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UBC Publications

The Ubyssey Oct 22, 1968

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Array BIRDS MORAL VICTORS, DRAW SOME BLOOD
The UBC football Thunderbirds scored a moral
victory in their game against the SFU Clansmen
Monday night in Empire Stadium.
In a game which started in a downpour on a
sloppy field, Birds managed to score their first
points of the season to go down to a 27-7 loss.
Head coach Frank Gnup attributed the loss to
a combination of mental mistakes, a slow-starting
offense and a poor punting squad.
SFU opened the scoring with a safety touch
worth two points, the result of a bad snap from
center on a punt.
SFU quarterback Wayne Holm went around
right end to open the scoring four minutes into the
second quarter. Cutler converted to make it 8-0 SFU.
Nine minutes later a poor punt set up the second
Clan score with Holm again carrying the ball across
the goal for a major at the thirteen minutes mark of
the second quarter.
The Clan then kicked off to UBC. After three
plays the Birds were forced to kick and SFU's Bill
Robinson was allowed to run the punt back 37 yards
for the major. Cutler again missed his conversion
attempt, making the score 21-0 SFU.
SFU led UBC 12-1 in first downs and had 159
yards to 31 yards in total offense.
Half time entertainment was provided by UBC
W,
*. -J.'
■*■?;
Isobel
necessary
and SFU cheerleaders, a marching band from Mount
Baker, which didn't march due to the heavy rain, and
Lady Godiva with her engineers.
Most interesting was the engineers' march
around the track, especially as they walked by the
SFU stands suffering indignity after indignity without reciprocating. A few tense moments occurred
when the horse decided half-way around the track
it didn't want to go on.
But Lady Godiva remained seated, and the
horse calmed down.
The second half was a complete reversal as the
Birds outscored the Clan 7-6.
The offense showed promise as it gave the defense the longest rest it has had this season, controlling the play for the third quarter and an early part
of the fourth.
Late during the third quarter UBC's individual
star, Dave Corcoran, crashed over from the six yard
line for the UBC score — the first points UBC has
managed this season.
In the closing minutes of the game the Clan
ran out the clock using the pass to set up their final
score, a two yard run over tackle.
A post-game analysis showed the Birds were
outmatched but played well.
The defense deserves better than the 27 points
the scoreboard indicated. The held the potent SFU
team to a mere 297 yards, 189 against UBC's porous
pass defence.
The UBC specialty squad also deserves some
comments as in three cases their mistakes led to
SFU points.
The individual UBC star had to be Dave Corcoran who scored the touchdown, led UBC in rushing and played a good defensive game.
Gnup said after the game, "They didn't push
us around physically, we beat ourselves with mental
goofs. We blew the game."
He was pleased with the Birds' effort though
and pointed especially to Corcoran.
Bird players were not at all pleased with the
deportment of some of the Simon Fraser coaches
along the sidelines when the action went out of
bounds near their bench.
Apparently Charlie Phipps was kicked after
knocking an SFU player out of bounds. There was
also another incident but the player involved declined to air his heef-^thinking it petty.
The crowd£^142-^trong, will probably agree
the Birds gave nrg"game away on mental errors, but
otherwise held their own surprisingly well.
But mental lapses are nothing new to the Birds,
they've been putting on a show comparable to even
the Lions for the last few seasons. This game was
only a small improvement.
Vol. L, No. 18
VANCOUVER, B.C., TUESDAY, OCTOBER 22, 1968
228-2305
— dick button photo
UBC's DAVE CORCORAN, in dark jersey center, plunges on paydirt side of goalline which the
referee is standing on, for UBC's first and only TD. The ref, one of the excellent imported trio,
indicates Corcoran's success by raising both arms. Photographer Dick Buttton caught this and
other action in Emipre Stadium. (See story above.)
Chairman Koerner speaks,
statement covers finances
The problem at UBC, as board of govemers'
chairman Dr. Walter Koerner sees it, is money.
That's the essence of Koerner's long-awaited
statement on his accession to the board chair-
manshop, released Monday.
"The function of the university is not merely
to turn out trained people for the professionals,
business and industry, but to enable every student to acquire the best possible education in
. the truest sense of that word," says Koerner.
"To do this in the face of mounting costs
and ever larger numbers of new students we
must have adequate capital and operating
funds."
Koerner says the board will leave the academic side of UBC to "those whose proper busi-
v ness it is."
But he adds: "Faculty and student views
make most sense to me when they are directed
prmiarily to improving the quality and integrity of this institution.
"Let us reject coercion as a tactic; it is no
substitute for reason and for ideas, or for democratic persuasion."
Kosrner pledges the support of the board
to efforts at finding more money for UBC.
"We will do everything we can to provide
the highest possible level of moral and material
support in order to develop the university in
accordance with the needs of the students and
the facutly."
"To this end I will press our case vigorously
with industry, taxpayers and government, and
do all I can to rally the support of the alumni,
business and the public generally."
Booze cabinet
discovered in
AMS offices
By CAREY LINDE
I don't suppose that most of you fellow students have had
occasion to go up to the Alma Mater Society offices in SUB yet.
Along with more than half a dozen executive offices up
there, there's a very plush executive conference room, not to be
used by anyone other than the top AMS bureaucrats. I've been
in it now and then with law students, giving advice to students
through our legal aid program. And I've got to admit, it is a
comfortable place.
But you can imagine my surprise Friday when I saw my
dog Friar chewing on an electric cord that came out from behind
a cabinet that I thought was a mere piece of plush furniture..
I took a second look.
It was a locked cabinet*, with a cord running out behind.
After a while I managed to discover its true identity: an
opulent $500 refrigerated bar.
Imagine that, said to myself, the AMS bureaucrats, who at
general meetings condemn pub-ins, -Who get so self-righteous
about the use of booze in SUB, and who condemn Leon Ladner
for wasting money on a bell tower, these same hyprocrites
sanction the spending of $500 (student money) on a bar, that
they hid away in the executive conference room, and keep it all
under lock and key.
Maybe there is something to the rumor after all that AMS
types are just glorified clerks who like to have their own offices,
own private conference rooms and their own bar.
I'm only the lowly vice-president, but nobody told me about
it, that's for damn sure. But, thanks to my great companion, Friar
Hound, the extravagant folly of our so-called "leaders" has been
uncovered.
Scanty science vote I
boots in Kowalczyk |
Only  503  sciencemen  turned out  last  Thursday  and   §f
*   Friday to elect undergraduate president Peter Kowalczyk,   §
sc. 3. H
; Kowalczyk won the election on a moderate-reform   f;
-    platform. f*
Returning officer Bill Lear, sc. 4, was not available to
confirm the voting score.
The figures as given by an SUS spokesman: Kowalczyk
1   297, Mike McPhee 156, spoiled 50. Page 2
THE     UBYSSEY
Tuesday, October 22, 1968
SFU referendum motion
rekindles campus clash
By GEORGE REAMSBOTTOM
BURNABY (Staff) — Simon Fraser University student council's motion to hold a referendum asking students if they want to withdraw
from the Canadian Union of Students has sharply reawakened the conflict between radical and
moderate students.
The few weeks of quiet studying which followed the rousing series of confrontations between students, faculty and administration during the summer semester ended last Tuesday
when student council voted 7-4 in favor of withdrawing from CUS and holding the referendum.
The well-organized radical Students for a
Democratic University (SDU) quickly acted to
rally student support for CUS.
A - rally at SFU Monday noon, called by
SDU, was attended by more than 700 students
who listened to arguments for and against
membership in CUS.
Simon Fraser student president Rob Walsh
told students the $6,000 it costs them to maintain membership in CUS is neither financially
nor politically worth it.
Emphasizing provincial government responsibility for education, Walsh said a CUS lobby
in Ottawa is no longer important.
He added that services such as charter air
flights, life insurance at group rates and research assistance could be provided at the provincial level.
CUS president Peter Warrian, who flew to
Vancouver from Winnipeg Sunday night, told
students here that student loans and the tax
emption for fees were both a direct result of
CUS lobbying in Ottawa. Both are federal matters.
Former SFU student president Martin Loney, now president-elect of CUS, told students
their role in Canadian society would be sharply
weakened  by  withdrawal.
The CUS referendum was the first important
confrontation between moderate and radical
students this fall. Moderate students lost the initiative when they allowed the radicals to call
the Monday rally.
The radicals first showed that a quorum
of students (more than 10 per cent of the student body) was present and then overruled
the original student council motion which would
have asked students in a complexly-worded
referendum if they were in favor of pulling
out of CUS.
The referendum, to be held Monday and
Tuesday, will now ask students to adopt five
principles of support for CUS.
Student council must either regain momentum from the radicals or face an embarrassing
defeat which could affect council's influence
here for the remainder of the school year.
Shrum drops BoG job,
1 deserve holiday'
By SUSAN GORDON
Gordie wants a holiday.
Commenting on his decision to step down from the chairmanship of the board of governors at Simon Fraser University,
chancellor Dr. Gordon Shrum said Friday: "My main reason
for retiring — aside from the increased pressure of other activities —is that I would like to take a vacation.
"After all, I deserve a holday. I haven't had one since I
became chancellor nearly six years ago."
Shrum will continue in office as chancellor and will remain
a member of the board.
Acting president Dr. Kenneth Strand said appeal court judge
Angelo Branco will be acting chairman of the board until a
permanent chairman is elected.
Strand, expressing the regret of the board at Shrum's retirement, said, it would be "difficult if not impossible" to measure Shrum's contributions to SFU.
"As chairman of the board, Dr. Shrum's personal dedication,
drive and determination played the leading role in bringing
Simon Fraser Univesity into existence," Strand said.
Shrum announced his retirement on the fifth anniversary
of his election as board chairman in October 1963.
Earlier that year he had been delegated by premier Cece
Bennett to create a new B.C. university.
By April, 1964, constuction on the hill had begun.
It was Shrum who labelled SFU "the instant university" at
its opening in September 1965.
Work in Europe
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THE     UBYSSEY
Page 3
— jahn frizell photo
TOWN FOOl Jochaim Foikis fools around while 1000 dance at Cool-Aid benefit. Featured with
friends, he holds hands in a round of talks with dead basketballs and other spirits in gym.
No classes needed
in SFU education
Students in the faculty of education at Simon Fraser can
now set up their own intensive study programs without going to
lectures or tutorials.
The program's purpose it to let undergrads set up and resolve
their own problems through intensive but independent study.
The student must have completed at least half of his degree
credits to be eligible.
Scholarship offered
to Israeli university
The Canadian Friends of the
Hebrew University is offering
scholarships open to all Canadians for study at Israel's He-
gbrew University of Jerusalem.
The scholarships, worth be-
ween $430 and $3500 are good
UBC student
running for
alderman
*•**
A UBC student is running in
the Dec.  11 city election.
Rick  Blagborne,   arch   3,   is
" an official candidate for alder-
-    man.   He   is   one  of   a   group
wanting   to  stimulate   student
activity in civic affairs.
This group is looking for
other students who are willing
to run for civic positions.
There will be a meeting today noon in La. 102 for anyone
who is interested in running
•r and meets the requirements,
or just helping with the campaign.
for both undergraduate and
graduate studies.
The scholarships, valid for
one year, allow the successful
candidate to enter any of the
faculties at the  university.
Application forms may be
obtained from Professor M.
Butovsky, Chairman, National
Student Affairs Committee,
Canadian Friends of the Hebrew University, 15 0 6 Mc-
gregor Ave., Montreal 109,
Quebec.
Groovy gardeners
grow greenery
Want to see some
greenery in SUB? Ombudsman Bob Gilchrist is
organizing a group of stu
dents to find ways and
means of getting plants
put in the building. If you
have any suggestions and
want to help, join the
Groovy Gardeners and
come to the meeting in
SUB Conference Rooir
"B" at noon today.
Cool-Aid
dances to
$1400 profit
Over  1,000 danced the
'   Cool-Aid   dance   at   War
Memorial Gymnasium
Saturday night.
Alma Mater president
Dave Zirnhelt said the
dance took in a total of
$1,649.
With an estimated $200
going toward physical
'   plant  bills, Cool-Aid
should receive $1,400.
Four   bands  donated   *.
"-'   their services.
The dance was origin-
ally booked for the SUB   „
,   cafeteria   but   food   serv- '.
'.   ices chief Ruth Blair re- C
t   fused to allow the dance -J
~   to be held there.
The Cool-Aid dance was ,
finally settled at the Me- -
morial Gym by Zirnhelt.
Travel grant
open to grads
Four Mackenzie King Travelling Scholarships of not less
than $2000 each will be available to graduates of a Casa-
dian university for study in
the fall of 1969.
The scholarships are open for
students who plan to engage
in post-graduate studies in the
field of International or Industrial Relations, either in the
United States or the United
Kingdom.
Further information may be
obtained from Dean Gage.
UBC hosts Yippie,
Rubin speaks here
Rubin raps Thursday.
Jerry Rubin, who organized and led yippies at Chicago during the Democratic convention, in August will climax a four-
day stay here with a talk on Chicago and Beyond, Thursday noon
at Hebb Theatre.
Rubin first rose up to abandon the creeping meatball during
the Berkeley Free Speech Movement in 1963.
Since then he has run unsuccessfully for mayor of Berkeley,
thrown dollar bills from the balcony of the New York stock exchange, lived and loved in countless demonstrations, and appeared perennially before the House of Un-American Activities
(HUAC).
He said he was "getting pretty pissed" at having his way
paid to Washington for the second time by HUAC in two years
and not being asked to testify.
He said he wanted to present the HUAC with one of his
"Fuck Communism" posters and accuse them of being soft on
communism if they didn't accept it.
How does he explain all this?
"Only an emotional child can reach properly to this world.
What can a grown-up Harvard professor say about napalmed
babies? What can a rich man know about black poverty? I try
to react to America like an emotional child.
"The Yippies are a festival of life, a social movement,
dynamic youth energy force. International. Young people too
alienated to become spare parts in somebody's junk car. Young
people ecstastic with the Now."
Before Thursday's show here, he will perform at the University of Victoria, Simon Fraser University, on camera for
CBC, and CTV and on CKNW with Jack Webster (Tuesday at
6:30 p.m.).
Singapore PM asks
'peace and quiet'
Psst! Lee Kuan Yew's here, but don't tell anyone.
Singapore's prime minister, in North America for two
months of study and rest, will give two lectures at UBC but
doesn't want any publicity while he's here.
"I've heard its beautiful and quiet here," he told newsmen
at a press conference Monday. "I want to get away from the
ceaseless administration I'm faced with in Singapore."
That said, the 45-year-old lawyer neatly brushed aside, cir-
cumlocuted and evaded reporters' questions.
"I'm on a private visit and I don't want any attention," he
said.
He speaks Wednesday at noon in the Freddy Wood Theatre,
and Nov. 2 at 8:15 p.m. in the Hebb Theatre he will address the
Vancouver Institute.
He also hopes to "meet groups of faculty members and students, and use the UBC library for private study."
Lee will study mainly economics while he is at UBC and
at Harvard University as a research fellow.
He was returned to office as prime minister in April, once
again heading the People's Action Party which swept all 58
seats in the Singapore legislature.
No Commerce classes
in memory of Dr. Wong
UBC's commerce faculty has cancelled its classes today in
memory of commerce prof Dr. Leslie Wong, 49, who died Saturday.
Wong was chairman of the commerce faculty's finance
division. He was deeply involved in Canada's financial affairs.
Wong was to greet Singapore prime minister Lee Kuan Yew
on Lee's arrival here Saturday.
Lee will speak here Wednesday. He is on a three-week tour
of the country. He became a close friend of Wong in the early
sixties when Wong was teaching in Southeast Asia. Page 4
THE     UBYSSEY
Tuesday, October 22,  1968
THEUBYSSEY
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the university years
by the Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C. Editorial opinions are
those of the editor and not of the AMS or the university. Member,
Canadian University Press. The Ubyssey subscribes to the press services
of Pacific Student Press, of which it is founding member, and Underground
Press Syndicate. Authorized second class mail by Post Office Department,
Ottawa, and for payment of postage in cash. The Ubyssey publishes Page
Friday, a weekly commentary and review. City editor, 228-2305. Other
calls, 228-2301 editor; Page Friday 228-2309; sports 228-2308; advertising
228-3977.  Telex  04-5843.
OCTOBER 22, 1968
Mealies
Last year's student council was very bad.
Not as bad as this year's council, perhaps, but bad
nevertheless.
The one redeeming feature of that particular council
was second vice-president Kim Campbell, whose snide
and snargy remarks made appropriate mockery of council
idiocy.
At one particularly ludicrous bumble of the student
government, Miss Campbell remarked of president Shaun
Sullivan: "That guy is so mealy-mouthed, it makes me
mad."
Which brings us to the present and president Dave
Zirnhelt.
For mealy-mouth is an apt (though perhaps not
strong enough) description of Zirnhelt in regards to his
mysterious conference room bar, detailed on page one
of today's Ubyssey.
Demonstrations aimed at getting a pub in the student
union building were disapproved of by the student president.
And yet, the existence of a $500 private liquor cabinet
and bar in the student executive conference room in SUB
is kept from the students.
Perhaps, had Zirnhelt informed the students that a
bar for the use of student leaders did exist, he might only
appear an agrestic weiner, and that's in style.
However now Zirnehelt appears mealy-mouthed and
hyprocritical. And that's bad.
Two years of mealy-mouthed presidents at UBC
might just do the trick in destroying student confidence
in student government.
And that would be a shame. M.F.
Betrayal
Students relaxing in the opulently-appointed SUB
Monday night had the misfortune to be audially assulted
by the alternative voices of dime-store demagogue Jack
Webster and prissy politician Isobel Semple.
Miss Semple, invited to appear on Webster's far-
reaching radio show, proceeded to use this dubious platform to systematically misrepresent and betray a large
segment of UBC's student population.
And students, listening to the evil-eye SUB speakers,
lapped it up. For a start, they heard Miss Semple charge
that only 5 per cent of UBC students support unsuccessful secretary candidate Stan Persky.
The facts, supported by rudimentary political analysis, show differently. Persky captured roughly 1,300 of
the 5,000 votes cast in his election against Miss Semple's
which is 25 per cent of the votes cast. Miss Semple's
claim that this represents only five per cent of UBC's
20,000 students is specious, for analysis of past UBC
political trends — obviously not Miss Semple's strong
point — shows that when we deal with politics, those
who vote are the only ones that can be counted.
Further, UBC students last year elected Persky
their president — eligibility or no eligibility — by a cle.ar
majority in a clear two-man election. And they also
elected a significant number of dedicated radicals — who
by Miss Semple's admission still admire Persky—to their
AMS executive.
Next, Miss Semple castigated UBC's Students for a
Democratic Society-University, saying that they" only
communicate what they believe to students," and implying that this is empty talk.
But compared to Miss Semple's consistent refusal to
face the issues (short of mouthing the traditional blue-
blazer platitudes about housing and academic reform),
and the Persky scare campaign which she conducted "If
you wantsit-ins , vote for my opponent"), SDS and SDU
present a refreshing note of realism combined with
idealistic optimism.
Apart from the fact that true radicals are a
minority everywhere, the fact that at least three of the
seven elected executive members — more than ever
before — are dedicated radicals shows the existence of a
definite trend away from the mushy, do-nothing liberals
who still grip the AMS.
Decent citizens, it is Isobel Semple who, although we
recognize her excellent secretarial qualifications, does not
speak for UBC students. Those who know UBC will
know enough to disregard the gleeful I-told-you-sos from
Webster, the downtown press and Isobel. P.K.
Reform commerce:
'The business ofthe world, not the world of business'
By  KEITH  MOORE
Dear Dean White:
I have assumed that you are concerned by
the statistics recently released by the registrar
showing that the enrolment in first year commerce has declined by 20 per cent, and that
the numbers proceeding from one year to the
next   in   commerce   also   show   some   decline.
I understand that you have sent out letters
soliciting the opinion of students who have not
re-registered in commerce in an attempt to
determine some of the causes of this apparent
dissatisfaction with the commerce program and
are inviting discussion on this matter.
This open letter to commerce dean Dr. Philip
White appeared recently in the Commerce
Cavalier. The author is a fourth-year commerce student.
With this in mind, I thought you might be
interested in hearing the opinions of a fourth-
year student who now wishes that he had had
the foresight to drop out in an earlier year because commerce is now failing to answer many
of the questions in his mind and offers no
intellectual stimulation or challenge.
I am dissatisfied -with the most basic philosophy underlying the commerce program. As
I analyze it, this philosophy assumes that our
existing business, social and political structures
are to be taken as given and not to be tampered
with. Therefore the commerce student is to be
taught the technicalities and niceties of this
existing structure because it is expected that
after graduation he will go out to fill a niche
within it. However, I think this application of
the basic philosophy conflicts with the ideal
relationship between the commerce faculty, the
university and society as a whole.
As I look at today's society, I see too many
examples of injustice, exploitation and man's
general inhumanity to man, caused by the
search for ever greater profits, to be convinced
that the business world is not in need of a
reorientation. The university, because it is
populated by young intelligent students, should
be encouraging in these students an awareness
of social conditions, an idealism and a sincere
desire to reform and improve the social, business and political structures.
And commerce should be playing a leading
role  in  this  by inducing  students  to consider
the social implications of business decisions as
well as the financial implications. The profit
motive orientation in too many instances provides great financial benefits for a few by
avoiding any concern for the community as a
whole. Business does have responsibilities other
than to its shareholders, and it is an awareness
of their great social responsibilities that must
be encouraged in the businessmen of tomorrow.
In earlier times society looked to institutions such as the church to champion the rights .
of the exploited individual but I think today
it is the university and the business community
that should be leading the way in the quest to
eliminate some of the social problems on the
way to a just society. Again the commerce
faculty should be acting as the vanguard, for
much of the initiative for change in the business
community will have to come from young uncommitted businessmen.
It is this attitude, which I have heard ex- '
pressed in the commerce faculty, which really
disturbs me: that business can continue to feed
itself at the expense of others until government
legislation forces it to assume a social responsibility. I feel that commerce and the university can help shape a more human world by
educating students to be aware of social conditions, of the questions of morality and ethics
in business, and who leave university with an .
idealism and a desire to create a just society.
It is in this regard that commerce fails to satisfy
me. The orientation is to teach me how I can
best fit into the existing framework with the
greatest financial return to myself and to my
company's shareholders. This is creating a monstrously efficient but very inhumane world, and
it bothers me to the extent that I want no part
of it.
I wish the underlying philosophy of the
commerce program would be to educate students to consider the business of the world, not
lo train them lo consider only Ihe world of;
business.
I would like to leave this university with
at least a semblance of my idealism, with a
desire to instigate social changes and with a
belief that in some way I can be successful. In
four years of commerce I can see nothing that
has encouraged these desires or beliefs. In fact,
I think that commerce has attempted to stifle
my idealism, and this is what frustrates and dissatisfies me most.
Action: from the classes
By JILL CAMERON
Fair Weather or  Foul   (that  soggy old
forgotten Alma Mater Society brief) seems
to have actually caused some changes.
In very many classes, no exams at all
will be written this year, and in others, at
least some Christmas exam will be held.
There appears to be agreement from many
faculty and students that examinations are
not  a  valid educational method.
And  so  a  lot of  students   are happier.
But it seems that most
of us missed the point.
We've been fighting
against exams for so long
that we've forgotten, in
$ our moment of triumph,
that what we really wanted was freedom of choice,
not freedom from exams.
CAMERON The well-intentioned prof
who announces that "students will simply
be required to write four papers" is just as
authoritarian as the one who decrees
exams. Some of the ideas about the methods of evaluation seem to have changed,
but not the method by which these decisions are made.
Th'e pertinent "request" in the brief
states: The choice of exams or other methods of evaluation shall be left to the students and the professor in each class." It
is implicit here, since the entire brief
deals with democratization of the university, that this decision should be made
democraticlly. I would assume this means
various points of view would be expressed
and discussed and that classes would then
take a vote, each person present having an
equal vote.
Points raised in discussion on methods
of evaluation could range from quizzes
every Friday to no evaluation at all. (In
Jerry Farber's classes, there are no requirements and everyone automatically gets-a B.)
Thus people would have to think about
such issues as the value of competition and
pressure in learning, the kind of evaluation
best suited to the subject matter and perhaps the relationship between exam-writing and the business world. In any case, I
would suspect that such a discussion would
be an educational experience.
More important, however, is this: by
participating in this kind of activity, every
student and prof is learning about one of
our widely-heralded institutions — democracy.
Since the country that we live in is reported to be a democracy, and since our
education is supposed to be intended to fit
us to live in the world, then I think that
no student's education here could be complete if he had not learned how to participate in a democratic decision-making body.
Certainly our institutions will become even
less meaningful if we don't.
And so I suggest that in every classroom
this question be raised by someone before
Christmas. That someone might as well be
you. The only place where everyone can
get involved in changing this university
is the classroom. Tuesday, October 22, 1968
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 5
LETTERS TO THE  EDITOR
Carillin
Editor, The Ubyssey:
That damn thing was bad
enough before it started caril-
ling. It looks like a Minuteman
silo and sounds like a Safeway
store  on   Christmas  Eve.
I should like to propose,
therefore, that it be activated
only (a) at Christmas; (b) during a national emergency.
ROGER CLAPHAM
arts 2
Boot Bennet
Editor,  The  Ubyssey:
It has been brought to my
attention by an officer in the
student placement office that
representatives of Pacific Press
Ltd. have been in touch with
his office several times within
the last short while, making
inquiries about the expected
arrival of recruiters from the
Dow Chemical Co. The calls
were made in anticipation of
potentially the first sign of
major "unrest" on this campus.
Talk about outside agitators!
Not having anything to print
abtut their long overdue revolution at UBC, the news hounds
are now making a desperate
attempt to uncover concrete
evidence to back up stories
which are products of their
journalistic fantasies.
I suggest that when Dow
does come to campus, arts and
engineering students band together to rid this campus of
its true source of unrest and
trouble by throwing Wilf Bennett and his cohorts out on
their collective ear and tell
them to play their little games
elsewhere.
STEVEN   BLOCK
arts 4
Leave em up
Editor, The Ubyssey:
It is unfortunate that the
planners of UBC buildings and
residences and the local art
circles do not provide sufficient examples of enjoyable art
for university students. As a
result, the true art aficionado
must resort to the relocating of
somewhat mediocre advertising
posters. Such pursuits are understandable and pardonable —
NOTICE TO '69 GRADS
Last Chance For
Your FREE Grad Photos
To Be Taken
Mobile Studio Location
TODAY ONLY - Behind Brock (South)
Arts Students Anytime — Hours: 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Don't Delay — No Appointment Needed — No Cost
(This Service is Covered  by Your GRAD FEE)
CAMPBELL STUDIO
10»h & Burrard 736-0261
OFFICIAL NOTICES
Alma  Mater  Society
Election for the Office of A.M.S. Co-Ordinator
In accordance with By-Law 25 of the A.M.S. Constitution, an election will be held for the position of A.M.S.
Co-ordinator.
To  be eligible  for the position,  a student must have
completed his or her first year or its equivalent and have
achieved,  in  the   previous   sessional  examinations,  an
average of not less than 60% for 15 units or more and
not less than 65% for less than 15 units.
Nominations will open at 9:00 a.m., Wednesday, October
16th and close at 12:00 noon on Wednesday, October
23rd. Voting will take place on Wednesday, October 30,
1968.
The duties of the Co-ordinator as outlined in By-Law
4 (4) (g) are as follows:—
"The Co-ordinator of Activities shall be responsible for
the co-ordination and booking of all Alma Mater Society
functions and events. He shall work in close co-operation
with the Treasurer to ensure the financial success of
the various activities of the Society. He shall act as
Brock Management Committee Chairman."
Nomination forms to be returned to the AMS Secretary,
Box 55, Brock.
Communications Commission
Campus communications are poor. People are needed to
do various exciting jobs such as on-campus coordination,
SUB publicity coordination, archive collecting and just
general jobs that are not demanding, but are a necessary
part of any bureaucratic Society such as the AMS.
Come around to SUB if you are interested and either
leave a note in the AMS executive offices or talk to
Ruth Dworkin, Internal Affairs, Rm. 254 any time this
week.
not to mention complimentary
to the designers and producers
of said posters.
We who design posters enjoy
the apparent adulation bestowed upon us — but we wish
the hell people would leave the
damned things up until the
advertised event is complete.
B. CHISHOLM
Cinema  16
EDITOR: Al Birnie
Associate    Mike   Finlay
City    Paul  Knox
Managing Bruce Curtis
News John Twigg
Photo Powell   Hargrave
Wire Peter Ladner
Page  Friday Andrew  Horvat
Sports Jim Maddin
DEBATING TEAM TRYOUTS
WED., OCT. 30
Trips to Foreign Lands
(Alberta, Vancouver Island, Montreal)
For Topic — Time — Location . . . contact
MIKE HUTCHISON - 321-1125
or Through Debating Union, co/ AMS
EAT IN'TAKE OUT. DELIVERY**
Available at
UNIVERSITY
PHARMACY
5754 University Blvd.
In The Village - \Vz blocks
from Memorial Gym
<e<
INTERNATIONAL   HOUSE
presents
A HALLOWE'EN
COSTUME DANCE
^   FRIDAY, OCT. 25, 8:30 p.m.
^ THE REIGN LIQUID
> int KEIUN   REFRESHMENTS
'THE PENMAN*
IMPROVE YOUR PENMANSHIP BY MAIL
BUSINESS
ORNAMENTAL
Write for information
2373 Haywood Ave., West Vancouver, B.C.
Phone 922-4427
3484 KINGSWAY
YOUR HOSPITALITY CENTRE
WELCOMES YOU TO ITS
COMPLETE BANQUET & DINING ROOM FACILITIES
NEWLY DESIGNED IN SPANISH DECOR
WITH AMPLE PARKING
FOR OVER 1,000 CARS
FOR RESERVATIONS. . - CALL HE 3-8255 Page 6
THE     UBYSSEY
Tuesday, October 22, 1968
BIRD" WATCHERS
Pick Up Your
BIRDCALLS
Today - Noon
SUB LOBBY
A REMINDER
The United Appeal
Contributions to
DEPARTMENT OF FINANCE
68-69's FIRST SUPERDANCE
DIRECT FROM EDMONTON:
THE PATCH
and
The Boston Tea Party
SUB BALLROOM - FRIDAY, OCT. 25
9-1 Chicks: $1.25   -  Sticks $1.50
-plademailr
;«.,wMdi las
Cf-reeevea)
tte tank of*
Hiarttreal's new
teak About career
ofportiinities in
-lie fcaak,	
■■UJU1B
completely ignores,«»
heoux-aj-tay c-4 -plan-
•because -£few-en*gtnflers
lave ever lteaa?d°£ a
■Ward like ^ym-mefcry.
dew
•aa.
IPIIIIIII
on moat*..
cai-rtpu-Sii.
if-ywfve
seen, one yen
lave-smelt
ttexn all.
Wkofinortfreal
■^ujmHe very test o£ company. •#
c&mirostaxtk'branch,
in the adminiabwlicm. buildincj
cj.f. peirflon, manager
©pen. a-So -5 Mpnday lo ThuiSday - *3!5o-6 Friday
— dick button photo
TONY MEIER (in dark shirt) was all alone againist  four  Italians  in  the   Birds'   game  against
Columbus Sunday. The Birds managed a 0-0 tie, gaining one point and keeping them in the
race for first place in the Pacific Coast soccer league.
Soccer Birds  defense holds
as forwards fail to score
UBC soccer coach Joe Johnson was satisfied
with the Thunderbirds' 0-0 tie with Columbus
on the weekend.
The coach said the game was a good team
effort, but the forwards were not playing quite
up to par. "The defense was outstanding,
though," he added.
Of special note was goalie Barry Sadler,
who several times stopped Columbus by himself. He also delayed the game for ten minutes
in the late minutes of the first half in a search
for his contact lens which was never found.
Sadler now leads the league in shutouts,
with four.
Of more interest as far as the Birds are concerned is the rumor circulating that the Birds
will get a chance to replay a game they lost
to the Firemen.
Apparently the Firemen used Cheung Chi
Doy, while he had not yet completed the full
requirements in moving from a professional
league to an amateur league.
If this is true it means the Birds will have
another go at the Firemen to make up for their
last game in which they were defeated badly.
The team is also preparing for the first
San Jose tournament where they will play in
a touch, single knockout meet, possibly meeting
such teams as San Jose State College, the University of California at Berkeley and San Francisco University.
Special Events - Speakers Committee of AMS
i Presents ———————^^—
JERRY RUBIN
LEADER OF YIPPEES IN CHICAGO
"Chicago & What Next"
Thursday, 24th, 12:30, Hebb Theatre - 35c
KAHN-
TINETA
HORN
CANADIAN INDIAN WOMAN
"Immigrants in Their Own Land"
FILM & DISCUSSION
SM.B. BALLROOM, FRIDAY, 25th      12:30 - 35c Tuesday, October 22, 1968
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 7
River rats need
robust rowers
UBC rowing crews need more men.
The teams row in western intercollegiate competitions
against some thirty teams.
Some of the American schools UBC will definitely compete
against include crews from the universities and colleges of Washington, Oregon and California.
The final, and most important meet for the crew is the Western Sprints which this year will be held in San Diego in May.
UBC will, in all probability, be represented by both varsity
and junior varsity crews.
Workouts consisting of calthisthenics are being held in the
gym every afternoon from 4:30, Monday through Friday. All
those interested are invited to turn out.
Over the weekend's starting in two weeks, the teams will
do water workouts in both barges and shells, in preparation for
the upcoming season.
Schouten leads Birds
to field hockey win
Braves victorious
The Jayvee Ice Hockey team
scored a whitewash 7-0 victory over British Columbia Institute of Technology at the
F'orum on Friday night.
Football Birds
lose, but
gracefully
SEE PAGE 1
— dick button photo
RUGBY THUNDERBIRDS (in white) leap for ball in weekend
rugby action.
Birds bash Ex-Brit
as Crompton stars
The rugby Thunderbirds jelled over the weekend and came
up with a convincing 23-9 victory over Ex-Britannia.
Led by captain Don Crompton, who scored 11 of the Birds'
23 points on penalty goals and a convert, the Birds controlled
the second half.
Ron Hungerford, Reid Owen, Leigh Hillier and Doug Schick
all scored tries to bolster the points count.
In explaining the success Buzz Moore, athletic manager and
long time B.C. rugby star, attributed it to a new-found ability
by the Birds to play as a team.
"They were playing as a unit — finally," he said. It was a
very wide open game, with lots of razzle-dazzle. In the last fifteen
minutes varsity showed their superior conditioning."
The next Bird game will be against the Georgians at St.
Georges school, Oct. 26 starting at 2:30 p.m.
Antonie Schouten led the
field hockey Thunderbirds to a
4-0 win over the Grasshoppers
"A" on Saturday.
Schouten donated a hat trick
to get three of the Bird goals
while Maartin Tjebbes scored
the other goal.
The Birds dominated
throughout the game as seen by
the fact Bird goalie Sandy Hill
was called upon to make only
Womens
track, field
All prospective members are invited to turn
out for women's track
and field. Practises will
be at the John Owen Pavillion or War Memorial
gym if it's raining. Times
are Tuesday, Wednesday
and Thursday at 4:30 p.m.
one save to keep his shutout
intact.
If the Birds continue to improve as they have in their last
two outings, their rematch
with league-leading Hawks "A"
should be a foregone conclusion — UBC all the way.
All other field hockey games
over the weekend were cancelled due to the poor weather.
GIANT FALL SALE
of
Over 1000 Typewriters
at Savings up to 50%
New and Reconditioned Electric, Portable, and Standard
Machines of all makes and
models, at the Lowest Prices
in Canada.
Every Machine Fully
Guaranteed
Top Price For Trade-Ins
Poison Typewriters
LTD.
2163 W. 4th Ave.    731-8322
Open  Daily  & Sat. 9-.  — Fri. 9-9
PIZZA smorgasbord
• EVERY WEDNESDAY
• 6-9 P.M.
• ALL YOU CAN EAT
• $2 MEN    $1.50 WOMEN
• THE FRIAR, 4423 W 10th
We now make our own cheese and it's so m-m-m we
want you to try it. So come in Wednesday for our
smorgasbord.
P.S.: WE DELIVER - 224-0833
They're Going Fast
Buy Your Copy
Today
BIRD CALLS 75c
SUB LOBBY
GRAND PRIX
MOTORS LTD.
"SPORTS CARS ARE OUR
BUSINESS"
PEUGEOT
ALL MODELS
SALES AND SERVICE
Special Consideration
to U.B.C. Students
Local   &  Overseas  Deliveries
1162 SEYMOUR
682-7185
FROM THE CELEBRATED PRIZE-WINNING PLAY!
M"
A MAN'
for.mj:
SFM)NS
motion
picture
en lor lu in inon I
for nil
Unit's!
FILM SOCIETY  PRESENTS
"A MAN FOR ALL SEASONS"
THURSDAY & FRIDAY IN OLD AUDITORIUM
Times: 12:30, 3:30, 6:00, 8:30
ADMISSION  50c
Rait
Regular Officer Training Plan
IN THE
Canadian Armed Forces
Do you have the qualifications to receive
a Government sponsored education ?
IF YOU ARE . . .
— a Canadian citizen
— Single
-Physically fit
— Between 16 and 21 years of age
AND IF YOU HAVE ...
— A junior or senior matriculation
— A desire to serve your country
You are eligible to apply for enrolment as an OFFICER
CADET. The standards required of Officers are high, the
work is hard — but the satisfaction is great. Not only do
you have the opportunity to serve Canada but the financial
rewards range to $18,000 per year.
Full Details of the R.O.T.P. may be obtained from:—
THE CANADIAN FORCES RECRUITING CENTRE
545 Seymour St., Vancouver Phone 684-7341 Page 8
THE     UBYSSEY
Tuesday, October 22,  1968
'TWEEN CLASSES ..
Guerilla theatre
in old auditorium
San Francisco Mime Troupe
noon and 8 p.m. today only,
old   auditorium.   Tickets   at
door, 75 cents noon; evening,
$1.25 students, $1.75 others.
SLAVONIC CIRCLE
Meeting noon today SUB
room A.
THUNDERBIRD
MOTORCYCLE CLUB
Membcrshin meeting Wednesday noon SUB 101.
ACADEMIC ACTIVITIES
COMMITTEE
Czechoslavakia lecture series.
John Norris of UBC history
dept. speaks on History of
Czech oslolvakia Wednesday
noon, Bu. 106.
WOMEN'S  CAUCUS
Meeting noon today on birth
control, SUB exec. conf.
room A.
CHORSOC
Practise and meeting Wednesday, 6 p.m., Bu. 104.
Exec, meeting Tuesday noon,
SUB D. All welcome, especially men.
SDU AND BROTHER
ORGANIZATIONS
Meeting tonight 7:30 p.m. in
the people"s (Jill's) office.
We've finally found an issue !
IL CAFFE
'Meeting Wednesday noon IH
402. Modern Italian songs.
ARTS LECTURE SERIES
Dr.   Chapman  of  geography
speaks Wednesday noon, Bu.
106  on  The Field  and  Current Issues in Geography.
VIETNAM MOBILIZATION
Emergency meeting today
noon. Bu. 223, to get UBC
students out on street Oct.
26—solidarity with the Vietnamese revolution!
GERMAN CLUB
Film and meeting noon today
in Upper Lounge, IH.
NETHERLANDS
STUDENT ASSOCIATION
Important  meeting  Wednesday noon at IH.
UBC NEW DEMOCRATS
General meeting, Wednesday
noon, Bu. 217. All members
please attend.
DEBATING UNIOI?
Yes, Virginia, the debating
union does debate. Hear Calgary Chinooks, noon today,
SUB 205. Eat lunch, make
out, sublimate.
CANOE CLUB
Meeting noon today, Ang.
110. Safety talk, slides and
plans for Capilano river trip
this weekend.
HISTORY CLUB
Urgent meeting noon today
Bu. 219.
INTERNATIONAL HOUSE
Presentation on Baha'i faith,
noon today IH 400.
PRE-LIBRARIANSHIP SOC
Guest    speaker    Wednesday
noon, Bu. 225.
POLI SCI SOC
Trudeau Is a Disaster to Canada — Liven vs. Tennant
7:30 p.m. today, IH.
CROSS ROADS IN AFRICA
Information on trips to Africa, noon today, Bu. 104.
ENG. LECTURE
Dr. Richard Hosley, U. of
Arizona, talks on Elizabethan
Theatres and Elizabethan
plays. Wednesday, noon, Bu.
100.
SPEAKERS COMMITTEE
Jerry Rubin,  Yippie  leader,
Chicago   and   What   Next ?"
Thursday,    noon,    Hebb
Theatre, 35 cents.
FRENCH STUDENTS
Honors    and     majors    meet
Wednesday noon, Bu. 2244.
UCC
Meeting today noon, Bu. 204.
Election of pres. and p.r.o.
CIASP
Meeting    Wednesday    noon,
SUB 105 A.
SAILING CLUB
Meeting and lessons, Wednesday noon, Bu. 100.
PARLIAMENTARY COUNCIL
CUS   committee meets noon
today, SUB 115.
CANOE CLUB
Meeting   noon   today,   Ang.
110.    For    Squamish    River
trip, meet Sunday 10 a.m. at
Shannon Falls.
PRE-SOCIAL WORK
John Fleming, Boys' Club,
speaks Wednesday noon,
SUB K.
DIALOGUE
Discussion on Confrontation
as an instrument for University Reform. Wednesday
noon, SUB 207.
SUS
Meeting for all Sc. 1 students. Council being formed.
Noon today, Hennings 200.
ART U.S.
General meeting in JSM
lounge Wednesday noon.
SDS
Meeting with Jerry Rubin tonight at 8 p.m. in SUB Upper
Lounge.
TEEN CENTRE
The Kiview Boys Club needs
male and female volunteers
to help with their teen centre. For more information
phone Don Malin at 879-5108.
GROOVY GARDENERS INC.
Anyone interested in getting
plants for SUB come to Conf.
B. at noon today. It's one
time when students can do
something for themselves.
BADMINTON TEAM
Women's intercollegiate badminton team tryouts Wednesday 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. Women's gym.
KOERNER LECTURE
Mr. Lee Kuan Yew, Prime
Minister of Singapore, speaks
on "Southeast Asia Today"
Wednesday noon, Freddy
Wood.
MARKETING CLUB
Mr. Rusty Harris, vice-president and general manager of
PWA, speaks on Marketing
in Air Transportation Wednesday noon in Angus 215.
Be there early. New members welcome.
COMPUTER CLUB
S t u d e n t-prof. get-together
Wednesday evening 7:30
p.m., Grad Student Centre.
Coffee and doughnuts.
FU
Free English 100 tutorials
and discussion with grad
students, 7:30 p.m. tonight.
Phone  738-8432.
SPEAKERS COMMITTEE
Kahn Tineta-Horn, Canadian
Indian Woman, "Immigrants
in their Own Land". Film
and Discussion. Friday, SUB
ballroom, noon, 35c.
PRE-MED SOC
Meeting Wednesday noon,
Wesbrook 201. Film on alcoholism.
ANTH. SOC. UNION
Meeting of anthropology and
sociology union Wednesday
noon, SUB 125F. All welcome.
CLASSIFIED
Rates:  Students, Faculty & Clubs—3 lines, 1 day 75<t, 3 days $2.00.
Commercial—3 lines, 1 day $1.00, 3 days $2.50.
Rates for larger ads on request.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone and
are payable in advance.
Closing Deadline is 11:30 a.m. the day before publication.
Publication Office: 241  STUDENT  UNION BLDG., UNIVERSITY OF B.C., Vancouver 8, B.C.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Dances
11
VANCOUVER'S TOP BANDS ARE
managed exclusively by MCM &
Associates.  7:11-4741.
DANCE — TWO BANDS DIRECT
from Edmonton. The Patch and The
P.ostnn Tea Party. SUB Ballroom,
H-1,    Friday,    Oet.    25.    Chicks   $1.25.
_Sticks   $1.50^	
X\XtXwe'EN ' COSTUME DANCE,
Friday, Oct. 25, 8:30 p.m. Featuring
Tim   Reign.
Greetings
12
UNIVERSITY STUDENTS OF VAN-
couver are alive and attending
Capilano  College.
Lost & Found
13
LOST LIBRARY BOOKS VICINITY
Empire Pool, Monday morning. Pinder please call or contact Colin Godwin. 4540 W. 11. Phone 224-1741.
Reward.
POST: A SILVER CHARM BRAC-
let at the Armouries in mid-September.   Call  Lina,   985-4841.   Reward.
LOST: GOLD RODANIA WATCH —
Memorial Gym. Sentimental value.
Reward.   224-3553.
FOUND: DAN TANCOWNY: I HAVE
your wallet which you left in my
car. Ph. Rick 224-9752, leave message.
found: Money, meter dot by
Fred.   Wood   Theatre,   Pri.   224-1950.
SUNGLASSES IN BROWN CASE,
found C parking lot, Sunday Oct.
13. Come to Publications Office, 241
SUB.
FOUND: PEN KNIFE 2nd FLOOR
Buchanan, north wing, outside men's
room. Claim at Bu. 467 or call &
describe:  Taylor,  local  2161.	
BLACK   WALLET   LOST    FRI.,    IM-
portant papers.  Reward.  Phone Bob
277-1715.
LOST PURSE: GRUBBY RED AND
brown suede, saddlebag style. Desperate for all contents. Please phone
733-5453 after 6 p.m. or return to
registrar's office.
Rides & Car Pools
14
RIDE, CARPOOL, NEEDED, 8:30's,
9:30's from Edmonds and Kingsway.
Phona  521-7034.
Special Notices
15
THE GRIN BIN HAS POSTERS,
Jokes, Cards, Gifts and a Post
Office. You'll find it across from
the Liquor Store at 3209 West
Broadway. 	
THE NEW YORK LIFE AGENT ON
your campus is a good man to know.
SMILE YOU "69 GRADS! YOUR
Grad pictures are being taken behind (South) Brock in the Mobile
Unit until October 22nd. You've already paid for this service in your
Grad fee so hurry before it's too
late! This is the only time pictures
will  be  taken  this  year.
LIFE INSURANCE
Students, age 23 — $20,000 (commuted amount). Reducing Term.
Includes 3 options. Premium $42.50.
Also New Fidelity Inflation Fighter
policy; first in Canada. Call George
Kaiway, Fidelity Life Assurance
Co. — 681-7496.
REDUCE THE COST OF YOUR IN-
surance by as much as 20%. All
risks insured and no cancellations.
Motor bikes also. Phone Ted Elliott,
299-9422.
AQUA SOC — BOAT DIVE OCT. 26.
Anyone wishing to go, sign list in
Outdoor   Club  Lounge.
ARRIVED   AT  LAST,   IT'S   A  GIRL!
Aug. 16. Carol and Les P.	
TAKE NOTICE THAT PURSUANT
to the provisions of the Public Utilities Act, R.S.B.C. 1960, Chapter 323,
and regulations thereto the University Cab Company Ltd. has made
application to grant a ten (10%) per
cent rate reduction to students producing a student card, effective on
the 25th dav of November, 1968.
TAKE NOTICE FURTHER THAT
this application is subject to the
consent of the Public Utilities Commission and any objection may be
filed with the Superintendent of
Motor Carriers, Public Utilities Commission, Vancouver, British Columbia,  up  to  November 6th,   1968.
68-lnvitation-69
A studenforiented booklet of 33
different entertainment passes
valued at over $50.00. Available
at the Bookstore, He & She
Clothing (the Village). Canteens
in the Residences and the Information   Desk   at   SUB.   $2.50.
Travel Opportunities
16
Wanted Information
17
INSURANCE STALL. ANYONE
witnessing accident Monday, Sept.
16, 2:15 p.m. at 10th & Alma. '60
Olds,   '68  Chevy  II.   Please  call  261-
7065.
Wanted—Miscellaneous
18
AUTOMOTIVE
Automobiles For Sale
21
'64 M.G. MIDGET EXC. COND.
Mech. sound. And extras. $850. See
on   campus  call  M.W.  224-9769.
u VOLKS, GOOD COND. $500. Cash,
685-2775 between 6-8. Ask for
Denny.
57 METEOR EXCELLENT TRANS.
6 Std. Good radio, brakes, tires.
$275   or   best   offer.   Call   224-0311.
PARTING IS SUCH SWEET SOR-
row. 1961 Corvair, Auto., radio, excel, cond., $695 or best offer. John,
228-2377,   eves.:   684-7602.
1952 BUICK V-8 AUTO., RADIO, 86,-
000 miles, body fairly good. Offers!
922-8819.
1958 PONTIAC 4-DOOR STANDARD,
good condition. Must sell, going
cheap.  Best offer!  Phone  263-711S.
'63   VAUX;    6   CYL.;    RADIO;    EXC.
cond.   Ed   Smith,   224-9691.
•59 ZEPHYR 4-DOOR, 6 CYL. AUTO.
$275. 224-9822, Room 3, Hut 33
$2.75. 224-9822, Bu. Rm. 3, Hutt 33
to leave your name and phone no.
'66 FIAT 750, COACH, FINE CON-
dition, low 15,000 mileage, $850 cash.
224-0656.
IDEAL CAR POOL OR GRAD. STU-
dent car. Comfortable, dependable
quick 1960 Pontiac 6-cyl. auto. Ask
$650.00. Offers welcome! Take 10
min.   to   look at  this  car.   266-8621.
Automobile—Parts
23
Automobile—Repairs
24
Motorcycles
26
1966 YAMAHA 350CC, $425.00. TRAIL
gear, good condition. 1965 Honda
65cc, $125.00, new engine, excellent
condition.   Call   Larry   732-8033.
64 VESPA, GOOD CONDITION, GOOD
in wet weather, $170. Call Peter,
273-4105,   evenings.
BUSINESS  SERVICES
Dance Bands
31
Miscellaneous
33
NOW WITH APPOINTMENT SER-
vice, Upper Tenth Barber Hair
Stylists, 4574 West 10th Avenue,
224-6622.
Home  Entertainment
35
Guaranteed Expert & Efficient Repairs
Color TV — Black and White TV
Record Players — Radios
Stereo Equipment — Tape Recorders
ALEXANDER   AND AXELSON  LTD.
4512 W.  10th —  228-9088
Complete   Record   Department
Scandals
37
THURS. AFTERNOONS FREE?
Come to Evelyn Wood Reading
Dynamics from 1 to 4. Course guarantees to triple your effective reading speed. For more info, phone
732-7696.
THE MT. BAKER SKI PASS IN 68
Invitation 69 is good any legal or
school holiday.
FORTUNE AND MEN'S EYES, Tomorrow through November 2nd,
8:30, Playhouse, Stage 2, Arts Club
Theatre.
WATCH OUT! THE AUTUMN LEAF
ia  coming.
Typing
40
GOOD EXPERIENCED HOME TYP-
ist available for essays, etc. Please
call  435-0882. 	
FAST,      ACCURATE     TYPING     MY
home,
Phone   325-6637
EXP. TYPING ESSAYS & THESES,
reas. rates; legible work; phone
738-6829 after 10 a.m. Mon.-Thurs.,
and  Sundays.	
WILL TYPE THESIS, ETC. GOOD
knowledge of medical terminology.
Phone   325-4729.
GOOD EXPERIENCED TYPIST
available for home typing. Please
phona   277-5640.
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted—Female
51
WANTED GIRLS TO WORK PART-
time in an expanding business. We
offer an opportunity for rapid advancement plus choice of own working hours. Phone Heather, 321-3603
between 5-7 p.m.
Help Wanted—Male
52
APPLICATIONS ARE NOW BEING
taken for the Pizza Patio Pizza
tossing program. Training course
will be held at the Milano Pizza
Training Institute — Italy. For further information contact:
Personnel Director — Pizza Patio
The Home of Perfect Pizza, 688-2381
Male  or  Female
53
TUTORS REQUIRED, HIGH SCHOOL
Mathematics and Sciences. Minimum: fourth year. 6:30-9:30 p.m.
Phone   736-6923.
DO YOU NEED EXTRA MONEY?
Become a sub-agent for "Canada
Savings   Bond".   Call   Eric,   526-1611.
Work Wanted
54
RESPONSIBLE MARRIED COUPLE
would like babysitting or odd jobs
for weekends. Reasonable rates.
Phone   733-1375.
INSTRUCTION
Tutoring
64
FIRST YEAR MATHEMATICS, PHY-
sics, Chemistry lessons given by
excellent  tutors.  Phone 736-6923.
ENGLISH, FRENCH, HISTORY LES-
sons given by B.A., M.A., B.L.S.
Other languages offered. Phone 736-
6923.
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
BUSY "B" BOOKS — USED UNI-
versity texts bought and sold. 146
W. Hastings, opposite Woodwards.
681-4931.
NO APPOINTMENT NECESSARY
at the UBC Barber Shop & Beauty
Salon. "It pays to look your best."
5736  University Blvd. 228-8942.
BUNK BEDS, SET, $29.50. 2'x4' TOP,
unpainted    double    pedestal    desks,
- each $29.50. New 25'2 coil single
Hollywood beds, complete, from
$49.50. Unpainted book cases, from
$8.95.
KLASSEN'S
3207  West  Broadway RE  6-0712
(Beer bottle drive-in at rear of store)
3-SPEED    C.C.M.     BIKE.    SIZE    10;
Bauer   skates.   Ph.   224-9946,   Peter.
PLAYHOUSE*, STUDENT TUESDAY
today 8:30. Eric Nicol's The Fourth
Monkey. Few season tickets left.
$10.00.
STEREO TAPE RECORDER GRUN-
dig TK47, 2-track professional quality stereo. Very fine condition. Asking $250.00. Reasonable offers considered.   224-9017,   Robert   Rm.   418.
UNDERWOOD STANDARD TYPE-
write, good condition. Offers? Can
deliver.  Phone  738-6225 evenings.
RENTALS  & REAL ESTATE
Rooms
81
NICE HOUSE-KEEPING ROOM FOR
male student. Prefer non-smoker.
Phona   325-9503.
ROOMS ON CAMPUS $40.00 (M.) 2250
Wesbrook. Kit. priv., TV lounge, on
campus   parking.   224-0439;   224-9662.
FURN. ROOMS — ONE SINGLE,
one double, $30 & $50. Some kitchen
privileges.    Near    U.B.C,    224-3833.
CLEAN COMFORTABLE ROOM —
available after Nov. 5. Ph. 228-8256.
Near gates. 	
SLEEPING ROOM WITH SHOWER.
Male student. Near UBC gates.
Phona   228-8124.
QUIET ROOM FOR MALE STU-
dent, non-smoker, non-drinker. Near
gates, excellent hitchhiking. Phone
224-3099.
LARGE    ROOM,    BREAKFAST    AND
lunch. Room shared, $55. Male only.
Near  gates.  4545 W.  6th.  224-9460.
NICE   FURNISHED   SINGLE   ROOM,
near   bus   stop.   Washing   facilities.
Preferably  oriental  girl.  Phone  263-
9891.   $50   mo.
Room 8c Board
82
LIVE ON CAMPUS AT THE DELTA
Upsilon Fraternity House, good food,
short walk to classes, quiet hours
enforced for study. Phone 228-9389
or 224-9841. 	
ROOM AVAILABLE (BOARD Optional) for senior professional married couple, in clean, quiet home, in
South Granville district. 224-3617 or
733-7181.
EAT, DRINK AND MAKE MARY
at Phi Kappa Pi. Delicious cuisine,
luxurious accommodation at prices
lower than residence. Phone House
Mgr.,   224-9667. 	
RM. AND BOARD AVLBLE. OCT. 27
for female student. Kerr. area. Good
food! Ride to UBC avlble. Phone
Audrey  261-0804.	
ROOM AND BOARD. EXCELLENT
meals. Breakfast, lunch and dinner.
736-5036.
Furn. Houses & Apts.
83
WANTED — A CHRISTIAN GIRL
to share basement suite, $40 month.
Call   733-2228.
FURNISHED ROOM, MADE. AVAIL-
able Nov. 3. Private entrance, kitchen privileges, bath. $60 per month.
Phone 733-8702.
WISH GIRL TO SHARE WITH
same, semi-furnished, one bedroom
apartment in West End. 683-3678;
alternate  685-2640.
WANNA KILL YOUR LANDLADY?
You won't ours. Leaves us to our
spacious 3 bedrm. Point Grey pad.
$50 ea. 2 female students need non-
schizo  roomie.  733-9339.	
GIRL TO SHARE PLEASANT FUR-
nished apartment, Kitsilano. Low
rent in exchange for light babysitting.
733-3348

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