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The Ubyssey Jul 19, 1989

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Array SUMMER, v V
theUbyssey
AMS splurges
by Michael Booth
A lack of executive control
contributed to a $15,000 cost-overrun by an enthusiastic Rec-Fac
committee originally slated to
spend $10,000 on an information
campaign for last November's referendum, according to an April
report releasedby Karl Kottmeier,
AMS Director of Finance.
The committee exhibited "lax
fiscal controls, but money was not
wasted, just used on ill-conceived
projects with limited forethought
as to the final budget," according
to Kottmeier.
Kottmeier added he was not a
committee member at the time
and committee bills never came
through him. "I quite purposely
had nothing to do with it," he said.
The most expensive mistake
was that of the Rec-Fac model,
which cost $10,000 to conceptualize and construct.
But now, according to Andrew
Hicks, AMS Director of Administration, the building depicted by
the model won't be built, although
some components will be incorporated into the final design.
Instead of supplying the
architects, Henriquez & Partners,
with the $20 million construction
budget from which to design a
model, the AMS merely specified a
list of components to be included,
noted Hicks.
Based on the Henriquez
model, a final price tag of $30 million, with an annual operating
budget of $1 million, was estimated by AMS architect Michael
Kingsmill, shortly before the November referendum.
But the UBC administration's restriction of the facility's
budget to $9.5 million demanded a
total revision of all plans.
Another committee blunder
was the expenditure of $2000 on
Rec-Fac buttons which could not
be used because the wording contravened an AMS elections bylaw,
according to Mike Lee, AMS President.
Former AMS President and
committee member Tim Bird,
however, said that such overruns
are not uncommon and occur
within every budget year.
"Last year the Homecoming
committee went over by $10,000
and the High School Conference
committee also went over by
$10,000," he said.
"Every year three or four
committees go over budget to this
degree. We never know which
committee will go over budget
because each year there are several 'maverick' committees," Bird
added.
Much ofthe problem, according to Bird, is rooted in the enthusiasm of a committee's membership: "If one of the AMS signing
officers is not heavily involved
with the committee, then expenses just keep getting chalked
up with nobody keeping a tally on
them."
"As for the Rec-Fac committee, when there (are) five different
committee members spending on
five different things, then you
have no idea how much is being
spent. All you can really do is
guess," said Bird.
These committees, Bird said
"need an AMS signing officer on
top of them at all times. But the
problem lies in determining ahead
of time which committee will be a
maverick."
Bird added that lack of time
was also a factor in the delayed
AMS investigation of the matter.
After the referendum, committee
members were exhausted and difficult to contact, making it difficult
to track down invoices, he said.
In January, "the tuition issue
pushed everything else aside; then
there were the elections and I was
out of office," said Bird.
Lee said Hicks investigated
committee expenses immediately
following the referendum, but the
task was delegated to Kottmeier in
February after Hicks became frustrated over the committee's lack of
a treasurer.
Hicks is now in charge of ensuring that in the upcoming RecFac campaign the AMS will issue
only neutral statements, and that
all such statements are brought
before student council. The budget
for the new campaign will also
need council approval.
Also, Hicks promised to ensure that last year's budget overruns will not be repeated, going so
far as to stake his office on the
pledge.
Folk Fest '89: Rockin' in the rain
JOE ALTWASSER PHOTO
Budget approved: next
year's tuition will rise
by Laura J. May
UBC's Board of Governors
approved this year's budget on
Tuesday with no guarantees that
tuition fees won't be increased for
1990-91.
Both student representatives, Tim Bird and Kurt Preinsperg, asked the board not to increase tuition fees higher than the
rate of inflation.
President David Strangway
gave "an informal commitment
that (tuition increases) won't exceed inflation next year but (the
increase) is going to be at least
inflation," Preinsperg said.
Strangway said he didn't
want to increase tuition fees above
the rate of inflation. But the university won't know how much faculty salaries will increase until
August—after the budget has
been approved, according to
Strangway's written notes on the
budget.
If the arbitrator decides to
increase faculty salaries by more
than 8.2 percent, tuition fees may
have to be raised higher than the
rate of inflation, according to Bird.
Overall, the board thought
the budget was excellent and
quickly approved it, according to
Preinsperg and Bird.
"This budget is full of exciting
and constructive initiatives—like
considerably increased student
aid, and initiatives that promote
gender equity and encouragement
for disadvantaged groups," Preinsperg said.
The board approved $1 million for graduate fellowships and
$300,000 for emergency bursaries,
he said.
But Preinsperg voted against
the budget to protest "(last year's)
infamous ten percent tuition increase."
"This budget spends money
which the university has illegitimately taken away from students
and it promises students no relief
from further increases next
year," he said.
Bird criticized the board not
only for relying on tuition fee increases to cover end-of-the-year
deficits, but also for evading students' concerns about tuition.
When students ask the board
not to increase tuition in January, the board says they have toin
order to balance the budget, he
said. And when students ask the
board in July when the budget's
being approved, the board says
tuition fees were already determined in January, he said.
"When is the appropriate
time to debate tuition fees?"
asked Bird. "And why is tuition
the only area that can be changed
and altered?"
~ Beijing massacre witnesses arrive in Vancouver
by Chung Wong
The Beijing massacre's first eyewitnesses to visit Vancouver shocked audiences last Saturday at St. John's Church
with graphic slides they had smuggled out
of China.
The slides showed an endless row of
broken bicycles and mangled bodies with
spilled entrails.
"The official death toll given by the
government was once 23. Eventually it
became none. Until now we have only seen
the blurry pictures ofthe media. But I guess
now, you and me have the answer," said Ray
Chang organizer ofthe conference.
In the early stages of unrest, demonstrators included members of the People's
Liberation Army and several Buddhist
monks, as the slides revealed. Faint hunger
strikers wore headbands saying "I love
China."
Before the massacre, soldiers tried to
tempt students to take weapons so violence
against the students could be justified, said
VOLUME 8, Number 3
Jane Cheng of Hong Kong's Chinese University.
"On June 3 soldiers left behind uniforms and arms at the Shewan Gates, but
the students insisted that it was a peaceful
demonstration and returned clothes and
weapons to the police so they wouldn't have
an excuse later," she said.
Cheng worked in the Hong KongMate-
rial station set up in Tiananmen Square
which the Chinese government accused of
providing weapons to the students.
But according to Cheng they didn't
even have abutter knife. "The only thing we
could have possibly used as weapons were
the bamboo rods holding our tent," Cheng
said.
"All the bamboo poles which could be
used as weapons were purchased by me,"
said Stephen Yam, a shy student from Hong
Kong University.
Yam missed his final exams to protest
at Tiananmen Square. "As a student, as a
Chinese, I felt I had a responsibility to go,"
he said.
Reminiscent ofthe cultural revolution,
the Chinese government imported young,
ignorant soldiers from the countryside to
attack the students, Cheng said.
"In the early morning of June 4, 15- to
16-year old soldiers said they didn't know
they were in Beijing while others outside of
the square asked how to get to Tiananmen
Square," she said.
"The non-hunger strikers received
only two bread rolls in their daily diet and
had to sleep on the cold ground overnight
and endure the dry heat during the day,"
Cheng said. "The secret police had already
begun video-taping," she added.
At Saturday's presentation, Yam wore
the same shirt he wore on the day of the
massacre. He washed it once in Hong Kong,
but large blood stains still remained.
"Two images are most prominent in my
mind," Yam said. "I can remember trying to
stop an ambulance but it wouldn't stop. An
angry group of students blocked its way. A
frustrated driver told the students it was
full. He got out and opened the back door.
The ambulance was full of unconscious
bodies."
"The other image is the unconscious
soldier I tried to save. Comatose, he lay
against a tank. Angry students with clubs
began to approach him. Other students and
myself used our arms to block the clubs and
told them fighting will only bring retribution from the government. I picked the soldier up and began to walk toward the medics. I noticed his head was bent too far back
so with my left arm I tried to hold his head.
To my horror I was holding his neckbone."
Yam pointed to the blood stain on his
shirt. "This is the blood."
"In the massacre they also used the
type of bullets banned in previous wars.
They explode after entry," he said.
Suk-Yi Yau, a journalist from Hong
Kong, said she witnessed approximately
300 killingsjustin the inner city and several
hundred killings in the square. Though she
warned the people in the square about the
massacre in the inner city, the people would
not leave.
Vancouver, B.C. Wednesday, July 19,1989 Classifieds
Rates: AMS Card Holders ■ 3 Unas, $3.00,
additional Hnaa 60 cants, commarclal -3 Unas,
$5.00, additional Unas 75 cants. (10% Discount on 25 Issuas or more) Classified ads
payable In advance. Deadline 4:00 p.m,. two
days before pubUcalton. Room 266, SUB,
UBC, Van., B.C. V6T 2A7
FOR SALE 10	
1978 DATSUN 210 2 Dr, 4Speed, AM/FM
Tape Deck, 37MPG. Excellent Condition.
Looks Good. Runs Good. $1750. 536-7773
JOBS 30
$$$ Pick wild Mushrooms $$$
Fun and Profit. Fantastic Earnings. Details
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MESSAGES 40	
PENPALS!   200,000 members —All Ages
Int. Pen Friends
Box 6261, Stn. D. Calgary AB T2P 2L8
AN INTERNATIONAL FRATERNITY,
founded in I860, plans to become reestablished at U.B.C. This fraternity is interested in hearing from a group of undergrad
students who wish to participatein the reorganization of this fraternity. Funds and
organizational support are available. Box
1850 Ubyssey N/P or phone Murdo Mackenzie 684-3402.
TYPING 85
PROFESSIONAL TYPIST, 30 years exp.,
work proc. & IBM Typewriter. Student
Rates. Dorothy Martinson 228-8346.
Word-Processing
Fast and Professional
Phone Alfie 420-7987
WORD-PROCESSING $2.50/page
Computeremiths 3724 W.  Broadway (at
Alma)
224-5242
DEPENDABLE W/P SERVICE 888-9093
Have An expert who loves to type
make you look good.
TYPING QUICK right By UBC all types
$1.257page clal Rob 228-8989 Anytime.
ON CAMPUS WORD PROCESSING
Type it yourself...simplified instructions,
spell check, and laser printer make your
work look top quality. $7.00/hr and 150/
page. Friendly help always available.
SUB lower level, across from Tortellini's
Restaurant; 228-5496.
ON CAMPUS WORD PROCESSING
Need the professional touch? ... have it
done for you - you can even book ahead.
$27/hr., 6-8 double spaced pages of normal text per hour, laser printer. SUB
lower level, across from Tortellini's Restaurant; 228-5640.
TYPING SAME DAY SERVICE. UBC location. 224-2310. Tapes-Cassettes. Transcribed Essays. Resumes. Papers
Between
TILL SEPTEMBER
UBC Museum of Anthropology
Exhibit;     Lyle Wilson:     When
Worlds Collide
Tuesday:    11 am - 9pm (free)
Wednesday-Sunday   llam-5pm
Closed Mondays
Students $1.50 Families $7.00
UBC Museum Of Anthropology,
Theatre Gallery
TILL OCTOBER
UBC Museum of Anthropology
Exhibit; A Family Affair:  Cloth
Making In Taquile Peru
Tuesday:   lam-9pm (Free) Wednesday-Sunday llam-5pm Closed
Mondays.
Students $1.50   Families $7.00
UBC Museum of Anthropology,
Gallery 5
• Honi-cooked Me.ils
■ Appetizers, Salads
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Cheesecakes & Muffins
UBC Village   •   224-5615
21 34 W. Parkway
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Monday - Thursday
4*00- 11-00 pm
Friday   4-00 - 12*00 am
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Hair Styling
4384 W.IOth Ave.
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2142 WESTERN PARKWAY UBC
SUMMER SCENE
Vol 18 No. 3
Hello and welcome to Summer Session '89
Oi ipOpp|^r   Q^CC |OP_    The Summer Session Association is the student organization of
O-Ul I II I lv_7l    OvI/OOIwl I    Summer Session; if you have any problems, concerns or
suggestions, please drop by our office - SUB 210. We are
there Monday - Friday, 10a.m. to 3 p.m. Phone 228-6185.
Association
SUMMER SOUNDS
FREE, noon-hour concerts. Bring your lunch
and a friend. At SUB Plaza.
Wednesday July 19
Thursday, July 20
Friday, July 21
Monday, July 24
Tuesday, July 25
Wednesday, July 26
Gary Keenan Quartet
Trombones To Go
Hollyburn Ramblers
Phoenix Jazzers
Penguin String Quartet
Brass Men
MUSIC FOR A
SUMMERS EVENING:
FREE, Music Building Recital Hall, 8:00 p.m.
Thursday, July 20     - Julia Nolan, saxophone
Jane Gormley, piano
Music from schubert to the present
BLOOD DONOR CLINIC
Thank you to everyone for your continued support — last week's clinic was a success
because of your giving and caring.
SUMMER SCREEN
All films are FREE to everyone! 7:30 p.m.. Coming
soon to Woodward IRC Lecture Hall #2!
Wednesday, July 19: My Stepmother Is An Alien
A sci-fi spoof featuring the antics of Dan Akroyd
and the beauty of Kim Basinger.
Friday July 21st: The Fox and The Hound
Walt Disney Animation Classic. An orphaned fox
cub becomes fast friends with a hound puppy.
Their freindship is put to the test when, as adults,
the hound is expected to hunt down the fox.
Monday, July 24: Working Girl
A delightful comedy starring Melanie Griffith,
Sigourney Weaver and Harrison Ford dealing with
the values and silliness of the high-powered business world.
Wednesday July 26: Enemy Mine
A si-fi classic featuring Dennis Quaid and a moving, evocative performance by Louis Gossett, Jr.
as a superior alien who must learn compromise
and cooperation in order to survive.
2/THE SUMMER UBYSSEY
July 19,1989 NEWS
Driver falls out of van in Seafest Parade?
DAVID LOH PHOTO
Plaza to be built for fall
By Pat Nakamura
and F. Cordua-von Specht
The metamorphic site between SUB and the newly constructed parkade will assume its
final form as the SUB Boulevard
Plaza this September.
"It will be a student center—
an outdoor gathering space—to tie
together SUB, Brock Hall and the
other surrounding facilities," said
Miner, Director of Physical Planning and Development.
"It used to be a temporary car
park and rough ground," said
Miner.
Miner estimated the total
construction costs to be under
$500,000.
Student Council president
Mike Lee, said the plaza, which
will be wheelchair accessible, will
be bordered by a speaker's platform for official ceremonies and
special events, a terrace, and a
shelter.
The shelter, which will be lit
up at night, is for students waiting
for rides or dropped off at the university, said Lee.
But the shelter is still too isolated from SUB and could be un-'
safe, he added.
When asked about the shelter's isolation, Miner said he had
not heard anything about this
problem, but would address the
question.
Lee also said Tim Bird, Past
President ofthe AMS, lobbied the
Board of Governors to provide
handicapped and meter parking
spaces close to SUB. "Tim Bird and
his executives, worked hard last
year on the project," said Lee.
The plaza project is closely
linked to the parkade construction—"a cause and effect relationship," said Bruce Gellatly, Vice
President of Administration and
Finance.
The parkade eliminates the
need for the plaza site to be a
parking lot, said Gellatly. "Therefore, it was decided to finish the
site in a landscaped fashion."
Also, partially funded by
"surplus funds the University had
on hand in anticipation of the
building ofthe parkade," full funding ofthe plaza will come from the
parkade's "user fee," said Gellatly.
"It's all fully funded by the
operations ofthe parkade over the
next 20 years."
Rec-Fac still
in cradle
By Michael Booth
Last year Rec-Fac was born—
a troublesome baby. This summer
Rec-Fac is a problematic toddler,
stumbling along under the guidance of a Rec-Fac committee.
The committee includes AMS
Director of Administration Andrew Hicks, Director of Finance
Karl Kottmeier, UBC Vice-President for Student and Academic
Services Dr. K.D. Srivastava, and
planner Graham Argyle.
By mid-August, the committee plans to present a case statement on the proposed recreation
facility which will tie together the
committee's recommendations on
the management, financing, users, and day-to-day operations of
the facility.
Not only will the case statement be used to help sell the facility by providing information for
students, Hicks said it will serve
as "the first foundation of Rec-Fac
and will be given to the architect
for designing the facility."
Hicks said that during last
November's referendum the costs
involved were not clear, and information presented in the Informant newsletter, regarding agreements between the AMS and the
administration, "was not 100 percent confirmed."  .
At present Hicks said the
committee will try to match the
'wish list' of components for the
facility with the $9.5 million
budget.
"'In the past there has been
some problems as the university's
vision ofthe center and our vision
of the center has differed to some
degree," Hicks said.
■ "We are basically working to
resolve our differences on the actual contents of the facility and
who will control it. I want to give
students a real vision of what they
can get for their money."
Another area of debate centers on who will use the facility.
The AMS does not want the new
complex to be used by varsity
teams, a point brought out repeatedly during the Rec-Fac campaign
last November.
The university agrees the
facility is 'intended' to be used
primarily by the intramural program, but this agreement would
only be established as an intention, not a firm legal agreement.
While Hicks understands the
university's position, he would
prefer a legal document to ensure
Intramurals does retain a high
priority.
Still another issue the AMS
must clear up is the time period
they need to collect the $30 levy
from students to finance the project.
During the November referendum campaign, the AMS stated
the levy would only be collected for
a period often years.
But now the levy's termination date is uncertain. According
to Hicks, after the facility is completed, students will continue to
pay the levy to fund facility expansions, upgrades and equipment.
Board of Governors' student
representative and ex-AMS President Tim Bird confirms the levy
will not be limited to ten years but
believes that it can terminate at
any time after the project is completed.
"The intention is that the levy
can be stopped by students," said
Bird. "Whenever the recreation
facilities are at an acceptable
level, the AMS will run a referendum to ask for an end to the levy."
Bus fare still too
high for students
By Heather McCartney
BC Transit has reduced bus
fares for some university students, but fares are still too high,
according to Mark Rose, MLA for
Coquitlam-Moody.
BC Transit's new reduced
fares allow students to travel
across more than one zone and pay
only the one-zone rate beginning
in September, the Vancouver
Regional Transit Commission
decided on June 1.
The Student Transit Advisory Committee had lobbied for
this change because ofthe exorbitant fees multi-zone travellers
paid—up to 90 dollars per month,
according to Vanessa Geary, AMS
External Affairs Coordinator.
But Rose said these concessions won't help poor students in
the long run. "Even though travel
expenses are now covered by student loans, these (loans) do have to
be paid back plus interest. Students that are less economically
advantaged are more likely to
have a student loan. These people
are most desperately in need of a
concession fare," he said.
Also, student loans now com
pletely cover travel expenses. The
ceiling for the amount of travel
expenses covered by a student
loan has risen to $53.00 per
month. (All full-time students now
pay a flat rate of $50.00 per
month,so travel expenses are
completely covered by a student
loan.)
Rose said he didn't know why
high school students—who live at
home and don't pay tuition fees—
pay a lower fare than university
students do.
Diane Gendron, from BC
Transit's Public Relations Department, said, "We base our fares on
established tradition adopted by
most businesses which charge
concession fares.
" Normally, high school students are charged a youth fare
while university students are
charged an adult fare."
The Transit Commission
agreed in principle to give a discount to all full-time students, as
long as the provincial government
would provide funding to cover the
discount's cost.
The Student Transit Advisory
Committee will continue fighting
to lower travel expenses, Geary
said.
New SUB plaza to be completed by September
PAT NAKAMURA PHOTO
July 19,1989
THE SUMMER UBYSSEY/3 ANGER
Courtenay native Sue Medley about to be hot with new record.
Folk Festival set down in
history by Chung Wong
The Audience
As twilight hit Vancouver
last Friday, dogs could be seen
rolling in the sands of Jericho
Beach while kids with the energy
of delirious bees did cartwheels
and flips along the shore.
Couples lay in blankets and
crowds of people conglomerating
into a population of around 5000
came to a social event.
Saturday broke open with
heavy summer dancing before a
15-piece band which included 13
guitars and three female blues
singers. Talk about a guitar
seance. The heart of this makeshift gig—deemed a "folk
workshop"—was the Sun
Rhythm Section, pioneers of Sun
Record studios, which spawned
legends such as Elvis Presley,
Carl Perkins, Johnny Cash, Roy
Orbison, and Jerrv Lee Lewis.
Sue Medley sang a raw
acoustic version ofthe Led
Zeppelin classic Ramble On—
"Just wanted to do this English
folk song," she said. The band
then played Buddy Holly's "Not
Fade Away" in E until Vancouver native Roy Forbes said, "Let's
switch keys. We're going to go to
the Canadian key in A."
Forbes's soaring vocals can
certainly be compared to Roy
Orbison's. A magical moment
was reached when they faded
away into the vocals of the
female blues singers.
Sunday, July 17, Jericho
Beach—I got the wet sock in me
muddy shoe blues. Rain. Rain.
Rain. But wait...
The Innuit Throat Singers
Throat singing. Sounds
dirty, doesn't it? Don't be scared
away (of course all you naughties
out there wouldn't be scared
away)—in fact, the Innuit Throat
Singers displayed the greatest
virtuousity ofthe entire festival.
Throat singing is a primitive
vocal style in danger of becoming
extinct. Air is thrown from the
diaphragm through the esophagus for thirty seconds continuously—each song being roughly
two minutes. The sounds created
fabricate tape looping, dubbing,
and electronic manipulation.
Impossible to believe.
Sue Medley
This Courtenay native
opened up Saturday afternoon's
rock special with her raw voice
singing "Ramble On" (oddly,
Melissa Etheridge sounds a lot
like her). Her spirit, along with
Roy Forbes's, brought rock and
roll to the forefront on stage four.
She'll be recording a new album
in Bloomington, Indiana in John
Cougar Mellancamp's studio.
Sunday, she performed her own
composition "It's a Hard Life" before a rain-drenched audience.
She might strike you as a pop-
gismo, but that's yet to be
proven.
Lilian Allen and the Revolutionary Tea Party
Believe in the message; remember the beat.
This co-op radio favourite
from Toronto plays a brand of politically syncopated reggae.
John Cephas and Phil Wiggins
"Glad to see people still
listen to the blues."
Quality Missisippi blues players.
Tissa Farrel, Thando Hyman ana
M.C. Motion with D.J. Power
A rapping hip hop band from
Ontario who sang anti-apartheid
songs.
Suzanna Bird
She stopped in from Manitoba with an energetic train
rhythm from her title track
Heart Full of Soul.
Bisserov Sisters
Though one of the lead
singers looks like a twin to one of I
the Bangles, don't let the
resemblance fool you. These are
not the Bulgarian Bangles.
Though the sound they create
requires virtuousity, these
Bulgarian sisters from hell are
now the official Ubyssey torture
group. Not for North American
ears.
Roy Forbes
He can sing higher than Roy
Orbison and he knows early rock,
country and blues. And he's
actually from Vancouver.
Harbord Trio
Toronto folk band. Forget
about them.
Mae Moore
Look out for this BC native—she can sing the blues.
Atilla the Stockbroker
A bard-comedian from England and Billy Bragg" s nemesis.
He only knows how to rhyme. He
represents the mediocre, the obnoxious and the middle class.
But he rages with the best of
'em. "Me an Billy have a love-
hate relationship. I love him, he
hates me."
"Wike u
Bragg n
ONE HOUR
SOFT CONTACT
LENS SERVICE
(Soft contact lenses in about one hour for most
prescriptions - Specialty lenses excluded)
* SUMMER STUDENT RATES «
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Opening July 4,1989
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Monday To Friday 8:00 -
4/THE SUMMER UBYSSEY
July 19,1989 Billy Bragg—impoverished
victim ofthe Thatcher government
He rages against the past
and present economic and social
"conditions in England.
Now he is avidly following
rg^ents in China and wondering
about the students—he left
China just before the Beijing
massacre.
"I had some gigs set up in
,£he universities for the upcoming
year...now I don't know." His
message to apathetic Canadian
•Stftdents: "Look a' China, look a'
Korea—students are at the
forefront. Students are at the
forefront. Wike up for fuck's
sake!"
" -i   One would not call him a
political activist from the way he
.talks or sings—political activator
would be wat ya call Im.
anniversary of the Nicaraguan
revolution at La Quena Cafe
along other Nicaraguan groups
in the folk festival.
Frankie Armstrong
She will strike you as weird.
While the other women on stage
sang, she passionately breathed
in their music. Literally. When
she and Quebecker Lucie Blue
Tremblay (reknowned for her
courageous songs about incest
from a child's perspective) sang
The Water is Wide, the audience
cried—the only time they did
during the weekend.
Larrikens
"Ever hear about the three
microsurgeons? There's one from
the United States who said he
had this one arm of this guy from
a car accident. He built 'im up
full again and he put five guys
for drug smuggling.
"It was the first time in
many years that two white men
got hanged. They sent us to
cheer up the press I guess," sai
Fahey.
"Colonel Sanders went to town
riding on a chicken/stuck his
finger up his bum and called
it finger licking."
The Finale that made history
When it got hot at night...
Things picked up with the
Soul Vibes, an eight-piece reggae
band from Nicaragua. They sent
a few hundred people, including
flower children, media, punkers,
and quite a few folkies, into a
dancing frenzy.
Then Billy Bragg—in cut-off
shorts and lumberjack shirt—
grabbed the first standing
ovation.
"This song is about a fear we
all have of something that has
entered our society. It is why
condoms exist. It's called yup-
piedom. So for all ya people who
need material (objects) to (make
yourselves) better...this song is
for you../ Jus becoz I dress lyke
this doesn't mean I'm a commune
eest.'"
The song with these words:
"The revolution is just a T-shirt
away." He raged against the
dying of the light.
"Socialism is *bout lovin'," he
said.
MANDEL NGAN PHOTO
»r fuck's sike" - students of the world should be at the forefront of society
s against the dying of the light.
J-Ut this does not sit well
with everyone.
"Me ma—she don't lyke me
TMttin' all the pol-itical
stuff in. In fact she says,'They
got John Lennon—they'll get
you!'"
And what about his references to women's issues in
Valentine's Day? Bragg says, "I
think itsa perfec' idea far a man
to spake on women's issues. We
^-fyte rice-ism but we never
experience it...but at the sime
time we express our solidarity
with the anti-apartheid movement."
B-Cuadro
With their Latin American
~rrrythmns, this Nicaraguan band
was the most energetic act in the
festival. They can merengue.
They will celebrate the tenth
out of work. "Well that's nothin','
said the man from England. "I
just had a hair and I put the rest
of a guy back together—he put
ten guys out work.' "Well that's
nothing, I caught a fart in the
street and gave it arms and legs
and it got elected premier—put
half the population out of work.'"
Warren Fahey created the
group The Larrikens in 1973 to
play "just Australian songs."
"We like to sing old songs as
they were done as opposed to
taking the American rock-and-
roll route," said Fahey.
The group has frequently
been subsidized by the Australian government to go overseas.
Recently, the government sent
them to Kuala Lumpur after the
Chambers-Barlow incident in
which both Aussies were hanged
Sunder
Warren Fahey owns Larrikens
Golden Arches marchin'
across the world
So you thought Bragg was
good and uncatchable. You
might've been right until
Australian Judy Small rang the
words, "We are foolish people
who do nothing 'cause we know
how little one can do" and "You
were the mothers, daughters,
wives...and you believed them."
I thought I was in for
something corny when she asked
us to "reach to the most honest
part of our souls."
I reached into my empty
wallet.
Small then asked the crowd
of 4000, "How many of you...have
never eaten at a McDonald's?"
Only three or four raised their
hands.
"Each year McDonald's
spends 192 million dollars on
advertising. There are 10 000
McDonalds in the world. Only
230 McDonald's are in Australia
but it seems like so many," she
said.
"Did you know that every 17
hours a new McDonald's is being
built?" she asked.
"Last year on New Year's
Day in Moscow there were no
records, largest private Aussie label.
McDonald's. This coming New
Year's Day there will be 37," she
said.
Small then begged the
audience to make the satirical
song "Golden arches marching
across the world" as well-known
as the McDonald's commercial
ditties.
Her final song—You Don't
Speak for Me—condemned "a
group called National Action,
which has made the anti-
apartheid movement in Australia
difficult, and has pushed to limit
the immigration of Asians into
Australia. They claim to speak
for 85% ofthe Australians—
sound familiar? Well they don't
speak for me!"
Magic
The legendary Pete Seeger
closed things off with an oomph.
"The only thing worse than a
song being banned is to be
named the official song of
something," he said before he
sang L'Hymne Internationale,
written in 1871 by Eugene
Pottier after the failure of the
Paris Commune.
Billy Bragg joined midway to
sing translated verses of the
Chinese version sung by students in Tiananmen Square.
ITED
-a Job?
Opportunities
able.
.ink In
e Of SUB.
,/Casual.
aits Your Needs.
NK
228-5627
00   RmlOOB
EMPLOYEES NEEDED
AMS USED BOOKSTORE
• CLERKING JOBS AVAILABLE
• $7/HOUR
• FULL-TIME/PART-TIME EMPLOYEES NEEDED
• WILL ACCOMODATE FULL-TIME/PART TIME
UBC STUDENTS
• EXPERIENCE IS PREFERRED, BUT NOT
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• FLEXIBLE HOURS, BETWEEN AUG 28-OCT 8
• MANDATORY, PAID TRAINING SESSION
ON AUG. 28, 9-12
APPLICATIONS AVAILABLE
SUB ROOM 238
APPLICATIONS MUST BE SUBMITTED
NO LATER THAN
12 NOON FRIDAY AUGUST 11TH, 1989
BEST BREAKFAST IN TOWN
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rfl-
The Corner of Broadway & Burrard
1794 W. Broadway
Vancouver B.C.
731-1319
Mon-Fri   8:00-5:00     Saturday 8:00-3:00
Sunday/Holidays 9:00 - 3:00
Our Customers Are The Reason We Are In Business
July 19,1989
THE SUMMER UBYSSEY/5 ;_"..:.„ y.	
Entertainment
v^o
FRIDAY & SATURDAY JULY 21 & 22
CUV, PIO ADD PIC ffiW
AT THE ARTS CLUB (1181 SEYMOUR STREET)
Guitars guitars guitars! For two different treatments of this
wonderful stringed instrument, listen to these two very
different acts all in one night. Clive Pig brings us his
acoustic guitar and British accent; Pig Farm bring their
Ontario guitary twang. A few bucks at the door.
SATURDAY JULY 22
W OROOVftlOLIG AID VOL. Of WS.
STATION STREET ARTS CENTRE
(1 BLOCK EAST OF MAIN ON STATION STREET)
Ex-Doa axe-man Dave Gregg, Ron Allen from the Scramblers, et al give a rare appearance, this time at one of
Vancouver's newer theatre venues. If you hark from the
era of platform Cola shoes and corduroy bell-bottoms,
you'll love the Croovaholics' seventies retro-perspective.
A benefit performance for Station Street. Seven bucks at
the door, five bucks advance.
SUNDAY JULY 23
Lil QUfJtf* fKffl,
GRANDVIEW PARK (1200 COMMERCIAL DR)
An exciting half-day of music, speakers, info, food, and
other goodies. For those who could not afford the Folk
Festival. Noon to 7:30 p.m. Free, but buttons are for sale
on the grounds.
Tevye charms the world
by Parminder Parmar
Last week, Joseph Stein's
musical, Fiddler on the Roof,
played to near-capacity audiences
at the Queen Elizabeth Theatre.
After seeing the play, it is not difficult to understand why.
Fiddler on the Roof is about
change—change   in   societies,
* ' •
■
f*            "~">s.        S    At       1
/ This Samosa is^v      /                      \    _.
(delicious! Where ] /       \-ViS-      (SlS^t^,
\c-lid yon get ir?/ (     Delly   /"sj   S     T
y n  r?^_______
■r 1 -
»|^ai^nilT^^Hirp_^^                                                 ^^________B'_S__Il_1
sub            ;
LOWER./.
CONCOURSE |
'    "  °-">'™
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r
UBC Aquatic Centre
A
The University of British Columbia, 6121 University Blvd., FOR MORE INFORMATION CALL: 228-4521
UNIVERSITY SWIMS
Mon to Fri
Mon to Fri
Mon/WecVFri
Tues/Thurs
7:30 am - 9:00 am
11:30am - 1:30 pm
4:30 pm • 6:00 pm*
4:30 pm - 5:30 pm
* Outdoor pool not available after 5:30 pm
Entire facility open to UBC Students, Staff, Faculty and
Conference Delegates. Upon presentation of 88/89
UBCLibrarycard. UBCstudenUareadrnittedfreeand
UBC staff and Faculty pay $175. Conference
Delegates pay $1.75 upon presenting residence keys.
PUBLIC SWIMS —
Mon to Fri
Monday
Friday
Wednesday
Sat/Sun
Sat/Sun
1:45 pm
6:30 pm
' 6:30 pm
7:30 pm
1:00 pm
6:30 pm
4:15 pm
10:00 pm
10:00 pm
10:00 pm
5:00 pm
10:00 pm
Pool is open to all ages. Children 7 years and under
must be accompanied by an adult and supervised in
the pool (within amis reach) at all times. Fitness ana
is open to those 16 and over for an additional chary*
of (1:00. shirts, shorts and runners must be worn In
the fitness area at all times.
FAMILY SWIMS 	
Wednesday 6:30 pm   -     7:30 pm
Sunday 10:30 am -      12:45 pm
•Parents without their own children are not admitted
to this session.
Parents with their own children only. Children an
admitted free only -when accompanied by their own
parents. Passes and book tickets are not accepted and
the fitness area is not available.
ADULT SWIMS 	
Tues/Thurs 8:00 pm   -      12 midnight
Saturday 10:15pm-      12 midnight
•Fitnes* area closes at 10pm. Sauna and steam room
remain open and co-ed for free.
Adults only, must be 18 years old and over. Proof of
age may be requested. FKnessareaopenonly until 10
pm for additional charge of $ 1.00.
FITSWIM '
Mon/Wed/Fri       9:15
Starts Monday, June 19, 1989
Last class Friday, September 1,1989
Adults only, must be 18 years old or over. This swim
coincides with children's lessons and rentals,
therefore, the availability of the indoor and outdoor
pools is limned. Fitness area, sauna and steam
available. Cost is $2.25 for adults. Those over 65 ar*
$1.25. No book tickets or passes accepted.
CO-ED FITNESS  	
Tues/Thurs 6:30pm    -
•Starts Tuesday June 20/89
Last class Thursday, August 31/89
8:00 pm Anyone 18 years and older. 50 minutes of dry land
exercises and 30 minutes of water exercises. No book
tickets or passes accepted. Cost is $2.25.
SENIOR'S SHAPE-UP
Tues/Thurs
Fifty-five years and older welcome. Stretch and
Strength deck exercise dass, 9:35 - 10 am, followed
by water exercises to music, 10-10:30 am, or just do
your own thing. Restricted use of pool due to lessons
and rentals. Steam, sauna, weights are open with
limited Supervision.
•Starts Tuesday June 20/89
Last dass Thursday, August 31/89
FITNESS AREA (Check schedule for hours) , ,	
The fitness area is equipped with uni versa fglobal stations, hydra-gym exercise machines, stationary bicycles,
dumbells, wall mirrors, exercise posters, weight scale, steam rooms and saunas. All the equipment is suitable
for every level of fitness, so drop by to start your fitness program or to maintain your fitness level. Fitness area
is supervised by an attendant during the University, Public and Adult swim sessions and is open to anyone 16
years and older. Cost is $1.00 extra, over and above single admission pool fee. T-shirts, shorts and runners
must be worn when using the fitness area.
ADMISSION FEES   	
Single admission Book Tickets (10)
Passes: 4 Months (no Probating)
Under 3 years old
#1 January 1 -April 30
a(_rtitted free
#2 May 1 -August 31
#3 September 1 - December 31
Children: 3-12                                               $1.25
$10.00
$30.00
Seniors: 65 and up                                    $1.25
$10.00
$30.00
Youth: 13-17                                              $1.50
$12.50
$35.00
UBC Student Valid Student Card              $1.50
$12.50
$35.00
Adult 18-64                                              $1.75
$15.00
$40.00
Keep ft and Swim                                      $2.75
$22.50
—
FitCard (weight room)                                   —
15 visits for $12               —
FITNESS AREA:
Please Note: Swimscneduleandadmtuionfeesare
To use the weight room, sauna and steam rooms
subject to change and/or cancellation without
during Public and Adult Swims there is an additional
prior notice.
charge of $1.00.
>
Tevye, played by Chaim Topol, wishes to be a
rich man.
change in families, and change in
individuals.
The plays shows how the
Russian Revolution—and the dramatic changes in thought and ideals it brought—affected one Jewish town, one Jewish family, and
all the members of the family.
The acting in this production
is superb. Chaim
Topol plays the
always analytical,
yet sometimes
confused Tevye.
Strong and dominant around his
daughters, he
reverts to a childlike disposition
when he is with
his wife, Golde,
played by Marcia
Rodd. Unfortunately, Golde's
character is one-
dim en sional:
stern and dominant. Rodd could
have brought a
greater emotional
range to this part.
Ruth Jaroslow
plays the town
matchmaker,
Yente, who arranges the marriages of all young
couples     except
those of Tevye's "rebellious" and
"untraditional" daughters.
Yente's symbolic role ofthe play is
to preserve the dominance of tradition in society for the sake of stability.
THEATRE
Fiddler On The Roof
Queen Elizabeth Theatre
July 11-16
Though simple and blunt, the
musical numbers and choreography complement the characters
and setting of the play. The set,
apropos, is plain and uncomplicated. The cozy and warm appearance of the set early on in the
drama falls into tragic paradox to "
the turbulent revolution which
ends the play.
It is difficult to find many
faults with this play. The prices of
the tickets, however, were astronomical . The least expensive seats
were twenty-seven dollars, a price *■ *
which does not make productions
like these accessible to many stu- *»
dents.
The musical ends with a fiddler playing on a roof just as he
was in the beginning, symbolizing
that no matter how many changes *
take place — everything stays the
same.
.*•
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BOOKSTORE
6200 University Boulevard • 228-4741
6/THE SUMMER UBYSSEY
July 19,1989 This editorial is dedicated to the individuals who formed a
barrier to protect retreating students, workers and civilians—who propagated a movement toward human rights
in a struggle for democracy—as tanks rolled in and ignorance began firing bullets. This song was sung in solidarity
for its social context by the students in Tiananmen Square.
Llnternationale
C'est la lutte finale:
Groupons-nous, et demain
Llnternationale
Sera le genre humain.
Debout lee damnes de la terre!
Debout, let forests de la faim!
La raison tonne en son cratere:
C'est l'eruption de la fin.
Du passe bisons table rase:
Foule esclave, debout! Debout!
Le monde va changer de base;
Nouse ne sommes rien, soyons tout!
II n'est pas de sauveurs supremes:
Ni Dieu, ni Cesar, ni tribun.
Producteurs, sauvons-nouB nouB-memeB,
Decretons le salut commun!
Pour que le voleur rende gorge,
Pour tirer l'esprit du cachot,
Soufllons nous-memes notre forge,
Battons le fer quand il est chaud!
L'Etat comprime et la loi triche,
Llmpot saigne le malheureux;
Nul devoir ne s'knpose au riche,
Le droit du pauvre est un mot creux.
C'est aBsez languir en tutelle,
L'egalite veut d'autres lois:
Pas de droits sans devoirs, dit-elle;
Egaux, pas de devoirs Bans droits!
Hideux dans leur apotheose,
Les rois de la mine et du rail
Ont-ils jamaiB fait autre chose
Que devaliser le travail?
Dans les coffires- forts de la bande
Ce qu*il a cree s'est fondu.
En decretant qu'on le lui rende
Le peuple ne veut que son du.
Les rois nous soulaient de fumees;
Paix entre nous, guerre aux tyrans!
Appliquons la greve aux armees,
CroBse en l'air et rompons les rangs!
Slls s'obstinent, ces cannibeles,
A faire de nous des heros,
Ds sauront bientot que nos balies
Sont pour nos propres generaux.
Ouvriers, pay sans, nous sommeB
Le grand parti des travailleurs.
La terre n'appartient qu'aux hommes,
L'oisif ira loger ailleurs.
Combien de nos chairs se repaissentt
MaiB si les corbeaux, les vautours,
Un de ces matins, disparaissent,
Le soleO brillera toujours!
The Internationale
You rise, prisoners of starvation!
You rise, wretched ofthe earth,
For justice thunders condemnation,
A better world's in birth.
No more tradition's chain shall bind us,
You rise, all slaves; no more in thrall!
The earth shall rise on new foundations.
We have been not, we shall be all.
Tis the final conflict,
Let each Btand in one's place.
The International
Shall be the human race.
We want no condescending Baviors,
To rule us from a judgement hall;
We workers ask not for their favours:
Let us discuss for all.
To make the thief diBgorge his booty
To free the spirit from the cell,
We must ourselves decide our duty,
We must decide and do it well.
The law oppresses us and tricks us,
Wage slavery drain the workers' blood;
The rich are free from obligations,
the laws the poor delude.
Too long we've languished in subjection,
Equality has other laws;
"No rights," says she, 'without their duties,
No claims on equals without cause."
Behold them seated in their glory,
The kingB of mines and rails and soils
What have you read in all their story
But how they plundered toil?
Fruits of the workers toil are buried
In the strong coffers of a few;
In working for their restitution
They will only ask their due.
Toilers from shopB and fields united,
The union of we of all who work;
The earth belongB to ub, the workers,
No room here for the shirk
How many on our flesh have flattened!
But if the noisome birds of prey
Shall vanish from the sky some morning,
The blessed sunlight still will stay.
Si   H.*
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Each translation was written in the socio-cultural context
ofthe realities that existed in the times. The original was
written by Eugene Pottier in 1888. The Chinese students
sang this song for its social context. Ifs historical power as
the international anthem for socialists put the government
in the People's Republic of China with its actions against
itself. And continues to do so.
r
iheUbyssey
July 19,1989
The Summer Ubyssey is published Wednesdays
throughout July and August by the Alma Mater Society of
the University of British Columbia. Editorial opinions are
those of the staff and not necessarily those of the
university administration, orof the sponsor. The Ubyssey
is a member of Canadian University Press. The editorial
office is Rm. 241K of the Student Union Building.
Editorial Department, phone 228-2301; advertising,
228-3977; FAX# 228-6093
To: Comrade Yurii / Campus Secret Agents Desk
KGB HQ, The Kremlin
Re: Ongoing undercover investigation of Ubyssey, UBC hotbed of petit
bourgeois neo-conservatism.
Profuse apologies for lateness of report Thanks for inscribed copy of the
works of our glorious sainted leader Lenin. Cover of reactionary working wonderfully, allowing for my continued progressive influence on Ubyssey staff.
Suspect that staffers David Loh and Pat Nakamura are agents of the
other side and plotting to eliminate me. Also suffered another setback when my
planned 45 inch feature on the aweinspiring father of our peoples, Joseph Stalin,
was pulled by Chung Wong and Joe Altwasser in favour of article by Michael
Booth (an NRA member) on RecFac (a facility where the overpaid revanchist
lapdogs of the AMS plutocracy Ted Aussem, Hao Ii and Alexandra Johnson can
exerciBe while the sainted workers grovel in the throes of wage slavery).
Although editors Laura J. May and Franka Cordua-von Specht refuse to
take a class view of the ongoing economic crisis caused by the imperialist
graspings of the dying Western capitalist system and imperialist running dogs.
Nadene Rehnby, George Oliver, Carla Maftechuk and Heather McCartney
refuse to read the copies of Pravda I leave in their mail boxes, there is some
progress. Parminder Parmar has written a fine review of Fiddler on the Roof
(which actresses the people's struggle to wrest control ofthe music industry) and
Steve Chan and Chris Wiesinger continue to fight layout orthodoxies set by the
bourgeois press.
Singing the hallowed strains ofthe song of progressive capitalism smashers everywhere, The Internationale, I remain:
Richard Donaldovich
John Maxwell and Kelly Duncan hummed, "Mussolini Lives."
Edtton
Joe Altwasaor • Franka Cordua-von Specht
Laura J. May • Chung Wong
Letters
AMS ignored
referendum
So the AMS Council has
taken a strong moral stance
and struck a blow for human
rights and freedom in South
Africa. . . at the expense of
student rights and freedom
at UBC.
Two years ago, as THE
UBYSSEY reported, a referendum calling for the banning of South African products was defeated by a campus-wide student vote. Apparently this referendum
was a mere sham since a
more enlightened AMS
Council in 1989 has seen fit
not only to take action without consulting the present
student population, but also
to flagrantly ignore the
opinion of the students who
voted in the previous referendum; many of whom are
still a part of the student
peasantry (well if that's how
you're going to treat us).
This action raises some
very serious doubts about
the integrity of the student
referendum process and,
unless the boycott is retracted and put to a student
vote, I would suggest that
we, as students, not even
waste our time going to the
polls this fall to vote on the
proposed Recreation Facility. After all, "if a referendum fails to pass it is not a
vote against, rather it is a
failure to arrive at a consensus. . ." (Thank you for the
double speak Mr. Kogan).
If Rec Fac fails "to arrive at a consensus" we can
all sleep easy knowing that
a more enlightened AMS
Council will just darn well
build it anyway, given a
couple of years for the students to forget about the
issue. While not a Rec Fac
basher, if promise breaking
is the precedent, and disregarded student opinion part
ofthe price, then I think I'd
rather spend my $30 a year
elsewhere.
Top marks to Joanna
Wickie for her observation
that Council's decision will
limit personal choice (something I was misled to believe
we valued out here). I cannot even begin to comprehend what sort of self-right-
The Ubyssey welcomes letters on any issue. Letters must be typed and are not to exceed 300 words In length. Content
which Is judged to be libelous, homophobic, sexist, racist or factually Incorrect will not be published. Please be concise.
Letters may be edited for brevity, but it is standard Ubyssey policy not to edit letters for spelling or grammatical mistakes.
Please bring them, with identification, to SUB 241k. Letters must include name, faculty, and signature.	
eous fog drifted through the
minds of other council
members that they would
hold their own wisdom and
doubtlessly flawless expertise on a complex issue of
international affairs in
higher regard than their
duty as elected representatives of the student body.
The entire matter
leaves me wondering what
issues we are going to be
allowed personal, educated
choice about on this campus;
at least within the realm of
the socially conscious AMS
Council. What's next guys?
Maybe afew South African works in the libraries or
the bookstore?
OK. Anybody have a
match?
Bill Allman
Law 2
No smoking
Well, what do you
know! After a century of
needless death and torment
caused by the legal dope
ring known as the tobacco
industry, our AMS council
has come up with a reason
for boycotting Rothman's.
And what is that reason? Is
it that babies in Canada who
are breastfed by smoking
mothers get the equivalent
of two cigarettes a day?
Nope. Is it that the entire
tobacco industry as we now
know it was built on 300
years of black slavery in
America? No. Is it that the
industry is deliberately using media stereotypes of
young "glamorous" women
in their ads to target young
girls who aren't hooked yet?
Or that tobacco has been
linked to Sudden Infant
Death Syndrome (SIDS) in
cases of smoking during
pregnancy? Or that from
10,000 to 15,000 Canadian
children took up this deadly
addiction each month between 1982 and 1987? Or
that, since the millionaires
who run the tobacco cartel
have every intention of remaining millionaires, they
will stop at nothing to ensure that our children become tomorrow's smokers?
No, none of the above. The
AMS council wants to boycott Rothman's for being a
subsidiary of a South African company.
Let me be sure I have
this right. The next time I
wish to lend my financial
support, my "dollar votes",
to an industry which knowingly spreads cancer, heart
disease and other horrors
from generation to generation both here in Canada
and in S. Africa, I should
make sure it is for a brand
that only kills Canadians.
This will show how politically correct I am. Such lofty
idealism just takes my
breath away, so to speak.
Sure let's boycott Rothman's. But while we're at it,
let's take that "strong stand
on human rights" for the
children of Canada and kick
all tobacco products off the
campus altogether. That
will really send a strong
message!
Nick Sullivan
Unclassified
FSL Summer Institute
Apology
won't do
Dear Mr. Hill;
I recently received your
letter 'apologizing" for some
very offensive statements in
'The Red Menace'.
Your response to our
concerns is not good enough,
Mr. Hill.
Lack of journalistic experience is not sufficient rationalization for the obnoxious garbage found in your
'newspaper'. The material
in The Red Menace' demonstrates a hatred and fear of
women that has less to do
with editorial policy and
journalistic experience than
it has to do with our culture's (and particularly engineering students'!) perceptions of women and our
'place'.
It is up to you and your
peers to re-educate yourselves, for when the next
issue of The Red Menace'
comes out, we will be watching. Should we find it in any
way offensive or demeaning
to women, we will take further action.
Erin Graham
for Vancouver Rape Relief
The engineers apologized and Vancouver Rape
Relief wouldn't accept the
apology.
Perhaps Erin Graham
should re-think her attitude toward engineers
while the engineers are
busy re-educating themselves about women.
Though the engineers'
statement in The Red Menace was outrageous and offensive ("a .44 under the
chin is a million times better than a nice dinner,
flowers, or a trip to Whistler"), they apologized.
They also changed the way
their newspaper operates
to avoid future offensive
remarks.
The Red Menace's remark was more than just a
simple journalistic mis
take: at least one engineer
is awfully insecure about
women. But he may not
write the same thing today
that he wrote last March
And besides, could
Graham really expect the
engineers to say what she
wanted to hear? "We, the
engineers, apologize for
our statement. We are
guilty of promoting a
hatred and fear of women
that derives from our cul
ture's perceptions of
women and their place." I
don't think so. The engineers' apology may have
lacked insight into the
causes of sexism, but the
apology itself was sincere.
Give them a break,
Graham. However small a
step the apology may have
seemed to Vancouver Rape
Relief, it was nevertheless
an apology.
Let's try to end this
war between feminists and
engineers. Just imagine
it—engineers realizing
that feminists really aren't
a bunch of unreasonable,
angry bitches, and feminists realizing that engineers aren't a bunch of intolerant, ignorant pigs.
Peace, harmony, bliss,
we can do it if we try and all
that baby boom claptrap.
by Laura J. May,
Ubyssey staff
July 19,1989
THE SUMMER UBYSSEY/7 UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
STAGE CAMPUS' 89
Presents:
1837: The
Farmers' Revo It
by: Rick Salutin _
directed by: Martin Millerchip
July 19 - August 4
BOX OFFICE: 228 2678
FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE, U.B.C.
:: 8:00PM    TICKETS: $6.00
(MONDAYS & MATINEES ARE 2 FOR 1)
UBC • Student Union Building
Lower Concourse
All Ages Welcome
Recommended in
"Where to Eat in Canada."
2505 Alma At W. Broadway
Tel • 222-2244
is for "creating
a literary
masterpiece
that will be as
aesthetically
pleasing as it
is intellectually
stimulating."
WE    CAN    HELP
AMS CUSTOMER OPERATED
WORD PROCESSING
SUB LOWER LEVEL
228-5496
m AMS
FREE GUIDED CAMPUS TOURS
Bring your friends, visitors, community, school or civic group to UBC
for a walking tour of the campus. Drop-ins welcome every Monday
through Friday at 10 a.m. and 1 p.m.; 3 p.m. weekdays and weekend
times available by reservation only. Groups will have the opportunity
to see and learn about everything from the unique Sedgewick
underground library to the Rose Garden and more. Tours
commence at SUB and last approximately 2 hours in the
morning andl 1/2 hours in the afternoon. To book, call the
Community Relations Office at 228-3131.
THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
Lutherans
ASK QUESTIONS
LUTHERAN
CAMPUS CENTRE
Wesbrook &
University Blvd.
(By the Village)
Sundays, 730pm
Ray Schultz, Pastor
224-1614
But that puts us in good company.
Jesus cried out from the cross,
"My Cod, My Cod, Why have you forsaken me?"
Luther's life was a chronicle of wrestling with Cod.
Lutheran's have a lot of questions,
because life is not easy
And Faith is not Certain.
We believe in promise not proof.
"The conviction of things not seen."
Lutherans ask questions
because we do not know the answers,
but we know the God who does.
Come—ask—and grow with us.
The Lutheran Church Welcomes You.
BY    LORI    DUNGEY    •    IAN    FORSYTH
KEN     ROBERTS     •     RICHARD     SIDE
FROM   JUNE    28
Tuesday to Saturday 8:00 p.m. 2 for 1 Sat 4:00
BACK    ALLEY    THEATRE
751     THURLOW
Reservations 688-7013  TtcktthlmStM 280-4444
Hong Kong
Chinese Foods
5732 University Blvd.
Lunch Specials (combination)
$3.65
MSG FREE
Licensed
224-1313
3 V
COPIES
July 17-23
• 8 1/2X11 201b.
S=   =*£i PLUS NO EXTRA CHARGE
™ """j _■l-» • Automatic Collating
• 3 Hole Paper
3 _   __. __■*. • Standard Color Paper
2 _£   VW S__T * Reductions
• Elargements
UNIVERSITY VILLAGE
2ND FLOOR
2174 WESTERN PARKWAY
VANCOUVER, B.C.
TEL # 224-6225
FAX # 224-44492
OPEN EVERY DAY MON
FRI 8-6 SAT-SUN  11-6
THURS 8-9
VOLUNTEERS REQUIRED
Genital herpes treatment studies. Tests
involving potential new treatments for
genital herpes are presently being conducted.
Volunteers with recurrent genital herpes are
required for testing of these agents. The study
involves admission to hospital for 5-6 days for
the intravenous infusion of this new drug. The
study drug will be given every 8 hours for a total
of 1 5 doses. Volunteers may receive treatment
with the new drug or with a placebo containing
no active drug, and must be 18 years of age or
older, and definetly not pregnant. Females
should also not be susceptible to becoming
pregnant during the study because of their use of
adequate birth control, or for other reasons.
Volunteers will be provided an honourarium to
cover their expenses.
Ifyou are interested in finding out more about
participation in these studies, please call for
details 660-6704 before your next recurrence.
8/THE SUMMER UBYSSEY
July 19,1989

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