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UBC Publications

The Ubyssey Oct 30, 1979

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Array Boss denies
sexual bias
THE UBYSSEY
By GEOF WHEELWRIGHT
The manager of the Back to Eden
health food store denied yesterday
he discriminated against a gay job
applicant and charged the man attempted to seduce him after being
refused the job.
"It wasn't a hiring issue at all. It
seems like every newspaper in town
so far has written from the fag's
side. The person did not qualify for
the job, so he tried his sexual charm
on me and I didn't want it. And any
time a person comes on to me in my
store, I kick them out," owner Clifford Morris said.
He said Jonas Goldstein rolled
his eyes, licked his lips, changed his
voice and slobbered after Morris
told him he was not qualified to
work at the store.
But Mark MacDonald,
spokesman for the UBC gay/lesbian law association, said Morris'
Anti-gays
write fake
letters
It now appears UBC anti-homosexual students have jumped on the
"Lettergate" band wagon.
A Ubyssey investigation yesterday revealed that the authors of an
anti-gay letter published in the Oct.
25 Ubyssey ("Necking gays are
gross and disgusting") do not exist.
UBC's master registration list does
not include H. Johnstone, arts 3; J.
Black, law 2; or D. Knauer, science
1, the names signed at the bottom
of the letter.
Peter Druet, one of the authors
of an earlier anti-gay letter, denied
writing the Oct. 25 letter. "I have
no idea at all of who might have
sent it. That (Druet's Oct. 19 letter)
was the only letter we sent. That's
it," he said.
And Mark MacDonald, spokesman for the UBC gay/lesbian law
association, said the author(s) of
the letter might have taken their
letter-writing idea from a Social
Credit campaign manual. "But no
one has come to us directly. It looks
like they can only attack us through
the paper. If they were serious,
they'd attack us face to face," he
said.
MacDonald said he also examined the registrar's list to check the
authenticity of the names on the
Druet letter and the fake letter. He
submitted "his findings in a letter to
The Ubyssey.
k MacDonald said he has no idea
of who might have written the Oct.
25 letter.
UBC staff policy is to print almost all letters received, and to
check them for authenticity when
possible. "With the dozens of letters we get every week, it is impossible to check every one," said Ubyssey co-editor Tom Hawthorn.
The Oct. 25 letter was not checked until the UBC gay club questioned its authenticity. The letter was
written in response to an alleged
hiring discrimination incident at the
Back to Eden health food store.
The letter stated "Firstly, gays
are mentally ill. Why? Because all
men are not made to 'do it' with
other men, and secondly, because
gays do propose to non-gays. It is
totally wrong and gross to see two
men necking or whatever."
The fake letter and the Druet letter began a deluge of letters to The
Ubyssey in support of the gays' position. The law association is still
disputing the Back to Eden hiring
issue.
denial and charges were typical
methods of covering up discrimination on the basis of sexual
preference. He said Goldstein was
qualified for the position, but was
told "as an afterthought" that one
of the job qualifications was to be
"straight."
"This is a usual tactic used by
employees who want to get rid of
people who they think are gay. First
they say the person is not qualified,
and then they say the person made a
pass at them."
MacDonald said students should
boycott the store at 2290 West 4th
Ave. to put pressure on Morris to
reverse his hiring policy. "It's
basically UBC students who support the store, so if they stopped it
would put pressure on the store,"
he said.
But Morris said he does not
believe the call, for a boycott will
have much effect on his business.
"Most people that are into
healthy food and healthy exercise
also have healthy minds and won't
be bothered by it (the hiring incident). I'm running a store here, I'm
trying to get people healthy."
And he said he is not bothered by
gay activist picket lines in front of
his store. The Gay Alliance Toward
Equality first picketed Back to
Eden on Sept. 29.
"They've already done it a couple of times," said Morris. "As
long as they (the picketers) don't
bother the customers, 1 don't mind.
They are a minority and are trying
to get legalized."
Goldstein originally took his case
to the B.C. human rights branch
but was told there was insufficient
evidence for a case. But a human
rights branch spokeswoman, who
declined to be identified, said Morris had actually practised
discrimination.
But she said that under the current human rights code it is impossible to make a legal case against him.
"An employer could say 'are you
gay?' and there is nothing prohibiting them from asking that
question. But unless the information is used there's nothing we can
do about it.
"But if the applicant is told that
their sexual orientation is why they
didn't get the job, we can deal with
it."
She said any person who is asked
about their sexual orientation during a job interview should ask the
interviewer what it has to do with
their job qualification.
The Goldstein incident has sparked a flurry of letters to The Ubyssey
supporting both sides of the argument.
Vol. LXII, No. 21
Vancouver, B.C. Tuesday, October 30,1979
SUBSTANDARD WINTRY TEMPERATURES did not deter courageous collegians from braving damp outdoors in summery attire. This warm-thinking woman tried to recreate balmier beach weather by wearing sandals.
Intrepid photographer Yvan Fortin staked out only pool of rainwater remaining on campus and waited patiently for
summer neophyte to puddle through, then almost spoiled effect by trying to steal photo for foot-fetishist friend.
Trident protesters arrested
By STEVE REILLY
Civil disobedience at the Trident
nuclear submarine base in Bangor,
Wash. Sunday resulted in 100 arrests.
And four protesters in Pittsburgh
were arrested while parading with
the UBC-designed "Trident
monster."
About 3,000 people took part in
Sunday's demonstration, and 125
people were planning to go over the
fence on Monday, said Roy Macfarlane, a member of the Pacific
Life Community. "At least one
Canadian group has already gone
over for certain," he said.
About 100 people were arrested,
including 15 Canadians, and another 200 people are still supporting
those who entered the base, said a
spokeswoman for the Ground Zero
anti-nuclear group.
' 'Those who were arrested will be
arraigned in Seattle and will probably appear in court in six months.
There has been no violence whatsoever," she said. "But the people
who have been arrested were handcuffed and had their ankles
bound."
The demonstration is part of a
series of anti-nuclear protests across
the U.S., said Macfarlane. "Ademonstration on Wall Street forced the
police to come in with horses and
arrest 500 people. The protesters resisted passively, and no one was injured," he said.
The Ground Zero spokeswomar.
said arrests were made at protests in
California, Connecticut and Wisconsin. She added three people
were arrested at the General Dynamics headquarters in St. Louis,
Mo., where protesters held a "die
in," by playing dead lying on the
ground.
In Pittsburgh, Penn. four protesters were arrested while carrying
the Trident monster, a protest symbol designed by UBC fine arts professor Herb Gilbert.
"The monster is made out of 408
sheets of black plastic on bamboo
poles, each of which symbolizes one
of the 408 missiles carried by the
Trident submarine," Gilbert said
Monday.
The theme of the Bangor protest
was one of Peace Conversion, said
the  Ground   Zero  spokeswoman.
'Planned paper probe unprofessional'
By VERNE McDONALD
A newspaper is scheduled to appear on campus Nov. 1 advertising career opportunities for
graduating students. But the manager of
UBC's student placement office doesn't want
College Probe at UBC.
"I'm not at all interested in it," Maureen
Gilchrist, Canada employment centre and student placement office manager, said Monday.
"(The publishers of) College Probe are a very
unprofessional bunch."
The tabloid, published by a private company
located in Paradise, Nfld., is scheduled to be
distributed from the employment centre in
Brock Hall.
Gilchrist said she was told permission had
been granted for the paper to be dumped at
Brock Hall.
Who   gave   the   permission   is   unclear.
Peter Young, managing director of Probe
Publishers Inc., claims permission was granted
by the presidents of all universities where College Probe would be distributed.
But Elaine Dawn, secretary to administration vice-president Erich Vogt, said Monday
the paper's request for distribution was passed
on to Alma Mater Society president Brian
Short three months ago.
But Short said he had no recollection of any
such request.
"We have jurisdiction only over distribution
in SUB," he said. "The rest of campus is up to
them (the administration)."
Short said the AMS as a rule does not allow
private publications to be distributed free in its
jurisdiction and the administration "usually
says 'no' to that kind of thing."
"If the paper was to be distributed only
through the employment centre then the
manager of the centre would make the final
decision," he said.
But Gilchrist said she did not favor distribution of College Probe. "I agreed because I
received a recommendation from the administration," she said. "I'm not convinced
they have a reputable service at all."
Dawn denied that the president's office gave
permission to College Probe for distribution
on campus. She said the office took no further
part in the process after they passed the question on to Short.
"We saw nothing on it after sending it to the
AMS president," said Dawn. "Perhaps he
might have lost or misplaced it (the correspondence)."
"I don't remember it crossing my desk,"
said Short. "But I forget a lot."
Canadian University Press, a cooperative
organization representing more than 60 student newspapers, has charged that College
Probe will adversely affect the advertising
revenues of campus publications.
"All student newspapers run career opportunities ads from local as well as national
sources and will be adversely affected by any
private publication dumping on campus," said
CUP president Maureen McEvoy. Page 2
THE   U BYSS EY
Tuesday, October 30,1979
Students
wreck old
beach plans
Students are finally getting involved with the planning on the
Wreck beach erosion project.
Some geography 315 students are
currently preparing a proposal for
the stabilization of the Wreck beach
cliffs to be presented at a public
meeting on Nov. 10.
"We thought that there was a lot
in the Swan Wooster engineering
company's plan that neglected the
human viewpoint," said geography
student Don Golob.
The proposal is not a critique but
an alternative plan, Golob said. He
added the students' plan is more environment-oriented .
But Judy Williams, vice-chairman of the Wreck beach committee, said the students' ideas are
nothing new.
And she cautioned that the haste
with which the brief was put together could be dangerous. "You
can't put together an in-depth report in just a week," Williams said.
Board of governors member
Stanley Weston said he is pleased
with the students' interim brief.
Weston, who was appointed by the
board to investigate the Swan
Wooster plan, said he was happy to
get input from the students. The
public meetings were designed to
encourage as much input from as
many people as possible, he said.
Senior geography instructor Margaret North said preparing the proposal is a very good project for the
students.
And geology professor Wilbert
Danner said he doesn't see any reason to spend money on the project.
Illlllllllllll
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| OPTIC
/ ZONE
Student Discounts
ARBUTUS VILLAGE
733-1722
FAITH, SCIENCE
and the FUTURE
Christian discussion of the role of science
and technology in society is prompted in
part by people's growing awareness of the
ambiguity of their use. On one hand, we are
conscious of the costs and risks of their application, there are also deeper questions
about the search for scientific "truth" and
its relationship to what the church holds to
be "truth".
We hope to examine some of
these issues in a four-week
series called "Faith, Science
and the Future".
November 1 — "Scientific
Education", Dr. Karl Erdman,
U.B.C. Physics Dept.
November 8 — "The Production and Use of Scientific
Knowledge", Dr. Edwin Levy,
U.B.C. Philosophy Dept.
November 15 — "The Relationship between Science
and Religion", Dr. Jim
Berger, U.B.C. Zoology
Dept., and Gail Berger,
former U.B.C. lecturer.
November 22 — "The Role
of Science and Technology
and the Quality of Life", Dr.
Hugh Dempster, U.B.C.
Computer Science Dept.
THURSDAYS, 12:30
at the
LUTHERAN CAMPUS
CENTRE
5885 University Blvd.
Careers
■II
Career Choices
A Workshop for Women Students
Six Weekly Sessions Will Help You:
1) Assess where you are now in life
2) Clarify your values and interests
3) Identify your work skills
4) Apply this knowledge in defining a career
direction
5) Develop resume writing and exploratory interview skills
SESSION I:
DATES:November 6 - December 4
(Tuesdays)
SESSION II:
DATES:November 7 - December 5
(Wednesdays)
TIME:    12:30 - 1:30 p.m.
PLACE: 301 Brock Hall
REGISTER AT THE FIRST SESSION.
JUST COME! ENQUIRIES 228-2415.
Sponsored by the Women Students' Office.
OFFICE OF THE AUDITOR GENERAL
PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
CHALLENGING
AUDIT CAREERS
VICTORIA
The Office of the Auditor General of British Columbia has been established with broad authority
to carry out an independent examination of
management controls, expenditures and
revenues, and the accounts of the Government
and various Crown Corporations and public
bodies. A comprehensive report on the results
of these examinations will be made annually to
the Legislative Assembly.
Creation of this new organization presents career
opportunities in Victoria with unique respon-
sibiities and potential for advancement in a
growth environment.
We require students with B.Comm. (Accounting
major), or a licentiate in accounting, wishing to
register as C.A. students with the Institute of
Chartered Accountants of British Columbia, to
join the Office as Audit Assistants. Interested
students majoring in other subjects are also invited to apply.
We offer a comprehensive and attractive compensation package to successful candidates.
Interested students should contact the Manager
at the Canada Employment Centre on Campus,
telephone 228-4011, for further information.
Illilllllllllllllllll
■
i
THE ROYAL BANK will be on campus
November 28th and 29th, 1979 interviewing students for our Branch Administration Officer and Consumer
Loans Officer Training Programs.
Applications should be submitted to the
Canada Manpower Centre on Campus
when arrangements can be made to attend an interview.
Interested students are also invited to
attend a Career Presentation on
November 7th at 12:30 p.m.
TH E ROYAL BAN K O F CANADA
Have You Considered
A CAREER IN
TEACHING?
Simon Fraser University's Faculty of Education invites applications from qualified students wishing to attend a one
year (three semester) Professional Development Program
leading to teacher certification in British Columbia. The
program begins in January, 1980 and is divided into equal
components of practical experience in school classrooms
and university coursework and seminars.
If you have completed two or more years of academic study
at a college or university by January 1, 1980, you may want
to find out more about our program.
Faculty admission's personnel will be available at the
Academic Advice Centre at Simon Fraser University on
Wednesday, October 31 from 2:30 to 4:30 p.m. and Thursday, November 1, from 5:30 to 8:00 p.m. Appointments
are not necessary.
Applications may be obtained by writing immediately to:
The Registrar,
Simon Fraser University,
Burnaby, B.C.
V5A 1S6
For further information on the Program,
please telephone 291-3620.
' nLBeRTa Gas TRUNK UNe
The Alberta Gas Trunk Lme Company
will be on campus November 19. 20 &
21 to recruit graduates in the following disciplines for positions within
the Calgary Head Office:
Mechanical Engineering
Metallurgical Engineering
Electrical Engineering
Civil Engineering
Computer Science
(Applied Mathematics)
Commerce
(Accounting Ma)orsl
Pre-screening deadline is November
2: for additional information, please
inquire at the Campus Manpower Office
v:
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THE    UBYSSEY
Page 3
Technology key to B.C.'s future'
British Columbians must roll up
their sleeves and prepare for the future by developing secondary industries instead of pining for the
simpler life of yesterday, education
minister Pat McGeer said Friday.
McGeer told about 300 people at
a UBC science conference that the
proposed research parks will expand the development of the province and provide prosperity for all
citizens.
"We've got an important task in
the future to try and produce a
coming generation of citizens who
are understanding of science and
technology which will do so much
to shape our future," McGeer said.
The education ministry has taken
initiatives to achieve its objectives
and has high hopes for the discovery parks concept, he said.
McGeer said gifted scientists have
not had the opportunity of working
in Canada, while the research parks
will do much to stop the "brain
drain."
"If you examine the way we have
structured the opportunities for
young people you will realize we
haven't provided the equivalent opportunity that Thomas Edison had
in his laboratory."
The research park will also provide an opportunity for the development of secondary industries
in B.C., McGeer said.
"I mention this to give you some
insight of gains that can be made by
Canadians if young scientists remain here."
Undergraduate and graduate
students will have an opportunity to
apply their gifts and the elementary
and secondary school system can do
much to inspire students, he said.
McGeer said he would like to see
"children reach the frontiers of science at a younger age."
'Uranium ruins lives'
By GLEN SANFORD
The Social Credit government
should declare a moratorium on
uranium exploration in B.C., an
anti-nuclear spokesman said Friday. -  -
John Moelaert told 25 students in
SUB auditorium that current
regulations governing uranium exploration are "grossly inadequate."
He said an immediate moratorium
should have been called when the
royal commission investigation on
uranium mining began.
The situation is similar to that of
the DC-10s that were grounded until the enquiry into their safety was
completed, said Moelaert, a
spokesman for the Canadian Coalition for Nuclear Responsibility.
"The B.C. government is more
concerned with the interests of mining companies than the interests of
the people."
The (royal commission's) interim
report clearly states that uranium
exploration is not safe. It's
ridiculous that exploration is allowed to go on without adequate safety
standards."
Moelaert said he felt the major
danger in uranium exploration is
that the drilling or trenching involved can pollute water for drinking or
irrigation.
He expressed concern for the
royal commission's technical hearings which are presently taking
place in Vancouver.
"They miss the main point," he
said. "The main point is whether or
not uranium mining is in the public
interest. But they aren't answering
that question."
But he said his main concern for
the hearings are "the little public
and media interest shown.
"The greatest threat to society is
apathy. We lull into this apathy
with disco and other things like
that. It's like having a party on a
sinking ship."
As an example of lack of public
concern Moelaert pointed out that
only 25 people were present.
"People just aren't seeing the
writing on the wall," he said.
More people should be concerned
with the issue of uranium mining
because it opens the door to nuclear
power, he said.
•nford photo
NAPPING STUDENT ABSORBS copious amounts of boring material for mid-term exam by osmosis. Current
medical theory of knowledge absorption, known as "big sponge theory," indicates higher success rate for
students who sleep on their notes. Another current theory suggests students copy notes on inside of eyelids and
find exam answers simply by closing eyes. Professors should be wary of students sleeping during their exams.
Injuries won't halt T-Cup chariots
The annual engineering-
agriculture chariot race will continue despite injuries sustained by a
student in this year's event.
Agriculture student Scott Wright
was taken by ambulance to Vancouver General Hospital during
Thursday's race. Hospital staff put
Wright under observation with a
suspected concussion, but released
him after he was pronounced fit.
But there are no plans to cancel
or control future races, administration vice-president Erich Vogt said
Monday.
"I know that some races have
gotten out of hand in the past but
the administration is not a police
force and I don't think students
would appreciate it if we hired a lot
of police to ring the field," he said.
He added it would be better if the
deans of the two faculties talked to
the undergraduate societies. "I
hope for reasonable attitudes from
the students," Vogt said. "And any
-problem should be settled by rational discussion."
The engineering faculty does not
plan to speak to the engineering
undergraduate society, said
associate dean Axel Meisen.
Facilities handicap accessibility f er some
By RORY MUNRO
B,
'RUCE   GILMOUR   WAS   LOST   IN   A
maze of concrete planters outside
Buchanan Tower.
"I could tell by the echoes off
Buchanan that maybe I was a little
too close," said Gilmour a UBC
arts student who lost his eyesight
two years ago.
"People always ask about my
sixth sense. Well what can I say . .
my other senses have become
more developed."
Gilmour said people cut in front
of him when they could take a few
extra steps or just wait a few
moments.
"My stick gets caught between
their legs and then I have to find
it. What's worse is people that
hold unions (conversations) on the
sidewalk and when they see me
coming they say, 'We're standing
here.'
"This means 1 have to get off
the curb and go around and then
get back over the curb onto the
sidewalk. I don't think they're
malicious, just not educated.
"People try to be so nice but
sometimes they just don't have
any idea. Like if someone walks
with me to the bookstore and tells
me we are standing in front of it.
Here, there or where?"
An information guide for han
dicapped students put out by the
counselling centre lists the special
services offered such as
mobility/orientation, information
on accessibility to buildings and
classrooms, housing, parking,
timetabling and preregistration,
interpreters and guides and equipment resources such as a special
teletype telephone for the deaf
and special library services.
But   political   science  student
Tim Louis is one wheelchair stu
dent who got lost in the shuffle.
Louis transferred to UBC from
Langara College and did not
know about some of the services
available to the handicapped, such
as preregistration.
"There's nothing telling you if
you register late that some
buildings  are  inaccessible."
"A
.T   FIRST   A   CLASSROOM
was accessible but then the room
got changed to biology hut B
which is inaccessible. The prof
told me to take it in the evening."
Louis says what is available to
others should be available to him
as he is paying tuition like everyone else. He went to see Erich
Vogt, faculty and student affairs
vice-president, about the problem.
"That was inaccessible too, because I had to go over three
stairs," Louis said. But he said he
/tosaa^
saw Vogt and the class is now accessible.
"The University of Victoria is a
dream compared to UBC for accessibility," Louis said. "All
buildings are accessible for physically and visually handicapped
students." Braille on doorknobs is
one of the unique building designs
in use at UVic.
He said signs are poor at UBC
and more visual direction is needed to find out which entry is acces-
ible. "It's just so slow, it might
take half an hour to find an accessible entry by the time you've
gone around the whole building."
Louis said an accessibility study
of the buildings on campus compiled by the counselling centre was
unclear and had vague descriptions.
"Curb access on the campus is
good, although some ramps are a
bit steep and in wet weather the
belts on my electric wheel chair
just don't grab," he said.
Paul Jones, a wheelchair student who has received a bachelor
and master's degree in English at
UBC, is disappointed with the improvement of accessibility over
the years.
"In the.bookstore there's three
stairs that make it inaccessible. It
seems to me it would be easy to
build a ramp.
Buchanan is accessible on the
See page 7: HANDICAPPED Page 4
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, October 30,1979
Let's get show on the ramp
It's a wet, dreary day and you're late
for class. You're loaded down with
books and can already picture your prof
spewing at the mouth on the other side
of campus. Rain is trickling down your
hair and you just don't seem to be moving too quickly. At first you decide to
skip the class, then suddenly you say
"oh what the hell" and run across the
slippery grass, dash up some steep stairs
and plunk yourself into a seat.
Not every UBC student is lucky
enough to have that choice.
Handicapped students at UBC are
faced daily with problems many people
never even consider — entry into
buildings, a search for accessible
washrooms and ramps for easier mobility,  a battle with steep passageways.
curbs, cluttered walkways, confusing
corners, turns and hostile surroundings.
How many students watch as a blind
student, dazed by incorrect directions,
and unfamiliar ground slowly moves
across campus unassisted?
How many students, too preoccupied
with getting to their own class, fail to
stop and help a handicapped student
ease his or her path? Often all it takes is
a descriptive, explanatory answer to a
question, a quick direction or guiding a
wheelchair over a stubborn curb. Clearing away a desk and some chairs can
make all the difference in helping a student in a wheelchair through a doorway.
Reading a book aloud to a blind student
or taking notes for another can ease a
considerable load.
In fact, everybody at UBC could be
doing a helluva lot more to ease the
burden of handicapped students on this
campus.
The administration should be making
accessibility to handicapped students a
far more committed priority. There is no
acceptable reason why a student in a
wheelchair who pays the same tuition as
anyone else, should be barred from taking a desired course because the
building is inaccessible.
The counselling centre's information
guide on mobility/orientation for handicapped students is a good start but
there's so much more that could be
done. More visual direction and clearly
marked signs are clearly needed. UBC
should follow the example of the University of Victoria and include braille on
doorknobs. Washrooms in all campus
buildings should have facilities for the
handicapped and every extended flight
of stairs should have an adjoining ramp.
Without acknowledging the need for
better accessibility and making much-
needed changes soon, we might as well
slam UBC's doors shut and say scram to
handicapped students.
'Bourgeois Pigs' are no running dog fools
On behalf of the West End Bourgeois Pigs, f wish to lodge a formal
protest directed towards the UBC
intramural society's handling of the
Arts 20 race. Before 1 sharpen my
sword it should be noted that the
organizers performed a commendable job in the preparation and general marshalling of the race. Our
gripe concerns the autocratic manner in which our winning team was
disqualified.
Last Thursday, the West End
Bourgeois Pigs participated in the
60th anniversary of the running of
the Arts 20 race. We won by a sizable margin. Subsequently, we were
disqualified because we won by
"too much." That, however, was
not the official explanation.
Groping for quasi-logical reasons,   intramural   director   Nestor
Korchinsky, chuckled, and maintained that the WEBPs were not affiliated with a recognized fraternity
or faculty. Come on Nestor, that
excuse is an insult to your intelligence. It would be unfair to openly
speculate who actually influenced
the decision of Mr. Korchinsky, despite our intuitive suspicions. The
fact remains it was Mr. Korchinsky
who took the actions, so it is he who
reaps the blame.
Mr. Korchinsky, with elated
pride, points out the fact that 95
teams entered the race this year and
88 teams crossed the finish line. I'm
not aware of the actual figures, but
1 would consider myself extremely
naive to assume there are 95 recognized faculties, teams and fraternities existing on this campus. 1
would surmise that a large number
'AMS hacks spew hypocritical
hype against campus apathyy
The student leaders of the Alma
Mater Society are in no position to
complain about apathy among their
fellow students. For the attitude of
the AMS towards the administration's plan for an industrial research park on campus land has
been an apathetic resignation far
more severe than anything exhibited
by UBC students.
In the wake of the student concerns day, AMS external affairs officer Valgeet Johl bemoaned the
lack of student interest in crucial
issues. Yet the same Valgeet Johl, in
unison with other AMS officers,
has accepted the construction of the
industrial park as an accomplished
fact and is unwilling to even look
into the dubious circumstances
leading up to the decision to build
such a park.
Is not environmental destruction
in our own backyard a "crucial issue?" Those who denounce apathy
in one breath and turn around and
practise it in the next, are hypocrites
at best.
Are any other UBC students concerned about the destruction of the
UBC woods? I am interested in getting in touch with them. Contact me
at the address below.
Kevin Annett
anthropology
4663 West 11th Ave.
Vancouver, B.C.
V6R 2M6
Give us options
The student body has a right to
know what is being said about the
SUB gallery in regards to moving
the Lethe bar into the gallery. As of
yet, no attempt has been made by
the UBC paper to fulfill its responsibility and inform the students as
to what is being proposed — please
do so.
Kathy Kenvy
ot these teams were comprised of
students whose sole purpose was to
participate and have some fun. A
purpose emulated by the WEBPs.
Obviously these teams had no official affiliation, other than the common tie of being registered UBC
students. Why were they not disqualified, Nestor?
The WEBPs represent an innocuous group of UBC students who decided to rise from our posteriors
and participate (an obscene word to
many UBC students). Our aim was
to have a fun time, and it naturally
follows that winning heightens the
fun.
We abided by the rules laid out in
the entry forms, and consequently
we were shafted. Entry forms had
to be submitted one week prior to
the race. This was the time, after
viewing the entry forms, to disqualify a team. Not five minutes after
eight guys bust their guts winning
the race. To quote Mr. Korchinsky,
"there would have been no problem
if you guys had finished third."
Meaning what Nestor?
After several approaches to Korchinsky espousing our disagreements with his unilateral decision of
disqualification, he changed his
tactic.  Being a reasonably intelli
gent man (?), he abandoned his first
excuse with respect to recognized
affiliation, and then whined that we
were seasoned runners, and this was
not conducive to the ideal of "the
spirit of the race." Rubbish! True,
we had a number of adept runners
on our team, but we did not consist
of varsity track team members.
1 would like to point out to Mr.
Korchinsky that the training regimen of the rowing club consists of a
rigorous running program. Why do
you think they've won the damn
race for the last umpteen years?
(Excluding last year.) Why should
fitness be penalized in an athletic
event? It's ludicrous. It appears the
intramural body believes in applying different rules to suit the situation as they perceive it, and are not
beyond inventing new rules.
On the subject of the phantom
rule concerning fraternity or faculty
affiliation, let's delve in a little further. If this rule is going to be enforced, the very least you could do
is to enforce it on a consistent basis.
Mr. Korchinsky, do you realize one
of the top place teams recruited an
SFU student to run for them? (An
especially unforgiveable sin, being
Shrum Bowl week.) 1 could cite a
multitude of similar antics that took
place in the recruitment of team
members, but the list would run on
ad nauseum.
In desperation the WEBPs suggested a compromise to Mr. Korchinsky. We proposed the recognition of two first-place teams, but
even this attempt at reasonableness
was flatly rebuked.
The option was available to us to
enter as a legitimate faculty team,
but we opted to enter as the
WEBPs. In retrospect this was a
grave error, but the intent was to
add a touch of color and mystery to
the event. However, we'll fit the
mold and play your little game.
Next year we'll conform to your
new rules, and a faculty comprised
of WEBPs, incognito, will end the
contrived domination of the UBC
rowers. Unless of course we do
anything as foolish as winning by
"too much."
David Taylor
John Hill
and six others
The West End Bourgeois Pigs
THE UBYSSEY
October 30, 1979
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the university year by the Alma Mater
Society of the University of B.C. Editorial opinions are those of the staff and not of the AMS or
the university administration. Member, Canadian University Press. The Ubyssey publishes Page
Friday, a weekly commentary and review. The Ubyssey's editorial offices is in room 241K of the
Student Union Building. Editorial departments, 228-2301; Advertising, 228-3977.
Co-Editors: Heather Conn and Tom Hawthorn
The invasion has begun from the North Shore. . . "The land whale situation is getting out of hand!" screamed Heather Conn. Grim rumors of impending
doom had filtered through to a complacent Ubyssey. "Stop the press!" bellowed a panicky Tom Hawthorn to Geof Wheelwright. "I wasn't running it — whad-
dya talking about?" "What is a land whale?" wondered Alan Favell and Steve Reitly aloud. "Only the destructive creature responsible for geography as we
know it today," said Joan Marklund smugly. Ian Stanwood, Glen.Sanford and Erica Leiren plainly don't believe in them, but Peter Menyasz does ... his
Volkswagen disappeared last night and only Julie Wheelwright knows the awful truth. She saw the huge form undulating down the street with it trapped in its
baleen. Dave Francis spotted one just the other day but Verne McDonald said it was a mountain from Colombia. Rory Munro knows better. Yvan Fortin and
Jim Steel were consumed by it the other day, screaming, "No, not back to Eden!" Kevin Finnegan tried to get photos but didn't have a wide enough lens. And
only Nancy knows the truth. . . . Tuesday, October 30,1979
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 5
'Gays will never gain total acceptance'
Homosexuality seems to be a
favorite issue around this campus,
judging by the amount of space
devoted to it in The Ubyssey every
year. The trouble is, most of what
we hear about it is completely out
of perspective. (That's the way of
getting around less palatable terms
for it.)
One example is the gay speaker
who made headlines in last Friday's
Ubyssey. One statement he made
began with: "Even though
homosexuality is accepted in
today's society ..." On what
basis is this supposed to be true?
The level of controversy over the
issue has increased, if anything.
Moral standards over all sexual
issues have certainly become more
flexible, but gays cannot boast of
now being an accepted norm.
Unfortunately, in their own acceptance of homosexuality, it seems
important to gays that society as a
whole accept it as well. Everyone
must agree that there is nothing unnatural about the act, and that, in
fact,  every individual  has within
him/herself homosexual tendencies.
Why bother with these rationalizations? People exist who are
not homosexual, who are nowhere
near homosexual, and I believe
these are in the majority. And why
fight it? Homosexuality is unnatural, as much as any oral or anal
sex, or intercourse among members
of the same sexes throughout the
animal population. If gays can't
feel good about themselves without
disputing these facts, something is
wrong.
On the other hand, there is the
viewpoint that says, "because
homosexuality is unnatural (and
gross and disgusting at that), all
gays are mentally ill." This attitude
does not take much thought. And
somewhere along the line, it's going
to fall back on whoever believes it.
One concludes that anyone who
regularly masturbates, has "kinky
sex," uses unnatural birth control
devices, etc. must be mentally ill or
least guilty of some carnal sin. It is
apparent that anyone arguing this
viewpoint must do so on a stronger
7 agree — you yre wrong'
In response to the letter "Necking Gays are Gross and
Disgusting," I would like to offer
some agreement and disagreement.
The authors state that it is
disgusting to see two men necking. I
agree, I find the sight disgusting
myself, but just because the actions
of others do not suit my tastes is no
reason to label them as wrong. I
dislike disco and the Annie Hall
look but I would hardly feel
justified in labelling all those who
disagree with me as sick.
Secondly the letter holds that
gays are not made to do it with
other men. By this I suppose they
are condemning homosexuality as
unnatural. This is also true,
homosexuality is unnatural whether
one holds the evolutionary or creationist view of nature, but it should
be also noted that such actions as
wearing clothes or thinking logically
for the ultimate
in fine coffee
and pastries
come to
0y§llins
\»S escxesso bar
are also unnatural whichever view
of nature one holds.
One may label everyone who indulges in unnatural behavior as
mentally ill but if so, the term
becomes functionally meaningless.
Thirdly, the letter holds that it is in-
credibily disgusting to be proposed
to by a member of your own sex.
Again 1 would agree but I would
like to point out that the proposee
always has the right of refusal and,
if the proposer is persistent, to slap
his face and call him fresh. 1 Vnust
admit though that the letter did present one irrefutable argument
against homosexuality: "it is just
totally wrong." Now there's an example of natural illogical thinking
for you.
Fred Banning
arts 2
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basis than merely a physical one.
As for the Back to Eden caper,
the incident was clearly in poor
taste. Any store has the right to
maintain a certain image and keep
certain standards, but when hiring
or not hiring a person hinges on
matters that are purely personal and
in no way related to the work, that
is discrimination. "Are you a fag?"
is about as relevant a question to a
person's employment as: "Do you
enjoy group sex?" "Have you had
VD within the past year?", "Do
you often speak in tongues?" or
"Did you vote NDP in the last election?"
The gay population is never going
to force society to accept its
behavior or attitudes. But too much
effort is placed in this emphasis,
and naturally people are going to
fight back. And in the end, moral
considerations are the only
legitimate arguments. In view of
this, gays should be aware that they
will never achieve total acceptance
— remember, there are even people
around who believe in abstinence.
(It's in the dictionary.)
Irene Plett
commerce 2
r
Aardvark lovers urge equality
1 have noted with interest the series of letters in
support of gays in recent editions of The Ubyssey.
It's good to see that there are a few, at least, who
speak up for the rights of minority groups, in spite of
the shameful attitudes, ill becoming students in an
academic atmosphere, that are held by some people.
I myself am a member of a minority group subject
to discrimination. Merely because of archaic, outdated moral standards those of us who prefer sex
with consenting aardvarks are bitterly persecuted. Is
it right to discriminate against people with a different
sexual preference? The answer, and all who support
the gay movement will agree, is no!
We too are trying to teach people that their inhumane and callous treatment of people different
from themselves cannot and will not be accepted by
society at large. Some people try to label us as queer,
perverted, or mentally ill, merely because we find our
sexual gratification in a manner slightly different
than the majority. With this sort of attitude how can
society progress?
After all, the practice hurts no one, as long as the
aardvark is consenting and of legal age.
The problem of gays in the area of hiring practices
are vary familiar to us. Just try to get a job, if you
admit to having sex with an aardvark.
In spite of this 1 am optimistic. Ten to 15 years ago
gays (or homosexuals, as they were known then) were
no better off than we are now. Hopefully a decade
hence "the principles of reason, rational inquiry and
measured response" will prevail
president,
UBC amrdvarks anonymous
Letter squeezes orange juice drinkers
In response to a letter outlining
prejudicial hiring procedures I am
subjected to the McDonnell and
companions' letter, which is nothing more than a composition of uninformed meaningless phrases.
Before this group labels gays
"mentally ill" they should produce
some reputable evidence to this effect. They then say gays "seem to
think there is support for gays on
this campus." I am amazed at the
power of these three people, seen in
their ability to express the opinions
held collectively by the people of
UBC. Again,, where is their
evidence for saying there is no support for gays on this campus?
The phrase, "we certainly will
not support their effort to expand
their influence," holds many possible meanings. What in the world
do they mean by the word "influ
ence?"  An: they afraid of something?
Once we cut away the unintelligible parts of the letter, which leaves
precious little, we are left with a
commendation for Desmond Morris by a group of orange juice
drinkers who "do not feel particularly generous towards gays."
Hopefully their letter will be read in
that light.
Kerry Baisley
arts 4
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DATE: OCT. 31st.
TIME: 1:00 p.m.
PLACE: ROOM 215
Student Union Building
new:
horizon's Page 6
THE   UBYSSEY
Tuesday, October 30,1979
'Tween classes
TODAY
CHINESE STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Cantonese class, noon, Buch. 220.
NEWMAN CATHOLIC CENTRE
Bible study and discussion led by Fr. Paul Ren-
nick, noon, St. Mark's College.
WOMEN'S COMMITTEE
General meeting, noon, SUB 130.
RUSSIAN CLUB
General meeting, noon, Buch. 1256.
FIRST YEAR COUNCIL CLUB
Organizational meeting, noon, SUB 207.
PRE-MED
Lecture by the assistant dean of admission,
noon, IRC 1.
UBC SCIENCE FICTION CLUB
General  meeting and discussion  on alien  project, noon, SUB 113.
AMS PROGRAMS COMMITTEE
B.C. Lions coach Vic Rapp lectures, 8 p.m., SUB
auditorium.
CHARISMATIC CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP
Prayer and sharing, noon, SUB 213.
CHRISTIAN SCIENCE ORGANIZATION
Testimony meeting, noon, SUB 224.
WEDNESDAY
CHINESE STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Mandarin (intermediate) class, noon, SUB 251.
NEWMAN CATHOLIC CENTRE
General meeting and introduction of executive,
noon, SUB 211.
BAHA'I CLUB
Informal discussion of Baha'i faith, noon, SUB
113.
WOMEN'S COMMITTEE
First meeting of the Fat is a feminist discussion
group, noon, SUB 130.
SAILING CLUB
General meeting with film, noon, SUB 207.
TM PROGRAM
Group meditation with videotape, noon, Buch.
217.
HOME EC
Pumpkin carving contest, noon, SUB plaza.
THURSDAY
UBC FORESTRY FACULTY
John Zivnuska lectures on Public policy, timber
supply and Canadian/United States forest products trade, noon, MacMillan 166.
IVCF
Stacey Woods speaks, noon, Chem. 250.
CHINESE CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP
Bill Lee speaks on The potential of an individual,
noon, SUB 207.
CHINESE STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Chinese painting workshop, noon, SUB 113.
UBC DEBATING SOCIETY
Practice debate on crown corporation ownership, noon, Buch. 204.
WOMEN'S COMMITTEE
Lesbian drop-in, 1:30 p.m., SUB 130.
LUTHERAN STUDENTS MOVEMENT
Karl Erdman speaks on Scientific education,
noon, Lutheran centre.
AQUA-SOC
General meeting with coffee and donuts, noon.
Aquatic centre.
EAST INDIAN STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
General meeting, noon, SUB 230.
AMS ART GALLERY COMMITTEE
Organizational meeting, noon, SUB 230.
NDP CLUB
Jean  Swanson,   provincial  candidate  in  May,
speaks, noon, SUB 119.
YOUNG ALUMNI CLUB
Relax to live music and bar, 8 p.m. to midnight
Cecil Green Park.
HOME EC
Obstacle race with crazy students for four-member teams, noon, SUB plaza.
FRIDAY
CHINESE STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Mandarin class (beginners), noon, Scarfe 200.
UBC DEBATING SOCIETY
General meeting, noon, SUB 215.
NEWMAN CATHOLIC CENTRE
Retreat weekend  led  by  Fr.   Bud  Pare,   call
224-3311  for information,  until Sunday,  Rosemary Heights.
Volleyball night, 7:30 to 9:30 p.m., gym A.
WOMEN'S COMMITTEE
General meeting, noon, SUB 130.
HOME EC
Boat races with milk, noon, SUB plaza.
Thyme to dance with Jade, tickets $2 in advance
and available from HEUS executive, 7:30 p.m.,
SUB ballroom.
TUESDAY
WOMEN STUDENTS' OFFICE
Career choices for women, noon, Brock 301.
Frederic Wood Theatre
OUR TOWN
By Thornton Wilder
October 26-November 3
8:00 p.m.
SPECIAL MATINEE PERFORMANCES
Tuesday, October 30 - 12:30 p.m.
Thursday, November 1 — 12:30 p.m.
Student Tickets: $2.50
BOX OFFICE * FREDERIC WOOD
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Frunch -as in Friday
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From Vancouver
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Return from Edmonton
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Canadian Universities
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RATES: Campus - 3 lines, 1 day $1.50; additional lines 36c.
Commercial - 3 lines. 1 day $3.00; additional lines
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Classified ads are not accepted by telephone and are payable in advance. Deadline is 11:30 a.m., the day before publication.
Pu&featians Office, Room241, S.U.B., USC* Van., B.C. V6T 1W&
5 — Coming Events
70 — Services
EXOTIC and domestic animals will be inexpensively priced at the First Animal Zoo
Sale.
FIRST YEAR
COUNCIL CLUB
Open to all interested 1st Year
Students. First meeting, Tues.,
Oct. 30, 12:30. Room 207-209
SUB.
For more information phone:
Kathy Ophel,
224-6158
PIANO LESSONS by Judy Alexander
graduate of Juilliard School of Music.
Member B.C. Registered Music Teacher's
Ass'n. 731-0601.
READING SKILLS. Reading, Comprehension, Retention and Speed. Plus Note Taking/Study Techniques. One Day Course.
Ideal for Students. 266-6119.
80 — Tutoring
TUTORING: German Language (Gisela) and
English Composition I Linda). Reasonable
rates. 731-0356.
85 — Typing
= 10 — For Sale — Commercial
= COMMUNITY SPORTS. Excellent prices for
— ice   skates, hockey, soccer, jogging and
— racquet sports equipment. 733-1612. 3615
— West Broadway, Vancouver, B.C.
= POSTERS, reproductions,  photo blowups,
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TYPING. Essays, theses, manuscripts,
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Electric typewriter. Call 987-3569 anytime.
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65 — Scandals
WHAT'S SO BIZARRE about the Mall Book
Book Bazaar, 850 Granville? If its the P.M,
we're open, 364 days a year.
PROGRESSIVE Pharmacists or Pharmacy
Students interested in a Co-op Pharmacy
with a feminist perspective call Melanie
736-6232.
99 — Miscellaneous
INSTANT
PASSPORT
PHOTPS
4538 W. 10th
224-9112 or 224-5858
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LOWER MALL
STUDENT UNION BUILDING
"Across from the Pit" Tuesday, October 30,1979
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 7
Handicapped have tough role
From page 3
ground floor and second floor of
the main wing but the third floor is
another story. You can take an
elevator in the office wing to the
third floor but when you try to get
back into the main wing you find
out that the office wing is offset
from the main wing by four stairs,"
Jones said.
J.
ONES    SAID    IT    IS    FRUSTRATING
when he cannot get around without
another person, like when he has to
enter the main library.
"It's a bit awkward because you
have to go in the receiving room
and interrupt someone to operate
the elevator."
A blind person has more mobility
over a physically handicapped per
son but once inside a building the
independence is gone, says Crane
library head Paul Thiele.
Thiele, himself visually impaired,
said it is alright when you are the
only person but when the elevator
stops at different floors and people
get on and off, a blind person soon
loses track.
Under a ministerial act, the B.C.
Building Code must include
building requirements for the
physically handicapped. Every new
public building must be completely
free of environmental barriers for
the blind, matching a similar law
for wheelchair accessibility.
This would mean raised letter
signage in elevators and on all
doors, and stair railings marked to
indicate changes in direction. Elevators would have characters beside
each button for identification and
each floor would be announced by a
sound system.
But Thiele said bells ringing for
every floor, even at a low decibel
level, might be sound pollution and
says a raised lettering inside the
door jamb announcing the floor
would suffice.
BLACK & LEE
TUX SHOP
NOW AT
1110 Seymour St.
688-2481
(<
w
▼  ▼   n
ITHIN  A  WEEK  ALL  OF
it was ripped off (the raised lettering) even though there were signs
saying why it was there. We can't
go into costly repairs because the
money is not available so sometimes
repairs have to be home made,"
Thiele said.
Visually handicapped students
follow general routes to get around
campus. Prior to the start of classes
in September, mobility instructors
from the Canadian National institute for the Blind come to UBC
to help the students plan their
routes.
COSTUME
CONTEST
at SUBFILMS
THURS   7:00 $1.00
FRI, SAT, SUN   7:00 9:30
Switch
blades.
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skates, you'll probably need
a monstrous, tasty burger.
15 super varieties. Plus other
great stuff. 11:30 on-7 days
a week. 2966 W. 4th Ave.
and Bayswater.
T
HERE    ARE    ABOUT    70    VISUALLY
handicapped students enrolled in
UBC day and night classes.
"Blind" can indicate a range of impairment from the ability to read
ordinary print with special glasses
to total loss of sight.
Crane library is North America's
only university-supported library
for the visually handicapped. It
provides texts and related material
on tape or in braille.
Handicapped students do not
hesitate to point out the positive
assistance of the staff, students and
faculty at UBC.
"UBC has come a long way,"
says Thiele. "But we still have more
to go."
The 1979/80 A.M.S. Art Gallery
Purchasing Committee
is now being formed. If you are interested in
purchasing Art for the A.M.S., please contact the
SECRETARY OF SAC - SUB 248
before Friday, Nov. 2/79.
BETTER BUY BOOKS
New and Used
TEXTBOOKS, QUALITY  PAPERBACKS,  ETC.
LARGEST SELECTION OF REVIEW NOTES IN B.C.
MONARCH - COLES - SCHAUMS - & OTHERS
Cash For Books—Texts, Paperbacks, Etc.
We Trade Used Pocketbooks
Located Near the Varsity Theatre at
4393 W. 10th Ave. Open 11 a.m. - 7:00 p.m.
HAIRSTYLING    ^
FOR MEN & WOMEN ^
10% Discount for all students on
hairstyling by Noolle and Terry with
presentation of this ad. Offer expires Dec. 7, 1979.
ken hippert
hair company ltd.
5736 UNIVERSITY BLVD.
(next to the Lucky Dollar
in the Village)
.DROP IN OR CALL 228-147ti
HILLEL HIGHLIGHTS
TUES. OCT. 30: Dr. Dov Friedlander
Head of Counselling, Dept. of Hebrew
University, Jerusalem
12:30    Hillel House
Falafel Lunch will be served
12:30    Hillel House
Tomato Rice Soup
Cheese &■ Tomato Sandwiches
Vegetable Spread Sandwiches
Fresh Garden Salad
WED. OCT. 31: Vegetarian Lunch Bar
~\
Have a FREE LUNCH with us. ! ! !
Bring your lunch to the Old Auditorium on Tuesday, October 30th, at 12:30 and we will play a super one hour concert for you FREE.
The U.B.C. Wind Symphony
"one of the best bands in Canada"
Also at 8:00 p.m., same place . . .
AMS CONCERTS PRESENTS
DOUG and THE SLUGS
SATURDAY NOV. 3
U.B.C. SUB BALLROOM
TICKETS
STUDENTS $3.50
GENERAL $4.50
AMS BUSINESS OFFICE
QUINTESSENCE RECORDS
GRENNAN'S RECORDS
ALL WOODWARD STORES
CONCERT BOX OFFICE - 687-2801
8:30 P.M
CITR FM 95.9 CABLE Page 8
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, October 30,1979
Mo lo—r IwBi poo«w—
Women's ice hockey turns serious
By DAVE FRANCIS
Everyone wants to be taken seriously and
the UBC women's ice hockey team is no exception.
"The attitude has been that women's varsity is a pee-wee team," said newly-appointed
coach Ralph Fraser. "The coaches weren't
serious and the performance of the team
reflected this attitude."
But Fraser is changing all that.
"Women's ice hockey will no longer be
condescended to," he said. "We are a varsity
team and are proud to be representing the
university."
In the three years UBC has been a member
of the Vancouver senior women's league,
there has been little emphasis on the basics,
he said. "I've had to start from scratch, con
centrating on passing, puck control,
backchecking and simple plays."
The Thunderettes have not disappointed
Fraser with a 2-2 win-loss record thus far in
the season.
On the weekend, UBC destroyed the
Burnaby B team 10-1 in a Sunday afternoon
romp that was their highest scoring game yet.
UBC opened the scoring after four seconds
play with the first of two first-period goals by
centre Diane Abbot. Her second came at the
halfway mark.
Two minutes later, winger Barb Bradbury
started her hat trick with an assist from
winger Sherri Smith. Bradbury followed up
with another first-period goal at the
10-minute mark and a third one minute into
second period. Smith racked up three assists
in the game.
Taking Bradbury's cue, centre Marna
Mueller scored two consecutive goals early in
the first period with a third late in the same
period for UBC's second hat trick. Other
goals were scored by winger Darcy Lazzarin
two minutes into the second period and
winger Yvonne Magnusson with the third
period's only goal.
Burnaby scored their lone goal at the nine-
minute mark in the first period.
The Thunderettes clearly dominated
throughout the first period, registering seven
of their 10 goals. Burnaby showed increasing
strength defensively in the final two periods,
but were unable to launch a successful assault
themselves.
Notably absent from women's ice hockey
is body contact between players, said team
manager  Shawn  McCue.   "You  never  see
fighting in this league and the players always
wear face masks. In eastern Canada there is
body contact, but it's only because hockey
has been there longer."
Fraser would like to see the women's team
become more of a priority in the women's
athletic department. For financial reasons the
team is limited to about four and one-half
hours of ice time a week, and for games the
clock is not stopped when there is a break in
play, he said.
"With such limited ice time, the quality of
play suffers as there is less time to practice,"
said Fraser. "The men's team can practice
just about every day of the week, not including the weekend games," he said.
UBC plays their next game on Saturday at
5:30 p.m. at the Killarney Community Centre.
'Birds killed
by own hand
And now number 147 in The
Ubyssey's continuing series of
stultifying sports cliches — the turning point. Imagine the following
scenario.
Alberta has taken an early 10
point lead but UBC has put
together a drive and has moved
down to the Alberta two yard line.
So the quarterback hands off to the
fullback who plunges over and we
now only trail by a field goal, right?
WESTERN INTERCOLLEGIATE
FOOTBALL LEAGUE
Final s
landing
$
W
L        Pts.
Alberta 'Bears
5    3    10
UBC 'Birds
5    3    10
Calgary D'saurs
4    4      8
Manitoba Bisons
4    4      8
Sask. Huskies
2    6      4
A HORIZONTAL EXPRESSION of a vertical intention has Thunderbird
back making yards the hard way in Saturday match against Alberta.
—Jim stMl photo
UBC offence as a whole ran into ground during first half as Golden Bears
took game and first place. Western playoff goes Saturday in Edmonton.
'Birds swoop through ups and downs
The UBC women's field hockey
team won one game and lost three
others on the weekend in Calgary in
the third and final round of the
Canada West University Athletic
Association tourney.
The UBC team placed fourth
overall, nullifying their chances of
representing the west at the national championships in Victoria
Nov. 1-4.
The Thunderettes shut out the
University of Calgary 2-0, but later
lost to the University of Victoria
1-0, the University of Saskatchewan
2-0, and the University of Alberta
1-0.
Coach Gail Wilson said UBC had
to beat Saskatchewan to place
third, but they failed coming last in
the standings. "Saskatchewan's
game was marred by excessive
rough play and intimidation on the
part of Saskatchewan's players,"
she said. "Umpires turned a blind
eye to Saskatchewan's roughness."
The Thunderettes' midfield play
is much improved, although they
still lack aggression in the striking
circle, said Wilson. Two players who
put in outstanding performances in
the tourney are goalie Sally Sherwood and half-back Anne Crofts,
she added.
UBC returns to regular Vancouver
league play facing the junior varsity
team Nov. 8 at noon on the south
campus field.
The Thunderbird rugby team
finished eleventh in the World
Rugby Tournament in Honolulu,
Hawaii. The 'Birds defeated
Freyburg of New Zealand, the
Hawaii Barbarians and the Hawaii
Harlequins but lost to New South
Wales and Tonga. Thirty four
teams competed in the tourney.
Saturday UBC meets the Kats at
Camouson Park at 2:30 p.m.
*    *    *
Steve Pomeroy of UBC placed second in the Canada West cross
country track championships in
Victoria on the weekend. Pomeroy
qualified  for the national cham
pionships   in    Toronto   on   the
weekend.
*    *    »
The UBC men's ice hockey team
stormed through the east on a
weekend tour netting three wins in
as many games.
Friday the T-Birds defeated
Lakehead University 8-5 followed
by a Saturday win over the University of Winnipeg 12-5 and a 6-3 rout
over the University of Manitoba
Sunday.
The forward line of Jay Rumley,
Jim McLaughlin and Rob Jones led
the 'Birds offensively with Jones
scoring seven goals, including six
against Winnipeg. He also picked
up six assists. Jim McLaughlin
scored four goals and had 10 assists.
Other leading scorers in the tour
were Marty Matthews, Jim Allison,
Bill Trenaman and Bill Holowaty
with two goals each.
The 'Birds open the Canada
West league schedule Friday and
Saturday at Thunderbird Arena
when they meet the defending na
tional    champion    University   of
Alberta Golden Bears.
* » »
The women's and men's basketball teams both won their Alumni
games Thursday. The Thunderbirds
defeated the alumni 73-64 while the
Thunderettes edged the grads 61-58.
Aggie Baker, a transfer student
from defending Canadian champion Laurentian University, scored
21 points to lead the women.
But instead the quarterback
hands off to the fullback's hip and
a defensive linesman recovers the
ensuring fumble and goes 197 yards
for a touchdown. Suddenly, we are
17.
That, folks, is a turning point.
It was an easy task after that for
the University of Alberta, who
coasted to a 27-10 win over the
UBC football team Saturday at
Thunderbird Stadium. The Golden
Bears led 24-1 at the half.
The Bears exploited the left side
of the 'Birds defensive secondary
early, completing two long passes
that led to a field goal and a
touchdown. The 'Birds offence was
non-existent for most of the first
half, managing only one sustained
drive resulting in quarterback Greg
Clarkson's fumble.
The win gave Alberta first place
in the Western Intercollegiate Football League. The 'Birds and the
Golden Bears both finished with 10
points but Alberta took top spot on
the point difference. UBC defeated
Alberta by one point earlier in the
season.
The playoff game between the
two teams will be Saturday in Edmonton. The winner will advance to
the Atlantic Bowl in Halifax.
THURSDAY
Women's football
T-cup
Nurses 6 Home Ec. 0
Men's basketball
UBC 73 Alumni 64
Women's basketball
UBC 61 Alumni 58
FRIDAY
Men's ice hockey
UBC 8 Lakehead 5
SATURDAY
Women's field hockey
UBC 2 Calgary 0
UBC 0 Calgary 1
Women's soccer
UBC 8 Malaspina 0
Men's football
UBC 10 Alberta 27
Men's ice hockey
UBC 12 Winnipeg 5
Men's basketball
UBC60G.T.C. 61
SUNDAY
Women's field hockey
UBC 0 Saskatchewan 2
UBC 0 Alberta 1
Women's soccer
UBC 4 Jericho 0
Women's ice hockey
UBC 10 Burnaby ,'B' 1
Men's ice hockey
UBC 6 Manitoba 3

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