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The Ubyssey Feb 11, 1966

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Array THE UmSEY
Or
isn't
he?
Vol. XLVIII, No. 48
VANCOUVER, B.C., FRIDAY, FEBRUARY  11,  1966
48
'CA
Students
not to run
UBC-alum
Students have no legal say
in the administration of the
university, Alumni Association
director Tim Hollick-Kenyon
said Thursday.
Hollick-Kenyon told The
Ubyssey the university is run
by convocation, not by the students.
Convocation is composed of
the chancellor (chairman), the
president, the members of the
senate, all persons holding academic appointments whose
names are added by the president, all persons whose names
are added by the senate and
all UBC graduates.
Every three years convocation elects a new chancellor
and 15 members of the senate.
Any seven members can nominate a chancellor.
For the elections, the registrar must send out thousands
of ballots, all over the world,
to graduates.
"A student suggested at the
forum that president Macdonald had a janitorial job," said
Hollick-Kenyon.
The Universities Act states
the President can suspend any
member of the teaching and
administrative staff, any officer
or servant of the university,
or any student.
After exercising this power
he reports his action to the
board of governors or faculty
council and the suspended
party can appeal.
"Does this sound like a janitorial job?" asked Hollick-
Kenyon.
Cruise calls
for student
on senate
There should be students on
the Board of Governors, says
AMS vice -president Bob
Cruise.
"Participation in the university community isn't just consultation," Cruise said Thursday.
"The present attempt to get
student representation on faculty departments and the Senate should not be confused with
the real issue of genuine university democracy," he said.
Cruise said students should
seek representation on the
Board of Governors.
AMS president Byron Hender told council in Monday's
meeting to seek closer ties
with the Reads of their various faculties.
UBC president John B. Macdonald told Tuesday's forum
in Brock Hall he agreed it is
useful to consult students on
different matters.
"But, I don't think a student
can afford to be involved in
administration because it
would interfere with his education."
'Boylan fir
veep, even
if he's not'
AMS vice-president runner-up Jim Taylor said Thursday he will not accept the position if first-place finisher
Charlie Boylan is disqualified.
Boylan     won    Wednesday's
— norm betts photos
FEET INCASED in hot plaster of Paris, first year engineering vice president Vic Hardy sizzles in silence. Hardy was
victim   of   science   outdoor   society   prank   Thursday.
Librarian slams door
on late hours plea
Associate librarian I n g I i s
Bell said Thursday he doesn't
think it would be worthwhile
to keep UBC's library open 24
hours a day.
"We would need two or
three librarians if we were to
remain open at night," he said.
"I doubt if students would use
the library at four in the
morning."
Judy Bing, arts II, said Wed-
should remain open until 2
p.m. two nights a week and 24
nesday,   "I   think   the   library
hours a day the weeks prior
to and during exams."
Miss Bing asked UBC president John Macdonald at the
forum Tuesday why the library
could not remain open like
many libraries in the United
States.
In reply to her question,
Macdonald said, "All libraries
should be open 24 hours a day
seven days a week.
"But we simply do not have
the funds to do many of the
things we would like to do."
election, defeating runner-up
Jim Taylor by 400 votes.
But returning officer James
Taylor said Wednesday night
Boylan was disqualified toe-
cause he hadn't submitted his
expenditure account by the
4 p.m. deadline Tuesday.
Candidate Taylor said he
plans to back Boylan if the
disqualification   is   upheld.
"Boylan should not be disqualified and if he is, there
should be another election."
"I would be unable to run
conscientiously in another election, butt would cast my vote
for the person who I feel the
students have chosen."
Present first vice-president
Bob Cruise said Thursday Taylor had no right to disqualify
Boylan.
"Only the elections committee can disqualify a candidate,"
he   said.
Returning officer Taylor is
chairman of the elections committee.
Candidate Taylor, who was
returning officer for the first-
slate elections Feb. 2 said he
thought Boylan should win. He
said Peter Braund and Gabor
Mate had failed to submit their
campaign budgets before the
deadline.
"I didn't consider this sufficient to disqualify Braund and
Mate," he said.
The elections committee will
decide today whether the disqualification stands.
If it upholds returning officer Taylor's ruling, Boylan has
the right to challenge the de-
(Conlinued on Page 2)
SEE: BOYLAN
$11000 EXTRA
FOR BROCK CAFE
Coke soak no joke
By KRIS EMMOTT
The scandal of high Coke
prices in Brock has been exposed.
If a student buys a Coke
from the machine in the hall
of South Brock, he gets a
paper cup with 290 cubic
centimeters of pop.
But if he gets a cup at the
dispener in the cafeteriar
just around the corner, he
gets only 225 c.c.'s, or about
78 per cent as much.
Both cups cost a dime.
The Food Services cups in
the cafeteria fit right inside
the machine cups, with room
to spare.
A quick calculation on the
slide rule shows Food Services charges .0444 cents for
THE CUPS
Mary Gillanders compares
a cc. of Coke while the machine charges only .0345
cents.
This means that Brock
cafeteria is making an unjustified profit of 2.2 cents
per cup more than it should.
Even during cool weather,
the cafeteria uses between
three and four 600-cup tanks
of Coca-Cola syrup per week.
That's about 2,000 cups per
week, or 50,000 cups in an
average year.
That's not even counting
extra hot-weather sales.
And at 2.2 cents extra profit per cup, that means $11,-
000 extra a year for Food
Services.
Profits from the machine
go to the AMS.
Vance
suspends
arts paper
Publication of the controversial arts undergraduate
society's magazine Consensus
was suspended Thursday by the
Alma Mater Society.
The suspension made by
AMjS co-ordinator Graeme
Vance applies to all publications produced by the AUS.
The move came after AUS
president Chuck Campbell resigned from his position following a vote of censure against
him by the arts council.
AMS president Byron Hender
said: "We want to look at the
status of the magazine Con
sensus before it comes out
again."
UNCLEAR
He said the arts council does
not seem to have cleared up the
situation as to who is responsible for what is written in the
magazine.
Because of this Vance suspended publication.
The suspension is subject to
appeal by the AUS, Hender
said.
The president also said he
has not accepted Campbell's resignation.
INVESTIGATION
"There seems to be some
question about the exact composition of the AUS executive
and this will be investigated by
the AMS," said Hender.
"It is possible that Campbell
has been misinterpreting the
constitution regarding the
make-up of the arts council.
"It appears some of the executive members might not have
the right to vote on the council," said Hender.
Campbell resigned Wednesday after the executives voted
4 to 0 to censure him for firing
the editors of Consensus. Two
members abstained.
The controversy arose when
Consensus editors Peter Cameron and Nancy Corbett published a story about board of
governers member Einer Gunderson.
COUNCIL  OKs
PRESS BUFFER
SEE PAGE 2 Page 2
THE     UBYSSEY
Friday, February   11,   1966
—kurt   hllger   photo
MONDAY IS ST. VALENTINE'S DAY, and here local poet
Seymour Mayne takes a Cupid-like bead on mad, passionate embracers Joe Varesi and Kris Emmott. Mayne is
presenting open reading of erotic and amorous verse
Monday at 12:30 in Bu.  106.
Two  money votes
distract grad students
Referenda are competing
this week.
The AMS council agreed
Monday night to hold a referendum asking that AMS fees
for third and fourth year medical students be eliminated.
This followed council's acceptance last week of a medical undergraduate society brief
decrying the lack of benefits
to medical students in proportion to their AMS fees.
Graduate students are exempted from paying AMS fees
after their first year of grad
studies, but because of the
eventual increase in the percentage of graduate students at
UBC, council decided to reconsider this exemption.
WASHINGLINE (UNS) —
Government officials here
denied Mosscup charges that
the CIA was responsible for
the blor attack on Pango Pan-
go.
with Batman for popularity
Rent
A Gown
Lovely   Selection
Brides
Attendants
Formal  Wear,
Fur   Stoles,
Tux.  & Din.
Jackets,  Costumes.
MARIE BRUCKER SALON
Designers and Dressmakers
Sales and Rentals
2608   Granville 733-6727
4691   Kingsway 435-1160
Alma Mater Society
OFFICIAL NOTICES
CHAIRMEN   NEEDED
Applications are now being received for chairmanship
of the following committees:
CANADIAN UNIVERSITY SERVICES OVERSEAS
CANADIAN UNION OF STUDENTS COMMITTEE
HIGH  SCHOOL CONFERENCE COMMITTEE
SPECIAL EVENTS COMMITTEE
WORLD UNIVERSITY SERVICE COMMITTEE
All applications shall be in writing and shall be addressed to the secretary   (Box 54).
Eligibility forms must be submitted with applications.
Eligibility forms are available at the secretary's office
(upstairs south Brock).
Applications must be submitted by 4:00 p.m., Thursday, Feb. 24.
Council accepts CUP
press committee idea
AMS council Monday night
agreed to consult a Canadian
University Press appointed
commission in the event of a
council-press dispute.
The three member commission, composed of a professiorial
journalist, a editorial board
member of a nearby university
paper, and a CUP representative, would investigate disputes
between the university paper
and a student council and submit a report on its findings to
the council.
The report of the commission
would not be binding but would
act as a guide for a final decision.
"The   agreement   recognizes
BOYLAN
(Continued from page 1)
cision and the issue will go to
student court.
If student court rules the
election valid, Bill Grant, who
ran last in the race, may challenge the election on the basis
of two uncounted polls.
Grant said Thursday the edu-
building and auditorium cafeteria were disqualified because
candidates had not removed
their campaign posters from
the building.
Should Boylan be disqualified, the second choices on his
ballots would be counted for
Taylor and Grant.
Boylan said he intends to
contest his disqualification at
the meeting today.
that co-operation of council and
press is the only way to settle
disputes," said AMS president
Byron Hender.
By the agreement, council
agrees to withhold final decisions on disputes until it has
studied the commission's report.
The idea of the investigation
committee came out of the
twenty-eighth national CUP
conference at Calgary after
Christmas.
Delegates to the conference
agreed that, following the firing of Carrillion editor John
Conway by the student council
of the University of Saskatchewan at Regina, a basis should
be formed for investigation into
council interference of the student press.
The commission approved by
the conference was to submit
a binding report to the student
council.
The AMS approved a non-
binding report.
University Hill
United Church
on University Boulevard
Invites U.B.C;  Staff
and Students
To Worship on Sunday
February 13th at 11:00 a.m.
"WORRY"
Rev. Harold L. MacKay
7:00 p.m. University Young
People's Group
THE CHURCH ON THE
CAMPUS WELCOMES YOU
Council also approved a motion Monday night to hold a
referendum asking students if
they are in favor of requiring
grad students to pay AMS fees
for each year they remain active members of the AMS.
Under the present system
grad students retain their membership after their first year
although they pay no fees.
Each referendum costs the
AMS over $200.
BAY
THE LIST OF ADRIAN
MESSENGER
G. C. Scott, Dana Wynter
plus SURPRISE GUESTS and
THE LUCK OF GINGER
COFFEY
R. Shaw, Mary Ore — Students 75c
DELTA
FEB.  11   t  11
HORROR OF DRUCULA
(Adult)
plus
CURSE  OF THE
MUMMY'S TOMB
plus
THE GORGON
THERE'S ONLY ONE
A£S£AT®Aa4T
Desert Boots and Desert Khan Oxfords
are available everywhere they sell only
good shoes. Ask for them.
by
CJjosM.
Suggested   Retail
of   England
MR. FLETCHER
in attendance at
4564 West 10th Avenue
224-7922
ARTS
UNDERGRADUATE   SOCIETY
ELECTIONS 1966
Nominations open Wednesday, February 9th
Nominations close Wednesday, February 16th 4 p.m.
President - A.M.S. eligibility required
Vice-president - Open to all members in good
standing  of  A.U.S.
Treasurer -
Secretary -
Speeches
Mon., Feb. 21str Bu. 106, noon
FURTHER INFORMATION BUCH. 182 Friday,  February   11,   1966
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 3
BAD  JOKE
—  powell  hargrave  pnotos
CHECKING PROGRESS of her blood donation, pretty Elaine Berry, science II, leans over the
edge of cot in armory to watch bottle fill. An intrepid Ubyssey reporter also gave blood
Thursday   For her first person account, see   below.
PUBSTER SEEKS
VEIN  GLORY
Carol does slow bleed
By CAROL  WILSON
I am a red-blooded female,
and I can prove it.
Like the girl in the picture
above, I parted with a pint of
my pure, red blood Thursday
at the armory all in the interests of humanity.
After making sure I did not
have a cold, the flu, jaundice,
diabetes, cancer, epilepsy or
tuberculosis, the nurse stuck a
small steel harpoon in my
finger.
Second tries
cut in twain
There'll be fewer second
chances for Arts students next
year.
Faculty members voted to reduce the number of supplemental examinations allowed
arts students from two to one.
The Ubyssey has learned.
To be eligible to write a
supp, students must have passed their other four courses.
Previously students could
write supps if they had passed
three courses.
The vote came three weeks
ago at the same meeting it was
decided to split the Arts faculty in two.
The Senate will probably be
asked to approve the proposal
at its next meeting Feb. 16.
"Yikes!" I cried.
"Hold the cotton on your
finger and sit down," growled
the nurse.
While waiting, you play a
modified game of musical
chairs.
Every few minutes, everyone moves ahead one or two
chairs.
The poor clod who ends up
without a chair has to bleed.
Being very poor at sports, I
soon had my chance to save
a life.
The nurse grabbed me and
piloted me over to a bed.
She tied a piece of "gray
cloth around my arm and
pumped something. With the
skill and efficiency which
comes only after many years
of practice she poked the blunt
needle into my arm.
"Don't go to sleep!" a nurse
screamed, completely eliminating all notions I had of the
idea.
I lay on the bed and read
The Ubyssey.
All the nurses ignored me,
which was fine for a while.
But when three people had
been in and out of the bed
across from me, I began to get
panicky. I had visions of my
blood overflowing from the
bottle below the bed and
splashing onto the floor.
"Nurse, what about me?" I
yelled at the next woman in a
white uniform that went by.
UNIVERSITY    TEXT    BOOKS
Non-Fiction   Paper   Backs
New and Used
BETTER BUY BOOKS
1393 W. 10th Ave. - 224-4144
DEPARTMENT OF THEATRE
FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE
presents . . .
Shakespeare's Romantic Frolic
LOVES LABOR'S LOST
AN ALL STUDENT PRODUCTION
Directed by John Brockington.
Designed by Aristides Gazetas
Feb. 22 - 28. Curtain 8:00 p.m.
Students 75c. (Adults $1.75)
NOTE — Univeristy  students are advised to secure
tickets early as High School group bookings
are already coming in.
BOX OFFICE - ROOM 207 - FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE
. . . when you see a camel
lurching up an iceberg . . .
You    are    reading    PRISM
international's  new double
issue.
Authors from here & abroad
U.B.C.   BOOKSTORE
CNIB sign lifted
from ed canteen
No one was looking when a five-foot high plastic sign
was taken from the CNIB canteen in the education building
basement last week.
"What about you?" she inquired sweetly.
"I've been laying here for
half an hour."
"Well, you're nearly finished."
Ignoring the ambiguity in
her statement, I replied, "But
there's been three people in
that bed since I came in."
"That's okay dear, you're
just a slow bleeder."
After another ten minutes,
a nurse took out the needle.
Then I had to lie on a bed
for ten minutes, and sit on a
chair another five.
Then as soon as no one was
looking, I sneaked over to the
coat rack, grabbed my coat,
and escaped.
But at least I got my little
red pin as a reward for my endurance and valor.
Canteen supervisor Smitty
Currie-Smit said the CNIB will
have to pay $20 to replace the
sign if it isn't returned.
The sign reads: CNIB.
"At first I didn't realize the
sign was gone," said Currie-
Smit, who is blind.
"People were coming up to
the stand and not saying anything," he said. "I didn't know
they were there and wasn't
paying attention to them.
"Then we realized the sign
was gone and people didn't
know it was a CNIB' canteen."
Currie-Smit said the sign
may have been taken as a
joke.
"I don't want whoever took
it to think Smitty can't go
along with a joke," he said.
"But I'd hate to see the
CNIB pay out another $20."
Currie-Smit said the sign
could be returned through a
neutral person or The Ubyssey.
Mid-term  break
is  catch-up  time
The University will remain
open during next week's midterm break in the hope students' books will too.
During the mid-term break,
Feb. 17-20, university facilities will remain open even
though all lectures have been
cancelled.
Slocks Narrowed
Suits Altered
and Repaired
Tuxedos  Remodelled
Expert Tailoring
UNITED TAILORS
549 Granville St.
DON'T FORGET YOUR SWEETHEART
ON VALENTINE'S DAY FEB. 14
10%   Student  Discount
Vogue Flower Shop
2197 W.  Broadway 736-7344
JUST   ARRIVED
FROM    MADRID
Genuine
Spanish
Wineskins
Bad Boys Ragge Shoppe
315 SEYMOUR
GSA NEWS
THEA KOERNER MEMORIAL LECTURE: This lecture, the fourth in the
"Perspectives" Series will be given by Professor G. H. Durrant. The
topic will be "Freedom and Responsibility in the University". The
lecture will be given  Friday, Feb.  11/66 at 12:30 in   Ed.  100.
SPRING GSA DANCE: The spring GSA Dance, featuring a live band will
be held on Saturday, February 26, in place of the regular Club
Night.  Further details will  be announced  in  future  Columns.
SKI TRIP: Students interested in a Ski Weekend, to be held near the
end of February, at one of th Interior Mountains, (Big White or
Apex) should contact Mr. Dick Holt through the GSC Office.
SPRING GENERAL MEETING: Constitution Aemndment. The following
amendment to the G.S.A. Constitution will be presented for approval
at the Spring General  Meeting:
Article  II.  Officers
Honorary  President
President
Vice   President
be amended to read
Article II Officers
Honorary  President
President
First   Vice  President
Second  Vice President
Secretary
Treasurer
Six Officers
Secretary
Treasurer
Six Officers
McAAASTER UNIVERSITY
GRADUATE TEACHING FELLOWSHIPS
The University offers Graduate Teaching Fellowships to support graduate
students working towards a Master's Dgeree in Biochemistry, Biophysics, Civil
Engineering, Classics, Economics, German, Greek, Latin, Mechanical Engineering, Metallurgical Engineering, Philosophy, Politics, Romance Languages, Russian, Sociology and Social Anthropology; and for a Master's or Doctor of Philosophy Degree in Biology, Chemical Engineering, Chemical Physics, Chemistry,
Mathematics, Metallurgy, Molecular Biology, Physics, Psychology and the Religious Sciences.
The Fellowships vary in value but in all cases the stipends provide adequate support for a full year's study. Most awards are renewable for subsequent years. Holders of Fellowships will devote approximately one-fifth of their
time to instructional duties.
Travel advances are available to assist students who are coming to the
University from distant points.
Further information and application forms maybe obtained from:
The Dean of Graduate Studies, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada mnrsstr
Published Tuesday, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the university
rear by the Alma Mater Society, University of B.C. Editorial opinions
expressed are those of the editor and not necessarily those of the AMS
or the University. Editorial office, CA 4-3916. Advertising office, CA 4-3242,
Loc. 26. Member Canadian University Press. Founding member, Pacific
Student Press. Authorized as second-class mail by Post Office Department,
Ottawa,  and  for payment of postage in cash.
Winner Canadian University Press trophies for general
excellence and editorial writing.
FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 11, 1966
"The responsibility of the press
is to report the Truth."
—Batman, Feb. 3,   1966
Liquor and the law
We're glad to see the AMS tackling the plan of
doughty Vancouver deputy chief constable John Fisk
which requires faculty members to take out liquor
permits for student functions.
While it is true that the old chestnut of a pub
on campus is no nearer reality than ever before, nevertheless the graduate student center banquet permits, and
the over-21 groups at the Winter Sports arena must represent some cracks in the theory of drink-equals-sin for
students.
But while the AMS lawyers are jumping on Mr.
Fisk's interesting solution to student parties, there is
one other aspect of the booze problem they can consider.
Mr. Fisk's plan reflects the attitude only too prevalent that a 21-year-old student is somehow inferior in the
eyes of the law to a 21-year-old non-student.
And what is most strange of all is that this attitude
is reflected even in the midst of the citadels of enlightenment — right, you guessed it, even here on the UBC
campus.
At present, by the laws of this country, a legal
j adult can drink in his home. But the administration's
I neo-puritanical policy of "no booze in residences period"
'   probably contradicts this inalienable right.
An interesting legal tangle to be sure.
But anyone who has watched the 18-year-olds staggering loudly around any of the residence areas proving
they are "man" enough to drink realizes there is a very
pertinent social issue involved as well.
Once drinking is legal for those over 21 in residences
— as is the case in many other universities — then
all the youngsters would be proving by being very
obviously smashed is that they weren't "man" enough
to drink properly.
Whereas now they join with their older friends in
enjoying a flagrant violation of stupid regulations —
and join in with a gusto which usually manages to disturb
at  least somebody  and   often   everybody   else   around.
As we said,  an interesting  legal  and social  issue.
But it would be nice to hear a ruling from the AMS
lawyers on something other than the degree of libel
involved in Consensus articles.
IN  THE EAR
:*~-*^
fiY IAN CAMERON
Creeping phlox just creepy
Recently I saw an ad in one
of the downtown papers saying that so and so flower company would send Creeping
Phlox to you for only $5.
Frankly,  my  only  experi-
{ jmmmmmmgmm ence with
flowers has
been corsages,
but the name
has   got   me
wor r i e d. It
doesn't sound
like the kind
j of flower I
^cameron      would   care
to have around my loved ones.
As a matter of fact, it doesn't sound much like a flower at
all. It sounds more like something you'd get from listening
to election speeches, or eating
Brock hamburgers. Or something.
And even if it is a flower, I
wouldn't care to plant it in
my garden.
It would probably turn out
to be like the last flowers I
tried to plant.
There was this compost box
in my back yard, see, and it
was unsightly, see, and so I
asked for something that
would grow quickly.
The fellow behind the counter, a small, fat individual,
thrust a little packet into my
hand and pushed me out the
door.
I went home and planted
the little seeds that I found
therein.
EDITOR: Tom Wayman
New$                -   Ron Riler
Associate     __ _ George Reamsbottom
City  Al Donald
Photo     Norm Beth
Sports  -_      Ed Clark
Ass't News Dan Mullen
Richard Blair, Robbi West
Ass't City Danny Stoffman
Page Friday  - _         _.   John Kelsey
Managing            Ian Cameron
Features            Mike Bolton
CUP Don Hull
Versatile Norm Betts sat on the
city desk until the sleepy bureau
types stumbled in. Wisdom emanating from the bureaucrats was picked
up by Dick Taylor, Joan Fogarty.
Clark Kent, little Sus Gransby, Big
Bruce, vein drain Wilson, Kirs'ten
Emmott, Jim Good, Val Zuker, Rosemary Hyman, Anne Balf, Bert Sill,
and Derick Blackie. Ann Bishop
wrote about student council and
Hrushowy went to a seminar. Stoffman directed traffic and I ached.'
Inside of a week the compost box had disappeared. So
had the garage and the fence,
and my car was going fast
when I finally got to it.
Then V realized that my
next door neighbor hadn't
been around complaining
about the noise for some time,
which was more than somewhat unusual.
When I went around to the
$A8A,SHAVER        •
</>c_A_ior\_l'^_
plant two days later and it
rtarted belching, I got out the
weed killer.
Now I wish I hadn't done it.
I hear the SUB committee
is looking for some plants to
put around the building . . .
if it ever gets built.
As a matter of fact, maybe
the committee could use a nice
planter in their office.
Now where's that ad again?
LETTERS
Interviewee  biased'
"tile S.ei.veiltnTeS efj
FAR !5 THE DISTANCE   TWIXT   NINETEEN OJENTV-ON^RI^Hr?
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
The   article  "which   appeared Feb.  5 The  Ubyssey, entitled South Africans Fear Reprisals," was a gross misrepre-'
sentation of the truth.
I cannot but believe that
the alleged persecutions and
reprisals to relatives of the
South African woman interviewed by The Ubyssey were
a fabrication of an overfertile
imagination.
That the South African government would be concerned
or even kept informed of
such an innocuous and insignificant seminar is quite preposterous.
The statement that all South
Africans are interviewed by
the security police prior to
their applications for a passport is accepted as utter nonsense.
I left South Africa a year
ago, and no such thing happened to me.
This might only occur with
such persons involved in subversive movements against the
government; but certainly is
not common practice, as the
South African woman interviewed   suggested.
She claimed that she left
S.A. with her family because
they were getting a slanted
view of life.
This is only a matter of
opinion; I feel that the person
who said this has a strong
bias. I am not surprised that
she prefers to remain anonymous.
GUIDO BOTTO
Arts   I.
~U4___& L_J M& i-______________________________________________________________■ kr^T  \\   ui
HAPPY AMNIVERSARVi ST VALE NTiME'S   DAY"    MASSACRE ~ r\6N0^ J
I'M A HITCHIKER . . .
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
Much has been written for
and against hitchhikers in
Canada's greatest.
It had all seemed irrelevant
to me until today. I picked
up my first one.
She looked just like Hayley
Mills, whom I love, so I stopped and gallantly let the door
of my machine fall off.
She whispered a "Thank-
you" as she hopped in.
Playing a hustler, I asked:
"Have you got a 9:30?"
And then in the deepest,
most masculine roar in existence she replied, "Shaddup
and drive ya idiot. Just cause
ya pick up a hitchhiker it
don't give ya the right to talk
at me. Ya'll let me off at
Brock and like it bunky. And
besides   yer  seat  covers  are
chinsy.  Just  shaddup  and
drive."
Somewhat shocked, I drove
straight to Brock. She again
whispered "Thank-you" and
hopped out.
Man, it must be a peanut
butter and raisin sandwich
day.
RADFURD  CLYDEFINK
President
Hayley Mills Fan Club
'DONT  KNOCK,  IF .   . .'
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
Of all the nonsensical articles which appear from time
to time in your paper. I believe Mr. Dan Mullen's "The
Wedding's Not for Lovers", is
paramount.
It seems some people will
not hesitate asserting the
sheerest absurdities as long as
they believe they will shock
those who have some respect
of tradition, established order,
and in short give evidence of
some trace of civilization.
I shall scorn to confute the
ludicrous "arguements" that
Mr. Mullen advances in his
article, but want him to know
that I shall be the last .person
to tell him he should have a
formal wedding if he does not
wish one.
But as the French say: "Si
vous n'aimez pas ca, n'en
degouttez pas les autres."
E. MESPLIER
Commerce II
•      •      •
'I NEED HELP'
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
I am compiling a book
which will detail the aspirations and problems of youth
in present day Canada.
In order to prepare this
book for our county's centenary next year I am asking
the editors of all the university newspapers to pass along
to the readers of their papers
my request that my fellow
students 'write to me.
The format of the letter is
up to the individual but I
should like him to write on
the problems faced by students in his area and the solutions to these problems, as
they exist or as the student
forsees them.
Your assistance in obtaining information for the book,
tentatively titled "Letters
From U", will be greatly appreciated.
CHARLES COLYER
1141  McMillan  Ave.
Winnipeg 9,  Man. Trrsr^TT
i^__#_l__^_hl_^____V   ^^u_k___E ^ ^__^_l__i_____n#
j>uV^^J|.        4^^^.   •K^KHU________t______HI
«&$* yMNff *****
^l K ******
tttbT
has
Festival rehashed-
p/ 2, 3, 4,  6
pawnbrokers, god
and mate the great
—inside
IN    POOR   TASTE:   The
Vancouver Times Memorial
Award for macabre humor
in journalism has got to go
to the eastern Canadian
Press deskman who filed this
little gem: "GORE BAY,
Ont. (CP) — Marvin Fogal,
47, died from injuires suffered when gored by a bull."
•      •      •
INSIGNIFICANT: Neither
prexy-elect Mrs. Braund's
little boy Petey nor current
first veep Bobbie Cruise
were invited to join Sigma
Tau Chi, UBC's honorary
fraternity nor did they re
ceive Honorary Activities
Awards.
Seems every other AMS
functionary, minor or otherwise, got into the limelight
in one or the other self-
perpetuating nice-guys outfits.
INDEFATIGABLE: UBC's
chancellor is chosen through
an uncontested contest operated by, for and of The
Establishment. The possibility of having an election to
choose the chancellor is
within legal, written bounds
—it just isn't done, old boy.
This could be the year it
will be done, at considerable embarrassment to the
administration and current
candidate John M. Buchanan, if certain rabble-reusing
campus elements put forth
their man, a graduate student.
INDUBITABLY: President John (The Man) Macdonald attended Wednes7
day's engineers' ball at the
Commodore. He presented
the award for the best ball
model to the eleclricals for
their gizmo, an electrically-
driven rat which was remote-controlled by light.
"Before making this presentation," quipped the pres,
"I'd like to announce there
will be a two-hour question-
and-answer period."
INCENSED: Three lawyers so far have advised editor Tom (The Kid) Wayman
that The Man's accusations
that The Ubyssey "prints
lies, distortions and suppresses the facts" are actionable on grounds of slander.
INSANE: Ubyssey city
editor Al Donald was tearing large bits out of his desk
very late Wednesday night,
trying to make sense out of
the bollixed first vice-president election.
He had to be put into restraint when some mild-
mannered little man strolled
into the office and asked innocently, "Who won the
election?"
IN CONFUSION: Consensus of legal and moral opinion is that Charlie Boylan
will eventually have to be
named winner of the election nobody won.
It's either that or a re-run
of the whole mess.
As well as the leftist
fringe backing Boylan, more
than a few Brock establishment types are seething
about the foul-up, hinting
with considerable justification that no non-communist
candidate would have received such shoddy treatment.
IN HISTORY: SUBhuman
Roger (The Wheel) McAfee
asked student council Monday night to force The
Ubyssey to run free advertisements plugging the union building. As council was
told, the • idea stomps all
over the freedom of the
press because free ads cut
into the paper's news space.
Council wasn't too impressed with Roger's Big
Fib technique about The
Ubyssey "refusing to print
facts about SUB" and didn't
bother considering the motion.
1961 was the last time
someone tried the same
trick, and council actually
passed a rule forcing the
Little Wonder to print X
amount of free ad copy as
specified by some minor
AMS functionary.
After a week of banner
headlines and front-page editorials about raping the virginity of press freedom at
UBC, and after the Pubsters
got up a petition against the
motion, council backtracked.
Editor that year was a
chap named Roger McAfee,
arts IV.
INCOGNITO: Administration wheelies unveiled details of their new multi-
million dollar, umpteen-year
dream scheme for UBC's development at a hush-hush,
closed doors slide show in
the auditorium * Thursday
afternoon.
It seems anybody connected with the university
was welcome to attend the
p.r. peep show, even faculty.
Oh, anybody that is, except for those members of
the university who keep
fouling up administration
dream schemes — the students.
Thursday, February 10, 1966
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 5 pi
ON THE COVER.
Joe Varesi photo
Editor: John Kelsey
Current affairs-
Steve  Brown
Science, the arts—
Al  Francis
Assistant-
Claudia Gwinn
song,
dance
Tense drama, got it?
Everybody on stage is
tearing their multiple
guts out and throwing
psychological hell everywhere.
And suddenly the
whole stage breaks into
song and a merry dance.
It's musicals, which call
for the willing suspension
of disbelief to a far
greater extent than we
can muster.
We're not knocking
Mussoc and Take Me
Along, which is apparently doing very well.
We simply say very
well to you, and have fun,
Mussoc, because it's just
too much.
Musicals are a surreal
world, which neither
mirror nor comment upon
Eny semblance of reality.
Musicals aren't even
amusing, because just
when the plot gets good,
dramatic, the songs start
and you forget what it's
all about by the time they
get back to action.
The songs are generally simple music expressing nonsense messages
about enjoying being a
girl or corn as high as
elephant's eyes.
The dances necessitate
stacking the stage with
actors Who have no roles
so the choreography will
be complete, further
mucking up the plot.
The plots are generally trivial anyway.
We prefer either song
and dance or ordinary
drama, but the mixture
is truly unpalatable.
festival
ARTSY
IN GROUP
Anyway,
Mussoc.
carry    on
Contemporary yes, festive, no
By JOHN KELSEY
Contemporary is when it happens
now, today, new, exploratory perhaps,
certainly alive.
Festival is when everybody gathers
to celebrate some joyous occasion.
The Sixth Festival of the Contemporary Arts made it on the contemporary
count, but missed all the people on the
festival bit.
"We didn't do art in action this
year because, hell, we did it two years
in a  row before.
"Sure, a lot of people came, but it
was too much work."
—Murray   Farr,   festival   committee.
It pandered to a little in-group, maybe 600 people, centered around the
auditorium cafe, the music building
and the Laserre building. It catered
only to the people already intimately
associated with the arts, and they
arrived over and over, packing each
event, benefitting greatly by it. The
festival was thus some kind of success.
That kind of success is really failure,
since the basic premise of such a festival is to influence and involve the surrounding community. Sure, festivals
must provide the serious artists with
massive stimulation, toe specialized, but
festival organizers must remember the
other function and try to get the artist's
message across to the rest of the UBC
world.
"This schedule is packed this year
— I'm sure we've got more events
than ever before."
—B.C.    Binning,    festival    chairman
and head of fine arts.
It is valid and valuable to stimulate
the only artists. It is far more valid
to reach the non-artists, to pass the
artistic word to those for whom it is
ultimately intended.
The function of the artist ought to be
to involve society in his work, and
himself in society.
This year's festival, without the
large, campus-covering events of past
years, has forgotten one of the tenets
which make it possible.
Last year provides an effective contrast, with its armory happening, the
Medium is the Message, Jeffrey Lindsay's jellyfish-floating plastic structure
plus the ever-popular Art in Action.
"What festival?"
—Al Francis,  Page  Friday associate
editor.
The happening really did happen,
and called for more performances than
were originally scheduled. (People from
every sector of campus came, most to
watch passively, some to actually involve themselves in the proceedings.
Best estimates said 2,700 different students passed through it.
"What's   so   great  about   this?   It's
just like my living room at home."
—an engineer, overheard at Bagged
Place.
Designer-engineer Jeffrey Lindsay
built a thing out of huge polyethylene
balloons, which looked like several
dozen malformed sausages twisted together, 40 feet across and 25 feet high.
When it left main mall for the heights,
umpteen hundreds saw it.
Art in Action traditionally invaded
the corridors and quadrangle of Buchanan building, bringing 25 or 30 Vancouver artists and their current work
in front of students.
The festival spent about $7,000.
$1,500 of this was paid admissions,
the rest comes from the Fine Arts committee, the AMS and from Special
Events committee."
—the  Festival   Committee.
Nobody could resist stopping to
watch Wayne Ngan's potters' wheel
crank out huge ollas or Iain Baxter's
ice heap slowly melting under blowtorches and ink. The artists arted and
the students gaped, questioned, criticized, praised, damned.
"I didn't understand it. It failed to
reach me."
—Al   Donald,   Ubyssey  city   editor.
Art in Action was a way to force
several thousand souls, who would
normally not bother, into intimate contact with working artists. From the
point of view of communicating with
the great washed mass, Art in Action
was the best part of the festival —
yet this year it was dropped. Probably
because it is notoriously and hellishly
hard to get that many artists in one
place at the same time, with equipment, without amazing complications
and errant paint. A lousy excuse.
"We think the total attendance was
about 7,000.
"But it was all the same people—
you get so you can tell this after a
while.
I've been to so many events, I know
if there are ten outsiders in a room
of 200 regulars say, at a concert."
—Murray   Farr,   festival   committee.
Certainly, the sixth festival had
more different events than ever before. It covered film, painting, music,
poetry, architecture, drama, happenings and the rest of today's art gamut.
And covered it well, too. Every day
had something worth going to, for eight
days opposed to the traditional five.
"People just don't understand things
like Baxter's environment here. That's
why I make these little explanatory
cards, so they won't be too disturbed
at the context."
—Alvin    Balkind,   Gallery   Curator.
Local artists and critics say the
people imported, such as Merce Cunningham and his dancers, or Vladimir
Ussachefsky and his electronic sounds,
are so far ahead of Vancouver's avant
garde as to give this city momentum
until next year's festival.
The festival serves a great function
by bringing all these people here at
the same time, making an orgy of art
and new ideas, exposing UBC's artists
to an astounding number of new ideas
and influences, physically bombarding
them with material.
But it has got to reach the student-
at-large, and has got to force them to
notice it. Force is the correct word —
it need not be violent force. People's
natural curiosity will impell them to
take part if something is" shoved
between their eyes.
In that sense, probably the most
important sense if art is to be relevant,
the Sixth Festival of the Contemporary
Arts failed.
LAST YEAR, cartoonist Jeff Wall went to art  in action  and  watched  the
spectators . . .
Page 6
THE        UBYSSEY
Friday, February   11,   1966 festival
ONE  WORD...
... REACTION
Fixthedamnspeaker system
Merce Cunningham, one of
the leading figures in contemporary American dance, is
dedicated to the principles of
improvisation  and  chance.
Under the musical direction
of John Cage, the Merce Cun-
Merce Cunningham Dance
Company. At the Festival
Feb. 9.    Noisy.
ningham Dance Company highlighted the Festival of the
Contemporary Arts with two
works by Cage—Suite for Five
and How to Pass, Kick, Fall,
and Run. The music accompanying — co-existing with —
Suite for Five was produced
by plucking, knocking, hammering and scraping the vari
ous intestinal parts of two
pianos, a technique no longer
surprisingly novel. The movements and physical images
created by the dancers were
not dictated by the music but
were felt as physical, sensual
responses to it.
How to Pass, Kick, Fall,
and Run was delightfully good
fun, and I don't think Cage
had anything else in mind. The
humorous animations of the
dancers were refreshing in
their freedom of movement
and expression. The music is
typical of Cage's current experiments in random or indeterminate effects.
Here's how it worked: at the
rate of one per minute Cage
picked at random and read
aloud short humorous stories
from his lecture, Indeterminacy. With David Tudor at the
controls of four tape-recorders,
each playing pre - recorded
stories, and an arsenal of
oscillators, monitors, amplifiers, modulators, beepers and
other electronic noise - making
devices, fragments of these
stories were picked up, distorted, superimposed and amplified through speakers, in
each corner of the auditorium.
My one-word reaction was f ix-
t h e damnspeakersystemsolcan-
listentothefunnystories. Later I
discovered Cage had instructed
Tudor to create an image of a
piece of broken pottery. The
sound was supposed to sound
broken.    It did.
What relation this had to the
dance is a good question. Another Cunningham dance, not
performed here, is accompanied
by two sounds, a high and a
low pitched continuous static,
which penetrates the audience's
eardrums for no less than 20
minutes.
MERCE CUNNINGHAM
Our attitudes and reactions
to Cage are, like his music, indeterminate. But there is one
constant in his work — the
reactionary experience of the
listener makes them art. He
wants his listeners to experience what I had to say rather
than just hear about it.
Tapes foreshadow new era
By IAN WALLACE
Those fortunate few who were able to
attend the concert of compositions for tape
and projections presented by members of the
San Francisco Tape Music Center were treated to a spectacle that foreshadows a new era
in music, theatre, art, and film.
Taped sound (electronic chance and selection) recalls color, temperature, space, and
action which the tape centre materialized on
the stage (swallowed up the auditorium) with
players and projections.
Here, sound and vision are on longer merely complementary, they are necessary to each
other and they impart this necessity to the
The San Francisco Tape Music Center, 3:30
p.m., Tuesday, Feb. 8 in the auditorium.
Wallace liked it.
viewer, the actor, who feels impelled to becomes a kinetic, force moving through and
within the spectacle (of the life-drama), kinetic even in immobility.
This interaction of sight and sound is not
accomplished through interdescriptive harmony, as in Lone Ranger and the William
Tell Overture, but instead in chance fluctuations between harmony and dissociation,
where sight meets sound as an independent
force.
As when simultaneously reading a comic
and listening to a radio there is an interplay
of independent forces, they exist alone, but
at the juncture of a single experience.
This is exactly what exists between the
Merce Cunningham dancers and John Cage,
and inadvertantly in everything we do.
This is what happens when we move
through Baxter's Bagged Place, where we
are cut off from objects by a film of plastic;
we can no longer take our environment for
granted; we must realize its independence,
and our own independence, and the point at
which diverging paths meet.
While the purists decry the corruption of
man by the machine (the easy-made) ths
Tape Centre people use the machine (magnetic tapes, etc.) to extend possibilities of human expression.
And they are not alone, for novelist William Burroughs, electronic poetry re: Pierre
Coupey, Dancers Alwin Nicholais and Merce
Cunningham, composers John Gage and
Stockhausen, et. all are involved in similar
activies.
Today, through an intelligent and creative
use of new communication machines a kind
of all-media all-encompassing drama is possible.
The Theatre of Cruelty described by An-
tonin Artaud back in the 1930's is now made
effective, is brought to fruition, we feel
necessity of it, and the new language it provides.
Artaud writes (1936): "Theatre, which is
no Thing, but makes use of everything —
gestures, sounds, words, screams, light, darkness — rediscovers itself at precisely the
point where the mind requires a language to
express its manifestations."
Adam's Way
booms away
in fine style
By DENA BALVA
Adam's Way by San Francisco poet Robert Duncan is
a 1-o-n-g poem for voices
which has only a distant relationship to drama.
The battle over whether
poetry does or does not have
a place in contemporary play
is irrelevant here since Duncan's imagination is auditory
rather than theatrical.
It relies for effect on variety of pitch and tone color
and etymological and phonological word-play such as
tho series "fails . . . falls . . .
fouls" or "woman . . . wife-
man . . . womb-man".
At the UBC reading a major difficulty, for some at
least, was the occult literature which forms the mythological basis of the poem.
The unfamiliar nature of
the material limited the audience's appreciation of the
poetry.
The readers, chosen by Duncan himself for the quality
of their voices, chirped, rasped or boomed away in fine
style.
LOOK, LOOK
SOON:   the   other   side   of
Rhodesia.
ALSO SOON: all about happiness.
PLUS:   the   christian   corner.
pf 3hree
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Friday,  February   11,   1966
THE        UBYSSEY
Page 7 ARMSTRONG & RE A
OPTOMETRISTS
EYES EXAMINED 2 Convenient Offices. . .
■BROADWAY at GRANVILLE
CONTACT LENSES      .i/toDicnm c   /iw* _tvc\i_
Sport Shirts:
Casual and
Attractive
Comfortable too; for classes, relaxing or those active
endeavors only college students indulge in. Eaton's
has them in variety in a price range to suit the most
modest of budgets. And in patterns and styles that will
adapt to whatever you do, wherever you go.
Guitars too. You'll find these at Eaton's too. No need
to write home for money for one, you can afford it out
of your allowance; well, almost. The guitar comes with
a case, you have to grow the hair and beard.
EATON'S
FRIEDHOT
DRAMA
Immortal headache just pain
By DENA  BALVA
David Watmough's Friedhof was a tossed salad of
such diversified dramatic
styles that no amount of oil
FRIEDHOF. critic David
Walmough's first play. At
the Freddy Wood Theatre.
Feb.  3-4.  Promising.
administered by the director,
Michael Irwin, could have
made is digestible fare.
Ostensibly a protest against
the mechanization of life,
Friedhof, using the styles of
Becket, Shakespeare, Eliot
and Good Housekeeping
magazine, was in fact a somewhat less than moving representation of man's existence on the edge of the
grave.
Watmough's hero, called
Youth, has the headache of
immortality. Unfortunately,
with lines such as "Like a
stuck  joke  box  is  festered
ERIC SAGER
identity searcher
behind this bandage", the
pain was transferred to a
different portion of the spectators' anatomy.
Malcolm Crane as the
Youth achieved a certain
amount of understated sensitivity but was unable to prevent his lines sounding like
parody. Lionel Lukin Johnston, Eric Sager and Jocelyn
Watson were competent in
supporting roles although all
tended to deliver their lines
in a monotone.
The production was technically adequate although
the lighting was unimaginative at best and the haphazard setting worked against
the author's stated intention
to avoid being needlessly obscure.
Similarly, spraying the
audience with floral bath-
r o o m deodorizer, while
thoughtful, was no help.
Mr. Watmough, as your
play's sexton says, "You've
come a long way." But not
far enough.
No excuse for atrocity
By AL FRANCIS
Possibly The Pawnbroker could be forgiven its primary fault of unbridled horror
were it excellent in some facet other than
its settings.
Unfortunately, it falls painfully short in
every other way.
The film centres on a Jewish pawnbroker
in Harlem, who suffered the most excruci-
The Pawnbroker, starring Rod Steiger.
Odeon downtown. Atrocious.
ating horrors of Auschwitz. His fate was to
survive while all that he loved, that made
life meaningful died.
He continues to exist from day to day
avoiding the unbearably painful memories
and hoping for death to relieve him of a
tasteless, meaningless life.
His buried memories are resurrected in
gruesome detail through flashbacks which
pound at the audience with the delicate
finesse of a sledgehammer.
The Pawnbroker is a worse tear-jerker
than One Potato, Two Potato, and a worse
film.
The photography is unimaginative, leaving
the task of producing an effective screen
impact to the editing, which is little better
than dull.
The plot is iboringly repetitious without
excuse or reason. It appears that an attempt
was made to cover up this fact with subplots.
These senseless, dead-end sub-plots cluttered the film beyound belief.
With the exception of Rod Steiger's strained performance and a couple of Negro thugs,
the acting is stilted and amateurish.
Third-rate screenplay, casting, and unconvincing acting conspire to produce prolonged
and frequent scenes of utter triteness.
Poor direction turns Steiger's potentially
good acting into an almost comic caricature,
fraught with screen-filled close-ups of endless tortured grimaces like those of a man
who has bitten into a particularly sour
lemon.
In the last scene, clumsily symbolic of the
crucifixion, Steiger skewers his hand with a
paper spike.
It should happen to the film.
*'",
UBC^«^
£> c    ON YOUR
Oj   RESIDENCE
RADIO DIAL
<a
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Goes All Out On
VALENTINES DAY
12:30 - Brock "CUPID'S FOLLIES"
Free Record Hop, All the Latest Records, Free Prizes
Greet Your Valentine Over UBC Radio's
"Sweetheart* Line"
Day, CA 4-3242 - local 33 Night, CA 4-3245
GREETINGS - REQUESTS - DEDICATIONS
From 8:30 a.m. — 10:30 p.m.
Page 8
THE
UBYSSEY
Friday, February   11,   1966 There are tv/o governments
in the world which would honestly favor the reunification of
Germany: the United States and
West German  governments.
The United States sees a
strong, united Germany as its
chief ally in the containment
of Russia in Europe, while the
West Germans are convinced
that reunification would result
in the elimination of Communist  influence from  Germany.
Other powers, while paying
lip service to the concept of
reunification, are by no means
eager to see it realized. Even
the other NATO allies are wary
of a unified, rearmed Germany.
France, for example, has
fought three major wars in the
last hundred years against
Germany, while it has been
threatened from Russia since
Napoleonic times. England was
engaged in a life and death
struggle against Germany just
, a generation ago. Many other
European countries also harbor
bitter memories of German
militarism.
Thus the paradoxical situation has arisen that America's
allies are in fact aligned with
America's chief opponent on an
important matter of policy.
When President De Gaulle
visits Moscow in June, he will
have ample common grounds
for discussion with the Soviet
leaders. Neither he, nor they,
wish to see Germany reunified
and rearmed.
The United States has pursued her rearmament of Germany with a strange disregard
for the opinions and sensibilities of her allies. Recently
the Defence Department
awarded a fifty million dollar
contract to Rheinmetall of
Dusseldorf, a West German
arms manufacturer which had
used slave labor from Hitler's
concentration camps during
World War II. Many French,
Belgian, or Dutch citizens
toiled in slavery for this company that the U.S. is now
favoring with a huge order of
arms.
The question of nuclear
weapons for Germany is of
greater consequence than the
awarding of a relatively minor
defense contract, but once
more the U.S. is pressing for a
policy in direct opposition to
the desires of her allies.
To give West Germany control over nuclear arms is to
give her the potential to provoke a war with Russia, the
allies believe, and thus to drag
the entire western world into
an unnecessary and unwanted
holocaust. The Americans maintain that a Germany with nuclear weapons would discourage
Russian aggression, and thus
diminish the possibility of war.
The difference arises from
the divergencies between the
American and European concepts of the Cold War. The
U.S. sees every political occurence as a part of some global
struggle that the Western,
democracies are waging against
the forces of international
communism. Viet Nam, Korea,
Hungary, Cuba, the Dominican
Republic, and the Berlin Wall
are all stages in the conflict
that is leading to an Armageddon, whence either communism
or the western nations must
emerge victorious. In this context, the stronger Germany is,
the weaker are the communist
opponents. European leaders,
on the other hand, refuse to
simplify the present international situation into a life and
death struggle between opposing ideologies. They recognize
the role that regional and national interests play in the
cold war. Thus they understand, and to a large extent
share, Russia's fear of a
united, militarized German.
Russia has suffered more
than any country from German
aggression, and she is sincerely afraid that the spirit of re-
vanchism would once more set
Germany against her if Germany possessed the means for
the struggle. This fear lies at
the basis of Russia's European
policy, and it is this fear which
American policymakers mistake for unprovoked belligerency.
It is to be hoped that De
Gaulle can convince the Russian leaders that America's
European allies will themselves
oppose the creation of a Germany unified for the purpose
of posing a military threat to
the U.S.S.R.  .
|,f 5ive
Spring  Formal Specials
Complete Outfit
Tuxedos Colored Tails
$6.50 Jackets $8.50
$7.50
E. A. LEE Formal Wear Rentals
623 Howe (Downstairs)      MU 3-2457
(jetting HHlattkJi?
Yours for the Asking . . . Our FREE
"Take Home" Invitation Album — mailed
to you or call at our store
Careful  advice expertly  given   to  "Away
From   Home"  Brides
™* card shop
Corner Robson and Burrard
MU 4-4011
CUISINE AT ITS BEST!
MODERN CAFE
Bavarian Room   -:-   3005 W. Broadway
RE 6 9012
A VALENTINE OFFER ...
Bring in Your Sweetheart (opposite sex)
and this coupon and receive
Two Sundaes of Your Choice
for the Price of One
PETERS ICE CREAM
3204 W. Broadway and Park Royal
OFFER GOOD  THROUGH   FEBRUARY   15,  19(56
Also get a Free Sundae on Your Birthday
SHAKEY'S
PIZZA  PARLOUR
1026   GRANVILLE ST.
Tke Drtih fyitH
FEB. 7-19
Friday,  February   11,   1966
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 9 Angers angry quartet
shocks, pleases critic
By JUDY BING
Kenneth Anger's quartet
of films, shown last Monday, was the best of the
Festival.
The first is a sensitive
essay on the fountains of
Rome, entirely in shades of
blue, with a masked figure
of uncertain purpose running
among the repeated arches of
water to the music of Vivaldi's Four Seasons Suite. The
cool, fresh purity, the fluid
texture, the very feel of
the water is transmitted by
Anger's  visual poetry.
The second (and only black
and white) film of the four,
Fireworks — the nightmare
of a young navy recruit—is
in the style Antonin Artaud
has called the Theatre of
Cruelty.
This nightmare is a collage
of homosexual castration fantasies, of a group of young
sailors beating the central
figure with chains, and of the
eventual dismemberment of
his body. It is a fine, if
shocking, study in the violence done to the subconscious by sexual repression
and the latent homosexual
tendencies which emerge in
an all-male milieu such as
the services.
Scorpio Rising is a superb
documentary on the motorcycle gang Hell's Angels in
all its splendid vulgarity,
accompanied entirely by a
medley of mindless rock-and-
roll songs.
It is also a commentary
on the psychology of the
hoodlum obsessed by material things, with his motorcycle, with bodies, with his
leather jacket decorated with
the medals and symbols of
his group.
He is also obsessed with
death and has a noose above
his bed together with news
paper clippings about traffic
fatalities. He arrives at a
group orgy in a skeleton
costume. He seeks violent
thrills to tempt a violent
death.
Throughout the film, segments showing Christ and his
disciples from an old Cecil
B. De Mille movie are interposed with shots of Hell's
Angels alternately racing
their motorcycles and undressing each other at a bac-
chanalia, bringing into high
relief the absurdity of religion in the hoodlum's
world.
Inauguration of the Pleas-
sure Dome is a lavish debauch in the pretentious Fellini manner, accompanied by
arias from an obscure opera.
It is the poorest of the four
films.
Macabre men and women
costumed to suggest Oriental,
baroque French, ancient
Greek, Roman, Egyptian,
and Norse traditions in their
more degenerate aspects parade across the screen, swallowing jewels and drinking
ambrosia to inaugurate this
dome of unwholesome sensuality.
This sort of visual feast
becomes rather cloying when
nothing more substantial
than dessert is served.
. Kenneth's Anger's films
are accompanied only by
music — no dialogue. Another film maker, Maya
Derek, has returned to entirely silent movies.
It is significant to note that
38 years after the advent of
the talkies leading young
film makers are returning
literally to the moving picture, trimmed of verbalization, the pure image of man.
pf 6ix
SPONSORED   BY  THE  ALMA  MATER   SOCIETY  AND   INTERNATIONAL  HOUSE
INTERNATIONAL
BALL-
SATURDAY  FEBRUARY 12th
i
8:30 p.m. - 12:00 p.m. A
it
THE HOTEL VANCOUVER BALLROOM
2 BANDS ! I I Trinidad Steel Band,
Brick Henderson's Orchestra
SEMI FORMAL, FORMAL OR
NATIONAL DRESS
TICKETS: $5.00 PER COUPLE
$2.75 SINGLE
Available Ah
International House
Alma Mater Society
Graduate Student Centre
Hudson's Bay Co.
^
GARNETTS
GARNELENE
r-Swfnctt t?/ ii^Ctni
•j Leu wood
SPORTCOAT
The man who wears a Progress brand garment sets the
pace for spring. Progress brand tailoring and styling are
splendidly reflected in the newly arrived spring suits,
jackets and slacks. Detail by detail these garments are
built and moulded with patience and skill by Progress
brand craftsmen. See our spring selection featuring the
new "Antrique Jade" and  "Black Ruby" colourings.
Clintcn's
mErrs WEAR
742 Granville
MU 1-5625
Clothing for campus and dress-up occasions
Page  10
THE        UBYSSEY
Friday, February   11,   1966 Friday,   February   11,   1966
THE        UBYSSEY
Page  11
Dalhousie Liberals
deface student paper
HALIFAX (CUP) —For the
second time this year the Dalhousie Gazette has been confiscated and defaced by a student organization.
This time it was the campus
Liberals.
Gordon Hunter, Liberal candidate in the coming Model
Parliament elections, and Kirk
Tennis boys
upset Yank
netters 7-6
Four members of the UBC's
"A" tennis team travelled to
Portland last weekend and
beat the best from that city.
Each match consisted of just
two sets and the UBC team of
Don McCormick, Al Skelton,
Tony Bardsley and Bob Moffat
won 7-6.
The competition wasn't decided until the last set of the
doubles which was won by
Skelton and Bardsley after
they split the first two sets.
CHEMISTRY
101   STUDENTS
If you would like the re-,
warding thrill that Chem.
labs can  bring, drop into
THE COLLEGE SHOP
Brock Extension
for your new
"Complete Guide
to
Chemistry 101 Labs"
$2.50
MtlSCRimOM
95
EYEGLASSES
r» «*iew_   Includes (§ # I
All Doctor's Eyeglass Prescriptions filled. Only first
quality materials used. AU
work performed by qualified
Opticians.
GRANVILLE  OPTICAL
861 Granville MU 3-SM1
ayMoimv Back Ouarsnlii —
RUSHANT
CAMERAS
4538 West 10th
THE STORE WITH THE
TECHNICAL   PHOTO   KNOWLEDGE
For all your Photographic Needs,
Equipment and Supplies
Park
224-5858     R£r    224-9112
MacCullough, his campaign
manager, pried open a window
of the Gazette office and hijacked 3,500 copies of the Feb.
4 edition. The newspapers
were returned last Feb. 6 with
VOTE LIBERAL stamped in
large red letters on the front
of each issue.
Hunter and MacCullough's
timing was off and when they
returned the marked copies
they ran head-on into the Gazette editor-in-chief, Terry
Morley.
After blasting the culprits
Morley impounded the spoiled
copies and ordered the edition
reprinted. He is demanding
that student council ask the
Liberals to pick up the $100
for the printing.
Morley said he is considering legal action on a number
of counts including breaking
and entering and conversion of
the newspaper into a propaganda leaflet. "Their childish
and unwarranted action will
not go unnoticed," he said.
Dalhousie student union
president Robbie Shaw called
Hunter and MacCullough's actions "completely unwarranted" and "showed a complete
lack of judgment."
He said $100 is too much
to charge a campus club, but
the final decision will be made
by council.
Newspaper stamping has
been a yearly affair with the
Dalhousie engineers. Until this
year, when council levied a
$20 fine, the practice went unpunished.
Morley said council must set
a precedent now or soon every
organization on campus will
feel it has the right "to defeat
the Gazette with its propaganda."
iv
COMING   SOON!
THE  EX-MAGEE  DANCE
featuring The Shockers
n
Sat., Feb. 19, 1966
Vancouver Hotel
Refreshments Served
$4.25 Couple
8:30-1:00
Tickets: AM 1-2466
AM 1-6230
EVERYONE WELCOME
OPTICAL DEPT.
Bring your optical prescription
to us and save!
Glasses   Single vision from _.  9.95
Bifocals from 12.95
Contact Lenses    49.50
ONE LOCATION ONLY
677 Granville, opp. the Bay, 681-6174
1 Hour Free Parking at Rile Park
Boys and girls together
begin curling playoffs
The Pete Arnet rink, representing UBC, starts on the
road   to   the   O'Keefe's   national   mixed   curling   finals
Arnet with Faye Thompson at third, second Ed Clark
and Mary Anne Hauubauer throwing lead stones, play at
at 9 a.m. against the McPherson Club entry in the opening
round of the 11-rink Zone 3 Playdowns held at the Thunderbird Winter Sports Centre.
Two rinks will come out of the double-knockout competition and play in the Pacific Coast Curling Association
Championships at Qualicum Beach, Vancouver Island,
next weekend.
"ONE OF THE YEAR'S BEST"
— /V Y   Jm,,-:
224-3730     4375 W. 10th
Feature
7:15 - 9:35
Students $1.25
FKDKRICO FKI.IJNI
^lULICT
W OF THE
Spirits
We bend an ear to undergraduate money
problems of all kinds, from setting up a savings
account, to budgeting, to discussing your financial
future. Any time we can be of help . . .
#♦
WSSi
ROYAL BANK
AMS CHARTER FLIGHT
TO LONDON
May 21 to August 13
$400.
PLEASE NOTE: All those interested in
travelling on this flight are urged to
submit their applications as soon as
possible, as the plane is filling up
rapidly.
Inquiries will be received concerning
the possibility of one way tickets on the
flight.
Anyone interested in a proposed charter flight to London
leaving Vancouver Aug. 24, 1966 and returning on
September 14, 1966 at a cost of $340 is asked to leave
their name with the receptionist in the AMS office.
Students and their families (parents or spouse and child)
are eligible.
APPLICATIONS AT AMS OFFICE Page  12
THE       UBYSSEY
Thursday, February   10,   1966
TWEEN CLASSES
Arts festival whirrs on
FESTIVAL  AND  SPECIAL
EVENTS
More dirty flicks at 3:30 in
Aud. 35 cents. Electronic concert at noon in Ang. 104. Free!
Robert Duncan's verse play
Adam's Way 3:30 in Ed. 100.
Free.
• •      •
PRE-SOCIAL WORK
Mr. Goad from New Haven
speaks Monday noon in Bu.
202.
• •      •
BRIDGE CLUB
Annual Intercollegiate Campus par Bridge Touranment to
be held Monday at 7 p.m. in
Brock T.V. Lounge.
• •      •
ALPHA OMEGA SOC
General meeting Monday
noon in Bu. 223.
• •      •
UBC NDP
Seminar tonight at 8 p.m. in
Bu. Penthouse. Discussion and
refreshments.
• •      •
ENGLISH LECTURES
Special lecture series called
Perspectives at noon in Ed. 100.
Professor Durrant will speak.
• •      •
PRE-DENTAL SOC
Banquet tonight at 7:00 in
the Grad Students Centre.
• •      •
SUS
Nominations for executive
positions open on Monday, Feb.
14 and close on Wednesday,
Feb. 23. For details enquire at
Hut Q-8.
ALLIANCE FRANCAISE
French day at IH. Film at
noon and discussion.
• •      •
VIET  NAM  COMMITTEE
General meeting to discuss
March 26 march, all welcome.
Monday noon, aud. Film—Mills
of the Gods.
• •      •
LUTHERAN STUDENTS
Judy sounds out. Tonight at
10 p.m. at the Student Centre
4608 W. 10th. Dr. J. Conway
speaks Monday noon in Bu.
104. Everyone welcome.
DESERET CLUB
Dr. Dale Tingley speaks on
the Philosophy of Mormonism.
Monday noon in Bu. 100.
• •      •
UBC SOCREDS
Special meeting Monday
noon in Bu. 313 to discuss
plans for upcoming trip to Vic
toria.
• •      •
UN CLUB
Latin America Week, Brazil,
noon in Bu. 203. Discussion
noon Monday at IH.
MAKE YOUR
WEEKEND
RESERVATION
EARLY
Now Renting To Those 21 Years And Over
Type of Car
24 Hour Day
Weekends
Acadian
Chevy II
$5.00 & 5c
$12.00 &  5c
Valiant
Comet
$6.00 & 5c
$14.00 & 5c
Parisienne
Galaxy
Impala
Mustang
$8.00 & 5c
$18.00  & 5c
Save up to 40% on Special overnight rate. Any car in
our fleet — $5 & 5c per mile.
You Pay Only For The Gas You Use
BUDGET RENT-A-CAR
New Location
1058 Alberni
Phone
685-0536
The Player's Jack( I 1 i h on J l'> B -M'\M \t   ml.r   !    t*   ll.lUI'rv.
Come on over to smoothness
with no letdown in taste      i
Hi   ,1 ( •'   T.M.
Come on over to
New!
Player's
Kings
CLASSIFIED
Publications Office: Brock Hall. Ext. 26. 224-3242
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Lost & Found
11
FOUND ADS inter-ted free. Publications office, Brock Hall. Local 26,
224-3242.
LOST: BROWN PURSE, TUESDAY
in Buch. Purse and contents needed urgently. Please return to Ptpc-
tor's  office  in  North  Brock.
LOST: A CROYDON RAINCOAT AT
dance at Totem's. Picked up one
by mistake, please phone George
at RE 8-7834.
LOST: SILVER BUTANE LIGHTER
—inscription "Brad". Reward. Ph.
228-2208.
LOST FEB. IstIN BUCHANAN 222,
gold watch, artificial rubies. Desperate.   Please   phone   Bonnie  t&.,
224-9038.
I HAVE YOUR RAINCOAT; YOU
have mine since Wed., Feb 2, outside Bac. 200 lab. Phone Dave, 987-
1903.
LADY'S WATCH — TISSOT.  LOST
on  Chancellor  or Beach.   Reward.
Ph. 224-6846.
Valentine Greetings
12
JAN, A PINK VALENTINE TO YOU
—R.D.
LIZZY: WITH MUCH DEAR, DEAR
Love,  Always,  DREWY.
TIGER — KISSES AND CUDDLES,
x x x x x x x"x
from your only Valentine.	
LOVE AND KISSES TO VALENTINES. 1 through 10. Gordie. Num-
11? Phone 224-9953.
HAPPY   VALENTINE   TO   LITTLE
Running Scar, xoxo xoxo xoxo xoxo
GOOD-BYE   KITTEN
TIGER!
TO SOMEONE ALWAYS SO DEAR
to my heart SYC. Very Happy
Valentine, my Special One! Ybur
help Is badly needed. Help! Without you, I'll be lost in darkness,
and can't see what I fare. However
I must Fight the odds, not afraid
of failure. Though hopes start to
fade, yet I'll always keep unfalter-.
ing trust in You. Rem'ber someone's future N happiness depend
On You. Reward? Broken heart
meets broken Dreams . . . Never
so stubborn before . . . Never give
up!	
TED: BE MY VALENTINE AND
your teeth will always be fulf of
cavities! XXOX
HAPPY TWENTIETH BIRTHDAY,
C.B. From Carol, Jack, Berig, Greg,
Penny, Rick, and Ringo.    	
SINCE    IT'S    VALENTINE'S    DAY,
Here's my Heart. Happy Feb. 14th.
DEAR J'ESPERE, BE MY VALENTINE — Que voulez vous encore.
T-2-T.
TONI PESQUITSKI AND MERINA
BULLONI went down to the seal to
play — said Toni Pesqliitski to
Merina Bulloni, "Happy, Happy
Valentine's Day."
DEAR GRANDMA HAPPY VALEN-
tine Day. Love Grandpa S.Y.O.B.M.
ATTENTION! PAULETTE, CAROL,
Janet, Susan, Rossanne and Judy.
Phone 266-2297 after si.x Sat. nite
for Valentine treats. Al.
TO MY VALENTINES: DOLORES,
Mary Ann, Crazy Jane, Mary, Gail:
All Our Love,  Ulli and Mickey.
Special Notices
13
WHY PAY HIGH AUTO INSUR-
ance rates? If you are over 20
and have a good driving history
you qualify for our good driving
rates.  Phone Ted  Elliott,  224-6707.
VALENTINE A - GO - GO. DANCE
to the Escorts. Jewish Community
Centre. 41st and Oak St. Saturday, Feb. 12, 9 p.m. to 1 a.m.
Tickets A.M.S. — $3.00 couple.
Nisei   Varsity   Club.
ROCK TO THE ACCENTS IN THE
Lower Mall Ballroom, Wed. 9-1,
Feb. 16th. Just before mid-term
break. I guess so,  eh?!! "	
SORRY FOLKS! THE SONICS
can't come. But, from Seattle we
have the "Bootmen" and the
"Liberty Party." Also Kentish
Steele and The Shantelles. Only
$1.25,   9-1  a.m.,   Friday!   Armories.
SKI FORBIDDEN PLATEAU,
Courtenay, Vancouver Island. T-Toar
will operate Thurs. and Fri. of
mid-term break if numbers warrant. Call Mel, 224-3103 by Feb.' 14
for information.
COME TO THE INTERNATIONAL
Ball, Saturday, Feb. 12th, Hotel
Vancouver Ballroom, two bands!
International floorshow. $5 per
couple. Tickets AMS and International  House.
All My Thoughts, All My Wishes,
With All My Heart,
Now and Always,  Valentine.
— Love, Pussycat.
NOTICE! THE ROCK BEAT ARE
booked solid till Feb. 23. If you
wish to hire us after that d&te,
phone Keith, AM 1-7840.	
SKI AT TODD MTN. OVER BREAK.
Room in car for two girls. Call
RE 8-4504 for details.
ARTS-A-GO-GO-GO; ARTS U.S.
elections nominations close Feb. 16.
See Bu.  182.
CRAIGEY STURROCK, KING OF
the Polacks, calls an all Trollop
meeting at the Kappa Sigma House
—Nickel Chippies invited!
Transportation
14
WANTED RIDE TO TRAIL DUR-
ing mid-term break. Will share
driving (if you wish) and all expenses.   Phone   Sheila,   224-7821.
HELP! RIDE NEEDED FROM ED-
mond's area of Grandview Hwy.
for 8:30 classes. M.T.W.T.F. Return about 5:30 every day. Phone
Dafcy, LA 2-3613.
WANTED RIDE FROM 23rd AND
Puget Dr. M.W.F. 9:30-5:30. Call
Jim, RE 1-3925.
AUTOMOTIVE & MARINE
Automobiles For Sale
21
53 CHEV. 2-DOOR, EXCELLENT
running cond., 2 snow tires, $80 or
offer. Phone Janet, RE 3-2687 after
6:00 p.m.
58 ZEPHYR, EXCELLENT COJJD.
Low mileage, also '57 Austin, "rebuilt engine, A-l cond. YU 8-2980
after 5:30.
HILLMAN MANUALMATIC 1958,
4-dr., top condition, 1965 re-built
motor, one owner, new tires. Terms
to be discussed. Call 224-7374 or
522-1924  after 5 p.m.
'61 TRIUMPH HERALD. GOOD
running cond. TR 4-7236, Walter,
after 5:30.
'57 DELUX V.W. FOREST-GREEN,
new tires, radio, leather interior,
new motor. Bill, 228-8496. Open to
offers.
FOR SALE: 1951 CHEV. DEPEND-
able transportation. Looks bad,
runs well. Phone Rob, HE 3-4038.
Motorcycles
27
305   CC   HONDA,   CHEAP.   PHONE
Dave at 224-0467 evenings.
BUSINESS SERVICES
Sewing & Alterations
.40
GRADUATION GOWNS; SHEATH
dresses; separates. Custom designed and made by European designer. Reasonable prices. 731-2003
evenings.
Typewriters 8c Repairs
42
GOOD CLEAN TYPEWRITERS, $S0
up. Also Typewriter repairs at
50 percent savings. Poison Typewriters, 2140 W. 4th. Phone RE
1-8322.
Typing
43
PROFESSIONAL TYPING, ARDALE
Griffiths Limited, 70th and Granville,  263-4530.
TYPING: 25c PAGE OR $1.95 HR.
West End, 685-5539 eves. Campus
pick-up & deliverey 224-6341 (John)
leave tel. no.
FAST, ACCURATE TYPING SER-
vice on essays, theses, term papers.
Reasonable rates. Mrs. More, RE
1-7496.
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted
51
PIZZA PATIO IS CONTINUING
with its policy of making employment available to students for part
time evening work—one or two
evenings a week. Students considering applying must have clean
driving record for use of Company
cars and be 21 years of age or
older. Contact Manager at .the
Pizza Patio most convenient to
you after 5 p.m. Locations in Kerrisdale, South Van., Downtown
and  West   Van.
PS:   New   outlet   now   open   close
to  U.B.C.
AMS PUBLICATIONS OFFICE RE-
quires experienced clerk-typist "for
eight months employment per year,
Sept.-April. Due to this fact, the
campus location, and the _york involved the job is especially suitable
for a lady married to a senior student or a staff member. No children. Applicants must be available
for at least the next two years. For
further information call Manager
of  Student  Publications,   224-3242.
INSTRUCTION
Tutoring
64
TUTOR FOR RUSSIAN, POLISH,
Serbocroation. Phone 738-4933 after
7 p.m. ;	
CHEM 101: COMJPLETE GUIDES. TO
Chem 101 Labs available now at
the College Shop, Brock extension.
• Complete with data, procedure,
calculations       and       discussions.
• Helps you to obtain a better
perspective and understanding of
your labs. • If you would like the
rewarding thrill that Chem Labs
can bring, drop into The College
Shop, Brock Extension, for your
new "Complete Guide to Chem "101
Labs",   $2.50.
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
MUST SELL HARMONY ELECTRIC
Guitar and Honda 50, fully equipped. Cheap.  Ph.  CA 4-1203, nights.
RENTALS & REAL ESTATE
Rooms
81
SINGLE OR DOUBLE ROOM FOR
male student: kitchen privileges,
common room, congenial social
atmosphere; two blocks from gates.
Phone 224-9092.
BED SITTING ROOM. SHARE KIT-
chen and other home privileges.
Faculty or senior student preferred
(female).    References    exchanged.
CA 4-4282.	
LOOKING FOR ROOMMATE (Male),
preferably upper years, to share
expenses of fully furnished two
bedroom apartment. Call at 2-1911
Yew St.  (Very reasonable rent.)
Room & Board
82
ROOM AND BOARD (OPTIONAL).
Near gates, 1st & 2nd yr. male students. Excellent study facilities.
224-1631.	
ON CAMPUS ROOM A,ND BOARD.
PSI. Upsilon Fraternity. Phone
224-979*.

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