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UBC Publications

The Ubyssey Jan 5, 1988

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 NSERC chairs
'benefit B.C.
Packers firstv
By Chris Wiesinger
BC Packers, the largest fish processing
company in B.C., is trying to establish two
research chairs at UBC, and thereby gain
first access to any research done by those
chairs, even though the chairs will be two
thirds government funded.
BC Packers has offered a $300,000
committment which is expected to result in
a $590,000 contribution by the National
Science and Engineering Research Council.
The UBC Senate guidelines for the
chairsreadin part, "the chairs will disseminate their achievements firstly through
B.C. Packers and then to the Canadian
industry at large?
But Ralph Drew, technical services
manager at Canadian Fishing Ltd., another large fish processing company, while
lauding the establishment of the chairs, expressed concern when told that BC Packers
would be the initial recipients of research
achievements.
Drew said any results should be available to the rest of the industry as they
develop.
Jeff Meggs, editor of The Fisherman, a
union newspaper, said "public resources
like universities should be used for public
benefits?
BC Packers should not get the jump on
the rest of the industry, Meggs added.
In December, UBC Dean of applied
science Axel Meisen said, "BC Packers is
directly involved, so they have direct access, whereas other people will have to wait
until this material is published in journal
articles and presented at conferences. It's
a normal process of releasing information."
But yesterday, when asked about
Canadian Fishing's concerns, Meisen said
the research would be in the public domain,
and "if [Canadian Fishing] have an interest
in it, then they should express it and we
would of course provide the results to
them?
Head of UBC mechanical engineering,
Dr. N. E. Salcudean, explained that the
reason Canadian Fishing hadn't been approached was because when BC Packers,
which is the largest of the "big eight", was
approached, they were so enthusiastic that
they "were willing to support it by themselves? she said.
"Once the research is done? Salcudean
continued, "BC Packers would not object to
these things filtering to other companies,
because they would have lead time [on the
innovations.]"
The incumbents for the two chairs will
be chosen, according to Salcudean, in collaboration with BC Packers. BC Packers
will also have a direct say in the direction of
the research.
Meisen, emphasizing that final confirmation from NSERC has not been secured,
is confident that the project will move
ahead.
The purpose of the two department of
mechanical engineering positions, which
have not yet been filled, will be to utilize
robotics, remote sensing, and computer
vision in an attempt to reduce wastage of
the raw product (salmon) in a number of
industrial processes.
Asked whether the potential equipment resulting of this research would
eliminate jobs, Meisen replied: "No, quite
the contrary. It will enhance [the workers']
productivity. The major problem that BC
VOLUME 70, Number 27
Packers and west coast fish processing
plants are facing is wastage?
Meggs agreed that such technology
would probably increase employment. "If
there's more meat to process, then that
inevitably creates more work?
Canadian Fishing Ltd., one of B.C.'s
"big eight" fish processors, has for the past
two years been engaged in research to
computerize "the iron butcher", a device
which cuts the head and fins off fish that
has been used in the industry since the
beginning of this century.
"They calculated that this would add
hundreds of thousands of pounds to the
supply [of fish meat] each year," said
Meggs.
Elaine Bernard, a Simon Fraser University professor specializing in the history
of technology and the effects of technological change on labour, criticized the management bias of university-industry links.
"All of the discussion about automation and technology is not about the people
who for years have been standing in freezing cold rooms dealing with frozen fish.
There's nothing being done to improve the
condition of those workers?
"I suppose that the ultimate improvement of these jobs, from a management
point of view, is their elimination? Bernard
added, laughing. She pointed out that
there were no similar research chairs for
labour at UBC.
"This is a completely management
biased type of project. It's typical. Technology itself is neutral, supposedly, and therefore [the argument goes] its' benefits will
benefit all. But this seems to be a clear
example of where it won't? she concluded.
Meggs concurred. "The frustrating
thing is that we've been hoping for a long
time that the government would get together with industry and unions to study
and research ways to make bette'r use of our
fish resources for the purpose of creating
jobs.
"Unfortunately, universities are more
and more winding up in situations like this
[the BC Packers chairs] where those with
money get the research they want to make
more money. We don't, for instance, have a
chair in industrial health and safety in the
fishing industry?
Meggs explained that shoreworkers
are susceptible to what is called industrial
disease, or repetitive motion disease, due to
the introduction of new technologies which
speed up the production process.
"Repetitive motion diseases are aggravated by faster work? he said. "When
you're doing the same thing over and over
again, your tendons become aggravated.
People are being forced out of the industry
because they simply can't work at that pace
anymore."
Meggs said, "When the union was
bargaining to change this, we proposed
that instead of putting all of the increased
productivity into faster operation, the industry create rotating crews and relief
workers so that people on the line would be
able to get some relief from this repetitive
motion disease."
"They refuse to do that. When they're
looking for ways to increase productivity,
they are looking for it to line their pockets,
not to assist people in avoiding consequences of technological change that has
already occurred? said Meggs.
Cheryl Verney sings for her supper during last night of hunger strike on her Vigil for Ethiopia
Professor has $600
bursary in the can
A $600 bursary is available to UBC
geological students because one professor
believes in the principle "waste not, want
not."
Professor Wilbert Danner of geological sciences donated $7,000 to a bursary
with money he raised by collecting empty
cans, bottles and loose change from UBC's
beaches and grounds.
"This fund shows students what a
waste of money it is to throw stuff around
on the beach? Danner said.
Danner said "there is no stigma attached" to collecting bottles and cans and
said he knows of other faculty who do the
same thing.
But Danner's bursary, appropriately named the "beer, pop, can, bottle,
deposit, refund bursary, almost never
got off the ground.
The Senate awards committee
thought Danner's bursary title inappropriate and named it the 'department of
geological sciences bursary'. After Danner objected the awards committee renamed the bursary the 'beer, pop, can,
bottle, deposit, refund bursary".
Wilbert Danner with can (and a bottle)
dan andrews photo
Vancouver, B.C. Tuesday, January 5,1988 CLASSIFIEDS
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10 healthy Caucasian males (20-
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Only first year graduate students at UBC will be exempted from
proposed tuition fee increases in the coming year, not all graduate
students, as reported in the December 4 issue. The person responsible has been fined and sent to re-education camp.
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Shop and swap. Nionn, Intertla*.
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A talk by Dale Narauda entitled;
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FoctiB Meeting. Topite "Answering Difficult Questions <on
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Masterpieces of film with Prof,
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LARGE SENATORS
REQUEST CONTACT
Now that the fall term is over, the
student Senators "at large" would
welcome input on matters of Senate concern. The present Senators
"at large" can be reached by phone
or mail at the following locations:
Barry Dumka
International House 228-6249
Campus Mail
Tony Fogarassy
Geological Sciences 261-7246
Room 62 or SUB Box 164
Derek Pettingale
SUB Box 161 263-5984
A.Igx Sdggt*s
McMillian Building   228-2167
Room 220D
Justin Williamson
Civil Engineering 228-2379
Alex Speers
(for Student Senators at large)
A  Testimonial:
"Before I joined the Ubyssey, people
kicked sand in my face. Now that I
write brilliant prose twice a week,
Ifm   king   of   the   beach."
Gross   Malarkey
Ubyssey   livestock  editor
You too  can  rule the  sands.      Just   drop  by
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2/THE UBYSSEY
January 5,1988 Nature stomped
Suzuki counsels slow growth
CHARLOTTETOWN (CUP) —
"In 30 years there will be no wilderness left on the planet except
for tiny, isolated islands if we
continue at our present assault
rate on the environment? predicts Dr. David Suzuki.
In half that time, British
Columbia will have no virgin
coastal rainforest, he said. By
the year 2140, 50 per cent of all
animal and plant species on
earth will be extinct, Suzuki
said.
He added that 50 years
later, the extinction rate would
hit 80 per cent.
Suzuki made the points at a
recent visit to the Universtiy of
Prince Edward Island, where he
addressed a crowd of 600.
The geneticist, author and
broadcaster said governments are
living an economic myth.
The sacred truth of economics is that we must maintain
steady growth. Slowing down the
expropriation of land is the only
choice left for governments,
Suzuki said.
"If we don't slow down now
voluntarily, war, famine and disease will slow us?
Suzuki quoted the native in-
dian proverb which says the planet
is not inherited from our parents,
but rather borrowed from our children.
"We want to leave the world a
better place for our children. Now,
for the first time in history, our
children come into a world more
impoverished than the world of
their parents? Suzuki said.
And the scientist said all
change in the rules and attitudes
surrounding the environmnet
can only come about through
political means. Environmental
issues must become part of political platforms.
Yet few politicians have a
background in science and technology. Mostareinlawandbusi-
ness, and Suzuki wants them to
educate themselves.
"They know virtually nothing about science and technology. They are scientifically illiterate - yet they make the decisions..."
Concluded Suzuki, "How do
you ask a question? What is
real? What is discovery? Science
has to show that current ideas
are wrong, and that only the
truth will stand the test of time?
Women avoid
science careers
Map quiz stumps students
MONTREAL (CUP) — Can you
locate Mozambique on a map?
Ifyou can't, you are not alone.
A survey at Concordia University
shows 72 per cent of students
polled could not locate Mozambique, 69 per cent the Phillipines,
65 per cent Sri Lanka, and 44 per
cent the Falkland Islands.
The survey of 250 students
was conducted in November by a
coalition of students and faculty
from Concordia's geography department. The students were
asked to find on a blank map the
location of five places which have
consistently appeared in the news
recently.
The coalition says the survey
confirms more scientific studies
indicating most people have a very
poor awareness of the Third
World.
"I was not really surprised at
the results? said George Welcher,
one of the students in the coalition.
"I had been aware that the level of
geographic literacy of university
students was generally low.
Welcher blamed the students'
ignorance of their reliance on television news.
"Images on tv give you no idea
where these places are unless you
have a personal interest? he said.
"They're  cute  little  five-minute
packages."
With the five locations circled
on a map, students surveyed at
random in the hallways of the
university showed similar results.
Only two out of ten students located the five places correctly.
Four other only succeeded by process of elimination.
"There was only one gulf
circled, so that was easy? said one
students who didn't want to be
named. "The Philippines are Chinese, right? So the circle at the
bottom had to be Falkland Islands?
HALIFAX (CUP)— Women are
still not considering the option of a
career in science, according to a
researcher at Dalhousie University.
"There are no barriers to a
female student going for a ph.d. -
there will be a job offer. The students are simply not choosing to?
said chemist professor Katherine
Darvesh.
Darvesh is concerned that
women need more role models in
order to become involved in chemistry, physics and biology. She
said the biggest problem is attitudes.
Forty per cent of those studying undergraduate chemistry in
Canada are women. But the
number drops to 25 percent at the
ph.d level, according to Anne
Alper, the executive director of the
Chemical Institute of Canada.
Out of Dalhousie's 26 chemistry professors, one is female, reports the university's faculty association. Yet there are more female
instructors than male - a position
which does not impose research
mandates. Insructors tend to run
labs and help students.
Dalhousie's Darvesh says the
scientific community is trying to
determine the reasons behind the
few women in graduate studies.
Some factors may be the lack of
day care, time constraints on
women, and society's attitudes
towards women, the researcher
says.
The chemist says women walk
into their science classes and
wonder why they have no female
professors. Ifs difficult to see science as a possible career without
role models, Darvesh said.
(Darvesh) blames the
media, too, saying
that scientists are
often portrayed as eccentric men with 'flyaway' hair.
She blames the media too,
saying that scientists are often
portrayed as eccentric men with
'flyaway' hair.
The Chemistry Institute's
Alper notes that 50 per cent of
students enrolled in medicine and
law are women.
Darvesh says many women
don't consider themselves intelligent enough to do research.
"This is going from the frying
pan into the fire. It's a woman's
own self-imposed barriers. The
two careers are equally difficult?
Summer research grants and
science weekends can help dispell
the myths about scientific research, Darvesh said.
But she says that placing
women in positions of authority
and advertising the role women
play in the scientific community
are the keys to getting more
women involved.
»S"»_fe* ■*-       <___.-__£
1 •liiJiiii
Hidden in the picture: a telephone, a knife, a bluebird, a pair of spectacles, a bicycle, a football, a sock, a brass candlestick, a frozen fish and one Torontonian.
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Mon-Th 8-9, Fri 8-6, Sat-Sun 11-6
DARLENE MARZARI,
M.L.A. VANCOUVER. PT. GREY
is available to help you with
- student aid appeals
- landlord & tenant problems
- up to date information on
government programs
at her community office
3606 West Broadway
Tel: 732-8683
Hours: Monday-Friday 9:30 a.m.- 4 p.m.
Saturday 10 a.m.- 1p.m.
Serving All Point Grey Residents
U.B.C. DEPARTMENT OF
STUDENT HOUSING
Invites Applications for the Position of
RESIDENCE ADVISORS FOR 1988 - 89
These positions are open only to full-time registered U.B.C. students.
Successful applicants will be required to live in the residences. Application forms and detailed job descriptions are available at the Ponderosa Housing Office and at the Front Desk of each single student
residence area: Totem Park, Place Vanier, W.H. Gage, and Acadia/
Fairview.
Information Meetings: 6:30 p.m. in the Residence Commonsblocks -
January 12 at Totem Park; January 13 at Place Vanier, Janurary 14 at
Walter Gage.
Applications will be accepted from January 4th to January 18th, 1988
at the Front Desks of the single Student Residences, or at the Ponderosa Housing Office.
January 5,1988
THE UBYSSEY/3 ONE HOUR
SOFT CONTACT
LENS SERVICE
(Soft contact lenses in about one hour for most
prescriptions - Specialty lenses exlcuded)
* STUDENT RATES *
20% OFF (CONTACT LENSES!)
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UBC intramurals special
events filling fast
Run, don't walk. To the intramurals office that is. The pine
needles haven't even been vacuumed off the carpet yet and the
UBC intramurals program is almost up to full speed.
Registration has already begun for women's basketball and
volleyball, and the increasingly
popular co-rec volleyball that had
20 teams on the waiting list at one
point.
"Judging from last term's response to intramurals at UBC, this
one is going to be a block-buster?
said associate director of intramurals Joan Richer.
"Based on last year's response
we're expecting a 25 percent increase in all special events?
This term's first special event,
the Grouse Mountain Ski Chal-
leng, also has begun registration.
Last year's field of 150 participants was an all-time high but 50
people were still turned away.
This years capacity has increased to 200 but there is still no
guarantee that all applicants will
be accomodated.
All special events have suffered the peril of turning away
teams and individuals, including
the Centipede Championships,
the UBC Triathalon, and Storm
the Wall. And this year's newest
event, the Spanish Banks Downhill Derby, promises to be just as
popular.
So run, don't walk to the UBC
intramurals office to reserve your
place.
Roller coaster ride for hoop 'Birds
3665 WEST 10™ AVE.
PHONE 736-5669
During the past month, while
UBC students were writing exams, celebrating Christmas, and
counting down 1987, the Thunderbirds men's basketball team was
riding the win-lose roller coaster.
The "Birds managed a 4-2 holiday
record.
At the Thunderbird Invitational Tournament on December
fourth, UBC won their opening
game 85-70 over the University of
Guelph.
In the tournament final the
following evening the 'Birds
claimed the championship with a
108-102 victory over Washington
state's Christian Athletes Association.
UBC's J.D. Jackson led all
scorers with 40 points. Christian
Athletes Association's Ron Van-
derSchaaf and Kenny Stone, who
were both selected late in last
year's NBA draft, were each held
under 20 points.
1988
oo
_____■_.
OO
THE BOOKSTORE
invites you
to begin the New Year
at our January
C&tk}^^
Bring your used books to the Bookstore
and get cash back. Soft or hard cover,
whether used on this campus or not,
we will buy all titles that have resale
market value.
ve
oo
oo
Buy Back dates:
January 4 - 8,1988
9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
BOOKSTORE
6200 University Boulevard ■ 228-4741
1988
In late December UBC
dropped their first game 100-93 to
seventh ranked Manitoba at the
University of Winnipeg Classic
then went on to post victories over
Dakota's Mount Marty College
(106-62) and McMaster University
(102-71) in the consolation round.
In their final Christmas break
game on January third the 'Birds
were flailed by the University of
Western Washington 111-83.
VOLUNTEERS WANTED
Help the Kinsmen Rehabilitation Foundation of
B.C. to provide services to the physically disabled.
The Foundation helps provide direct services including an equipment loan program.
Volunteers are needed to assist with:
•Kinsmen Mothers' March.
•Office Work at Regional Offices throughout the
Lower Mainland.
•Organizational work.
•Fund raising.
There will be a presentation held in the main
concourse of the Student Union Building on
Wednesday January 6, 1988 from 11:00 a.m. —
3:00 p.m. Please call 255-3595 for further information.
THANK HEAVENS
KINKO'S IS OPEN
SUNDAYS
At Kinko's, we offer complete copying services seven
days a week. And our staff has a friendly professional
attitude you won't find anywhere else. Try Kinko's. We
could be the answer to your prayers.
5706 University Blvd
222-1688
M-TH 8-9 F 8-6 Sat 10-6 Sun 11-6
kifiko's
Great Copias. Great Psopla.
THE UBC GRAD SOCIETY
N
LL
CLASSICAL GUITARIST
WED. JAN. 6,13, 20
5:30 - 8:00 PM
FIRESIDE LOUNGE • GRAD CENTRE
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UBC CAMPUS
CALL 228-3205
4/THE UBYSSEY
January 5, 1988 UBC's Reg Wiebe (30) hooks one over Western Washington's defense as Mike Clarke (40) and Kevin Korol
(24) prepare to rebound.
'Birds bounce back
By Victor Chew Wong
Last night the UBC men's
basketball team avenged a Saturday loss by edging the University
of Western Washington Vikings
89-84.
Defence made the difference
between last night's victory at War
Memorial Gym and the 111-83
massacre of the 'Birds at Lyndon,
Washington on the weekend.
No team wins many games in
any league giving up 111 points -
CIAU, NBA, or the association to
which the Vikings belong, the
NAIA.
In last night's contest UBC
coralled Western's high flying attack, limited their inside game,
and forced the Vikings to the perimeter. As a consequence, West
ern shot only 43 percent from the
field.
"Overall we got a much better
defensive performance from everyone," said UBC head coach
Bruce Enns. "We got great defence
on the perimeter - especially from
(Perrie) Scarlett, (Alan) Lalonde,
and (Reg) Wiebe."
The 'Birds started sluggishly,
letting Western get a quick 16-7
lead. It smelled like a blow-out
brewing in the early going.
But halfway through the first
frame UBC settled into a slower
paced half court game and hammered their way to a 27-24 lead. At
the half the 'Birds held a commanding 52-39 lead.
The second half opened like
the first with Western's full court
defence taking the game away
from the 'Birds.
"We handled the pressure but
we didn't attack? said Enns.
With 9:10 left in the game the
Vikings took a 69-68 lead and
looked like they would swing to a
victory on their momentum.
But the 'Birds fought back and
rode a five point cushion until the
end of the game.
"We turned the ball over way
too much and we couldn t defend
(Mike) Clarke," said Western head
coach Brad Jackson.
UBC forward Clarke finshed
with a game high 32 points, while
Scarlett and Lalonde added 12
each for the Thirds. EricSchurman
led the Vikings with 17 points.
busy bee
ONE HOUR CLEANERS
20% DISCOUNT
Present your AMS student
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(Not valid with any other
promotion and excludes
laundry & leather cleaning).
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PH.: 224-4212
UB7SSET   STAFF
meeting. Discuss rm coming term. "New
staffers especially welCOME. Wed.
72:30 SUB
2^T k.
Opportunities for Graduate
Studies in Biochemistry
University of Alberta
The Department of Biochemistry of the University
of Alberta (20 academic staff members) is recruiting
candidates for admission to graduate studies. Areas of
investigation include the following: structure and
function of enzymes and other proteins, including the
application of x-ray crystallography and high field
nuclear magnetic resonance; molecular biology membrane biology; cell surface receptor function, molecular virology; DNA structure, replication and interaction with proteins; biochemistry and molecular genetics of immune responses; metabolic control mechanisms; lipid and lipoprotein metabolism; molecular
biology of bacterial surface structures. Stipends for
graduate students are available through granting
agencies, including the Alberta Heritage Foundation
for Medical Research ($12,825 + $2,500 research allowance per annum.) Interested applicants should contact:
Dr. William A. Bridger, Chairman
Department of Biochemistry
University of Alberta
Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2H7
GMAT     LSAT     GRE
(Graduate Management
Admission Test)
(Law School Admission Test)
(Graduate Record Exam)
WEEKEND TEST PREPARATION COURSES
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• Includes Sexton text book, lectures and  ,,<,
• One year personalized services. Ay';
Instructors hold PhD, MBA or LLB.    • ftV?
a
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PROFESSIONALS IN TEST PREPARATION
222-8272
Xg AWARDS
WORK STUDY NOTICE
Work Study funds are now almost fully committed, and Work
Study Drop-in sessions have been cancelled for the balance of
the term. Students who have "Work Study Applications" should
return them to the Awards Office immediately. Students with
"Work Study Authorizations" who wish to participate in the
program, but who have not yet been to the Canada Employment Centre in Brock Hall should do so immediately. Authorizations will be accepted until the funds are fully committed or
until January 15th, whichever occurs first.
Awards & Financial Aid • Rm 50, General Services Admin Bldg • Phone: 228-5111
The University of British Columbia
FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE
JUNO AND THE PAYCOCK
by Sean O'Casey
January 13-23
Special Previews -13 + 14
2 for the price ofl regular admission
Curtain: 8 pm
Thursday Matinee - Jan. 21 @ 12:30 pm
BOX OFFICE * FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE * Room 207
Support Your Campus Theatre
.  »S * FROM *   . V
OPTICAL
Glasses r
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Contacts
$39.99oR$79.99
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You Money * * S $ $ $ , $ $ $ $ s . * * C°,NpLA«I
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CAMPUS CUTS 5736 University Blvd
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January 5, 1988
THE UBYSSEY/5 Knowledge sales
sell out university
Knowledge for sale! Specialists available to the
highest or loudest bidder! Pay for half, and the government will pay for the rest!
UBC is going industrial.
The original purpose of the university, as American
author David Noble recently emphasized, was to provide
an arena for "untrammelled inquiry, bold judgement,
and social criticism? The proposed National Science and
Engineering Research Council (NSERC) funding of two
Chairs in Industrial Automation in the Fish Processing
Industry violates that goal. Rather, it will turn part of
the campus into a research lab for BC Packers.
The arrangement stinks. B.C. Packers is the largest
fish processor on the coast; it is however, one of several
firms. Why should B.C. Packers have what amounts to
exclusive access to the university research and consulting services? B.C. Packers gets a $590 000 subsidy from
NSERC and its own "donation'' of $300,000 will probably
be deducted from taxes.
B.C. Packers will have access to the information produced by the UBC academics before the rest of the
industry does. Once prototypes have been tested, and
designs finalized, the information will be released
through journals and at conventions. In the meantime,
B.C. Packers is grinning. There is often at least a year
before articles submitted to journals are published. B.C.
Packers will be reeling in the profits by the time the rest
of the industry gets access to the knowledge.
The university benefits by being able to train students in actual production process design.
Both the university and B.C. Packers, it seems, gain
from this arrangement. But what of the general trend of
university-industry links? In the long term, this type of
arrangement isn't in the interests of the university.
When the university becomes too closely linked with
private industry, the interests of the corporations
become the interests of the university. This wreaks
havoc with academic freedom. It becomes politically
"unhealthy" to criticise certain corporations, because the
miffed corporation may withdraw funding. David Noble,
author of a book criticising MITs links with industry
and the military, was denied tenure and fired by that
university. The danger is real.
As is, university administrations have started
acting more and more like private employers, making it
extremely difficult for faculty to be tenured. And
un tenured faculty members who utter expressions contrary to the 'party line' dictated by the university are
politically at risk. So much for "untrammelled criticism,
bold judgement, and social criticism?
If the university allows those with dollars to dictate
the direction of research, how long will it be until it
becomes a totally profit-orientated institution and
dumps subjects like history, classics, literature, and
philosophy? Unless philosophy suddenly develops a
market value.
Ask not for whom the bell tolls, academia ... it tolls
for thee.
THE UBYSSEY
January 5,1988
The Ubyssey is published Tuesdays & Fridays throughout the academic year by the Alma Mater Society of the
University of British Columbia. Editorial opinions are
those of the staff and not necessarily those of the university administration, or of the sponsor. The Ubyssey is a
member of Canadian University Press, the editorial
office is Rm. 241k of the Student Union Building. Editorial Department, phone 228-2301/228-2305; advertising, 228-3977.
So Steve Chan chained Ross McLaren to the production desk and made him recount 104
times how the CUP conference was. Just when Ross thought the torture was over, Jeff
Sirverstein made him and Victor Wong sing "Thank God, fm a Country Boy" in two part
harmony. Corinne Bjorge thought it was all pretty groovy and began playing accompaniment on her banjo. Lisa Langford was getting really pissed off because she was typing
the alphabet backwards and couldn't concentrate. Laura Busheikin, meanwhile, flitted
about the room flabbergasted that Deanne Fisher was farting on her futon. Not paying
attention to any of it was Tim McGrady who was crying because he couldn't find his owl
eraser in his pencil case. Katherine Monktoldhimto stop crying because she had a drawer
full of them and would sell him one if only Stephen Wisenthal would stop break dancing
on the office floor. After the commotion had died down, the Ubyssey staff, led by Chris
Wiesinger, went down to the grad student centre to meditate and roast marshmallows.
In the sky, a whirling cloud evolved into the image of the infamous zBop. well known at the
University of Western Ontario for his sexual rambunctiousness and graphic talents. zBop
said: "Don't go changin', babe." And they didn't. And it was good.
Dusk set softly on VAHlaton's Mountain. And around the remains of a cheese-only
pizza sat the fretting family members. "Gosh darn," said pragmatic IP-boy, "This family
will be dead in two years." Grandpa Harry KRISHNA nodded sharply. "Don't be a
pessimist; even in the worst-case scenario, this family will survive." A symphonic,
soothing snore arose from the corner of the room where the Baldwin spinster siblings, ERIC
and DEREK, slept obliviously. "What could possibly go wrong?" mused JACK, lulled into
nicety by the snoring. The door crashed open. "Holyfinancing from hell!" yelled blond-
haired BUTLER-bob pedalling in on his trusty tricycle, "MIKE Godseyand that token female
CAROL-Belle are on our backs once more." The family shuffled frantically through the pizza
bills. One small voice fiftered through the chaos. "I'm afraid we'll have to resort to deficit
financing," whimpered IAN, clutching his wild thing. Two years later, they were all dead.
The End.
city desk:
Corinne Bjorge
Ross McLaren
production:
Lisa Langford
entertainment:
Laura Busheikin
sports:
Victor Chew Wong
The last tiling I i^rnemher was sin^ng Auld Lang
8yne?..When 1 wotoe up 1 hadinadefliyfrsochetti
lab...Talk abouHoss of aetf-corrtrol.
"back-to-
the-grind-
after-sev-
eral-
weeks-of-
non-stop-
wacky~off-
the-wall-
uninhibi-
ted-hedon-
istic-holi-
day-may-
hem."
Letters
Totem toots
T-Birds in T.O.
For the second straight
year about 10 UBC grads
living in Toronto and myself
went to the Vanier Cup to
cheer the ol' Birds on. There
were probably about 1,000
or so UBC fans at the game,
but none were more vocal
than the 50 students from
Totem Park residences who
took the effort and expense
in coming to Toronto. Most
flew to TO, but I understand
that 5 drove across.
I think that this spirit is
fantastic, (it certainly would
not have happened in the
late 70's) and I hope that it is
endemic of UBC's student
body support of the fine athletic program today
Peter V. Varsek
BA' 1980
Let's Grinch
Hollywood
Re: Dear Santa: A Grinch
for Hollywood
While I wholeheartedly
share your aversion to the
recent arrival of advertisements at the movie houses
(the accompanying cartoon
said it all admirably), I must
object to the passive tone of
your editorial. Your assertion that audiences are
"captives" of these grabby
establishments is incorrect.
We have the right to go elsewhere (Ridge, Vancouver
East, Hollywood, etc.), to
stay at home, or perhaps
even more appropriately, to
show our displeasure. Yell,
hiss, boo, throw popcorn
(making sure you don't get it
on the person in front), accost the "Cineplex magnate"
in the lobby, boycott products advertised at movies—
do something! (but do go
forewarned here: some of
the more circumspect may
accuse you of terrorism.)
Exercise your consumer
vote and your power in the
market-place. Admittedly,
Vancouver did lose some of
its alternative movie houses
last year. As consumers, we
can help reverse this trend.
If the line-ups at these businesses are seen to be growing, it won't be long before
some bright-eyed, bushy-
tailed entrepreneur sees
and fills a need.
For some, the sixties
may be nothing but a faded
memory waiting their turn
to be exploited by Hollywood
The Ubyssey welcomes letters on any issue. Letters must be typed and are not to exceed 300 words in length. Content
which is judged to be libelous, homophobic, sexist, or racist will not be published. Please be concise. Letters may be
edited for brevity, but it is standard Ubyssey policy not to edit letters for spelling or grammatical mistakes. Please bring
them, with identification, to SUB 241k. Letters must include name, faculty, and signature.
Bill 28 threatens democracy
The provincial government is about to begin debate on Bill 28, the Election
Amendments Act. The bill,
which proposes to eliminate what is known as Section 80 of the current act,
will deny every British Columbian the basic and fundamental right to register
and vote in a provincial
election on election day.
The passage of bill 28,
and the subsequent elimination of Section 80, will
have a far reaching impact
upon many citizens in BC—
particularly students. Students are by and large transitory and are mostly tenants which makes enumeration of the student
vote problematic at best.
This fact, coupled with an
inadequate enumeration
process, has meant that
thousands of students are
regularly left off "official"
enumerated voters lists.
For example, many
students were part of the
157,000 eligible voters who
cast ballots in the last pro
vincial election using the
safeguards provided by
Section 80. Now, with Bill
28, the government wants
to eliminate both that safeguard and the right to vote
of thousands of people—
seniors, new Canadians,
tenants, working people,
and professionals—who
regularly fall through the
"cracks" in the enumeration process.
The proposed elimination of Section 80 from the
Election Act should be of
the upmost importance to
every democraticly inclined British Columbian.
As a student representative, I encourage all concerned to join us in our
campaign to protect this
most basic democratic
right to vote as provided for
under Section 80. In the
interest of democracy, Bill
28 must be withdrawn.
Paul G. Mendes
External Relations Officer
Simon Fraser Student
Society
film makers. Yet the period
contains many valuable lessons; Ralph Nader and consumer power is but one of
them. Don't wait for the
"Grinch to steal the materialist trappings from the
movie houses"—be the
Grinch!
Ron Kenworthy
Arts
Hashish hardly
hospitalizes
Having followed the
ongoing cannabis debate
with some interest, let me
add some of my own comments.
While I am not advocating breaking the existing
laws, I am in more or less
complete agreement with
the position taken by Blair
Longley. The present anti-
cannabis laws were undoubtedly influenced by our
anti-Chinese racist government. The fact that these
laws are still in effect is
obviously unrelated to -the
lack of medical evidence
which might condemn the
use of the plant. No such
evidence exists. In fact,
marijuana is well known to,
and even prescribed to relieve nausea and glaucoma.
In response to David Li's
article "Philosopher fails to
convince in dope debate? I
ask the question: have you
ever heard of a hospitalization due to the use or abuse
of cannabis? The fact remains that while nicotine
and alcohol are known to be
extremely toxic, a lethal
ingested dose of hashish
(often more potent than the
green plant) has been estimated at roughly 2 kg! Can
you imagine someone eating
that much of anything in a
sitting?
I suggest that the current marijuana situation
resembles the prohibition
movement of the U.S. and
certain Canadian provinces
during the 1930's. Despite
greater public awareness
and increased law enforcement regarding marijuana,
the use of the plant has risen
dramatically in recent
years. Moreover, with regard to the rights of others
concerning the smoking of
cannabis, wouldn't it be reasonable for users to smoke it
where no one else objects, or
failing that, just to spark up
outside? Let's face it, folks.
A change in attitude toward
this relatively harmless
(and often beneficial) plant
is long overdue.
Nathaniel Hurvitz
Grad. Studies, Music
Dix pix tix
Tom off
Let's discuss censorship.
A hoopla has been
raised over the current censorship versus freedom of
artistic expression debate,
which really should not exist.
In principle, everyone
has individual rights to free
expression, but this freedom
must be carefully guided as
not to impinge on the rights
of the individuals that
choose not to consume everything on the market.
The freedom of artistic
expression has its place in
the private realm which
should be accomodated
within society; but it should
only be available to those
that seek its pleasure. The
consumer has the final right
to consume what lies beyond
the doors of a cinema or the
cover of a book.
However I have dealt
solely on a matter of private
consumption. The rules
change somewhat for publi-
cally offered material. By its
nature, goods for public consumption are more open,
and therefore must be presented conservatively in
order to protect the rights of
those citizens with less liberal attitudes. This isn't
written doctrine, but it is a
courtesy extended to the
public in general, as it
should not be an intension to
offend others.
University newspapers,
like the McGill Daily or the
Ubyssey, for that matter,
are publically offered papers
which attract a wide audience. Therefore , like any
public good they should
maintain the condition of
said public material mentioned above - ie. stay away
from making offensive gestures. Whether it is a
woman's hand grasping a
penis, or "our" clocktower
supporting a condom, the
public paper is not the place
for such display no matter
how legitimate the statement is.
For those of my persuasion, that have judged the
said material to be offensive
and distasteful, we already
have enough exposure to
places where we can consume this proclaimed "art".
One only has to visit our
washrooms on campus.
Tom Bolland
Poli Sci 4th
Newman Club
6/THE UBYSSEY
January 5,1988 Drug argument
displays dopey logic
In response to his legalize it' letter (Ubyssey, Nov.
27), I would like to provide
some 'conflicting observations' for Mr. Reiffer's edification.
Noticing that Mr. Reiffer is a fourth-year philosophy major, I was surprised
to see that he doesn't recognize a non-sequitur, even
one of his own making. He
writes that no one has
proved marijuana causes
more health damage than
alcohol or cigarettes; since
they are legal, it is irrational
to criminalize marijuana.
The fallacy of this argument
is best exposed by analogy:
Canadians may legally own
and use rifles and shotguns.
By Randy's logic, it therefore is irrational to prevent
them from legally owning
machine guns, zip guns, and
any other type of firearm. It
doesn't follow that because a
few harmful substances are
relatively uncontrolled in
our society, we should automatically throw the door
open to the others.
Mr. Reiffer tells us it is
an 'epistemic' (sic) duty to
justify our beliefs by gathering and analysing conflicting thoughts and ideas.
This process is enhanced, he
says, by drug-induced states
of altered consciousness. I
believe we've heard that
argument before, in the Sixties and early Seventies.
Back then, it was called
'instant karma'. John Lennon even wrote a song about
it. But even John and company abandoned that approach when they discovered that their chemically-
induced insight didn't last
much past Saturday's party;
it seemed to get flushed
away the next morning with
the rest of the drug's residue.
If Randy is looking for
insight, then perhaps he
should re-open his philosophy books and examine the
lives of the men who wrote
them. The great thinkers
East and West invariably
spent many years observing, reflecting and comparing before they attained
anything that they themselves would call wisdom.
I would suggest to Mr.
Reiffer that if he is anxious
for a vegetative aid in his
search for buddha-nature,
he will do better with a
Bodhi tree than with a cannabis plant. There are
only two serious arguments
for legalizing marijuana - a
small but significant percentage of the population
uses it, and, if it is at all
harmful, it only harms the
user.
The large numbers argument isn't too persuasive.
Almost anyone who owns a
car has exceeded the speed
limit; most drivers in large
cities do it as a matter of
course. Does the fact that
most people ignore traffic
rules make those laws candidates for repeal?
Of course, traffic regulations involve activity that
might harm others, and
marijuana doesn't do that,
right? That depends on your
definition of harm.
Let's assume Mr. Reiffer is right, that marijuana
is no more harmful tha beer
or cigarettes. The illness
produced by those two has
taxed the health-care system to the limit. If marijuana is 'only* as harmful as
cigarettes, well have yet
another segment of the
population lining up for the
cancer wards. Why should
the rest of us be forced to pay
for those who choose to induce their own illness?
Those who harm themselves
in this way are in fact harming us all by using up valuable, and limited, health
resources.
The final refuge of the
true legalization believer is
the contention that no one
has yet conclusively proved
that marijuana is harmful.
If we assume that this is
true, where does it leave us?
Government tends to be
cautious in health and
safety matters; people have
made it that way. Nobody
wants to come out of a restaurant with botulism; no
one wants their new car to
shift into reverse by itself.
As a society, we like to be
insulated from life's dangers as much as possible;
and we've handed the job to
government. True to form,
it has responded with countless laws and regulations.
When some product manages to wreak havoc anyway
we call for stricter regulations - think back to thalidomide, and the exploding
Pintos.
What the decriminalization group wants is for the
government to legalize a
relatively untested, possibly harmful product.
Things don't work that way.
Merchants have to prove
that their goods are safe.
Drug companies must jump
through countless regulatory hoops to get their drugs
legalized - why should marijuana sellers have an easier
time of it?
That's the bottom line,
Randy. If you want marijuana legalized, the onus is
on you to show a sceptical
government why it should
do so. And questionable
philosophical arguments
won't cut the mustard.
You're going to need hard,
cold facts.
T. Hulley
T. Hulley is a mysterious
entity who floated into the
office on a smoke cloud
Playboy portrayal turns
persons into possessions
What's wrong with a
magazine portraying
naked women? Nothing,
according to Vancouver's
newest Playboy starlet.
The media tell us she's
revelling in the limelight.
Her boyfriend thinks its
all kinda neat too. He
doesn't mind all the attention she's getting because,
he saya smugly, "I've got
the real thing? Like Coke
I guess.
Playboy and Coke.
Such entrenched symbols
of our western consumer-
ist-sexist culture as to be
indistinguishable from
each other. And that, in
answer to my question, is
what is wrong with a
magazine portraying
nude women. Women are
the product in Playboy's
smooth marketing
scheme. They are just
another product for the
male consumer to buy and
ingest along with his Coca
Cola.
That Playboy's "product" is done in good taste is
supposed to make the result acceptable and distinguishable from the more
readily objectionable hard
core pornography. This
argument is deceptive in
that it steers clear of the
real issue. The real issue
is that sexism is sexism
whether it be couched in
"acceptable" imagery or is
hidden by weaving it intimately and subtly into the
consumeristic fabric of
our society. Playboy
magazine is guilty on both
counts.
Playboy is part of the
facade that props up our
consumerist-sexist culture.
As with any facade, a closer
look reveals its rotting foun-:
dations. The rotting foundation is, in this case, a society with its value system
askew and a closer look
leads me to wonder why men
need to use women to sell
things to other men (and
sometimes to other women).
Some examples. The
New York Times Magazine,
a supplement to the newspaper, a few weeks ago contained an ad featuring a
nubile model clad in a bathing suit arching her back
and holding a dumbell over
her head. The caption beneath the photo bleats
proudly, "She has more fat
on her than is on our salami." Ah yes, women and
beef. The relationship between the two is subtly
made and becomes a mere
nuance to the hungry male.
And in showing how lean
their salami is, the manufacturer implicitly suggests
that a woman should strive
for a similar standard. Part
of the real message of this ad
is that even though the
woman looks borderline
anorexic, she just doesn't
make the grade: not lean
enough.
The Vancouver Sun
recently contained an article on the tailboard ad
campaign pursued by
Suzuki to sell their motorcycles. The ad depicts a long
winding road "wrapping itself around a woman's
torso? The woman is wearing a bathing suit. Themo-
torcycli st takes a turn on the
part of the road just below
the woman's breast. Above
the billboard are the words
"Hugs Curves" adding that,
"Those who ride one know."
Jerry Kuleb, a partner
in the agency that created
the ad, is quoted as saying,
"Esthetically, we're in the
bounds of good taste. The
breast coul d have been more
protruding. There could
have been a nipple sticking
out." Aside from Jerry's
interesting notion of esthetics, what I found noteworthy
was the "good taste"
element of his defense. Its
the same one that Playboy
uses and it misses the whole
point. Suzuki wants to sell
motorcycles and who wants
to buy them? Why, of
course, boys —who are "into
speed and going out and
picking up girls? as Jerry so
eloquently puts it. Suzuki
markets its product as
smoothly as Playboy, gearing it to a specific male audience and uses women to do
it. Incidentally, one might
ask Jerry how these boys
"pick up girls" when, in his
ad, they're driving over top
of them. Facetious? Maybe,
but the imagery is all there
on the billboard.
One last point. The
headline writer (a male, I
suspect) gleefully shows his
contempt for the whole issue
as the headline reads
"Curves on billboard spark a
beef? Spare me the innuendo please.
More examples
abound where men use
women to do their dirty
work. We see women
selling fast cars or even
weapons systems (men
buying armaments are
treated to the sight of
women coyly wrapping
their arms around missiles).
The,prancing, macho
desire to have power over
a possession is lurking
furtively in all of this.
Does the beautiful girl
come with that fast car or
that really neat wartoy?
And Playboy feeds that
materialistic mind-set by
making women the ultimate object of possession
over which power can be
wielded. And whether
women are the centre of
attraction as in Playboy
or co-star with motorcycles, cars or salami '
makes no difference to
the result. The result is
that the woman stops
being a woman, a person
and becomes scenery, a
prop like the object she's
used to sell. Men don't
suddenly turn into zombies and treat woman like
used cars but all of this
sexistmerchandisinghas
taken its toll in a dulled
collective consciousness.
It confines us in a claustrophobic world where
men use their power to
perpetuate a materialistic agenda.
Tim McGrady is a
science student who
knows the difference between women and beef.
UBC Library
BOOK RETURN BINS at
SUB BUS LOOP
will be removed JANUARY 8
due to construction of New Parkade
After hours book return, Main Library front door
or at major branches
January 5,1988
THE UBYSSEY/7 Pursue the Total Experience
NON-CREDIT COURSES IN LEISURE PURSUITS
Courses are available to all Students, Faculty, Staff, Alumni and their spouses.
REC UBC membership is required for a Faculty, Staff, Alumni and their spouses.
All courses are open to ALL off-campus participants.
Registration for all courses will take place during regular office hours:
MONDAY-FRIDAY 9:00 a.m. - 11:30 a.m. 12:30 p.m. - 3:00 p.m.
Registration: Monday January 4 - Friday, January 15 1988
Where do you register? Room 203, War Memorial Gymnasium,
phone 228-3996 for further information.
REFUND POLICY: PLEASE NOTE:
- We cancel, you get a full refund. - Late registration accepted throughout the term
- You cancel before 3*00 p.m. Friday, January 22, - Late registration does NOT ensure a place in the course,
there will be a $5.00 processing charge. - Classes will be CANCELLED during mid-term break,
- THERE WILL BE NO REFUND ISSUED February 19 - 20,1988
AFTER FRIDAY JANUARY 22,1988.
MOST CLASSES RUN JANUARY 11 TO MARCH 28
THE RECREATION UBC OFFICE IS LOCATED
IN ROOM 203, WAR MEMORIAL GYMNASIUM
MARTIAL ARTS - $40.00
100
CALL 228-3996
FOR FURTHER INFORMATION
FITNESS AND STRENGTH - $40.00
COURSE & LEVEL
DAYS
TIME
PLACE
200
JUDOl
MON/WED
8:00-9-.30pm
GYME
201
JUD02&3
MON/WED
8:30-10:00pm
GYME
202
KARATE
MON/WED
6:00-7:30pm
GYME
203
KARATE2&3
MON/WED
6:30-8:00pm
GYME
204
KARATE3
SATURDAY
10:00-ll:30pm
GYME
205
AIKIDO
TUE/THUR
6:00-7:30pm
GYME
206
WUSHU (ADULT)
THURSDAY
7:30-9:00pm
GYME
SATURDAY
l:30-3:30pm
GYME
207
WUSHU (CHILDREN)
SATURDAY
11:30-1:30pm
GYME
208
TAICHI3
WEDNESDAY
7:30-9:00pm
TASK FORCE
209
TAE KWON DO
TUES/THURS
4:00-6:00pm
TASK FORCE
211
KUNGFU
MON/WED
6:00-7:30pm
ARM. 203
213
KENDO
MON/WED
7:30-9:00pm
ARM. 203
FUNDAMENTAL SKILL AQUISITION TUTORIALS $40.00
FOR PHYSICAL EDUCATION STUDENTS AND OTHERS
CODE COURSE b LEVEL DAY(S) TIME PLACE
303      SWIMMING 2ND WEEK FEB-       TBA AQUATIC CENTER
LAST WEEK MARCH
COURSE & LEVEL
KEEPING FIT PLUS
POWER AND SWEAT
AEROBIC WEIGHT
TRAINING aRCUIT
BODY FIT
BODY FIT
101 AEROBIC CIRCUIT TRAINING
102 STRENGTH TRAINING
103 STRENGTH TRAINING
104 BODYBUILDING
105 FACULTY* STAFF
FITNESS
106 TRIATHLON TRAINING CLINIC
$100.00 ('details below)
$40.00 ('details below)
DAYS
MON/WED
THURS
TUES
MON/WED
MON/TU/TH
THURS
TUES
TUES
WED
MON
MON/TUE
THURS
SATURDAY
Jan 30*
FEB 6™ AND 20™
Mar 5*
TIME
12:30-l:30pm
5:00-6:00pm
12:30-l:30pm
3:30-4:30pm
4:40-530pm
5:00-6.00pm
12:30-l:30pm
5:00-6:00pm
5:00-6:00pm
5:00-6:00pm
12:30-l:05pm
12:30-1.05pm
2:00-4:00pm
PLACE
WMG
WMG,WROOM
WMG,WROOM
GYMB,E&W
GYM B, E&W
WMQWROOM
WMG,WROOM
WMQWROOM
WMQWROOM
WMQWROOM
GYMA
GYM BE
WMG, WROOM
ACTIVITIES - $40.00
DISC- SPORTS - $30.00
BIRD WATCHING - $25.00
CODE COURSE & LEVEL
600
601
603
604
605
606
607
YOGA
BEGINNER SKATING
KAYAKING
SQUASH I JAN.12-FEB.4
SQUASH I FEB. 9-MAR.2
DISC-SPORTS ($30.00)
BIRD WATCHING ($25.00)
DAYS
MON/WED
THURSDAY
MARCH TBA
MON/WED
MON/WED
WED
TIME
4:30-6:00pm
12:30-l:30pm
EVENING TBA
4:15-5:45pm
4:15-5:45pm
12:30-2:00pm
SAT. DETAILS SEE BELOW
PLACE
ARM. 203
TWSC
POOL
TWSC
TWSC
GYMA
211 WMG
702      FITNESS INSTRUCTOR    (SEE UNDER CERTtHCATION COURSES)
f—FREE——FREE—FREB« FREE—FREE —— FREE
I
I
Ui
ui
cc
•
DANCE - $40.00
ALL DANCE CLASSES HELD IN NEW DANCE STUDIO - TASK FORCE
CODE COURSE & LEVEL
500        BALLROOM 1
502        BALLET I
504 JAZZ I
505 JAZZ II
506 MODERN I
DAY(S)
TUE/THUR
MON/WED
MON/WED
TUE/THURS
MON/WED
TIME
7:30-9:00pm
4:30-6:00pm
12:30-2:00pm
l:00-2:30pm
6:00-7:30pm
PLACE
TASK FORCE
TASK FORCE
TASK FORCE
TASK FORCE
TASK FORCE
CERTIFICATION COURSES
CODE COURSE & LEVEL DAY(S) TIME PLACE
701 ST. JOHN'S STANDARD THURSDAY 6:30-9:00pm OSB.203A
CERTIFICATION ($50.00 - INCLUDES MATERIALS
702 FITNESS INSTRUCTOR ($90.00) THURSDAY 3:30-6:30pm OSB.203A&B
STARTING JAN.21ST - MARCH 24TH
I
I
•
IM
III
£
i
i
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a
•
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i
L,
4:40-
M
!    T    ;
12:3(>pn*   p&s
j'Awr I p
3:30"*mi "BF
r j~
COST:    $40.00 - Choose any of the classes listed above as many
times a week, as you like, any time, any location, any intensity.
$2.00 - Drop-in per class
Registration: Jan. 4th - llth
- Recreational Sports (Rm.203)
War Memorial Gym or late registration during first week of
exercise class,
Sponsored by Recreation U.B.C. For Fitness Information - 738-4169
"FWEE——FREE—FREE-FREE-—FREE—.FREE
ft
RECREATION UBC
_¥
NUMBER
CLUB
9{tw
WAR MEMORIAL GYM
WEIGHTROOM
Freeweights New Machines
Term II Memberships Available Now
$35.00
Recreation UBC Office 203 WMG 228-3996
No. 1 Club Operation Hours
Weekdays 10:00am - 10:00pm
Weekends 10:00am - 2:00pm
Closed Daily 5:00 - 6:00pm except Fridays
9J$w\
WEIGHT LIFTING
extra
president Mike Adams
Thursdays $:00 - 6:00 pm
WAR MEMORIAL GYMNASIUM
$5:00 for term membership
register - 203 WAR MEMORIAL GYM
LIFT YOUR WAY
UP THE LADDER
9{ezo
SQUATS
BENCH PRESS
DEAD LIFT
^S8_5__S*_.
Welcome serious
powerlif ters of all levels
BIRDWATCHING FOR
BEGINNING BIRDERS $25.00
Birdwatching is an absorbing, life time hobby
which requires identification skills, patience
and specific knowledge.
RECREATION UBC, in collaboration with well
known birder Bob Morford, will conduct an exciting introductory seminar series with field trips
leading to birding independence and advanced bird watching practices. (Advanced
courses offered September '88)
To take advantage of the bird migration
movement, these 4x4 hour seminars
start in April
BUT REGISTER NOW
to reserve your space in the class.
RECREATION UBC, 203
WAR MEMORIAL GYM. U.B.C.
8/THE UBYSSEY
January 5,1988

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