
IN YOUR SKY.
New CN Tower whisky.
A brand-new Canadian
whisky of towering quality
For smoothness, flavour
and value McGuinness'
latest achievement stands
tall and proud.
NEW CIM TOWER
CANADIAN WHISKY
the tower you can take home.
SUS
Free films, noon, Hebb Theatre.
ACM
Organizational      and      program
planning   meeting, noon, Civils 201.
CITR
Party   for   members,   8   p.m.,   CITR
station.
CSA
Ballroom      dancing,      7      p.m.,
International House.
CSA
Mandarin    night,    7:30    p.m.,    SUB
207/209.
ALLIANCE   FRANCAISE
Meeting,      noon.      International
House.
CLASSICS  CLUB
Professor    Wells    speaks    about   the
German   frontier   under  Augustus,  8
p.m., 4049 West Eleventh.
CLASSICS  CLUB
Lecture     about     Masada    and     the
Jewish    resistance   to   Rome,   noon.
Bu.   104.
BLACK & LEE
TUX SHOP
NOW AT
1110 Seymour St.
688-2481
GEOGRAPHY  UNDERGRADUATE
SOCIETY
Geopit for all  undergraduates, grad
students     and     faculty,     4     p.m.,
geography lounge.
CHINESE CHRISTIAN
FELLOWSHIP
Bible study, noon, SUB  212A.
AMS ART GALLERY
PROGRAMS COMMITTEE
Photosoc exhibition,  10:30 a.m. to
4:30 p.m., SUB art gallery.
PSYCHOLOGY STUDENTS'
ASSOCIATION
Guest   lecturer,   noon,   Angus   223.
SKYDIVING  CLUB
General   meeting,   noon,   SUB   215.
FOAM!
Mattresses
Bolster
Camper—Boat
Cushion
Foam Chair
Orthopedic
Wedges
Camping
Pads
MADE TO ORDER
Open Six Days a Week
9 a.m.-5:30 P.M.
United Foam 1976 Ltd.
3696 W. 4th
738-6737
CAREERS IN
BUSINESS MANAGEMENT
Back to school. Exams. Cnnstmas. More classes, more
exams and graduation. And next...
Right now you are probably thinking about the past several
years and what you have to look forward to after graduation.
While you're at it, consider the personal growth and satisfactions you could experience at Procter & Gamble — a leader in
the consumer products industry. We regard training and
development as our most basic responsibility because we
promote strictly from within Procter & Gamble We knew of no
way to train people to become managers other tnan to have
them learn by doing
Economics, history, psychology — our managers include
diverse backgrounds. More important than your specific field
of study are such basics as intelligence, leadership ability,
innovativeness. and a solid track record of achievement.
Prior to on-campus interviews, representatives from Marketing. Finance, and Sales will be visiting your campus to answer
questions and talk about their experiences at Procter &
Gamble. Specific date, place and time will be advertised soon
in this newspaper and at your placement office. The visit will
be a one-day informal session in which all interested students
can learn more about career opportunities in business
management at Procter & Gamble.
As a first step, we invite you to visit your placement office and
obtain a copy of our literature. Additional information is also
available in the library file in the placement office.
Plan to be at our pre-recruiting session — no appointment
necessary, drop in any time.
Nov. 16 - Graduate Student Centre
The Garden Room, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.
PROCTER & GAMBLE
C\r\DIA TAVERNA
UD 3 E]EjE]E]g)E]ggB]g)gE]E]G]E]G] E]ggg]gE]E]E]gE]E|E]E]E]ggG]gE]gB]
19
IS
IS
IS
IS
ia
d 4510 W. 10th Ave., Open 7 Days a Week 4 p.m.-2 a.m. |
13 (srsBBIalalatslBratsrslslslalstslalalslaSlsta [aralalHlslalalaSlararals '
FAST FREE PIZZA DELIVERY
Call 228-9512/9513
Don't forget      /
\
CA. STUDENTS-VICTORIA
Thorne Riddell & Co.
We are seeking 1977 graduates for our Victoria
Office.
To arrange for an interview, please mail an original or
photocopy of your Application for Employment
form (available from the U.B.C. Placement Office) or
resume by November 15 to:
Personnel Partner
Thorne Riddell & Co.
305 - 645 Fort Street
Victoria, B.C.
V6W 1G2
\
Interviews on campus will be conducted November
26. All applications will be acknowledged prior to
that date.
THE CLASSIFIEDS
RATES:   Campus — 3 lines, 1 day $1.50; additional lines 35c.
Commercial — 3 lines,  1 day $2.50; additional lines
50c. Additional days $2.25 and 45c.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone and are payable in
advance. Deadline is 11:30 a.m. the day before publication.
Publications Off ice, Room 241, S.U.B., UBC, Vancouver.
10 — For Sale — Commercial      ;  35 — Lost
FRAME IT YOURSELF — complete instructions — Do-It-Yourself Picture
Framing — 3657 West Broadway —
open   til 9:00 p.m. Thursday.
40 — Message*
OUTDOOR EQUIPMENT. Down sleeping bags, ski wear, cross country skis,
packs, general equipment for tbe
traveller available at low prices from
the C.Y.H.A. members hostel shop,
1406 West Broadway, Vancouver.
Phone 738-3128. Open during the week
until 7:00 p.m., Saturdays until 5:00
p.m.
50 — Rentals
70 — Service*
Community   Sports
November Specials
Reduced Prices for — Ice
Skates, Hockey Gloves, Converse Runners, Ski Jackets,
Track Suits, Adidas, Roms,
Rugby Shirts, Racquets of
all kinds, and many other
items.
3616 W. 4th Ave., 733-1612
80 — Tutoring
GOOD STUDENT without Calculus
urgently needs tutor for chem. 205.
I need someone who can teach, and
who understands kinetics and thermo
dynamics. Can negotiate fee. Please
call Mike, 228-8307 evenings.
85 — Typing
PROFESSIONAL typing on IBM correcting typewriter by experienced
secretary.   Reasonable.   224-1567.
FAST EFFICIENT TYPIN6, near 41*t k
Marine — 286-5059.
11 — For Sale — Private
HELPI THE MOB IS AFTER MEI I need
money fast! Sell 1971 FIAT 128 with
1974 running gear. Properly modified
1300 with Anza header exhaust, lowered, Shelby mags, Hella fog, driving,
and headlights, Sanyo quad tapedeck,
Ueglia gauges. Raid wheel and much
more. Just tested. Invested over $4000.
Sell $1300. Very firm. 926-7071, Peter.
196? VW BUG. Runs well, city tested.
Extras, $1000 or O.B.O. 224-6072.
1970 TOYOTA COROLLA S.W.', 4-speed.
35 m/gal. Cheap insurance. Good condition. $1000 o.b.o. Phone 224-4331,
local 387 or 274-5272 after 5:00 p.m.
30 - Jobs
TELEPHONE SALES. Evening shift,
5:00-9:00 p.m. Monday to Thursday,
10,-00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. Saturday.
Salary plus bonuses. Call 734-2613 —
2:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m.
EFFICIENT    SELECTRIC    TYPINO my
home. Essays, Thesis, etc. Neat accurate work. Reasonable rates! —
263-5317.
CAMPUS DROP OFF for fast accurate
typing from accurate copy. Phone
11:00  a.m. - 9:00 p.m.   731-1807.
TYPING  ON   IBM Correcting Selectric.
West End — 685-6976.
90 - Wanted
WANTED: 4th YR. Bio-chem. student
to do some bio-ehem. work. Shaz.
collect 826-3946 between 7-10 pjn.
M-F.
TEACHERS AT ALL LEVELS. Foreign
and domestic teachers. Box 1063 —
Vancouver, Wash. 98680, U.S.A.
99 — Miscellaneous
SUMMER   JOBS   THAT   PAY
FOR A LIFETIME!
Become a NAVAL RESERVE OFFICER CANDIDATE. Join now and
ensure yourself of a summer jof. IF
— you have a love for the sea —
you are willing to undergo training
for leadership — you love to travel
— you are willing to earn your way.
There are a few openings left for
male candidates: earn over $2,000
for 12 weeks of training from May
to August which will include 8 wks.
at sea. YOU MUST BE — a Canadian
Citizen — enrolled in an undergraduate course leading to a degree
— between 17 and 22 years of age.
Interested persons should phone
H.M.C.S. Discovery at M6-3J71 or
S66-3272 between 9:00 a.m. and 3:00
p.m. weekdays or 7:30 p.m. and 9:30
P.m. Tuesday & Thursday evenings.
MARPOLE WOMEN'S AUXILIARY to
Pearson Hospital wish to announce
their memo calendars are now on sale
at many retail outlets. They may also
be obtained by calling 321-8114 or by
writing to Box 58151, Vancouver, B.C.
V6P6C5.
BOGGLED   MINDS   aV   WISDOM  HEADS:
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(refundable).
lr=lr=Jr=lr=Jr=T=nr='r=ir='l
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lOECOf Thursday, November 4, 1976
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 7
Med class to grow in 79
By HEATHER WALKER
The projected date for doubling
UBC's medical school enrolment is
1979, UBC administration
president Doug Kenny said
Wednesday.
"Enrolment will rise by 20 (to
100) next fall, and by another 20 in
the next fall after that. Then we'll
go up to 160 after that," Kenny
said.
Kenny, who later described
himself as a "bounding optimist,"
also said he thought the university
would be able to build a 240-bed
campus hospital by 1979 in accordance with earlier plans.
The hospital will be built with $50
million of joint federal and
provincial funds. Funds will also
be used to improve teaching
facilities in the downtown hospitals
and for basic science facilities at
UBC.
Federal funds can only be used
until 1980.
In a report to the provincial
government last May, Kenny
anticipated the university would
begin to build the hospital last
June. He said Wednesday he does
not yet know when construction
will begin.
The report says the new facilities
will have operating expenses of $12
million a year.
And, it says: "It is a necessary
Off-beat evangelist
eyes King Kong spire
The controversial, self-ordained
Korean evangelist Sun Myung
Moon is planning to add the Empire State building to his growing
list of American real estate
holdings.
According to the Christian
Science Monitor, Moon's
Unification Church hopes to buy
the New York skyscraper — once
the world's tallest skyscraper — by
next year. The Moonies, who
already own about $20 million
worth of property in the U.S., also
plan to start a daily newspaper in
New York City some time next
year, the Monitor reports.
But, despite Moon's financial
rise in the U.S., his followers were
terming his scheduled appearance
at a rally on the Washington
Monument Grounds in
Washington, D.C. two weeks ago as
his final public appearance in the
U.S. — at least for quite a while.
Facing growing opposition in this
country, Moon plans to begin
concentrating his efforts on a new
drive to spread his movement
through Europe.
Part of the reason behind Moon's
decision to concentrate on Europe
apparently stems from the U.S.
Immigration Service's current
campaign to deport about 600 of his
Asian followers.
Immigration officials recently
ruled that Moon has been bringing
Asian followers into the U.S. not for
religious training, but to sell goods
and make money for his
organization. Most of those
scheduled to be deported are expected to move to Europe for
Moon's new recruitment drive
there.
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As for Moon's weekend appearance in Washington, the U.S.
government has estimated that it
will cost American taxpayers
about $120,000 to provide security
and clean up the Washington
Monument grounds after the rally.
Moon has been repeatedly linked to
the oppressive South Korean CIA
and has been eschewing a right-
wing political line for the U.S.
condition that the additional
academic operating costs be
assured by the government in
advance of the expansion of the
medical school."
But, Kenny said, he has still not
received a definite commitment to
provide funds for operating expenses from either education
minister Pat McGeer or health
minister Bob McClelland.
"As to details on the operating
expenses, the answer on that is
no," said Kenny.
"But Dr. McGeer has indicated
we will receive the necessary
funding."
Kenny said the university would
receive operating expenses for the
expanded medical school from
both the health and education
departments.
Kenny also said he thought the
hospital could be built for $32.5
million, the amount set aside for it
in the government's decision.
In his report, he said the
downtown hospitals would need at
least $18 million more than the $13
million set aside for them.
He said the extra money was
necessary because of a "backlog"
in money spent to improve the
medical teaching facilities in B.C.
Kenny said the additional funds
were needed to produce a "first
class medical facility."
AMS urges restricted Pit
From page 1
to stop rowdiness and vandalism
on campus.
Hutchinson said he will have to
see the Pit in operation with the
proposed changes before he
decides oh their effectiveness.
Among the proposed changes are
a shortening of hours of operating,
a reduction of seating capacity and
the introduction of waiters.
Hutchinson thinks the seating
capacity in the Pit is inadequate,
AMS treasurer Herb Dhaliwal said
Wednesday.
"The Pit was never intended to
turn out the way it has," Dhaliwal
said. "It turned out to be a rowdy
place. The original application said
it was to be a quiet, congenial
place."
Dhaliwal said Hutchinson told
the student administration commission Tuesday the student
representative assembly must
decide whether to reopen the Pit,
because the SRA closed it.
In other booze news, the student
representative assembly voted
Wednesday to establish an advisory committee to study liquor
use on campus.
The SRA will appoint Byron
Hender, UBC financial aid officer,
Morley Beiser from the university
administration, John Swianson and
Hector Mackay-Dunn from the
student administrative commission and two as yet unnamed
SRA members to the committee.
The committee will submit its
findings and conclusions to the
SRA.
And the SRA voted Wednesday to
reverse its earlier decision to pay
student Pit workers half their
wages for time lost during the Pit
closure.
Instead the workers will receive
full wages.
Carol Lim, representing 50 Pit
workers, told the SRA that the
workers had lost $4,416 in wages
since Oct. 20. She said the group
was already low paid and was now
suffering   considerable  hardship.
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Paper nixes offer
WATERLOO (CUP) — Staff
members of The Chevron,
student newspaper at the
University of Waterloo, have
rejected a federation offer to
resume financing the paper if the
staff selected an interim editor.
Chevron news editor Henry
Hess said Chevron staffers —
who have been publishing the
Free Chevron without federation
funds for a month since the
federation suspended the paper
— rejected the offer because
"they don't believe it is in any
sense a compromise" of the
council's original position.
The federation decided at a
Sunday meeting it would resume
funding the paper if its staff could
produce an editor until the
federation and the staff can agree
on a regular salaried editor at a
future council meeting.
But Hess said staffers are
sucking to their original demand
that the paper be immediately
reinstated as the student-funded
campus paper and that two
editors fired by the federation be
rehired with full compensation.
Hess said the Free Chevron will
be published again Friday
despite cash flow problems, and
will be typeset at its regular shop.
Hess said the Free Chevron
staff is gaining support, and
added several petitions are
circulating on campus demanding the resignation of federation
president Shane Roberts and
reinstatement of the paper.
The federation executive cut
off funds to the paper Sept. 24
after Chevron editor Adrian
Rodway resigned and complained he had suffered political
pressure from some staff
members.
An emergency council meeting
overturned the executive
decision action, but four days
later reversed its decision after a
special edition of The Chevron
denounced the executive action.
Federation members have
charged that members of a
campus political group, the Anti-
Imperiahst Alliance, are trying
to take over the paper.
But Chevron staffers deny the
charge, and continue to publish
the Free Chevron, without
student funds, from the
newspaper office, which they
continue to occupy after being
ordered to vacate it.
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1 Page 8
THE        UBYSSEY
Thursday, November 4, 1976
UBC's poor facilities
confine handicapped
to limited areas
By CHARLIE MICALLEF
UBC's inferior facilities for
people confined to wheelchairs are
to be the subject of an investigation
by a president's committee
established Tuesday.
Dick Shirran, chairman of the
six-man committee and director of
student services, said the first
meeting of the committee to explore the concerns of the handicapped at UBC looked at the need
for upgrading of facilities for and
communication with the handicapped.
"Some students with disabilities
simply can't enter some buildings.
And because of a lack of communication, some don't know of
existing facilities to aid them,".
Shirran said.
Paul Thiele, head of the Crane
library for the blind, said
physically handicapped students,
unlike blind students, are not
organized at all.
He estimates UBC has about 15
wheelchair students but no records
are kept by either health services
or the registrar about their
numbers or medical needs.
"Right now a great majority of
buildings on campus are not accessible to wheelchairs. Not only is
it a mobility problem, it limits the
number and nature of courses a
handicapped student can   take."
Thiele said there has been no
concerted effort to date to make
proposals for improving handicap
facilities.
"If you wanted to get militant
about it, the AMS has been
fraudulently raking in fees from
handicapped students who are not
getting the full services they've
paid for."
He said many doors around
campus are too heavy for a
wheelchair student to handle,
special washroom facilities are
minimal, club areas in SUB are
difficult to get to and even the Pit
"is the shits to get to from a handicapped person's point of view."
Thiele said most of the existing
ramp entrances are out-of-the-way
service entrances used by delivery
trucks. But he said facilities are
poor because much of UBC was
built before accessibility laws were
passed.
Ida Curtis, resource person for
the handicapped at Simon Fraser
University, said Wednesday "UBC
is quite bad when it comes to
mobility for the handicapped."
"SFU's campus is about 95 per
cent accessible. There are only two
buildings which might cause
trouble, but even they are specially
equipped to accommodate the
impaired," Curtis said.
Curtis said SFU is better adapted
for paraplegics than UBC because
the campus is smaller and much of
the area is covered. SFU was built
after building regulations concerning the handicapped became
provincial law.
SUB building manager Graeme
Vance said Monday SUB was
poorly designed for crippled
people.
"There are no provisions  for
CORKY'S
access to the auditorium, no
special telephones on the main
floor and no special washrooms on
either the second or basement
levels," Vance said.
Vance said the SUB elevator
could be used in wheelchair cases
but even that might pose problems.
"In the event of an emergency,
say a fire, what would happen?
Elevators are usually cut off
during fires," he said.
Vance said renovations to accommodate the handicapped
should be made.
Shirran said the newly formed
committee represents a cross-
section of the university community.
On the committee are: Paul
Thiele, Crane library head; Joyce
Searcy of the dean of women's
office; Jim Jurascic, a paraplegic
student; Josh Gruber, residence
co-ordinator for Place Vanier
Residence; Glenn Williams of the
registrar's office, Kathleen Boyle
of Health Services; and Margaret
Urquart of the Alma Mater
Society.
Shirran is chairing a meeting of
all concerned handicapped
students and interested faculty and
administration members in the
Sedgewick library conference
room Nov. 18 at 1:30 p.m.
He said the meeting should bring
into the focus the seriousness of the
plight of UBC's handicapped
population.
Elio    Azzara,     director     of
Variety's treatment centre for
children said Wednesday he is
surprised at UBC's lack of
facilities for the handicapped.
"Universities should be instrumental in setting examples for
the   rest   of   the   community,
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especially when it comes to
providing for the underprivileged," he said.
Although stringent building
requirements have been passed for
Vancouver, they do not affect
standards at UBC.
Doug Mowat, director of the
Paraplegic Association of Vancouver, said UBC is regulated by
provincial building standards
which do not include strict building
codes concerning the handicapped.
"But it is our understanding that
UBC will update its own standards
to accommodate the mobility of its
students and handicapped
visitors."
Mowat said one out of every five
people in Vancouver has mobility
problems because of physical
disabilities, old age or medical
infirmities.
He said the university should
adopt the city's new innovations —
such as graduated curbs, special
washrooms and parking facilities
— or risk being labelled
"discriminatory."
Pam Frazee, science 3, is a
wheelchair student at UBC.
The good thing about being
handicapped on campus is that
you're around young, strong people
who are willing to help you. That's
not often the case in the city," she
said.
But UBC was definitely not built
with the handicapped in mind, she
said. "There are a lot of high curbs
and even parking is a hassle. Many
of the buildings such as Math, the
Main Library and Buchanan are
nightmares. There is a conspicuous lack of special
washrooms;   all   over   campus."
She said it is about time a
committee was formed to explore
the problems of the handicapped.
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PROBLEM FACING HANDICAPPED
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difficult struggle at UBC
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APPLICATION DEADLINE: NOVEMBER 5, 1976
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