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The Ubyssey Mar 13, 2001

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The Health
Plan stays
 by Alex Dimson
In a near duplication of last
year's referendum result, nearly
4000 students turned out in last
week's referendum to re-affirm
support for the student Health
and Dental Plan.
3870 students voted in favour
of continuing the current Alma
Mater Society (AMS) and
Graduate Student Society (GSS)
Health and Dental Plan, a mandatory health plan that covers a portion of students' health costs for
$168 ayear. 1354 students voted
against it
The referendum question
asked students, "Should the AMS
withdraw from the AMS/GSS
Health and Dental Plan at the end
of the current contract (August
31st, 2001)."
The referendum easily
achieved the ten per cent turnout
(3300 votes) necessary to reach
quorum—the number of votes
required to make the referendum
result valid-a number that has
traditionally been hard for AMS
referendums to achieve.
While Kathy Lo—an organiser
of the 'Yes' campaign and one of
the student petitioners who originally forced the AMS to conduct
the referendum—said that she
will not appeal, she also indicated
that she was displeased with the
result.
"It really shows how apathetic
students at UBC are. I'm really
disappointed about the result,"
she said.
Lo expressed concern that
while graduate students are
enjoying the benefits and support
the health plan, undergraduate
students are not aware or do not
support it but did not turn out to
vote.
But Annick Gauthier, the
organiser of the 'No' campaign
See "Referendum" on page 5
Ex-prof liable for
whipping patient
Court rules against former UBC prof
for forcing master-slave relationship
by Alex Dimson
The former head of UBC's psychiatry department has been
instructed to pay over half a million in damages for forcing a
patient into a bizarre
master-slave relationship.
James Tyhurst was found
liable by Judge David Vickers of
the BC Supreme Court in a civil
law proceeding and was ordered
to pay one of his former patients
Jill Gorman $556,790.
Gorman, who' launched the
civil suit, claimed that in a 11-
year period beginning in 1979,
Tyhurst forced her into a master-slave relationship, gradually
taking control of all aspects of her
fife.
She claimed that the situation
escalated to the point where
Tyhurst regularly forced her to
strip from the waist up and stand
against a wall while he whipped
her back repeatedly.
Gorman testified that Tyhurst
whipped her between eight and
12 times per one-hour session,
which she said were-first held in
Tyhurst's UBC office, and later
moved to his house once Tyhurst
left the university.
Tyhurst—now 78 and retired—
continues to deny all of the accusations.
Between 1959 and 1970,
Tyhurst served as the head of
UBC's psychology department,
and he continued as a professor
until the mid-1980s.
Tyhurst had been treating
Gorman for severe depression
and bulimia while she was a UBC
student
See "Hurst" on page 4
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Big bonus for Strangway
$91,000 for ex-UBCprez
by Stanley Tromp
A recently revealed $91,000 'retirement allowance' given to
former UBC President David Strangway after he left office in
1997 has angered some university officials.
The lump sum bonus was written into his contract, and is
in addition to his two-year full salaried administrative leave
and pension, according to UBC's Vice-President of Legal and
External Affairs Dennis Pavlich.
Pat McGeer, a UBC medical researcher and former BC
advanced education minister, called the bonus 'totally outrageous."
"No' ministry in Victoria would allow this for an employee," McGeer said.
The arrangement is not without precedent in BC.
While former Simon Fraser University (SFU) President
Jack Blaney received no retirement allowance upon leaving
SFU, his predecessor John Stubbs ended his five-year presidential term one year early by mutual agreement Stubbs
was paid a presidential salary for the final year, in addition
to receiving a one year leave at his professorial salary.
University of Victoria officials have said that UVic doesn't
give retirehient bonuses, and current UBC President Martha
Piper has no such bonus in her contract
feedback@ubyssey.bc.ca      www.ubyssey.bc.ca
See "Bonus" on page 4
STRANGWAY: The former UBC president looks on.
RICHARD LAM/UBYSSEY FILE PHOTO TUESDAY, MARCH 13, 2001
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SPARTACUS BOOKS Spring Sale, Mar
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www.palmer.edu THE UBYSSEY
NEWS
TUESDAY, MARCH 13, 2001
Women rally
 by Sarah Morrison
Women rallied on Saturday to raise awareness
of the plight of women in Canada and around
the world, in celebration of International
Women's Day.
At the rally—held at Grandview Park on
Commercial Drive—speakers highlighted
women's victories over the years, but also
addressed the struggles of women, including
aboriginal women in Canada.
"We are here to expose the systematic, religious, legal, and governmental abuse of
women in eveiy country," said Shalah, a
member of Vancouver's International
Women's Day 2001 organising committee.
"We are here to celebrate our struggle."
One of the key speakers at the event was
Moirrie Baradaran, recipient of the 2000
International Human Rights Award.
Baradaran, who currently lives in Germany,
was a political prisoner in Iran for nine years.
Baradaran said that women are still far
from achieving equalityi
"I am one of the thousands of Iranian
women jailed for many years just for their
political beliefs," she said, adding that
although celebrating International Women's
Day is prohibited in Iran, women still celebrate the day in small groups, and in their
homes.
"The ruling clergy of Iran has transformed
my country into a big prison.. .but has not been
able to crush women's resistance," Baradaran
added.
Speakers also highlighted the advances in
women's rights that have occured in the last
centuiy.
"When I started celebrating International
Women's Day about 2 5 years ago, I needed to
explain to everybody what it's all about," said
Geraldine Glattstein, executive director of the
Women Against Violence Against Women rape
crisis centre.
Now, she continued, she works for an
organisation that not only knows about the
day, but recognises it as a statutory holiday.
Glattstein said that the BC government had
played an important role in advancing the
issue of women's equality. Since 1991, she
explained, the number of women holding
provincial cabinet positions has risen from 12
to 34 per cent
'Our provincial government, as little or as
much as we think of them, has created the first
ministry of women's equality," Glattstein
added.
Women also celebrated World March of
Women 2000, an event held last October that
saw thousands of women march to protest
deteriorating conditions for women around
the world.
CELEBRATING INTERNATIONAL WOMEN'S DAY: Men, women, and dogs took to the
streets on Saturday to focus attention on women's rights, sarah morrison photo
In Canada, 50,000 women marched to
Parliament Hill to present the federal government with 13 immediate demands—"The
Feminist Dozen'—which they said would
advance women's rights.
Among the demands were calls for proactive pay equity legislation, increased spending
on social housing, and a national child-care
fund with an initial $2 billion contribution.
Lee Lakeman, a regional representative for
the Canadian Association of Sexual Assault
Centres, who spoke at the Ottawa rally, called
on the crowd to celebrate the various groups
of women in attendance at the rally.
"My job is to help you celebrate International
Women's Day," Lakeman said. 'Usually I'm the
one who brings you the miserable
[statistics]...today I want you to celebrate." ♦
SPEAKERS AT RALLY
CRITICISE TREATMENT
OF TIBETANS
Arts County Fair posters
take over campus space
by Michelle Bastlan
On the 42nd anniversary of the
Tibetan uprising against Chinese
occupation, Tibetans and their supporters held a rally in Robson
Square on Saturday to increase
awareness about Tibet's political
situation,
China invaded Tibet over 50
years ago, but the situation in the
countiy remains highly contested,
according to the Dalai Lama, the
Buddhist spiritual leader of the
Tibetan people who has been
exiled since 1949.
•' In a statement issued to mark
the anniversary of the uprising, the
Dalai Lama said that the countiy is
facing 'increasing repression, environmental "destruction, and alarming developments undermining the
identity and culture of Tibet*
But demonstrators on Saturday
expressed hope for Tibet's future,
Kate Woznow, a member of
UBC's chapter of Students for a
Free Tibet went to Beijing during
the recent Team Canada trade mission to protest the Chinese occupation of Tibet Woznow said that she
feels that 'this movement is really
starting to take a positive change.".
WozrtoVs actions have helped
create momentum that many in
the Tibetan community hope will
resolve the conflict, according to
Naomi Gyurme, a representative
from the Canada Tibet Committee.
"One of the biggest things is to
keep that energy going now that it
- has started/ said Gyurme. 'Every
year we hold [the rallyj hoping that
next year we won't have to hold it
again, that instead of having a
demonstration that we'll be able to
celebrate the .freedom of Tibet* * .
, Gyurme said that the date cho*
sen for the demonstration is.impor-
tant since it marks 'the first time
that the Tibetans demonstrated uni-
0ed resistance against the Chinese.*
Speakers at the rally harshly
criticised the Chinese government's treatment of Tibetans. John
Argue of Amnesty International
said that there have been "gross
human rights violations, particularly against Tibetan Buddhists
and nationalists.'
'In Tibet, few political prisoners escape torture," he noted.
The rally also had the support of
• the Vancouver Association of
Chinese-Canadians (VACC). Its vice-
president, Sid Tan, called upon
'the Chinese government to stop
the abuses, respect the rights of
Tibetans and negotiate a resolution with the Dalai Lama and his
representatives."
'Canada could be an important
player by acting as a mediator,' he
said.
In a letter to the VACC, Prime
Minister Jean Chretien expressed
similar views, claiming that "the
Canada-China human rights dialogue has allowed Canada unprecedented opportunities to influence
Chinese agencies whose cooperation is essential to improving
human rights practices.*
Chretien added, however, that
Canada has "never linked trade
absolutely to human rights.*
Pema Dolma of the Tibetan
Cultural Society raised concerns
about the Chinese government's
treatment of Tibetan women, and
accused China of using "Tibet as a
base for production of nuclear
weapons, as well as- a site for
dumping nuclear waste."
Alex Burt, a fourth-year UBC
exchange student who attended the
rally, agreed that Canada had a
role to play.
'I think that the Chinese have
been very oppressive and anything
the Canadian public can do to draw
that to the attention of the international, community is very important * he said. ♦
by Sarah Morrison
W-W«*(**'J
Some candidates running
in undergraduate society
elections are frustrated by
what they say is an overly
excessive postering campaign to advertise Arts
County Fair (ACF).
Corrie Baldwin, an
executive secretary candidate in the Science
Undergraduate Society
(SUS) elections, complained that Arts
Undergraduate Society
(AUS) representatives
have been removing any
posters that cover their
ACF posters, making it difficult for her and other
candidates to advertise
their campaigns.
'Student poll tics... [are]
pretty important And with
the poor election turn outs
that we already have; trie fact that
we're competing with Arts County
Fair [seems unfair],' Baldwin said.
But AUS President Aleksandra
Brzozowski defended the AUS' postering tactic, saying that there is still
room for other posters on campus.
She said that most of the ACF postering is at the bus loop and
Buchanan, but even in these places,
there is room for other advertisements.
"There's still lots of places to
poster, we're not a commercial
thing and we're not trying to be evil
or cruel," she said.
Brzozowski said that while AUS
members have been instructed to
move any posters covering ACF
posters, miscommunication may
have led to some posters being mistakenly torn down.
Alma Mater Society Vice-
President, Administration Mark
Fraser said that he is looking into
complaints he has received about
the AUS.
TO COMMERCIAL POSERS
On Sunday, February 25, • 2001,. Tt» Arts
a«Jeraradttate5ocfety scrubbed the bus w, „>,»
lo^&dal postings/ ■
:rt exfchar><)e for the 'dean-up,' tf* Mve<si Kas
teemed thai; the ony body flowed to poaer ft! to
iOob for the next mortfc > «* Ms <*f«^*|
SodecV, it* promotion of the cw* *«*v «"*
Arts County Fak.-     ~\._s        .  - .
yea"**
"NOT EXCESSIVE": AUS President Aleksandra Brzozowski doesn't think postering for Arts County Fair has gone too far, but some candidates running in
campus elections feel it has. tara westover photo
"I'm getting a lot of complaints
from constituency people," he said.
"I've received a couple about ACF
tearing down constituency elections
posters."
Baldwin said that she and other
candidates are restricted to where
they may put up posters, and how
many posters they are allowed to put
up in one space.
Every year, the AUS cleans the
back side of the bus loops—where
commercial events are usually
allowed to advertise—and
Brzozowski said the AUS has an
informal agreement with the university that gives them a monopoly over
that area.
But Baldwin wonders why it is
necessary for a massively-popular
event like ACF to advertise so extensively. The annual concert will be
held on April 5 this year."
"Whether or not they poster, it's
not like nobody's going to go to ACF,"
she said. 'Everyone knows it's going
to happen, everyone goes."
But Brzozowski said that extensive
promotions help to ensure that the
event remains popular in the future.
"We may not feel it this year or
next year, but if we stopped doing
promo like that it just wouldn't get
out to campus. And over four or five
years, people wouldn't know about it
the same way," she said.
SUS Elections Administrator
Scarlett Yim said that she and
Brzozowski have recently discussed
candidates' concerns, and that most
of the concerns have been
addressed.
Yim added, however, that it is difficult for candidates to advertise
their campaigns and still comply
with the election's rules, which stipulate that each candidate may only
place one campaign poster on each
board.
"It's kind of hard to stand out
whenyou can only put one poster on
the board. When there'3 Arts County
Fair, they've got ten posters on one
board," said Yim. ♦ TUESDAY, MARCH 13, 2001
NEWS
THEUBYSSEY
UBC BOOKSTORE
www. bookstore, ubc. ca
Days
March 16 & 17
• General Books
• Sale Books
• Textbooks
• Sportswear
• Giftware
• Stationery Items
• Art & Design Items
Many more in-store specials.
See in-store exceptions.
[58£l
igjg   6200 University Blvd., Vancouver, B.C. 822-2665 • www.bookstore.ubc.ca
x5P/  Hours: Weekdays 9:30 AM - 5:00 PM • Saturday: 11:00AM - 5:00 PM
Free coffee to boost
sustainability
UBC Food Services and the Alma Mater Society (AMS)
are holding coffee Tiappy hours,' during which students
bringing in their own mugs will receive free coffee.
"Its to encourage people to reduce waste by bringing in their own coffee mugs," said AInoor Aziz, general manager of Food Services.
"We are fully in support of this plan, I think it's a
great idea,* added AMS Food and Beverage Manager
Nancy Toogood.
Food Services and the AMS will choose three periods in March, usually for an hour, where they will provide free coffee to people with their own mugs.
They have already held their first event, which had
a very good turn out according to Aziz.
"That's what we want to do is get the word out
there. So it is working in a sense."
, Aziz added that Food Services has also increased
the discount provided to students who bring in their
own cups from five cents off of their purchase to 15
cents.
"That's available eveiytime you bring in your own
cup. And then we are going one step further to encourage people [with the new program},* he said.
SRC closed for exams
STUDENT (PEER) ADVISORS, ARTS
In a continuing effort to increase the level of service provided by
the Faculty of Arts Academic Advising Office, the Faculty intends
to hire three to five students to serve as the first point of contact
for students attending the Academic Advising Office.
Successful applicants must be entering third or fourth year in the
Faculty of Arts and have completed at least thirty credits at UBC.
They must possess good communication skills, and be reliable and
conscientious workers. Their duties will include offering assistance
to students in finding the correct path to resolution of their
inquiries, referring students to appropriate Academic Advising
Office staff, and scheduling appointments for the Faculty advisors.
Pre-employment training is offered and required.
Employment will be 3 to 10 hours per week on regular shifts of
between 3 and 3.5 hours, morning or afternoon. Payment is at the
rate of $12.79 per hour. Term of employment is September 2001
to April 2002.
Applications, including a resume, two letters of reference, and a
statement indicating the qualities the candidate would bring to the
position, must be submitted to:
Ms. Grace Wolkosky, Academic Advisor
Arts Academic Advising Office
Buchanan A201
THE DEADLINE FOR APPLYING IS MARCH 31ST
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briefs
Students hoping to use the upstairs gymanisum in the
Student Recreation Centre during the April exam
period will be out of luck.
The gym has been scheduled to be used as a loca-
. tion for exams from April 9 to April 2 7.
While the booking could upset some clubs and
groups that use the gym for events, KeUy Simmons,
the coordinator of UBCs Classroom Services, said
that the benefits outweigh the disadvantages.
"By booking the SRC we can reduce the number of
exam days by two, which is good both for students and
[administrators]" she said.
Simmons said that the upstairs gymnasium is one
of the larger venues on campus, and that maintenance being performed on other buildings made
booking it a necessity.
She added, however, that Classroom Services
might set up a long-term arrangement with the SRC.
UBC gets $5 million
for health research
Research projects at UBC are receiving almost $5 million from the Canadian Institutes for Health Research
(CIHR).
A federal agency responsible for funding health
research in Canada, CIHR gave $3.7 million to the
Canadian HIV Trials Network, a UBC-centered
research project studying how best to treat people
with advanced HIV who have not been helped by AIDS
drug cocktails.
The project is headed by Martin Schechter, the
head of UBC's department of Health Care and
Epidemiology.
Patricia Janssea an assistant clinical professor in
the Faculty of Medicine's department of Family
Practice, also received $1.3 million for her research
looking at early labour support at home for expecting
mothers. ♦
Tyhurst hurt ex-patient, Court decides
"Hurst" from page 1
In his defence, Tyhurst pointed to
a lack of physical evidence or wit-
nessess, but in a strongly-worded 61-
page decision, Vickers sided with
Gorman.
Vickers stated that he believed
testimony from two of Tyhurst's former patients, who testified that
Tyhurst also had whipped them. The
names of these patients could not be
disclosed by court order.
"The defendant's treatment of the
plaintiff wa3 deplorable and defies
all norms of civilised conduct
between individuals. It is aggravated
by the fact that he was in a position
of trust and she undoubtedly placed
her trust in him," Vicker3 wrote.
Tyhurst's lawyer Christopher
Hinkson declined to comment on
the judge's ruling, but said that
Tyhurst will appeal the decision.
Gorman also testified that
Tyhurst degraded her psychologically. She claimed that she was forced
to call him master and enter into
contractual agreements with him.
Vickers agreed with Gorman's
"The defendant's
treatment of the
plaintiff was
deplorable and
defies all norms
of civilised conduct between
individuals.''
—Judge David
Vickers,
BC Supreme Court
testimony, noting two slave "contracts" entered as exhibits.
'I am willing to submit as a slave
obeying all orders [and) accounting
all that I do gratefully. Submissively
doing eveiything without argument
to learn to make it work. This
includes taking any punishment
without question, carrying on or
quitting," the introduction to the
first contract reads.
While Tyhurst argued that
Gorman's testimony could not be
credible given her mental stability,
Vickers found Gorman'3 testimony
to be fair.
1 find the defendant did enter into a
relationship of master-slave as
. described by the plaintiff," he stated. 1
have no difficulty in concluding his
entire course of oonduct and the bizarre
'therap/ in which he was engaged was
for his own sexual gratification He was
in breach of his fiduciary duty to the
plaintiff in breach of his contract and his
acts were criminal in nature."
Vickers said that he believed that
Gorman suffered psychological and
career setbacks as a result of
Tyhurst's treatment
In 1991, Tyhurst was convicted
of sexual and indecent assault in a
case involving four patients, but the
result wa3 overturned, and Tyhurst
was acquitted in the retrial.
Tyhurst has 30 days to appeal
this ruling. ♦>
Strangway receiving big bonus
"Bonus" from page 1
SFU and UVic give administrators one year of fully paid leave after
a five year administrative term,
while similar officials at UBC
receive a year of leave after six years
of service.
In addition to the bonus,
Strangway also received a $350,000
interest-free loan to buy a "retirement house* in 1991, even though
Strangway collected rent while he
lived in the UBC President's man
sion at the same time.
The contract was approved by
UBC's then-chancellor Ken Bagshaw
and the Board of Governors' then-
chairperson Leslie Peterson.
Strangway, who did not answer
call3 for this story, is now president
of the Ottawa-based Canada
Foundation for Innovation, a nonprofit organisation set up by the federal government to dispense university research grants. He is also working to set up Canada's first private
university in Squamish, a project
that has so far been troubled.
Strangway had tried to keep the
$91,000 bonus confidential. When a
freedom of information request for
his contract wa3 filed two years ago,
it came back with the benefits section whited out In a letter, the university indicated that Strangway
protested that such a disclosure
would infringe upon his privacy.
But the figure was included in
the $136,108 UBC paid to
Strangway in 1999-2000, shown in
the UBC financial statements. ♦ THE UBYSSEY
NEWS
TUESDAY, MARCH 13, 2001      5
Sustainability college proposed
by Keymo Nedd
Integrating and popularising the
campus-wide study of environmental issues are the goals of a proposed
sustainability college at UBC.
While the logistics for the proposal have not yet been worked out,
the college would allow professors
and students from various fields to
work together on environmental
issues, according to UBC Associate
Professor of Political Science
Kathryn Harrison.
"The college would serve to better integrate programs that already
exist, while providing new opportu
nities for students who might not be
pursuing a major in natural
resources or environmental sciences," said Harrison, who has been
instrumental in the college's planning.
Harrison said that the college
would allow students from any UBC
faculty to take courses affiliated with
the school, as well as allow them to
pursue a minor in environmental
sustainability.
The idea comes from
the Environmental Programs
Committee, made up of members
from various faculties across campus, which was convened in the
summer of 1999 to think of ways to
reform environmental education at
UBC.
While      no
dates have yet
been set for the
completion   of
the college, and
the committees
are still working
through       the
related governing and funding
MCBRIDE       issues,     Barry
McBride, UBC's vice-president of
academic and provost, said that the
college has a good chance of being
created.
"We believe that this idea of a college is a very good way of bringing
together interdisciplinaiy programs
like sustainability," he said.
McBride said that UBC has a
large interest in the campus-wide
teaching and researching of sustainability, but has so far lacked a cen-
tral facility to coordinate the activities.
'UBC does not have a single environmental department but has a
large number of different units
addressing environmental issues
and sustainability," he said, indicating that the college would allow UBC
to use it resources more efficiently
and make the study of environmental issues available to more people.
The reaction from students
involved in environmental sustainability about the creation of a sustainability college has been positive.
"Some people will be attracted to
the idea of this college simply
because environment and sustainability are popular [topics] and can
be applied to so many different
fields of study," said resource conservation student Jeff Werner.
"Sustainability is a powerful concept
that presents new and innovative
ways of thinking." ♦
Trent students out on bail
Eight protesters scheduled for court appearances March 21
by Rose Spencer and Jessica White
Arthur
PETERBOROUGH, ON (CUP)-Eight female
students who were arrested while occupying a Trent University vice-president's
office have been released on bail, and are
scheduled for a court appearance on
March 21.
Police arrested the protesters on
charges of mischief. Bail was set at $500
for each protester, which Trent faculty and
supporters paid.
The students took over the office for three
days to protest the university's board of governors' approval in November 1999 of an
application to Ontario's SuperBuild Growth
Fund that didn't include a clause preventing
the 'sale, relocation or closing of any college.'
The fund is designed to provide money
for new infrastructure. In May 2000, Trent
was awarded more than $26 million under
SuperBuild. The university's two downtown colleges have since been slated for
closure.
The students inside the office had been
demanding a promise to keep the downtown colleges open, the creation of a committee to look at decision-making at Trent,
a referendum on campus advertising and
the creation of a policy on campus privatisation.
They also called for the current administration to grant legal and academic
amnesty to all students involved in the
protests.
The students' bail conditions include
not associating with each other on most
Trent University property, not attending
any administrative office except by
approved appointment not being on Trent
property between 11pm and 7am except
for those living on residence and keeping
the peace.
In a recent letter to Trent University's
president Bonnie Patterson, the Canadian
Association of University Teachers said
that it was "outraged" with the university's
decision to use police to end the recent
occupation the office.
The association's president, Tom Booth,
PAttKINp VIOLATION     "
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said that the action not only reflects badly
on Patterson and her administration, it
also 'undermines the tradition of academic freedom and open dissent at Trent
University.'
Rosario Marchese, Ontario's NDP education critic, compared the decision-making processes of Trent's board of governors
to those of Ontario's Conservative government in power in the province.
"We need to democratise these institutions," said Marchese.
In a statement last week, Trent president Bonnie Patterson said the administration refuses to submit to any activity that is
illegal or threatens a safe learning and
working environment
'University administration had offered
to discuss matters with these students, but
would not negotiate the demands set by
them...However, we will continue to consult and discuss issues of concern to the
university community through legitimate
means." ♦
-with files from Alyssa Evetts
y#u:Bg^;-:/.yjy7:'
Students vote 'No'
"Referendum" from page 1
and the incoming-GSS president felt that the
result is an accurate reflection of student sentiment about the health plan.
'I'm really pleased with tlie result. This
n-ally shows that students are in support of
the plan," she said.
The result comes just over a year after the
health plan was implemented following an
October 1999 referendum in which 4548 students voted for the plan and 1911 voted
against it.
The result means business as usual in the
offices of the health plan service provider
StudentCare Networks (SCN), according lo
SCN's UBC Service Manager Damian
Uei.singer. who said that the referendum
re>ult was reassuring.
Negotiations for the renewal of the contra t—due to expire at the end of August—are
already underway between SCN and the AMS.
While the details are still being worked on.
Gauthier, who will be involved in the negotiations, said that she hopes to incorporate some
of Lo's criticisms and ideas into the renewed
contract •>
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THEUBYSSEY
EDITORIAL ELECTIONS 2001.
The Ubyssey is looking for some enthusiastic arid talented indixid-
\ials to fill tlie following positions for tlie 2001-2002 publisliing
Editorial Board:
: Coordinating Kditor      ;
Mews Editors(2) Y;;.:
Culture Editor Y
Feature's Editor ; •-..r ■■-'■'.' 7 .-'J :4.'
', Sports Editor )> Y J J        Y;J J|7\-7777'77>
Photo Editor Y Y:        -     7'JJ        •. -4M
Copy Editor '  4: Y-Y'J'
ProductipiV Manager;      ;:-.-. J^.
expected tiiiie conmiitinent: at least50 how'sper week per position Y
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Volunteers Cwaiinator . .'"■ -'    2
expected time commitment: at least 15 hours per week per position
Position papers aredue by Wednesday March 14 at 12:30pm.
Voting will tike place from Thursday March 22 to Wednesday
March 28. Votersmust.be Ubyssey staff"members in good standing.:
For any questions, or to see a job description, please contact Daliah
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PpSeC
ACCKDCIEO
Duelling dudes
Lunging, poking, prodding
thrusting, stabbing, etc...
by Tom Peacock
People have been cutting, goring, slashing and
ultimately killing each other with swords for
over 3000 years. Egyptians, Greeks, Romans,
and medieval crusaders all wielded blades in
battle. As guns rendered armour obsolete, and
heavy cutting swords were replaced by lighter,
more showy weapons more suitable for poking
swords gradually became more than just a
means to a bloody end.
Swordplay evolved into a dangerous but
less-than-fatal athletic discipline with specific
rules and techniques, and duelling emerged as
a popular means of settling disputes between
gentlemen. Sometimes, but not always, somebody was killed, but usually they just got cut a
little and went limping home for a bandage, the
matter settled.
The rapier, developed in Italy during the
15th century, was the first poking sword. It was
eventually replaced by the shorter French court
sword, and the one-handed techniques of modern fencing emerged.
The foil, a lighter version of the court sword,
designed for practising is one of three swords
used in modern fencing. The second, the epee,
was originally designed specifically for duelling
and the third, the sabre, is a cutting sword modeled after the Turkish scimitar.
Techniques and equipment evolved to make
swordplay safe, and by the time of the first modern Olympic Games in 1896, fencing was an
accepted sport And over 100 years later, it still
is. All three swords—the foil, the epee, and the
sabre—remain Olympic disciplines.
The only problem with fencing is that it doesn't really work that well as a spectator sport It's
complicated. Unless you're the judge, it's often
hard to see why a participant is awarded points.
"That's why the only people who watch fencing are other fencers," Jeff Bowman, vice-president of the UBC fencing club, quipped after a
fencing practice last Thursday night in Osborne
Gym. Luckily, Bowman is not so concerned with
finding people to watch fencing as he is with
finding people who might want to have a stab at
it themselves.
Bowman and his friend Jeff Szi are tiying to
revive the UBC fencing club, historically one of
the most popular clubs at UBC. In recent years,
as key members of the executive left to start
their own clubs, the UBC club dwindled to only a
few members.
Szi and Bowman said that the club failed to
attract new members, because it had become
too elite. It had moved away from the traditional
structure of a school club with a mind towards
attracting student membership.
COM ME CA: (Above) Fencing coach Brett La Peyre (left) instructs a student. (Top) Jeff Szi
(left) and Jeff Bowman battle it out. tom peacock photos
Szi says he and Bowman have different plans
for the club. "Before, it became too competitive.
They weren't recruiting new people. Eventually
it was just a few veiy experienced people. We
would like it to be a club mostly for UBC students/ he said.
"Of course we would encourage competitive
fencing because it's fun,* Bowman hastened to add.
Bowman is a fourth-year Science student,
who only started fencing during his second year
at UBC. But he has already competed in several
tournaments in Washington State and the Lower
Mainland.
Szi has been fencing for seven years. During
a demonstration match with Bowman, his superior skills, his quickness and dexterity, are evident even to the untrained eye. The electronic
scoring light on his side keeps going off as he
stabs into Bowman's steel-woven breastplate.
Bowman retaliates but his jabs are deflected. Szi
counter-attacks and is awarded the point
After the quick match, Bowman and Szi are
sweating and breathing heavily. Although fencing might appear rather staid and physically
undemanding it's obviously quite a workout
In their firstyear as the fencing club's executive, Szi, Bowman and club secretary Maggie Woo
haven't wasted much time getting to know the
ropes: they have already attained respectable
membership numbers, acquired a certified coach
for the club, hosted a small tournament for club
members and some fencers from SFU, and
revived the annual UBC Stephen Lazar
Tournament a key event on the fencing calendar.
The Lazar Tournament was cancelled last
year because there was no one to organise it But
this year, the event which took place February
24-25, went off without a hitch. Over 80 local
fencers participated in the different disciplines,
and 21 medals were awarded.
"I think the tournament went really well,' Szi
said. "Members of the Seattle fencing club, Salle
Auriel, came up and said they were very happy
with how it was run."
Bowman is graduating in the spring but Szi
and Woo are returning to UBC next year and
have big plans to increase the fencing club's on-
campus presence and attract more, students to
the fine art of slashing and stabbing each other
with swords.
"We want to have more social events—movie
nights in the Norm Theatre and that sort of thing,"
Szi said. "We want to sell T-shirts, sweatpants and
do more advertising. We also want to build the
competitive part of the club, so we can send more
people to tournaments.' This year, he added, the
club has managed to accumulate a small surplus
that they will use to purchase more equipment
Although he is graduating Bowman plans to
stay involved with the UBC club next year. Ever
since joining the club, he has been hooked on
swordplay. And after watching him and Szi go at
each other with foils, it's pretty easy to see why.
Fighting with swords looks like a lot of fun. More
importantly, with the blunt tips of the modern
foils and all the safety equipment the only thing
you really stand to lose while having at your partner in the age-old art of fencing is your pride. ♦
For anyone with the urge to poke someone in the
belly with a blunt sword, membership fees for
the UBC fencing club are $125 for the year.
Fencing requires a lot of expensive equipment
and coaching is pricey, so, according to
Bowman, the price is a deal. As well during the
summer, the club is open to members of the
community, and offers introductory lessons for
young people at a discounted price.
TWO DOWN... And one to go.This runner is all
smiles as she heads through the transition and
out for the run. tom peacock photo
m /7?:®fi g/@fef/ 6® (Msm GfeG km
QUO
o
HEAVY TRAFFIC: A runner heads for the finishing stretch in Saturday's UBC
Triathlon and Duathlon, which attracted sunny skies as well as hundreds of athletes
for the annual race, which kicks off the local triathlon season, tom peacock photo
i *'
f
ir*wm
KM
World Team Wedgie Championships (above) vie for the
prestigious international title, as well as the coveted
Golden Ginch trophy. In other news, the UBC men's
rugby team lost 5-3 to the Scribes on Wolfson Field
Saturday afternoon, tom peacock photo
'irL<BF®c mim mn n <&<mr\s w&l
HOT POTATO: UBC outside centre Sabrina Selms (left) passes the ball to teammate
Sabrina Horak during Saturday's game against the University of Victoria Vikes.The
Thunderbirds won the game 23-10. tara westover photo
Track
In the women's 1500m, Karen Ruckman. who
went into the meet ranked sixth, placed fourth in
a time, pf 4:41.29. In the men's 1500m, Milne was
fourth. Jonathon Luckhurst was sixth in the men's
1000m, and Jeremy Edwards placed eighth in the
weight throw. The men's 4x800m relay team
wound up fourth, missing the medals by 0.26 seconds, despite only being ranked tenth heading
into the meet
The Thunderbirds track team was in Sherbrooke,
Quebec, this past weekend for the CIAU championships. The highlight of the meet for UBC came
in the men's 3000m, when David Milne took the
gold medal in a time of 8:23.50.
Proving UBCs strength in the middle distance
events, Byron Wood placed fifth in the race, while
Matt Coley finished seventh. UBC's other medal
came in the men's 600m, when Chris Williams
won the bronze for the second year in a row, with
a time of 1:19.06-   -
Baseball
The baseball Birds were south of the border again
this weekend, taking the plate in the Lewis and
Clark State Tournament Things started poorly for
the Birds, who dropped Friday's first game,
against Lewis and Clark, 9-5. Reid Wildeman took
the loss for UBC, and falls to 0-1 on the year. In the
second game that day, the Birds lost again, dropping a ten-inning decision to Western Oregon, 5-4.
Dave Gautier took the loss, and is now 0-3 for the
season.
On Saturday, the Bird3 started to turn things
around. John Campbell, now l-O, paced UBC
through a 14-3 win against St Martin's. Later that
day, T-Bird ace Jeff Francis {3-1} held Western
Oregon scoreless, as the Birds won 8-0, and
moved into the final against Lewis and Clark. The
game went to ten innings, but the Birds couldn't
hang on, losing 4-3. Cory Stuart took the loss,
falling to 2-2 on the year. The Birds are now 12-8
this season.
Storm the Wall
The Wall is up.
Racing starts in two weeks. ♦ 8
TUESDAY, MARCH 13t 2001
CULTURE
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GREEK
at the Telus Studio Theatre
until March 17
Until now, my understanding of
British culture has stereotypically
been represented by uptight, upper-
class ladies drinking tea with 'just a
lump of sugar." However, the dialogue of Greek, UBC Theatre's latest
endeavour, deconstructs any notion
of prim-and-proper British society,
instead confronting the audience
with raging monologues, and spewing forth an examination of a society
that is 'plagued* by the faults of
human nature.
Four anonymous-looking characters, dressed like mimes in white-
and-black face makeup, carry the
play. They bounce back and forth
between smatterings of situational
scenes, addressing the audience
with vulgar observations about the
world around them. These monologues paint 1960s and '70s Britain
as a bleak world—full of rot and
waste existing in small town pubs,
and suburban homes.
Of course, the name of the play is
GreeJc. Playwright Steven Berkoff
uses the story of Oedipus to call
attention to what he feels is Britain's
irrecoverable state—or 'fate," in
Sophoclean terms—and suggests the
endurance and immutability of classical ideas. This adaptation of Greek,
however, successfully uses the function of anonymity to represent classical ideas as well as to depict
British society.
The use of the black and white
costuming is wonderfully effective
at preventing the audience from
ever becoming completely comfortable with the characters. This makes
the transitions between personae
easily'palatable and representative
of the strata of British society. The
sparse set design is also accommodating, creating the generalised
atmosphere that provides a neutral
canvas for the raw emotional tone of
the actors' dialogues.
by Lisa Denton
SONIC BOOM
Performance Works
Mar. 10
This critic would like to make a confession. I'm a classical music geek.
While all the other kids were out at
the mall on Saturday, I'd be at home
listening to the opera on CBC Radio
Two. Why go to the Gap when you
can hear a four hour German operatic extravaganza, live from the Met
no less? Instead of rushing to the
Top 40 rack at the record store, I'd
slink to the classical section eyeing
that Glenn Gould boje-set or picking
up dirt-cheap re-releases of recordings from the '60s.  -
While we're on the subject of past
sins, I'd like to make another confession. Try as I might, I have never
been able to enjoy contemporary
music. Classical music for me just
kind of ends around 1950. I went
from Bach to Beethoven to Bartok
and finally—to nothing.
I'm happy to say that my ignorance has been dispelled after
attending a concert of Vancouver
Pro-Musica Society's annual festival
Sonic Boom. Pro-Musica is a cooperative of local composers,
whose participants range in age
from 16 to 71 or so. The music they
compose also greatly varies, as I
What is perhaps most notable
about the play is the actors' ability to
wrestle with the confrontational
speeches of social decay, portraying
a culture with a corruptive underbelly. But the dialogue is sprinkled
with comic observations, such as
when Eddy (Gregory Thomas) wonders how much the Queen "gets it
oa" The comedy often springs from
sexualised language; the act of sexual intercourse is symbolically depicted through a speech by Ivone
Fonseca, which remains hilarious
through its never-ending twisting of
metaphors, culminating in her portrayal of an orgasm.
Director Zaib Shaikh was motivated by the unconventionality of Greek,
in that it challenges the notion of
standardised theatre production.
Greek is not an easy play to understand or portray. It requires innovative and imaginative devices in order
for it to succeed" as social examination. For the most part, Shaikh
accommodates these thematic difficulties by his use of the non-specific
costuming and set design, allowing a
multitude of scenarios to take place.
These scenarios are therefore left to
the strength of the actors rather than
props and costuming.
The cursing, angiy characters
may be offensive to some, even terrifying to those who choose not to
face social decay, but Greek'dpe§j
push the boundaries of the''craft of*
theatre. It diversifies and tests the
strength of the artistic output of
UBC's cast and crew as a whole.
Shaikh wanted to take a risk in his
adaptation and the end result is a
challenging and refreshing performance. And if you're like me, you'll
realise that there is more to British
culture than just tea and crumpets
in the sitting room. ♦
A BOOM!
by Ron Nurwisali
soon found out
From the first moments of Sonic
Boom, I figured I would be in for
something different I, for one, have
never seen any conductor drop their
pants to reveal leopard print boxers,
like master of ceremonies John
Crawford did on Saturday night It
got my attention.
Looking at my program, my
curiosity was also piqued. Just how
were an erhu and zheng, two traditional Chinese instruments, going to
sound with a marimba? Pretty
darned good actually. The resulting
piece, "Lantern Riddles* evokes the
Chinese Autumn Moon Festival and
is a mesmerising and beautiful
piece. Equally evocative was the
mini song-cycle "Mamalilaculla."
Scenes of an abandoned Native village and other West Coast scenes
inspired composer Euphrosyne
Keefer. The result is something that
was haunting and reminded me of
Elgar's Sea Pictures.
Some pieces just seemed confusing. 'Sinewave' was apparently
inspired by a study of the geome-
tiy of melody. From what I could
understand from the program
notes, the piece seeks to fuse the.
melody of a Scottish folk song with
Chinese instruments. While it
sounds confusing, the results were
musically very rich and rewarding. I simply ignored what was
written in the program and just listened to the piece, letting the
music wash over me.
Humour, it seems, was also in
large supply at this concert Well-
known local composer Rodney
Sharman pitched in with two-
tongue-in-cheek songs. The first,
"The Anglo-Tango" has Mezzo-
Soprano Barbara Ebbeson lamenting the plight of the Canadian dollar. It would seem that blame can
be placed squarely on the shoulders of Quebec. The second song,
"Be Prepared!" was a hilarious
homage to Boy Scouts. Our performers went.all out, with pianist
Leslie Dala donning merit badges,
hat and all to get into the mood of
the piece.
I can't say that I enjoyed every
piece at Sonic Boom—a. few just
seemed trite or perhaps beyond my
musical understanding. But ultimately. Sonic Boom and Pro-Musica
have captured my interest in contemporary music. After having
heard some of the pieces at this concert this writer for one might be
willing to give contemporary music
a try. Maybe it's time for me to trade
in those old classical music CDs for
some John Cage. ♦ THE ubyssey
CULTURE
TUESDAY, MARCH 13, 2001
ReTI-IIIMHIN6 HIP-HOP
by Michelle Bastian
fliiA'^
SHE'S GOT TWO TURNTABLES: DJs were just part of the entertainment at Sistah'hood. nic fensom photo
SISTAH'HOOD
at Sonar
Mar. 8
It was International Women's
Day and I was going to a hip-hop
, night to celebrate. There was
something incongruous about it
and the little I did know of hip-
hop did not cast it in a very eman-
cipatoiy light. The men, the
videos, the lyrics, the butt-wiggling its uninventive gender
roles—it all seems more oppressive than something I would want
to celebrate for International
Women's Day. By the end of the
night however, I had reworked
my opinions on the subject
Sistah'hood included a documentary, spoken-word performances, live bands, live free-style
rapping, break-dancing and
graffiti art While each piece had
its own unique message, they all
challenged stereotypes of femininity. Taken together, they
proved that being a woman was
not something that could be confined to the trinity of "virgin,"
"bitch," or 'whore." Instead, we
were met with ordinary women
and goddesses, women who
were broken and strong butch
and femme, funny and serious,
and many in-between.
The evening started with a
documentary by Racheal
Raimist called Nobody Knows
My Name. Exploring the lives of
women in the hip-hop industiy,
the film revealed the pressures
that women face in trying to
create a reputation for themselves based on skill rather
than looks. While some, like
Medusa, seemed to thrive on
the pressure, others were
almost broken by the lack of
recognition and respect that
they experienced.
The spoken word performances that followed dealt with a
diverse range of topics, including
oppression, violence, envy, love,
childhood, and poverty. I particularly enjoyed T.L. Cowan's piece
about her entrepreneurial lawn-
mowing business and Ivan
Coyote's trials with facial
cleansers.
Zenobia started off the music
for the evening. With their
bizarre but fascinating improv
they took a while to get used to,
but it was definitely worth the
effort Next were Ndidi Cascade,
Matriarch QB and Kia Kidiri who
each performed separately but
joined forces toward the end of
the evening. This was when I
received my first experience of
live hip-hop. What impressed
me most was the technical virtuosity these women displayed. QB
the Matriarch, in particular—
with her mixtures of jazz, rap,
and blues—was brilliant.
Unfortunately, it is difficult to
understand rap when you have
never listened to it before.
This section was the highlight of the evening for me. The
spontaneity of the performances—many of which were improvised-enhanced the feeling that
this night was about the creation of art by women for
women. It reinforced the importance of women's experiences
and the validity of expressing
them in public. I found the experience inspiring, partly because
of its rarity. ♦
advertisement
When my best wasn't enough ;.. 8,wh>cu*
All my life, I've struggled to
earn approval. My mother placed
high expectations for herself and
she indirectly expected the same
of me. I strove to meet her
expectations, but I couldn't. I
became bitter and depressed
about myself. As I matured, I
realised that my family was just
as imperfect. I had looked to the
Cosby Show as an example of the
ideal family. When I didn't see
this mirrored in my own family, I
was frustrated; they had failed
my expectations. So, I began to
withdraw from them.
Looking back, I can see a
definite pattern in the way I
responded to my inability to be
perfect. This feeling of
helplessness stirred within me a
deep anxiety and self-hatred. I
didn't deserve love because I
didn't meet my standards. At
times, I felt guilty because I
couldn't justify my existence by
my actions or my efforts to win
approval. The yardstick by which
I measured my value as a person
often seemed like a tyrant that
condemned and accused me.
Soon, I realised that my
family wasn't meeting my
expectations for something
specific, love. I started searching
for love and acceptance
elsewhere. What I found left me
even more empty and dissatisfied
because they were each in themselves unrealistic and deceptive.
Finally, I reached a point where I
harboured so much self-hatred
that I constantly entertained the
idea of suicide. I was angry with
myself for failing to meet my
moral standards.
I didn't deserve
love because I
didn't meet my
standards.
During my inner struggles, I
had lost sight of God. Because of
my failures to live up lo my
expectations, 1 arrived al (he
conclusion that even if He did
exist, God would never love or
care for someone like me.
In ray third year al UBC, my
perception of how I related to
God changed radically. I met a
friend named Barry who shared
about Jesus with me in a manner
that was sincere and thoughtful.
At first, my reaction was, "Come
on, I've heard all this before.
Why are you telling me some
thing I already know?" Yet, as he
talked more about Jesus, I
gradually realised that God loved
me in spite of my many failures
to live up to my standards. In
fact, Jesus rebuked those who
tried to lead a perfect life by their
own efforts. What He wanted me
to dp was to admit that I was
unable to live that kind of life
and to trust Him because He had
met not only my standards, but
also God's standards. For that
reason, I could turn from self-
justification to accept the work
that Jesus had done for me.
That's when my knowledge of
Jesus and His life began to
change the way I saw my family
and myself. I now know 1 am
loved completely by God.
Though I sometimes si ill
wrestle to earn the approval of
others, I know Jesus has
accepted me. In fact, 1 know 1 can
never win God's love on my own
terms or through my own efforts
because He's given it to me
already. For He delights in me.
We welcome your comments or
questions. Please contact
crusadeubc@hotmail.com or
check out
www.choosefreedom.cjb.net.
advertisement THE UBYSSEY
NEWS
TUESDAY, MARCH 13, 2001
Women rally
 by Sarah Morrison
Women rallied on Saturday to raise awareness
of the plight of women in Canada and around
the world, in celebration of International
Women's Day.
At the rally—held at Grandview Park on
Commercial Drive—speakers highlighted
women's victories over the years, but also
addressed the struggles of women, including
aboriginal women in Canada.
"We are here to expose the systematic, religious, legal, and governmental abuse of
women in every country," said Shalah, a
member of Vancouver's International
Women's Day 2001 organising committee.
'We are here to celebrate our struggle.'
One of the key speakers at the event was
Moirrie Baradaran, recipient of the 2000
International Human Rights Award.
Baradaran, who currently lives in Germany,
was a political prisoner in Iran for nine years.
Baradaran said that women are still far
from achieving equality.
'I am one of the thousands of Iranian
women jailed for many years just for their
political beliefs," she said, adding that
although celebrating International Women's
Day is prohibited in Iran, women still celebrate the day in small groups, and in their
homes.
"The ruling clergy of Iran has transformed
my country into a big prison...but has not been
able to crush women's resistance," Baradaran
added.
Speakers also highlighted the advances in
women's rights that have occured in the last
century.
'When I started celebrating International
Women's Day about 25 years ago, I needed to
explain to everybody what it's all about," said
Geraldine Glattstein, executive director of the
Women Against Violence Against Women rape
crisis centre.
Now, she continued, she works for an
organisation that not only knows about the
day, but recognises it as a statutory holiday.
Glattstein said that the BC government had
played an important role in advancing the
issue of women's equality. Since 1991, she
explained, the number of women holding
provincial cabinet positions has risen from 12
to 34 per cent
'Our provincial government as little or as
much as we think of them, has created the first
ministry of women's equality," Glattstein
added.
Women also celebrated World March of
Women 2000, an event held last October that
saw thousands of women march to protest
deteriorating conditions for women around
the world.
CELEBRATING INTERNATIONAL WOMEN'S DAY: Men, women, and dogs took to the
streets on Saturday to focus attention on women's rights, sarah morrison photo
In Canada, 50,000 women marched to
Parliament Hill to present the federal government with 13 immediate demands-'The
Feminist Dozen'—which they said would
advance women's rights.
Among the demands were calls for proactive pay equity legislation, increased spending
on social housing and a national child-care
fund with an initial $2 billion contribution.
Lee Lakeman, a regional representative for
the Canadian Association of Sexual Assault
Centres, who spoke at the Ottawa rally, called
on the crowd to celebrate the various groups
of women in attendance at the rally.
'My job is to help you celebrate International
Women's Day,' Lakeman said. "Usually I'm the
one who brings you the miserable
[statistics]...today I want you to celebrate.' ♦>
SPEAKERS AT RALLY
CRITICISE TREATMENT
OF TIBETANS
Arts County Fair posters
take over campus space
by Michelle Bastian
On the 42nd anniversary of the
Tibetan uprising against Chinese
Occupation, Tibetans and their supporters held a rally in Robson
Square on Saturday to increase
awareness about Tibet's political
situation.
China invaded Tibet over 50
years ago, but the situation in the
countiy remains highly contested,
according to the Dalai Lama, the
Buddhist spiritual leader of the
Tibetan people who has been
exiled since 1949.
In a statement issued to mark
the anniversary of the uprising, the
Dalai Lama said that the country is
facing "increasing repression, environmental destruction, and alarming developments undermining the
identity and culture of Tibet*
But demonstrators on Saturday
expressed hope for Tibet's future.
Kate Woznow* a member of
UBC's chapter of Students for a
Free Tibet went to Beijing during
the recent Team Canada trade mission to protest the Chinese occupation of Tibet Woznow said that she
feels that 'this movement is really
starting to take a positive change.*
Woznow" s actions have helped
create momentum that many in
the Tibetan community hope will
resolve the conflict, according to
Naomi Gyurme, a representative
from the Canada Tibet Committee.
"One of the biggest things is to
keep that energy going now that it
has started/ said Gyurme. "Every
year we hold [the rally{ hoping that
next year we won't have to hold it
again, that instead of having a
demonstration that we'll be able to
celebrate the freedom of Tibet* .•  .
Gyurme said that the date chosen for the demonstration is important, since it marks 'the first time
that the Tibetans demonstrated unified resistance against the Chinese.*
Speakers at the rally harshly
criticised the Chinese government's treatment of Tibetans. John
Argue of Amnesty International
said that there have been 'gross
human rights violations, particularly against Tibetan Buddhists
and nationalists.'
'In Tibet, few political prisoners escape torture,' he noted.
The rally also had the support of
• the Vancouver Association of
Chinese-Canadians (VACC). Its vice-
president Sid Tan, called upon
'the Chinese government to stop
the abuses, respect the rights of
Tibetans and negotiate a resolution with the Dalai Lama and his
representatives.*
'Canada could be an important
player by acting as a mediator,* he
said.
In a letter to the VACC, Prime
Minister Jean Chretien expressed
similar views, claiming that "the
Canada-China human rights dialogue has allowed Canada unprecedented opportunities to influence
Chinese agencies whose cooperation is essential to improving
human rights practices.*
Chretien added, however, that
Canada has 'never linked trade
absolutely to human rights.*
Pema Dolma of the Tibetan
Cultural Society raised concerns
about the Chinese government's
treatment of Tibetan women, and
accused China of using "Tibet as a
- base for production of nuclear
weapons, as well as a site for
dumping nuclear waste.*
Alex Burt, a fourth-year UBC
exchange student who attended the
rally, agreed that Canada had a
role to play.
*I think that the Chinese have
been very oppressive and anything
the Canadian public can do to draw
that to the attention of the international, community is very important, * he said. ♦
by Sarah Morrison
Some candidates running
in undergraduate society
elections are frustrated by
what they say is an overly
excessive postering campaign to advertise Arts
County Fair (ACF).
Corrie Baldwin, an
executive secretary candidate in the Science
Undergraduate Society
(SUS) elections, complained that Arts
Undergraduate Society
(AUS) representatives
have been removing any
posters that cover their
ACF posters, making it difficult for her and other
candidates to advertise
their campaigns. "NOT EXCESSIVE": AUS President Aleksandra Brzozowski doesn't think pos-
'Student politics...[are] tering for Arts County Fair has gone too far, but some candidates running in
pretty important And with campus elections feel it has. tara westover photo
the poor election turn outs
TO COMMERCIAL POST^
On .Sunday, February,25,-2001, .n» tat»
Undergraduate ,Scxtety scrubbed the bus taj 4 all
atmnercial postings.'".
:h exchange for theilean-up, the ir*«*i»s
Jeemed that the only body allowed to poster btus
:0op far the next w* Is 0* **J****"
Society, in promobor. of tt» wrncus tfw*» «*
AnsCountyfate • '.   \_ \.„
)uyqs«!#f,,^Y,^ . " \  /.
. * \. ^   ''
3HI&
that we already have; trie fact that
we're competing with Arts County
Fair [seems unfair]/ Baldwin said.
But AUS President Aleksandra
Brzozowski defended the AUS' postering tactic, saying that there is still
room for other posters on campus.
She said that most of the ACF postering is at the bus loop and
Buchanan, but even in these places,
there is room for other advertisements.
"There's still lots of places to
poster, we're not a commercial
thing and we're not tiying to be evil
or cruel," she said.
Brzozowski said that while AUS
members have been instructed to
move any posters covering ACF
posters, miscommunication may
have led to some posters being mistakenly torn down.
Alma Mater Society Vice-
President, Administration Mark
Fraser said that he is looking into
complaints he has received about
the AUS.
"I'm getting a lot of complaints
from constituency people,' he said.
'I've received a couple about ACF
tearing down constituency elections
posters."
Baldwin said that she and other
candidates are restricted to where
they may put up posters, and how
many posters they are allowed to put
up in one space.
Every year, the AUS cleans the
back side of the bus loops—where
commercial events are usually
allowed to advertise—and
Brzozowski said the AUS has an
informal agreement with the university that gives them a monopoly over
that area.
But Baldwin wonders why it is
necessary for a massively-popular
event like ACF to advertise so extensively. The annual concert will be
held on April 5 this year.'
"Whether or not they poster, it's
not like nobody's going to go to ACF,"
she said. "Eveiyone knows it's going
to happen, everyone goes.'
But Brzozowski said that extensive
promotions help to ensure that the
event remains popular in the future.
'We may not feel it this year or
next year, but if we stopped doing
promo like that it just wouldn't get
out to campus. And over four or five
years, people wouldn't know about it
the same way," she said.
SUS Elections Administrator
Scarlett Yim said that she and
Brzozowski have recently discussed
candidates' concerns, and that most
of the concerns have been
addressed.
Yim added, however, that it is difficult for candidates to advertise
their campaigns and still comply
with the election's rules, which stipulate that each candidate may only
place one campaign poster on each
board.
'It's kind of hard to stand out
whenyou can only put one poster on
the board. When there's Arts County
Fair, they've got ten posters on one
board,' said Yim. ♦ THE UBYSSEY
CULTURE
TUESDAY, MARCH 13, 2001
11
THE DEATH OF FILM
at the Sugar Refinery
Mar. 7
This month's coiffing title for Cineworks'
Cinematic Salon was the ludicrously overdra-
matic The Death of Film. Schlock Horror, you
may ask? Well, not quite. You have to say it
with your tongue planted firmly in your cheek.
Wednesday's chat was led by experimental
filmmaker Ken Anderlini, who was full of
enough pungent sarcasm to spark the Sugar
Refinery's walls with the yabbering of audience opinion. An interesting speaker regardless of the topic of conversation, Anderlini
sure is passionate. Through passioa by his
own proclamation, he has gone so far as to
make film his fetish. So why does he want to
talk about the death of his great passion? As he
climbed onto his stool to talk to an electric
crowd of filmmakers, teachers, industiy types,
and film buffs, Anderlini explained that it was
not the killing of 'film' per se that he was there
to talk about, but the foreboding extinction of
the 16mm format and of experimental film.
Since his stint in film school in 1988,
Anderlini has been involved in various experimental film projects including his Tangled
Garden trilogy (1992-94), has worked in various film festivals including the Vancouver
International Film Festival, and currently
teaches in art and cultural studies at Simon
Fraser University. During his time in the
industry, he has noticed a trend of disinterest
in experimental film.
According to Anderlini, the 'death of film'
will come about because of the expense of
post-production processes and the problem of
distributing independent film in Canada. For
those not versed in the particular nuances of
film-speak, much of the discussion seemed to
grab at the traditional 'lack of funding for
experimental arts" maxim. With digital technology steaming its way through the industry,
it has become less economically viable—and
less popular—to fund projects using obsolete
mediaslike 16 mm.
Those that are in with the lingo would have
appreciated comments like, the 'aesthetic
rationale of convergence' is an 'excuse by
Canada Council to cut funding.' For the rest of
us, flamboyant statements, like "It's insane
how much money this government gives away
to the arts—nobody cares about artistry...' were
amusing flags signaling that this was the part
of the discussion where those two great foes,
art and money, met up for a little workout
'Why have I wasted so much money on
film?* Anderlini cried, his tongue nearly
shooting straight through his cheek this time.
Well, because clearly he is passionate about
the medium.
'What's exciting about 16mm is grain," he
said. For Anderlini, "It's about colour, aesthetic, grain, scratching....' He is in love with the
aesthetic of 16mm. Well, aren't most great
loves based on physical attraction?
Random images—Granville Street buses,
kitchen sinks stacked with plates, naked bodies, paint, window frames, and home movies
flickered on the screen behind Anderilini.
Some were collaged through double exposure,
others affected by time-lapse. They were the
stuff that he talked about—raw, grainy images
flushed with colour and texture.
The fact that 16mm is a fetish for Anderlini
is easily understandable. Its appeal is both
visual and tactile—just watching it makes you
by Ghita Loebenstein
want to grab a couple of frames and start splicing. "You become obsessed with the material
of film—of going over frame after frame,' he
explained.
'I look forward to the digital effect of 'dust'
on film,' he said. "I've seen the digital effect of
'scratches." But that's just the thing—and a
point that came across from the now excitable
audience members: digital can achieve all the
aesthetic effects that 16mm can—it can mimic
the scratches, the dust, the 'grain.' It's just that
it's not as satisfying to achieve by clicking a
mouse button.
While digital technology makes sense in
terms of accessibility, cost and time, for
Anderlini 'digital hasn't made my life any
more exciting—they're just different tools.'
And the answers? Well, there weren't any
really. For now, Anderlini sees the extinction of
16mm as 'a call to fetishise it and make it as
sexy as Super 8.' Does that mean that only the
really hip (and really rich) will be using 16mm
in years to come? His advice to 16mm followers is to keep doing what you're doing. "Keep
supporting the marginalised things you do and
find new ways to produce and distribute." ♦
^Jtri^UtM&M)W4
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The Health
Plan stays
 by Alex Dimson
In a near duplication of last
year's referendum result, nearly
4000 students turned out in last
week's referendum to re-affirm
support for the student Health
and Dental Plan.
3870 students voted in favour
of continuing the current Alma
Mater Society (AMS) and
Graduate Student Society (GSS)
Health and Dental Plan, a mandatory health plan that covers a portion of students' health costs for
$168 a year. 13S4 students voted
against it
The referendum question
asked students, "Should the AMS
withdraw from the AMS/GSS
Health and Dental Plan at the end
of the current contract (August
31st, 2001)."
The referendum easily
achieved the ten per cent turnout
(3300 votes) necessary to reach
quorum—the number of votes
required to make the referendum
result valid—a number that has
traditionally been hard for AMS
referendums to achieve.
While Kathy Lo—an organiser
of the 'Yes' campaign and one of
the student petitioners who originally forced the AMS to conduct
the referendum—said that she
will not appeal, she also indicated
that she was displeased with the
result
"It really shows how apathetic
students at UBC are. I'm really
disappointed about the result,"
she said.
Lo expressed concern that
while graduate students are
enjoying the benefits and support
the health plan, undergraduate
students are not aware or do not
support it but did not turn out to
vote.
But Annick Gauthier, the
organiser of the 'No' campaign
See "Referendum" on page 5
Ex-prof liable for
whipping patient
Court rules against former UBC prof
for forcing master-slave relationship
by Alex Dimson
The former head of UBC's psychiatry department has been
instructed to pay over half a million in damages for forcing a
patient into a bizarre
master-slave relationship.
James Tyhurst was found
liable by Judge David Vickers of
the BC Supreme Court in a civil
law proceeding and was ordered
to pay one of his former patients
Jill Gorman $556,790.
Gorman, who~ launched the
civil suit, claimed that in a 11-
year period beginning in 1979,
Tyhurst forced her into a master-slave relationship, gradually
taking control of all aspects of her
life.
She claimed that the situation
escalated to the point where
Tyhurst regularly forced her to
strip from the waist up and stand
against a wall while he whipped
her back repeatedly.
Gorman testified that Tyhurst
whipped her between eight and
12 times per one-hour session,
which she said were first held in
Tyhurst's UBC office, and later
moved to his house once Tyhurst
left the university.
Tyhurst—now 78 and retired—
continues to deny all of the accusations.
Between 1959 and 1970,
Tyhurst served as the head of
UBC's psychology department,
and he continued as a professor
until the mid-1980s.
Tyhurst had been treating
Gorman for severe depression
and bulimia while she was a UBC
student
See "Hurst" on page 4
Big bonus for Strangway
$91,000 for ex-UBCprez
by Stanley Tromp
A recently revealed $91,000 'retirement allowance' given to
former UBC President David Strangway after he left office in
1997 has angered some university officials.
The lump sum bonus was written into his contract, and is
in addition to his two-year full salaried administrative leave
and pension, according to UBC's Vice-President of Legal and
External Affairs Dennis Pavlich.
Pat McGeer, a UBC medical researcher and former BC
advanced education minister, called the bonus 'totally outrageous."
"No ministry in Victoria would allow this for an employee," McGeer said.
The arrangement is not without precedent in BC.
While former Simon Fraser University (SFU) President
Jack Blaney received no retirement allowance upon leaving
SFU, his predecessor John Stubbs ended his five-year presidential term one year early by mutual agreement. Stubbs
was paid a presidential salary for the final year, in addition
to receiving a one year leave at his professorial salary.
University of Victoria officials have said that UVic doesn't
give retireih'ent bonuses, and current UBC President Martha
Piper has no such bonus in her contract
feedback@ubyssey.bc.ca      www.ubyssey.bc.ca
See "Bonus^on page 4
STRANGWAY: The former UBC president looks on.
RICHARD LAM/UBYSSEY FILE PHOTO

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