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UBC Publications

The Ubyssey Feb 29, 1972

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 Alta* dean hisses at university system
The University of Alberta's
dean of pharmacy, Mervyn
Huston, has come up with a
radical new proposal which he
says will solve all campus
difficulties relative to tenure,
promotions, salaries and
administration.
His proposal, released in the
February edition of Canadian
University and College magazine,
hinges on a reverse salary
structure that is graduated
downward based on incompetence.
Lecturers get $30,000,
assistant profs, $25,000, associate
profs, $20,000, professors,
$15,000, senior profs, $10,000
and administrators, $10,000. All
new appointments are made at the
$30,000 lecturer level and instant
tenure is granted, though it works
two ways:
"The university could not fire
the staff member and he could
not leave," if his salary decreased
due to promotion.
"While the university could not
fire an incompetent or lazy
person', it could promote him into
oblivion and insolvency," Huston
says.
'Thus there is a strong
incentive to continue to be
productive. This is the reverse'of
the present situation whereby the
tenure professor cannot be fired
and therefore has a strong
incentive to do nothing."
No one could stay in a bracket
longer than 10 years under
Huston's system; it would take a
competent person 40 years to
reach the senior professor level,
while "a real dud would get-
promoted to senior prof in five
years."
The basis of Huston's proposal
is that universities should be
prepared to pay a high cost during
the youthful creative years, and a
low cost in the stagnant years. No
new appointments would occur
after age 25.
The teaching of students would
be    permitted    down    to,    and
including, professors. Senior
professors would not be permitted
to teach and would constitute a
pool from which administrative
officers and committee personnel
would be drawn.
"The Huston Inverse Salary
System provides a group of
effective incompetents from
whom to draw administrators. It
may be argued that this is no
change from the present situation
but the HISS assures
incompetence and does not leave
it to chance."
Particularly appropriate in light
of B.C.'s present government is
Huston's assertion that:
"Politicians feel ill at ease in the
presence of intellectual ability.
"The use by the universities of
senior incompetents will facilitate
rapport with governments."
Students get
warning on
group flights
—gary gruenke photo
IT'S BEEN A BUSY day for Karen Schendlinger but she refused to be the first to quit. An anonymous
letter to the staff arrived today saying typewriter 35429908670 is out of order and would someone be sure
it is repaired before a letter gets hurt. It is the general consensus of the staff that Karen wrote the letter just
prior to the taking of this picture.
By SANDI SHREVE
Students considering going on
a group charter flight should be
wary of the services offered by
individual promoters who are
advertising in newspapers.
A great many of these
individual promoters do not
adhere to Canadian Transport
Commission regulations for
organizing group charter flights,
Stuart Bruce, Western Student
Services general secretary, warned
Monday.
The major rule governing the
legality of a group charter flight is
affinity.
"Affinity means the group
planning to travel at the reduced
charter flight rates must have
originally been brought together
for a reason other than travel -
such a group would be the AMS,
which is represented by WSS," he
said.
Also, any individual going on
the trip must have been a member
of the group for at least six
months.
But many of these individual
promoters just "shove people into
any group so they can fill the
seats they have contracted from
the airline they are dealing with,"
said Bruce.
"They mail your (back dated)
membership to you with your
ticket — you don't even know
what group you are a member of
until then."
The adverse results of these
illegal methods affect the
individual who is travelling.
Bruce said the travellers' group
memberships are checked when
they reached their point of
destination.
"The passengers on a charter
flight from Vancouver to London
(the most common flight) would
be checked by the British Board
of Trade.
"If it discovers the
memberships are illegitimate the
flight is immediately sent back to
Vancouver," he said.
The organization that arranged
the flight would automatically
lose    its   charterworthiness   (its
licence to book charter flights)
and be told to refund the
passengers' money.
But the organization would
more likely than not go bankrupt
and the individual would lose his
money, said Bruce.
As well, it is a contravention of
CTC rules for an organizer to
advertise the spaces he has
contracted on a flight to the
public.
Charter flight organizations are
supposed to work on a non-profit
basis.
CTC regulations permit
organizers to charge passengers $8
more flight fares to cover
administration costs.
"In addition to that they can
arbitrarily raise the price to cover
reserve underload," said Bruce.
Reserve underload refers to the
loss organizers suffer if they are
unable to fill the seats they have
reserved with the airline.
"If all seats are filled, the
organization is supposed to refund
the individuals the extra money
they were charged," he said.
But this is only according to
CTC rules — it is not a breach of
contract with the individual if the
organization does not refund the
money, he said.
This is because the individual is
rarely informed of a possible
refund and he agrees to take the
trip for the price quoted by the
organizer — which includes this
reserve charge.
"Most organizations don't
refund this money at all," he said.
Letters
edition
With today's Ubyssey at a
moderately healthy 12 pages we
are able to print a small letters
edition.
Thus a variety of
correspondence from our friends
appears on pages 4, 5 and 6. Page 2
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, February 29, 1972
Student reps not on BoG list
By LESLEY KRUEGER
Student representation will not
be. high on the list of board of
governors priorities if the
Universities Act is reconsidered, a
governor said Monday.
"Many other things need to be
changed at the same time," said
board member Paul Plant.
"For instance the teaching
faculty would like to be
represented on the board.
"But if the public is interested
enough to change the act to admit
a student to the board, I say that's
fine," he said.
Student representation as such
would need a change in the act,
but students could sit on the
board now if they are elected by
the senate.
The possibility of a student
taking one of the senate-elected
positions on the board, which will
become vacant in September, was
raised at the senate meeting last
Wednesday.
Student senator Svend
Robinson said he will move at the
March 22 senate meeting that a
committee be formed to consider
the implications of a student
taking one of the senate seats on
the board.
Plant said he likes to see
students actively involved in the
university, but said he questioned
t h e value of student
representation on the board.
"I don't know how a student
can make meaningful
contributions to the board as it
now stands.
"For one thing the term is
three years.  How can a student
keep up with his studies and work
on the board at the same time?
"It would be extremely
difficult."
Administration president
Walter Gage said he was
unprepared to comment on the
proposal until the committee
made its report to the senate.
"This has been tried at other
places and has worked out well I
believe, but we'll have to wait for
the committee's report to see if
these other results would be
applicable here," Gage said.
No other board member was
available for comment.
The Best in
Greek Cuisine
ZORBA'S SHISH
KEBAB
2902 W. BROADWAY
733-7522
Hours 9:00 a.m. to 12 p.m.
10% DISCOUNT TO ALL
_,STUDENTS & FACULTY-
Students get trial parity
TORONTO (CUP) - Students at Glendon
College have won parity dn faculty committees.
In a 63-50 mail-in vote, students were given
equal representation with faculty members on the
10 subcommittees of the college.
Parity will be instituted on a two-year trial
basis, starting next September.
The next step according to student spokesmen
will be to petition the senate of York University —
under which Glendon is chartered — to grant
students parity on the faculty council itself.
Another Toronto campus also moved closer to
representational parity recently.
Student strength on the academic council of
Ryerson Polytechnical Institute will be increased if
the recommendations of a special committee report
on governance are implemented.
The report recommends an increase of student
representation to 25 seats from the present four.
This would put students on a roughly even footing
with faculty and administration on the council who
would have 27 and 36 members respectively.
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CLASSICAL RECORD SALE
SB 3739—Vaughon   Williams.      "A
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$12.98, 2 LPs. OUR PRICE      So.fS
SDL 3774—Verdi   Don  Corlo.  Domingo  Caballe.  Giulini,   cond.   Sugg.
list  $25.98,  4  LP's.
OUR   PRICE       $13.49
SB 3778—Sibelius   Kullervo   Op.   7.
First   recording,   Bournemouth  Symphony   Orchestra.   Paavo   Bergtund.
Sugg,   list   $12.98.  2  LPs.
OUR   PRICE       S«.98
SCL 3742—Verdi Otello. McCracken,
Jones and Dieskau. New Phil. Orch.
Barbirolli, cond. Sugg, list $19.98,
3 LPs. OUR PRICE       $9.99
SB 3757—Verdi   Requiem.   Caballe',
Cossotto,   Vickers,   Raimondt.   New
Phil.    Orch.   and   Chorus.   Barbiroli,
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SB 3763—Back. The Four Suites for
Orchestra.    Klemperer,    New    Phil.
Orch.   Sugg,  list $12.98, 2 LPs.
OUR PRICE      $6.98
Explanation of Prefix Codes
B—2 LPs C—3 LPs
LPs E—5  LPs
3SM B/L Tosca (La Scala/Callas/Di Ste-
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3337 Ss/L Rigoletto (La Scala/Callas/Di Ste-
fano/Serafin)
3556 B Dinu Lipatti: Last Recital
S 3S59 C/L Rossini: The Barber Of Seville
(Callas/Gobbi/Alva, etc./PhilA/
Galliera
S 3363 D/L Oer Rosenkovalier (Schwarzkopf/
Ludwig/Edelman/PhilA/Karalan)
S 3577 •       Beethoven:  Symphony No.  9;  Ep-
mont  (Loevberg/Nilsson)
5 3599 EL    '■    $'   Bach:   "St.   Matthew   Passion"    (Complete)    (Phil.    Orch./
Klemperer)
S 3604 C/L Pucrini: Madam Butterfly —
(Complete) (Jussi Bjorling/Vic-
toria   de   Los   Angeles/Other)
S 3413 C/L Biiet: Carmen—(Complete) (Nikolai   Gedda/Others)
S 3*1 S C/L Bellini: Norma (Complete) (Franco  Corelli/Others)
S 3622 C/L Gounod: Faust — (Complete)
(Gedda/Christoff/de Los Angeles/
Others)
S 3623 C/L Verdi: la Traviata — (Complete)
(Victoria   de   Los   Angeles.'Others)
SCL 362$ Beethoven: "Fidelio'r (Complete)
(Phil.  Orch./Klemperer)
S 3627 B J. S. 8ach: The Complete Brandenburg' Concerti (The Philharmonic Orchestra/ Klemperer)
S 3649 BL Verdi: Requiem Mass (Ludwig/
Gedda / Schwartzkopf / Philharmonic/Carlo   Maria   Giulini)
S 36S1 C/L Mozort: "The Magic Flute" (Gedda / Schwartzkopf / Ludwig /
Berry/Frick, Others/The Phil. Orchestra/Klemperer)
S CL 370$ Handel: Messiah — R. Tear, R.
Herincx, J. Baker, others, English
Chamber   Orch. — Mackerras
35023 Beethoven:   "Moonlight"/Pathetl-
que"  (Giesekinp)
S3544S   Grieg:   Peer   Gynt   Music   (Royal
Phil / Beechara / w.   Hollweg   and
Chorus)
35461      Music  of  India  (Album  2)  (Various Artists)
S 35505   Rimsky-Korsakov   "Scheherazade"
Symphonic   Suite,   Op.   35,   Royal
Philharmonic Orchestra.  Conducted by Sir Thomas Beecham, 8art.,
C.H.
$ 35607   Offenbach: Galte Parisienne; Rossini:  William Tell; Gounod:  Faust
(The Phil. Orch./Karaian)
5 35614   Tchaikovsky:  Overture   1812, Op.
49   (The   Phil.   Orch./Karojan)
S 35631    Prokofiev:    Peter   &    The   Wolf;
Haydn;    Toy   Symphony   (PhilA/
Von  Karajan)
S 35726   Chopin Waltzes (Malcuzynskl)
S 35728   Chopin: Six Polonaises (Piano solo
by Malcuzynski)
$35740   Tchaikovsky:   "The   Swan   Lake"
—Ballet Suite, Op. 20; Tchaikovsky: "The Sleeping Beauty" Ballet
Suite,  Op.  66  (Phil.  Orch./Karaian)
S35818   Bizet:   Carmen —  Highlights —
Sir    Thomas    Beecham,    Nicolai
Gedda, Victoria de Los Angeles
S 35821    Puccini:    Madame    Butterfly    —
Highlights — Victoria de Los Angeles,  Jussi   Bjorling
135822   Verdi:  La Traviata — Highlights
— Tullio Serafin, Victoria de Los
Angeles
S 35843   Beethoven:   Symphony   Na.
C Minor, Op.  67; Overture,
Stephen" <Phil./Klemperer)
5 35853   Beethoven:   Symphony   No.
F,   Flat   Major,   Op.   55,   "Eroica."
(Phil/Otto Klemperer)
S 33877   "The   Four  Seasons"  (Virtuosi  Ol
Roma   "Collegium   Musicum   Itali-
cum" Cond. by Renato Fasano
S 35881   Mendelssohn:   A   Midsummer
Night's  Dream  Incidental Music
5 35890   Rossini    Overtures    (Phil./Herbert
Von  Karajan)
S 35936
SUGG. LIST      ~"^t~
S 35947
$6.2» Per Record     ^P
A&B PRICE   \
5 35951
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5 35974
,0491
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i    ■
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m.M  per    m
►            S 36031
RECORD
3    ror   $9"
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Mail orders promptly tilled: Just tick
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promptly. First record 35c—each additional record 20c postage and handling  charge.
5 35922 Sibelius: Symphony No. 5 in E
Flat Major, Op. 82 Finlandia,
Symphony Poem, Op. 26 (The
Phil./Karajan)
S 35923 Brahms: Alto Rhapsody, Op. 53;
Wagner: Liebestod From "Tristan
Und Isolde" (Act. 3) Wesendonk
Lieder: (Christa Ludwig/Phil. Orchestra/ Klemperer)
Rossini: The Barber Of Seville —
Highlights (Gobbi/Callos/Others)
A Wagner Program (Phil. Orch./
Otto  Klemperer)
Russian    Orchestral   Masterpieces
(Borodin  Orch);  Rimsky-Korsakov
and  Glazounov   (The   Royal   Phil.
Orch./Georges Pretre)
Faure:   Requiem, Op.   48   (De  Los
Angeles/Fischer Dieskau, etc.)
Debussy:  La Mer  Nocturnes (The
Philharmonia Orchestra Conducted
by Carlo Maria Giulini)
Chopin: Mazurkas (Piano Solo by
Malcuzynski)
Beethoven: Concerto No. 5 in E
Flat Major (Emil Gilels, Piano,
Cleveland Orch. cond. George
Szell)
SFO 36032 Brahms: Double Concerto in A
Minor, Op. 102 (Dovid Oistrakh,
Mstislav Rostropovich, Cleveland
Orch., cond. George Szell)
SFO 36033 Brahms: Violin Concerto In D.
Op. 77 (David Oistrakh, Cleveland
Orch. cond.  by George Szell)
SFO 36038 Berlioz: Romeo and Juliet — the
Orchestral Music (Chicago Symphony Orchestra, Carlo Maria
Giulini Cond.)
8 36044 Schubert: Symphony No. 9 (Great
C-Major) (The Cleveland Orchestra,  George  Szell  Cond.)
$36046 Dvorak: Cello Concert & Silent
Woods (Jacqueline De Pre/Chicago Symphony / Daniel Barenboim Cond.) "
S 36047 Mahler: Symphony No. 1 in D
(Chicago Symphony Orchestra/
Carlo Maria Giulini Cond.)
S36048
$36050
S36121
$3*129
S 3614*
$36153
$3*173
$3618$
$3*191
$$6231
$36247
$36340
$3*341
$3*40$
$3*41$
Symphony No. 7 In A
(Chicago    Symphony    Orchestra/
Carlo Maria Giulini Cond.)
DMi With Tha Spanish Suite.
Laurindo   Almeida/Martin   Ruder-
man/Sallt Terri
Berlioz:   Harold  in  Italy, Op.  16
(Yehudi   Menuhin,  VkXin)
Mozart:  Symphony   No.  38  in   O
Mojor,   K.504   ("Prooue");   Symphony   No.   39  in  E   Flat  Major,
K.543   (Philharmonic  Orch.  Cond.
by Otto Klemperer)
Chopin: Ballads (Malcuzynski)
The  Boroq— Cenccrta  (Oboe,  R.
Zanfini/Flute,  P.  Risplli/The Virtuosi  Di  Roma/Cond.  by  Renato
Fasono)
Handel edited By ■»)*■»: Tha
Water Musk (Bath Festival Orch.
directed by Yehudi Menuhin)
Mozart: Symphony No. 40 in G
Minor, K.550; Symphony No. 41
In C Major, K.551 ("Jupiter")
(Philharmonic Orch. Cond. by
Otto Klemperer)
The   King  Of   Instrument!   (Noel
Rowsthorne    ot    the    Organ    of
Liverpool Cothedrol)
Mozart:   Violin   Concerto   No.   in
B Flot, K.207 Violin Concerto No.
2   in   D   Major,   K.21I    (Yehudi
Menohin/Bath Festival Orch.)
Mozart:    Serenade   for   Thirteen
Winds — London Wind Quintet 8,
Ensemble/Otto Klemperer
Leher.   The  Merry  Widow  Highlights   —   Gedda,    Schwarzkopf,
others.
Schanirti The Trout and Other
Songs — Ftscher-Dieskau, 6.
Moore _
Clear: Pomp and Circumstance
Marches — New PhHhormanw: —
Sir John Barbwatli cond.
OHismorhr Tales of Hoffman
(Highlights) — E. 'Schwarzkopf,
N Gedda, E. Blanc V. de Los
Angeles, others, Orch. de los Society du Conserv. — Cluytens
556 SEYMOUR ST.
PHONE 682-6144
OPEN THURSDAY & FRIDAY TIL 9 P.M. Tuesday, February 29,  1972
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 3
Money squeeze forces VCC course cuts
By BERTON WOODWARD
The Vancouver City College Council passed a
different budget Friday than that proposed by college
principal T. J. Gilligan, following a faculty non-confidence
vote in Gilligan two weeks ago.
Faced with a need for budgetary cutbacks, the
council decided to consolidate courses with few students
in each section, withdraw some low-enrolment
one-section courses and postpone two new programs.
About 15 summer-only instructor positions will also
be eliminated.
But none of the council's cutbacks will affect faculty,
who were enraged by Gilligan's proposals to extend their
teaching periods to 10 months from eight so half of last
year's 60 summer instructor positions could be
eliminated.
Faculty association president David Mitten blasted
Gilligan's proposal as "fiscally feeble and even absurd"
and "educationally farcical". Teachers currently use two
months of the summer term for course preparation and
development, and two for vacation.
Gilligan had argued that possibly one-third of the
faculty would not need their preparation period because
courses are not changed annually.
He also criticized the faculty association for not
proposing any alternative cutbacks after its no-confidence
vote. Langara administration officials made the approved
cuts, he said.
Mitten said Wednesday it is not the faculty
association's responsibility to come up with alternatives to
administration proposals since "that is what they
(administrators) are paid to do."
He said the greatest gain resulting from the
controversy was not the repudiation of Gilligan's proposal
but a new committee the council formed to deal directly
with the faculty association.
"We felt Gilligan does not have the interests in mind
appropriate for our campus," he said.
The association is not interested in getting rid of
Gilligan, he said, but is "perhaps not interested in dealing
with him directly because of the feeling around here."
*;-*s»   ,     t • ••£'
UBYSSEY PHOTOG Gary Gruenke says he plans to take the $2,000 first prize offered
by the socred government in its anti-dope and likker contest. Gruenke claims this shot
shows that some desperate junkies need so much, they have to shoot their smack with
a bicycle pump.
Exposure: a consumer column
By ART SMOLENSKY
More bookstore bargains have been
brought to light by Bruce Winning and
David Mesmer.
1. Emile Zola, Germinal, Penguin
Classics. Two different prices on the same
book $1.65 and $1.25.
2. Thomas Hardy, Tess of the
D'urbervilles, Macmillan. Price in the
English 100 section is $1.25 while English
420 students, being richer, are allowed to
pay $1.50 a copy.
3. Ernest Buckler, The Mountain and
the Valley, New Canadian Library
(McClelland and Stewart) has a publisher's
price of $1.25 stamped on the cover along
with a UBC bookstore price tag of $1.95.
To the credit of some fast thinker in the
bookstore these books were all whipped
off the shelves. I wonder if, in usual UBC
efficiency, they've been put back at the
same price or perhaps higher.
With regard to The Mountain and the
Valley it is interesting to note that
McClelland and Stewart have a new edition
of the book with a different color cover
now being sold at $2.50-that's a 100 per
cent   increase.  The text  of the  book is
virtually unchanged.
*  * *
Consumer lesson of the. week comes
from a hassle currently underway between
engineering student Conrad Winkelman and
the Iberica Garage Ltd., 1510 Commercial
Drive.
It seems Conrad's car ended up on a
service station lot in a state of malfunction
and was fixed without Winkelman signing a
work order.
According to the service station owner,
the work was verbally authorized by a
friend of Winkelman's as long as the job
was not too expensive. Winkelman and his
friend vehemently maintain that
permission of no kind was given.
The upshot of it all was that the car was
fixed and after Winkelman's arrival on the
scene he was presented with a bill for
$10.45. Winkelman refused to pay for
work unauthorized but after some talking
offered to pay $5 for the job (Winkelman
maintains that he would have done it
himself).
The service station owner balked and
then took off with the car saying that he
would keep the car until he was paid. In
addition he slapped Winkelman with a $3 a
day parking fee.
It seems pretty clear from talking to
both sides that Winkelman is legally in the
right. The fact that his friend allegedly told
the night attendant to tell the mechanic to
go ahead if it wasn't too much leaves room
for too many errors in relaying a message.
It seems more like a case of
misinterpretation.
Nonetheless, the public, especially those
without automotive knowledge, are
repeatedly victimized by operators that
take advantage of the right to retain goods
as security for payment and thus scare the
unknowing public into paying for repairs
that are totally uncalled for.
The lesson to be learned here is to sign
only for an estimate and then authorize the
work when you are satisfied with it. Try
and  deal  with your own neighborhood
station since they are probably more
interested in after service. Big places
generally charge bigger prices for the same
job.
* * *
Speaking of cars, problems with used
car dealers tend to be like the weather,
everybody talking but nobody doing
anything about them.
Three UBC law students, Dave Blair,
Larry Goulet, and Marv Hallgren, would
like to start doing something by finding
out just what deceptive practices are being
used on whom.
They have prepared a questionnaire that
can be .completed in about ten minutes for
people who have run into hassles with car
dealers over mechanical, financial
problems, etc.
If you would like to vent your
frustration in some more useful way than
kicking the fenders in blind fury, please
leave your name and phone number at
Used Car Study in the Ubyssey office, SUB
24IK, and the students will be in touch.
Watch for results in a later column. Page 4
THE       UBYSSEY
Tuesday, February 29,  1972
Dollars for degrees
We will begin today's editorial with two
very simple suggestions.
The first is that some UBC students
should learn how to read. That's R-E-A-D.
Read.
The second is that, having learned how
to read, they make an attempt to understand
the intent of what they've read rather than
ascribing  an  intent that does not exist — .
except in their own heads.
In today's letters edition we are charged
with "condoning" Term Papers Unlimited
and with "rationalizing" and "blaming" the
student response to this company on the
educational system.
We are supposedly guilty of all these
things because we have written two stories
and an editorial about this firm.
We have not "condoned" this company.
We have not "rationalized" its existence. We
have not "blamed" the fact that it stands a
good chance of flourishing on anything.
Rather, we have attempted to record
(that's R-E-C-O-R-D) its rip-off prices and
the student and staff response to it, and then
to explain (that's E-X-P-L-A-l-N) why we
think this phenomenon exists.
This is not rationalizing, blaming or
condoning. It is recording and explaining.
What do we think of Term Papers
Unlimited?
We think, first and foremost, that its
prices are an outright rip-off, and for that
reason we agree with people who maintain
we should not run these ads.
We further think that, unlike the
classroom and the exam, the essay is
probably one of the better and more flexible
formats for learning now in existance at this
university.
Students often — not always, but
often — find that they can use the essay to
do research in areas that really interest them,
and  hence to exert some kind of control
over their own education. Thus, Term Papers
Unlimited is destructive because it tends to
undermine one of the few areas of creative
self-education at this university.
However, the advent of Term Papers
Unlimited and companies such as Coles
Notes says something about North
American society and the North American
educational system.
It says that education stresses
competition rather than co-operative
learning; it says that education stresses
degrees rather than learning; it says that
education consists of dehumanized,
conveyer-belt processing of people rather
than learning; it says that students have been
programmed to try to succeed at getting
through the mill rather than learning; it says
that education is a straight dollars-now for
dollars-later deal.
And at the pinnacle of this structure is
the impersonal Big University — precisely
the sort of place where phoney term papers
are most likely to be Big Business
Some students are contemptuous of this
system; others merely try to struggle
through using any dog-eat-dog, time-tested
means at their disposal.
This shouldn't surprise anyone because
this is the precisely the kind of "ethic"
we've been taught. In fact, it's implicit in the
whole competitive school system we've
come through and it's not bad training for
some of the work we'll be engaged in after
graduating.
Even wounded outrage expressed when
we find someone else has "cheated" is part
of the competitive cycle.
Term Papers Unlimited, as one letter
writer correctly points out, is a facet of the
symptom. It is no more the disease than is
the student who uses its services or the
student who stays up all night cramming for
a final exam.
THE V6YSSSY
FEBRUARY 29, 1972
Published Tuesdays, 1 hursdays and Fridays throughout the university year
by the Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C. Editorial opinions are
those of the writer and not of the AMS or the university administration.
Member, Canadian University Press. The Ubyssey publishes Page Friday, a
weekly commentary and review. The Ubyssey's editorial offices are located
in room 241K of the Student Union Building.
Editorial    departments,    228-2301,    228-2307;    Page    Friday,    Sports,
228-2305; advertising. 228-3977.
Editor: Leslie Plommer
It was Mike Sasges Day in The Ubyssey's office as people gathered
from all around to salute the wiry little layout man. Sandi Shreve gave him
a big floppy kiss right on the em ruler while Berton Woodward played with
his type face. Lesley Krueger and Jan O'Brien plaited flowers in his curly
little locks while Vaughn Palmer, Jim Joly, Conrad Winkelman and Art
Smolensky did a few cute little numbers in barbershop quartet style. Paul
Knox passed copy to him but Mike Finlay just passed water. A lovely
photo album to commemorate the historic event was produced by 'Gary
Gruenke and Warren Mayes, while to top it all off with that surrealistic
touch Al Vince and Kent Spencer took on Gord Gibson and Mike Gidora
in a tag team sumo wrestling match while Jim Adams refereed. Roger
Macpherson said today was February 29.
From The Gateway
'The seorch  for beauty in our sterile corridors"
Letters Edition
Apology
We wish to apologize for the
printing of the jokes which
appeared in a recent issue of the
engineering undergrad society
newsletter.
We know now that we deeply
hurt people for whom we have the
highest regard and we will be
much more aware and much more
careful in the future.
The flippant attempt at an
apology which appeared in the
Feb. 23 issue of the Newsletter
was not made on behalf of the
EUS council which, at that time,
was engaged in the wording of a
formal apology, to be included in
the following week's issue.
All future issues will be edited
by the EUS publicity
representative. We hope, in this
way, we can avoid a recurrence of
the present situation.
Once again we are extremely
sorry about his whole matter.
The EUS executive
Resnick
It is rather flattering to observe
that a simple exchange between
prof. Young and myself (Ubyssey,
Feb. 4) has now acquired national
proportions. From the
metropolitan centre of English
Canada, prof. Smiley weighs into
the ring, determined to put a
young radical upstart in his place.
One more round, and I fear
Canadian universities will have to
declare a moratorium on classes to
deal with the grave charges flying
back and forth across The
Ubyssey's pages.
Prof. Smiley, if I read his Feb.
24 letter correctly, seeks to
disassociate his opposition to the
War Measures Act from my own.
Well and good. He is a confirmed
federalist, committed to the
continued subordination of
Quebec to a larger unit called
Canada. I believe in the separate
national characters of Quebec and
English Canada, hence, -in
independence for Quebec (and for
English Canada).
He is a conservative, concerned
above all with the rights of
individuals under bourgeois law,
and with the abuse of civil
liberties that the War Measures
Act entailed. I am a socialist,
suspicious of the equity of the
bourgeois law he defends,
concerned with the rights of
collectivities such as the Quebec
nation or the Quebec working
class in the context of October,
1970. It is natural that our
reasons for opposing the War
Measures Act should differ, even
as our views of what constitutes a
socially desirable order for
Quebec and Canada are
diametrically opposed.
These differences did not
prevent me, however, from
finding prof. Smiley's stance in
Oct., 1970 more praiseworthy
than that of the vast majority of
his colleagues in Canadian
universities. Unlike them, he
chose to speak out against
repressive governmental action.
He does not deserve any medal for
this. As I pointed out in my
exchange with prof. Young, it is
the duty of every one, academic
or not, to use his or her
intelligence critically, a duty
Canadian academics scandalously
neglected during the October
crisis.
Prof. Smiley goes on to imply
that in the social order in which I
believe there would be no place
for critical intelligence or for
dissent. How does he know? Are
we to assume that a socialist
revolution in Canada or Quebec,
advanced capitalist countries,
would take the same course as
revolutions in Russia, China or
Cuba, relatively backward,
peasant-based societies? Does
intellectual controversy or dissent
not flourish in Chile, a country
whose current road to socialism
may hold many lessons for us here
in Canada? For that matter, is
dissent totally lacking in eastern
Europe and the Soviet Union,
despite the heavy-handed
repression most of these regimes
employ? Or turning to China, can
one call the Cultural Revolution
an exercise in monolithic
conformism?
Let me turn the tables,
however, and ask what it is that
prof. Smiley so fears from
revolutionary change? Is it that
masses of people may come to
exercize forms of decision-making
in their daily lives that are
impossible in western capitalist
society? Does he fear that there
may be radical levelling in wealth
and income, so that people like
himself may no longer earn the
$30,000 he now fetches at the U
ofT?
Perhaps what prof. Smiley
most fears is that a critical
intelligence that goes to the root
of things will see through the
repressive quality of that
bourgeois existence and bourgeois
individualism that he so
single-mindedly defends.
Philip Resnick,
Dept. of political science
Women
Should a female come to the
defence of the men's honorary
society, Sigma Tau Chi?
Sandra Smaill, writing in
Thursday's Ubyssey, criticized the
discrimination of Sigma Tau Chi
by noting that when calling for
nominations of individuals who
deserve recognition for their
outstanding contributions to the
university — only males need
apply.
Sandra's lack of understanding
of the role of Sigma Tau Chi is
understandable since she first
arrived on campus in 1969.
In 1964 the counterpart to
Sigma Tau Chi, the women's
honorary society, Delta Sigma Pi,
was active on campus. Delta
Sigma Pi practised the same
discrimination for which Sigma
Tau Chi is criticized —
membership was restricted to one
sex— in this case the female.
Women were invited to nominate
others of their sex who they felt
had contributed to the university
through leadership, service and
scholarship.
This tradition, dating from the
1920s, was passed on to the
"outstanding women of 1965."
But disaster struck the society. All
members of the 1965 group
graduated or otherwise
unexpectedly left the university in
May 1966 (some seeking
employment to keep members of
Sigma Tau Chi at their studies!)
leaving no active members on
campus.
Cast your mind back over the
intervening years - '67, '68, '69,
'70, '71 — these have been years
when the political climate of
campus leaders was not one to
encourage the existence of small
'distinguished' groups set apart
from 'the people'.
In fact, the one vehicle for
recognition of both male and
female contributions to the
campus, the AMS Honorary
Activities Award, was
discontinued in 1967 by the
students' council. While female
students of the late 1960s
appeared unconcerned by the
death of Delta Sigma Pi, the men,
clinging to one of their last
bastions from a bygone age,
continued its counterpart, Sigma
Tau Chi.
Sandra, if you feel students
should be recognized for their
contribution to campus life a
dormant organization, with its
traditions and constitution, is
already in existence — only a
slight rewording of the
constitution  is necessary to end Tuesday, February 29, 1972
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 5
Letters Edition
"sexism". If you feel now is the
time for the phoenix to arise the
opportunity is there.
Ann McAfee,
Grad studies 9,
President Delta Sigma Pi 1964
Arts
Dear whoever organized
Contemporary Arts Week last
year:
What happened this year? We
have just met some very
disconsolate-looking musicians
who, when they offered their
services, were informed that the
dean of arts said there were
insufficient funds. Yet rumor has
it that a $5,000 budget had
already been set aside for the
purpose of having a
Contemporary Arts Week. Is this
only a rumor or does such a
budget exist?
Surely the high calibre of the
music, drama, poetry readings,
etc., which were so well received
last year and in previous years,
warrants repeating. So to anyone
who knows anything about why
Contemporary Arts Week was
cancelled with (as far as we've
been able to discover) no official
reason or statement being made,
please: make public just what is
going on before it is too late to do
something about it.
lisa Cowan,
Joan Cockell,
Arts 4
ft is our understanding that the
money does indeed exist and
should be available. A group of
arts students is currently making
efforts to get some of it for an
arts week.
Standards
To "Fifteen Signatures":
Ladies and gentlemen: Watch
it, your syntax is showing. Also
your splendid "non-sequiters".
You stated in your Feb. 18 letter
to The Ubyssey that the
"distortions expressed in letters
and articles which have appeared
in The Ubyssey are insinuating"
and then leave it at that. Could
you be more specific, perhaps?
You continue: "... since there
are 28 graduate students and 18
members of the teaching staff, it
was necessary to let go the most
recently hired persons." If this
was meant to be a logical defence
of the Slavonic studies
department's hiring and firing
policy, then the 'logic' of it
escapes me.
Further, it is interesting that
we all find it necessary to
withhold our names. Just what
the hell is going on in a
department (or at the university,
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for that matter) when one group
of students ask that their names
be withheld for "obvious reasons"
and another "kindly request" to
remain anonymous so it will not
appear that they "are seeking the
favors of the faculty." Do all
these grad students feel that
examination results and monetary
awards (fellowships, TAs) depend
on faculty approval or reprisal? I
thought the university had other
standards for judging academic
competence.
Last Friday, Robert Kubicek,
head of UBC's Faculty
Association was over in Victoria
defending tenure on the grounds
of "academic freedom" in order
that "free debate on the nature of
university disciplines" can
continue. The Ubyssey has
offered to assist in setting up a
public discussion of the Slavonic
studies situation. If the faculty is
still defending tenure on these
grounds it should welcome such a
discussion of the aims and policies
of our deparment with
undergrads, grads and faculty
taking part. Could we set a date
soon?
Sorry to forsake the academic
gown for the cloak of
anonymity — but that's the way
things are in our department now.
Name withheld,
Slavonic studies
Fraud
Congratulations to Term
Papers Unlimited for "exposing"
the fraud of universities today.
The very demand and success of
such a service indicates the fraud
of "education" today. When
universities are nothing but the
long arm of business why not buy
and sell degrees or the goodies
that go to "earn" degrees.
Besides by the time these
enterprising students graduate,
there will no doubt be services
selling blueprints, factums,
diagnoses and even lecturers for
those who will "teach", thus the
acquired skills of entrepreneurship
will be forever useful in a useless
but utilitarian world.
The only possible problem that
I see is that profs using such
canned notes will be no more
"advanced" than the essays of
clever students. However, fear
not, for status will preserve the
profs, who in any case will not be
reading the essays as readers who
are also researchers for other
canned essays will be doing the
marking. Everything will be
re-cycled and "nothing" will be
wasted for there is "nothing" to
waste — another good utilitarian
arguement.
Fear of the conspiracy of
fraudulent operators forces me to
withhold my name,  although it
See page 6: LETTERS
THEA KOERNER HOUSE
GRADUATE STUDENT
CENTRE ELECTION
for Student Members of the
BOARD OF DIRECTORS
Nominations are invited for three positions on the Board.
Nomination forms are available at the Centre Office.
Nominations close Tuesday, March 14, 1972 at 5:00 p.m.
UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO
SUMMER COURSES
in NICE, FRANCE
In addition to the regular Summer Session, the University of Toronto is
offering Degree Courses in Nice, July 6-August 18. Credit courses in
English, Fine Art, French, History and Political Economy will be given
by professors from the Universities of Toronto and Nice. Classes will be
held   each   weekday   at   the   Faculte   des   Lettres   and   the   Ecole
internationale d'Art de Nice.
Accommodation   will   be   provided   in   university  residences,  private
homes, and pensions.
Cost?  Approximately $750.00  (includes round trip, tuition for one
course, room and board).
Further information:'
TORONTO-NICE SUMMER PROGRAMME
Division of University Extension
119 St. George Street, Toronto 181, Ontario
CHARTER FLIGHTS
STUDENT SPECIAL: DEPT. MAY-RET. SEPT.
VAN. LONDON   $239.00
Return Flights    $225.   UP
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$120 London to Vancouver
We have numerous return and one-way flights each month
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free list of flights.
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GRAD CLASS
GENERAL MEETING
Thursday, March 2,  1972
SUB BALLROOM
12:30-2:30
—vote on class gift,
constitution changes
There's a plan that
can solve more than
just your money
worries.
It's called the
Regular OfficerTraining
Plan (ROTP).
It's a plan that pays
your tuition expenses
while you earn your
degree in Engineering.
Sciences. Or Arts.
It's a plan that solves
your summer employment
problems by paying you
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It's a plan that
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Consider ROTP. Contact your local Canadian
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sfe.
THE CANADIAN ARMED FORCES
ALMA MATER SOCIETY
O.F.Y. PROJECTS
This summer, A.M.S. Opportunities for Youth projects
could include:
— Endowment Lands study
— Recreation centre  in SUB for underprivileged
groups
— Student Credit Union study
— Voters' registration drive
— Cost-benefit study of Food Services
We have suggested programs.
We need people!
if you are interested in working on a program
Call-ADRIAN BELSHAW or TERI BALL
SUB 246 — 228-3092
before Friday, March 3rd
OPPORTUNITIES
FOR YOUTH Page 6
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, February 29, 1972
Letters Edition
From page 5
really ought not to, as who could
be bothered by this light
non-confrontation media criticism
which will only disappear into the
paper re-cycle to become next
week's garbage Ubyssey; which
will also be re-cycled.
Re-cycling of term papers and
garbage isn't all that exciting, but
just think of the possibilities of
re-cycling human beings-
re incarnation? Perhaps we could
re-cycle prostitutes to the Virgin
Islands or people in general back
to the womb! Beware the death
instinct — that does not serve
greater life — not that the death
of universities may not!
The Life Instinct,
Law 2
Way out
I often disagree with The
Ubyssey's editorials and found
Friday's to be no exception.
I really find it hard to believe
how the editorial writer could
have come up with such crap;
blaming the positive student
response to Term Papers
Unlimited on the academics of
this university.
The students interested in this
service are not contemptuous of
the "traditional educational
process". The only thing they are
contemptuous of is the work
required for an education. There
will always be people interested in
finding an easy way out,
regardless of the educational
system, and the fault of their acts
lies only with them.
I agree that the relationship
between faculty and students is
far from perfect on this campus,
but I feel this only serves to
increase the need for honestly
researched and written essays.
A well researched essay brings
the writer in close contact with
the thoughts of other
knowledgeable people, thus
helping to replace the lost
student-prof relationship. A
student using a phantom writing
service would therefore lose even
this opportunity, maintaining his
or her already poor prof
relationship.
Cam Bartram,
Forestry 3
Suggestion
I have a suggestion for the
editorialists of The Ubyssey
(which itself seems to be showing
degenerative changes, perhaps on
account of the dehumanizing
vastness of the Student Union
Building or some such nonsense).
Perhaps they should enlist the
services of Term Papers
Anonymous, or whatever it's
called, to write their editorials.
In areas of logic, syntax and
literary style they could only
benefit, for an outfit that wants
to stay live commercially would
not last long committing verbal
atrocities of the sort perpetrated
by "M.S." in Friday's Ubyssey
editorial.
Dear M.S., it is not the physical
size of a university that
dehumanizes its students and
faculty — it is the accumulation of
little acts of evasion and
cowardice on the part of all of us
in the face of the fact that to
educate and to become educated
is a very hard and complex
business, demanding of each of us
our own attempts, however,
fumbling and inept, to attain the
truth.
Ted Cragg,
Medicine 1.
Comical
I think the articles and
editorial in last week's Ubyssey
which uphold Term Papers
Unlimited are very "comical".
The Ubyssey, whose ideal I
presume is power to the people, is
now condoning a get-rich-quick
scheme. The initiator of Term
Papers Inc. admitted in an
interview with The Canadian
Magazine that he could be a
millionaire in a very few years if
his business survives.
Furthermore, if this "service"
is widely used what is the future
of the poor man's son who can't
afford the $2 to $7 per page
charge?
The company's claim that its
papers are for "research and
reference" use only is obviously
open to question. Why would
"reference" material have to be
Where's your HAIR at?
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2244636 - 9 a.m.-5;30 Mon.-Fri.      SUB Lower Floor -
composed in essay format if it was
not intended to be plagiarized or
submitted directly? Who would
pay $3 per page for actual
background information such as
Coles Notes?
The Ubyssey rationalizes this
"service" as an inevitable outcome
of the "dehumanizing" education
process at our university. Granted,
UBC is not perfect. However,
mass cheating will lead to more
exams and supervision rather than
more individual projects and
freedom.
I feel students will obtain more
control over their lives by
participating in committees and
the senate; calling another
person's work your own only
suggests students are irresponsible.
Randy Frith,
Artsl.
Concern
I echo Graham Dowden's letter
(The Ubyssey, Feb. 24) expressing
concern over the Term Papers
Unlimited advertising that has
appeared in the paper and surprise
over your acceptance of it.
In the Feb. 25 paper, you have
an incredibly detached description
— for The Ubyssey, even more
incredible — of the response to it.
Where's the fire and opinion you
throw into all the other issues?
There are things wrong with
the university, with universities,
the education system in general.
Term Papers Unlimited is only a
symptom of the malaise.
But supposedly we don't wait
for things to destroy themselves if
we have any interest in them — we
do what we can to change them.
Your lack of comment suggests
apathy, or at the most, a morbid
curiosity to see how this will
make a bad situation deteriorate.
Anyone at all interested in
education should find the services
of TPU despicable. Those who
welcome TPU shouldn't waste
their time and the public's money
filling up classes they have no
desire to be in.
Virginia Careless,
Anthrosoc grad studies.
The Ubyssey welcomes letters
from all readers.
Letters should be signed and, if
possible, typed.
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SPECIAL EVENTS Tuesday, February 29, 1972
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 7
'EUS lacks relevancy'
By CONRAD WINKELMAN
The victorious candidate in Friday's engineering
undergrad society presidential election says the low
turnout is not indicative of lagging enthusiasm
among engineers.
Harold Cunliffe defeated Doug Franklin
215-156 in the election. There were 40 spoiled
ballots and the turnout was about 40 per cent.
"I don't believe that the low turnout was an
indication of lack of enthusiasm, because taking a
mean of the vote turnout over the last few years this
year's turnout falls in the same category," Cunliffe
said after his election.
(The EUS has recently been severely criticized
by engineering students and others for its lack of
relevant programs.)
"The first time in history that I remember that
voters were urged to spoil their ballots," Cunliffe
went on, "the result was 40 spoils. The highest
spoilage rate was in the electrical and chemical
buildings.
"This tends to support my belief that we have
to do something about regrouping the faculty."
In his swan song, Franklin said: "I hope that all
the people who voted for me will support Harold as
I will because now that I have finished crying and
have accepted the agony of defeat I'm raring to go
on next year."
Student reaction to the victory of Cunliffe was
not enthusiastic.
Some said the election offered no alternatives
to the present EUS course and that the society's
newsletter represents the "EUS mentality" and not
the majority of the faculty.
"The low turnout indicates the level of apathy
of the engineering students and the fact that the
EUS has lost its relevancy," said Kim Stephens, civil
eng 3, when asked about the organization's future.
Stephens also commented that three years ago
students could identify with EUS executives
because they hold regular Thursday meetings.
"Now meetings are very rare," he said.
Philosophy meetings open
By SANDI SHREVE
The philosophy department
has decided to open parts of its
previously-closed departmental
meetings to its graduate student:?.
The graduate students will be
allowed to participate in the
sections of the meetings which are
non-confidential, department
head Peter Remnant told The
Ubyssey Monday.
"Grad students will not be
permitted to participate in any
decisions dealing with evaluation
of particular students or faculty
regarding appointments and
tenure.
"We made the decision at the
Wednesday, Feb. 16 department
meeting because some of the
graduate students had expressed
interest in attending meetings," he
said.
'The  graduate  students have
only a voice, not a vote, in
decisions."
He said the only opposition to
this move came from department
members who favored
continuation of periodical joint
graduate student-faculty meetings
which had previously been the
department's policy.
He said there had been no
discussion concerning allowing
undergraduates to attend
departmental meetings.
Graduate students began
expressing their interest early in
January. Since then the
department has met with them
and held private meetings of its
own to decide on the matter.
One meeting has been held
since the department ruled
graduate students could attend
and "it went very well," said
Remnant.
Remnant said he didn't think
Mass left group
planned in U.S.
STONY BROOK, N.Y. (CUPI)- The formation of a
mass-based, radical left organization in the United States will be
attempted at a conference to be held here beginning Friday.
Invitations to the three-day meeting to be held on the campus
of the State University of New York have been issued by the
sponsoring Red Balloon Collective to young people from political
groups, service organizations such as day care centres and community
switchboards, women's groups, gay groups and media projects all over
the U.S.
The Red Balloon Collective — a political organization in New
York including in its membership former members of the Students for
a Democratic Society — has published 150,000 copies of a newspaper
which is being circulated across the country and includes position
papers to be discussed at the conference.
Plans to have the newspaper distributed in Southern Ontario
and Montreal by the University of Guelph student paper, The
Ontarion, were thwarted at the Canadian customs office at Buffalo,
N.Y. when officials refused entry of the paper into Canada pending
scrutinization and clearance of the paper's contents. Such a decision
will take about three weeks. An attempt to bring the newspaper into
Canada as scrap material was also turned back by border officials.
In the paper the collective gives the purpose of the conference
by saying: "We see it as important to have a mass-based youth
organization that will try to defeat racism, sexism, repression and
wage-exploitation and to actively start to build a new, human and
lasting culture."
The group goes on to say: "It is our sincere belief that the
struggle against all the policies and mechanisms and institutions of
that powerful class which profits from the status quo can be carried
out on many levels. We reject that notion that there are irresolvable
differences between those who participate in non-violent raids on
draft boards and those who organize in factories, between those
involved in sabotage and those who create food co-ops or daycare
centres for those are some of the fronts upon which we must organize
against the enemy."
Members of the Red Balloon Collective, in an interview with The
Ontarion, expressed interest in having Canadians conduct a workshop
at the conference to explain the effects of U.S. imperialism on Canada
and the state of the Canadian political movement.
the department had been
alienated from the students before
allowing them to attend their
meetings.
"We always had regular joint
meetings with them to discuss
things they wanted."
He said the entire PhD program
was altered as a result of these
meetings.
"About four years ago the
graduate students introduced a
new procedure for the PhD
program where the set list of
requirements was thrown out and
a committee to decide invididual
student programs was organized."
ATTENTION
HIKERS - CLIMBERS
CAMPERS
PRE-SEASON
WAREHOUSE
SALE
LARGEST EVER HELD
STARTING
MARCH 1st, 1972     *
1601 WEST 5th AVE. 1
VANCOUVER 9 B.C.
AVE.
ALSO
END OF SEASON    SKI   EQUIPMENT SALE
intellectual adventures
at the university
of british Columbia
Daring the month of March, four eminent scientists and humanists, including two Nobel Prize winners,
will give a total of ten public lectures at the University of British Columbia. The lectures will cover a
wide variety of topics, including science in the People's Republic of China, human psychology, man's
search for understanding of the sub-atomic world and the universe and the current concern for the
preservation of an environment conducive to human development. Admission to all lectures is free and
the public is invited to attend. The lectures have been made possible by a gift from Dr. Cecil Green, a
former UBC student, and his wife, Ida, and a fund established by friends of the late Dr. A.E. 'Dal'
Grauer, a UBC graduate and former Chancellor of the University of B.C. Brief descriptions of the
lectures and tl■■■* locations where they will be given appear below.
Cecil H. and Ida Green
Visiting Professorships
Canada's 1971 Nobel Prize
DR. GERHARD HERZBERG,.
winner for chemistry and a research scientist at the National Research Council, Ottawa.
WEDNESDAY, MARCH   1   —   "The Spectra of  Hydrogen." A   non-specialist  lecture for a general
audience. 12:30 p.m., Hebb Lecture Theatre, East Mall, UBC.
THURSDAY, MARCH 2 - "Spectroscopic Studies of Molecular Structure." Substantially the material
presented at the Nobel Lecture in Stockholm in December, 197K 12:30 p.m., Hebb Lecture Theatre.
FRIDAY, MARCH 3 — "Experimental Verification of the Theory of the Hydrogen Molecule." A
specialized le:ture for physicists and chemists. 2:30 p.m., Room 250, Chemistry Building, Main Mall,
UBC.
DR.      DOMALD     O.      HEBB, one     of     Canada's    best-known
experimental psychologists and Chancellor of McGill University, Montreal.
THURSDAY, MARCH   16 - "The Nature of a University Education." 12:30 p.m., Hebb Lecture
Theatre.
FRIDAY, MARCH 17 - 'The Mind of Man." 8:15 p.m.. Lounge, Totem Park Residences, UBC.
.•     J.      I U£U     W lL«> wSM / one    of    the    world's    leading
geophysicists, University of Toronto.
MONDAY, MAUCH 20 - "A Scientist in China." Dr. Wilson spent a month in China in the fall of
1971 and will contrast his experiences at that time with an earlier visit. 8:15 p.m., Lounge, Totem
Park Residences.
WEDNESDAY,   MARCH   22   -   "The   Mechanics  of   Plate  Tectonics."   A   specialized   lecture   for
geophysicists and geologists. 3:30 p.m.. Room 260, Geophysics Building, Main Mall, UBC.
THURSDAY, MARCH  23 — "Earthquakes and Earth Sciences in China." A lecture for a general
audience. 12:30 p.m., Hebb Lecture Theatre.
Dal Grauer Memorial Lectures
DR.      bkUR(j£      W ALP/   Professor of Biology, Harvard University,
and winner of the Nobel Prize for Physiology, 1967. Prof. Wald is perhaps most widely known for a
1969 speech at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in which he attacked U.S. militarism and
analysed the disaffection of young people.
TUESDAY, MARCH 28 - "Therefore Choose Life." 8:15 p.m., Lounge, Totem Park Residences,
UBC.
WEDNESDAY, MARCH 29 - "The Origin of Death." 12:30 p.m.. Old Auditorium, UBC. Page 8
THE      UBYSSEY
No camping in tent city
Tuesday, February 29, 1972
TORONTO (CUP) - In a
compromise with university
officials, the Students'
Administrative Council at the
University of Toronto has agreed.
that the Wacheea tent
community, to be set up this
summer, will not be used for
overnight accommodation.
Instead of allowing transients
to camp out on the SAC lawn as
was done last year, this year's
administration-sanctioned plan
calls for a university residence to
be the community's hostel. If
there should be an overflow at the
hostel, negotiations for the tent
community accommodations
would be re-opened.
A proposal passed at a meeting
of the university board of
governors Thursday also
recommended Wacheea be set up
to provide educational, cultural
and information programs for
transients as well as the
community at large.
SAC is again seeking a grant for
Wacheea from the federal
Opportunities for Youth program
CAMPING TRIPS
RUSSIA 5 wk. $265
EUROPE 6 wk. $359
INDIA 9wk. $310
And many others — Special
Itineraries for as few as 14 people.
EXPERIENCED TRANSIT TRAVEL
Information Meeting
Friday — 12:30 - Buchanan 3223
ROSALYN DEERING — 922-0644
DISCOVER
EUROPE
OIM A BIKE
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GROUP INCLUSIVt I0UH PACKACfcS
OVER  ISMAKtSOl   TAXFRfcEMOTOR
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EUROBIKE
EUROB
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Wjihm9i0n.il C ?00OG  (202)347-0766
THINK
ABOUT
IT..
—Fewer parts to stock
—Specializing   in   repairing
fewer makes of cars.
— all    necessary    repair
equipment   right   on
premises
—all   adds  up to  saving  you
money  on  repairing and
servicing   your   VW,
Mercedes, Volvo, Porsche
or B.M.W.
fully   guaranteed   and
reasonable rates at. . .
but, hoping to prevent the
conflict that arose over last
summer's Wacheea, it has waited
for the university's official
support for the project before
submitting its brief to the
government
Last summer SAC and the
Graduate Students' Union invited
Grassroots, a coalition group of
14 community groups, to set up
their tent city on the
student-controlled property
behind the SAC offices. The
unversity administration
eventually called city police onto
campus to  evict tenters because
been taken without official
approval.
But Grassroots member,
Jennifer Penney, a key organizer
of last summer's Wacheea, spoke
doubtfully about the new plans.
"Since there won't be a
community living at Wacheea,
there will be no collective
decision-making," she said.
"In terms of the ideals we set
up last year, for Wacheea,
community involvement is a top
priority. Since there won't be an
organized community in this
year's project, I see it as becoming
a massive failure. People won't use
the SAC-Grad Union action had    the facilities."
$20,000 to be allocated
if grad quorum shows
This year's grad class meeting will allocate $20,000 among 13
applications from groups around the campus, but only if a quorum of
330 students attends.
Grad class president Mike Tratch stressed the need for a quorum
in the upcoming meeting.
"If there are insufficient persons attending to reach a quorum,"
he said, "we'll have to pass the money on the next year's council."
Some of the groups that have applied are: UBC day care
committee $3,500, the Mental Patients' Association $2,500, Urban
Vehicle $6,000, Speak-Easy $2,600, Canadian Woman $3,000,
Sedgewick Library $7,720, and Crane Library $4,600.
It will be held Thursday, at noon in the SUB ballroom.
COME IN TODAY!
SNOWED IN
ON
YOUR
INCOME TAX
No need to get lost in all
the details of tax preparation. BLOCK will quickly
prepare your return and
guarantee its accuracy.
Make tracks to H & R
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to place your confidence.
COMPLETE
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WEEKDAYS-9 A.M.-9 P.M.     Sat. 9 A.M.-5 P.M.
NO APPOINTMENT-NECESSARY I
327-0461
March 8
is the last day to mail applications to:
Opportunities for Youth
for more information telephone
your local OFY representative at:
688-7791 (Area code 604)
or contact the nearest Canada Manpower Centre or
regional office of the Department of the Secretary of State.
OPPORTUNITIES FOR YOUTH
A SUMMER 72 PROGRAM
i*
Government
of Canada Tuesday, February 29, 1972
THE      UBYSSEY
^.VscSo?
S V&^-wSfcX s \V\ i
Hot flashes
Historian
On Israel
Historian and geographer
Norman Carter will speak to
students Tuesday noon in the
SUB party room about a proposed
10-day visit to Israel.
Carter's talk is sponsored by
Western Student Services which is
organizing the trip's charter flight
from London, England to Tel
Aviv.
WSS also offers charters from
Vancouver to London.
Herzberg here
The title sounds ominous, but
Dr. Gerhard Herzberg assures the
world that his lecture in Hebb
Theatre at noon Wednesday is
intended for a non-specialist
audience.
Herzberg, Canada's only Nobel
Prize-winning scientist, will
lecture on The Spectra of
Hydrogen. His is one of the first
Cecil and Ida Green Visiting
Professors to speak at UBC.
Action
The women's action group will
be reading its brief on part-time
faculty at noon Wednesday.
"We would like to read it to all
part-time academic staff before it
is presented," said group member
Shelagh  Day.
The group is urging all women
faculty members to attend the
reading in Arts one building blue
room.
"The brief is about tenure and
really only deals with academic
staff," Day said.
"We are recommending tenure
for part-time faculty."
The brief will be presented to
the select standing committee on
welfare and education at the
provincial legislature Thursday.
Anti-union?
People willing to represent the
anti-trade union position are
needed for a staff debate on the
current organizing drive on
campus.
The debate, To Join or Not To
Join, will be held during women's
week March 8 at 5:15 p.m. in the
SUB ballroom.
Organizers have been able to
locate anti-union staff but are
having difficulty in locating
anti-union people. Interested
people should phone 681-4640,
224-0431 or 2082 on campus.
RCSW critique
Jackie Larkin, a researcher with
the Status of Women Commission,
will present a critique of the
Royal Commission on the Status
of Women, at 7 p.m. today in
the SUB ballroom as part of the
women's studies program.
Also speaking will be
Rosemary Brown of the Status of
Women Action Committee.
Scoff-iM eissner
Laborer Jack Scott and
industrial sociologist Martin
Meissner will discuss Social
Science and the Working Class at
Tween classes
TODAY
WSS
Norman Carter on Israel, noon, SUB
party room.
EXPERIMENTAL COLLEGE
Dr. Kasslson Islam, noon, SUB 111.
PHOTOSOC
Nominations     for     new     executive
close March 7.
YOUNG SOCIALISTS
Meeting, noon, SUB 210.
PRE-DENTAL SOCIETY
Dr.   Lear   on   root   canal  therapy,
noon, SUB 215.
CUSO
Information     about    work    in    45
countries, 7:30 p.m., IH 402.
NEWMAN CLUB
Bernice Gerard on marriage,  noon,
SUB 213.
HILLEL SOCIETY
Purim party, noon, Hillel House.
WEDNESDAY
FENCING CLUB
Final pre-tournament practice, 8:
p.m„, new gym.
ONTOLOGY
Life in the wilderness, noon, Buch.
216.
FREESEE
Civilization, noon, SUB auditorium.
HILLEL SOCIETY
Rabbi Hier on the laws of marriage,
noon, Hillel House.
SPECIAL EVENTS
Victor   Coleman,    noon,    SUB   art
gallery.
VOC
General  meeting,  noon, Angus 104.
ITALIAN CLUB
Meeting, noon, house.
CAMPUS MINISTRIES
Bernice Gerard  on the occult  and
the  Bible,   noon,  Lutheran Campus
Centre.
GERMAN CLUB
Important  meeting,   noon,  IH 402.
THURSDAY
STUDENT LIBERALS
General meeting, noon, SUB 213.
ALPHA-OMEGA CLUB
Author   John    Kolasky   on   Soviet
repression, noon, SUB 105B.
WARGAMERS
Meeting, noon, SUB 119.
VCF
Sexuality,  noon, SUB clubs lounge.
HILLEL SOCIETY
Rabbi Hier on the laws of marriage,
noon, Hillel House.
SIERRA CLUB
West     coast     trail     film,      noon,
MacMillan 166.
CCF
Practical Christian  problems,  noon,
SUB 211.
SKYDIVERS
General meeting, noon, SUB 205.
BICYCLE CLUB
Protest logistics, noon, SUB 224,
FRIDAY
WEST COAST TRAIL
For those who want to hike their
asses off along the trail, a meeting is
being held in the Ubyssey office, at
noon, after the film in SUB
auditorium.
SATURDAY
HILLEL SOCIETY
Movie night, 8:30 p.m., Hillel
House.
r-FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE	
THE
DUCHESS OF MALFI
by John Webster
MARCH 10-20—8:00 p.m.
Direted by JOHN BROCKINGTON
Setting & Lighting Designed by RICHARD KENT WILCOX
Costumes Designed by KURT WILHELM
SPECIAL STUDENT PERFORMANCE-Thursday, March 16-12:30 Noon
Student Ticket Price: $1.00
BOX OFFICE   •   FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE  •   ROOM 207
————————————————— Support Your Campus Theatre-
Page 9
an open forum today at noon in
Angus 110.
The forum is sponsored jointly
by the Alma Mater Society
education committee and the
Union of Radical Social Scientists.
Third crossing
A panel discussion with West
Vancouver mayor Art Langley,
Vancouver alderman Walter
Hardwick, Frank Leighton of
Swan-Wooster and planner
Norman Pearson, speaking on the
third crossing will be held at 8
p.m. today in Lord Byng
secondary school auditorium.
Sixteenth and Crown.
Trot folk
Richard Thompson, formerly
associated with the now defunct
Canadian Union of Students, will
speak at 2:30 p.m. Wednesday in
the SUB clubs lounge.
Thompson's topics will be
"The Crisis in Education" and
"The Strategy for the Student
Movement."
Thompson is the current editor
of the Young Socialist newspaper.
OFY debate
"Opportunities for Youth -
Fact or Fiction" is the topic of
March's Citizens' Forum.
Alderman Harry Rankin of
Vancouver and Hugh Faulkner,
parliamentary secretary to state
secretary Gerard Pelletier, will
speak at 8 p.m. Wednesday, in
the third floor auditorium of the
Vancouver Public Library,
Burrard at Robson.
PROBATION
OFFICER
has a tough, challenging but rewarding career. He works
with the courts, with the offender and with the community
to help solve one of society's major social problems —
crime.
If you think you could measure up for training with the
B.C. CORRECTIONS SERVICE
see your Student Placement Office
on campus for more details.
CLASSIFIED
Rates: Campos — 3 lines,  1   day $1.00; 3 days $2.50
Commercial  — 3  lines,   1   day $1.25;  additional
fines 30c; 4 days price of 3.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone and are payable
in advance. Deadline ia 11:30 a.m., tha day before publication.
Publications Office, Room 241 S.U.B., UBC, Van. 8, B.C.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Duces
11
OLD FORT CAMPERS HOME-
coming Dance and Party, March
4th. For information phone 224-
7383.
Lost 8c Found
13
FOUND — ONE WRIST WATCH
(men's at U.B.C. Stadium,
claim at admin, office War Memorial  Gym.
Special Notices
15
 SKI WHISTLER!	
Rent furnished condominium opposite Gondola,  224-0657 eves.
GESTALT, SENSORY AWARE.
ness — 1 jday introductory workshop — Individual — Groups.
Psychologist. One year Esalen.
929-3662   mornings.
LOOK    HERE
3 FOR S1.00
Why pay this much for your
prophylactics? We will mail you
24 Assorted Prophylactics for
only $2.00, by return mail in
plain sealed envelope. Enclose
this ad for additional bonus of
3  prophylactics.  •
POSTTRADING
BOX   4002       VANCOUVER,   B.C
OLD FORT CAMPERS HOME-
comingr dance and party March
4th. For information phone 224-
7383.
Travel Opportunities 16
FLY TO EUROPE FROM $170 00
round trip, student vacations end
tours, employment services etc.
Air mail for full details. Campus
Agents also required A.A.S.A
Limited, 15 High St., Ventnor
I.W.,  England.	
CAMPING TRIPS RUSSIA
Europe, India. Information meeting Friday 12:30. Bu. 3223. Rosa-
lyn   Peering  922-0644.	
TRAVEL TO ISRAEL? SLIDES,
and talk. Tuesday Feb. 29 at 12:30
SUB   Party  Room.	
TRAVELLING OVERSEAS ON A
budget? Then visit your youth
hostels information desk which is
open every Wednesday from 12:30
-1:30 p.m. opposite the concession
stand in the Student Union Building. Canadian Youth Hostels Association, 1406 West Broadway.
Vancouver 9, B.C.  Phone 738-3128.
Wanted—Information
17
ANYONE WITNESSING BREAK
and entry into blue 1968 Datsun
Saturday evening between 7:45-
9:30 at tennis courts behind War
Memorial Gym. Please phone Jack
at 731-9382. Many personal belongings and my car were stolen.
Wanted—Miscellaneous
18
SCUBA     PARTNER     WANTED
Call Terry 731-4589.
AUTOMOTIVE
Autos For Sal*
21
MECHANIC CHALLENGE '59
Vauxhall standard Running good
for parts. $89.00. 733-2063.	
'64 TR. SPITFIRE NEW BRAKES
transmission, differential. Best
offer.   Phone 229-4470.  Samir.
BUSINESS SERVICES
Scandals
n
RECORDS, WE HAVE THE LAT-
est releases in rock, folk, and
blues only. Trade-ins accepted.
We also have leathercrafts. Drop
in and listen to the music or play
a. game of scrabble. Joy Music
Sanctum, 6610 Main (at 50th) 11
a.m.-7 p.m.
Typing
40
EXPERIENCED TYPIST- Manu -
scripts, essays, etc. at 25tf per
page. Please supply own paper.
BEV  HARCUS   266-9837.
Typing—Cont.
40
EXPERIENCED TYPIST WILL
type essays and theses quickly
and accurately. Donna Peaker
266-4264   Kerrisdale.	
YR. ROUND ACC. TYPING FROM
legible drafts. Phone 738-6829 from
10:00 a.m. to 9:00 p.m. Quick ser-
vice on  short essays.	
EXPERT IBM SELECTRIC TYP-
ist. Beautiful work, Mrs. Ellis
321-3838.	
TEDIOUS TASKS — PROFES-
sional Typing IBM Selectric —
Days, Evenings, Weekends. Phone
Shari at 738-8745 — Reasonable
rates.	
EXPERIENCED TYPIST-ESSAYS
& theses. Mrs Anne Treacy 228-
8667.
ESSAY TYPING ....
19th and Dunbar
733-5922     ...  ....
EFFICIENT, ELECTRIC TYPING
my home. Essays, thesis, etc.
Neat, accurate work. Reasonable
rates.   Phone  263-5317.
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted
•1
STUDENTS THIRD YEAR TO
grads interested in work overseas
for two years. Meet Tuesday
Feb. 29 7:30 p.m. at Internation-
al   House,   Room   402.	
S TiU DENTS TO ORGANIZE
Youth Opp. Project. Study B.C.
interior. Air transp. provided. 274-
1814.	
SUMMER HELP ON INTERIOR
Ranch. Moving irrigation pipe
half day. Pleasure riding, swimming, hiking. Bachelor housing
supplied. Low wages,, mosquitoes
free. Four bodies required. Bonaparte Ranch, Box 217, Cache
Creek.
INSTRUCTION * SCHOOLS
Special Classes
62
POT AT POTTER'S CENTRE! 12
week Spring session starts April
3 register early. Limited enrollment.   G.   Alfred   261-4764.
Tutors—Wanted
84
POSSIBLE SUMMER PROJECT
for tutors. Please state subjects
and levels you could cover. P.O.
Box   2781,  Vancouver  3.
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
FULLSIZE ELECTROHOME AM/
FM stereo — attractive Deilcraft
cabinet — excellent condition —
$200.   Phone  266-0129.
NEW WORLD SITE, 160 ACRE
Chilcotin Ranch, Meadowa River,
trout pond, timbered land, groves,
new cabins, reasonable for par-
ticulars   576-2775.	
EXPERIENCES FOR SALE
Slides on recent trip to Israel
by Norman Carter. Party Room
Tuesday  at  12:30.
RENTALS fc REAL ESTATE
Room 8c Board
■I
IT'S NEW — STAY AT THE
D.K.E. House. Large spacious
rooms, semi-private washrooms,
full laundry facilities, color TV,
excellent food. 5765 Agronomy
Road.   224-9691.
Furnished Apts.
83
PRIVATE SEMI-FURNISHED
suite for one non smoker available now. 263-8441. Near univ.
Quiet, washer/dryer, separate
entrance.
Houses—Furn. fc Unfurn.
86
ONE PERSON TO FILL A HOUSE.
Close to campus, furnished, own
bedrm., $50 mo. 3928 W. 10th 224-
7035. Page  10
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, February 29,  1972
NEW
RECORDS
We have the latest releases in
rock, folk, and blues records.
New and used records;
trade-ins accepted.
New Stuff: Boz Scaggs (and
Band), Shawn Phillips (Collaboration), Herbie Mann (Push-
Push), Roberta Flack (Quiet
Fire), Hookfoot (lead guitar:
Caleb Quaye). The Who (Who's
Next), Santana (3d), and Cat
Stevens (Teaser) are still at dirt
cheap prices.
JOY MUSIC
SANCTUM
6610 Main St. (atsoth)
11 a.m.-7 p.m.
UBC skiers place well
everywhere they race
Despite having seven of its
members away at Lake Placid,
N.Y. representing Canada at the
World Student Games, the UBC
ski team were very successful on
the weekend.
Competing against many
Washington State colleges and
universities in a Northwest
Collegiate Ski Conference meet at
Snoqualmie Summit, the team
captured one first, one second,
and two thirds.
John Kindrel captured first
place out of 55 entrants in the
giant slalom. Guy Woods finished
seventh in the event and finished
third in the cross country. Dave
Williams was 13th and Bill
Mcintosh 18th in the giant slalom.
In the women's races, Kathy
Snowball finished second in the
giant slalom and Lee Ellis was
third in cross-country. The
women's team was missing five
competitors to the World Student
Games.
The slalom events were
cancelled due to heavy rains and
high winds on Sunday.
The team travels to Crystal
Mountain, Wash, this weekend for
the NWCSC championships.
In World Student Games
skiing, Lida Richardson of UBC
startled the skiing world Monday
by winning the gold medal in the
women's downhill against stiff
competition from French and
Austrian athletes.
CANADIAN COLLEGIATE
BASKETBALL
CHAMPIONSHIP
Thursday, March 2
7 p.m. -   McGill University "Redmen"
vs Acadia University "Axemen"
9 p.m. -   U.B.C. "Thunderbirds" vs
Windsor University "Lancers'
Fri. Mar. 3 — 8 p.m. — Consolation Game
Sat. Mar. 4—11 a.m. — Championship Game
UBC War Memorial Gymnasium
Gen. Admission '1" Students s1"
FOR PREFERRED RISKS ONLY
It Pays to Shop for Car Insurance
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MAIL THIS COUPON FOR OUR LOW RATES ON YOUR AUTOMOBILE
Name	
Residence
Address	
(Please Print)
City.       Prov..
Phone: Home Office	
Occupation    	
Age     Married □ Divorced Q     Male □
Separated n Never Married Q Female □
Date first licensed to drive	
Have you or any member of your household been involved
in any accident in the past five years?
Yes n No n (" "yes" provide details on a separate sheet).
In the last five years has your
license been suspended?  -
Are you now insured? .
Date current policy expires     	
This coupon  is  designed  solely to enable non-policy
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Car No. 1
Car No. 2
No. of cylinders
Horsepower...
Model (Impala,
2/4 dr-sedan, s
Days per week
work, train or b
or fringe parkin
Dart, etc.
/w, h/t, c
driven to
us depot,
 Da)
IS
s.
1
 Days
 Miles
Yes □ No □
 MilC
Is car used in business
(except to and from wor
k)?
Yes n No [
Give number and dates
of traffic convictions
in last 5 years.
LIST INFORMATION ON ALL ADDITIONAL DRIVERS
Age
Male or
Female
Relation
To You
Years
Licensed
Married
or Single
% of Use
Car#1
Car #2
%
%
%
%
%
%
FPR UBC 43
Sub-committee on athletics
presents proposals to MAC
By KENT SPENCER
Recreational, intramural, and
intercollegiate athletics at UBC
should be set up under one
'super-board', says a special
sub-committee to Walter Gage.
The preliminary report
recommends that there should be
"a body to integrate and
coordinate intramural,
extramural, and recreational
activities, and to oversee
allocation of the resources
available."
At present, men's athletics is
run through the Men's Athletic
Committee, and women's athletics
run through the WAC. Recreation
and intramurals are administered
through the physical education
department.
The committee wants to set up
an autonomous department
encompassing all campus
recreation, instead of the present
set-up where Athletics are run
partly through the PE department
and partly through the MAC and
the WAC.
Under the plan, a senior
chairman (equal to
department head) would be
responsible for coordination of
the entire effort, although men
and women would be subdivided
into committees to handle most
of the details. The overall
governing board would set the
athletic policy of the university.
Committee chairman Byron
Hender stressed ,the recreational
aspect of the program. He said
there was very little provision for
the casual athlete on campus.
Under the program, the present
gym space would be allocated
with a view to the whole area.
"The top group would simply
govern the overall direction of the
programs," Hender said. "Most of
the detail could be left to
committees."
The sub-committee is
composed of four students, one
graduate of the university and
three professors. They have been
meeting every week since
September, in hoping to improve
the present system.
Nancy Wells, women's athletic
director, said the committee's
proposals had been "officially
sanctioned in principle" by the
WAC.
"Ordinary kids on campus get
the rough end of it as far as
recreational athletics go," she
said. "... there are many
advantages that we (men and
women) could have in working
together."
Hender says the program will
not seek to change the present
system of funding. In it, women
receive 80 cents of the $5 athletic
fee, and men $4.20. However in
the future, a more equitable
distribution might be sought if
there was an increase in athletic
revenue.
The committee meets
Thursday with the MAC.
Intramurals
BRIDGE entry deadline is
today. Only two teams can be
entered from each team unit. The
bridge night will be held March 5,
from 6-11 p.m. in Gym A.
CYCLE DRAG cross-country
deadline is today, with the race
being held on March S at 1 p.m.,
the circuit being around the
campus.
ORIENTEERING deadline is
today for this exciting new
co-recreational event. Only two
couples are allowed per team with
an unlimited number of entries
per unit. For those teams not
formed yet, men's and women's
intramurals will put together
teams from lone entrants. Check
with the off ices on this.
The race takes place Thursday
at noon. A competitors meeting
will be held Wednesday at noon in
room 211 of Memorial Gym.
Athletic aid available
OTTAWA - The Department of National Health and Welfare this
year is again offering a series of grants-in-aid to student athletes who
wish to pursue both educational and competitive careers. The $1
million program, announced today by Health and Welfare Minister John
Munro,   is part  of the federal government's summer program.
Munro said the grants, which range up to $2,000 in value, will
assist students whose training and competitive schedules during the
summer months do not allow them to seek employment and raise funds
for educational purposes. Through last year's program, more than 800
athletes were able to benefit from the government's assistance.
All Canadian student athletes are eligible to apply. Those who
received non-renewable grants in 1970 or 1971 are invited to apply for
a 1972-73 award. The deadline for receipt of completed applications is
March 22, 1972.
Forms and information sheets are available from the B.C. Sports
Federation, 1200 W. Broadway, Vancouver. Students may also write to
Sport Canada, Department of National Health and Welfare, Ottawa,
Ont., K1A OK9
Following March 22, national sports governing bodies will rate
the applicants in their respective sports. A national selection committee
chaired by Dr. Robert Hindmarch, University of British Columbia, and
Pierre Charbonneau, co-ordinator of the Olympic Games, Montreal, will
review the applications and recommend the names of recipients.
The list of successful applicants may be available early in May.
Recipients will be expected to attend Canadian educational
institutions except in special circumstances. All must be Canadian
citizens or have made official application for Canadian citizenship.
Those receiving grants must continue training and competition in
their respective sport and verify that such a grant does not jeopardize
their amateur status. Sports governing bodies will give guidance on this
matter. Tuesday, February 29, 1972
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 11
'Birds win WCIAA championship
Huskies remember nothing
UBC's rugby 'Birds are
establishing a for-against points
record this year. Playing the
University of Washington
Saturday, Donn Spence's team
piled up 65 points and blanked
the Huskies.
In a wide open game, winger
John Mitchell had two tries
within 10 minutes of the opening
whistle.
The third try of the half came
at the 30 minute mark after a
series of fakes by Eric Lillie and
passes to Warrick Harivel and
Leigh Hillier. Ray Banks
converted two tries and added
three penalty goals for a 25-0
half-time score.
UBC's game was a continuous
flow of scrum and back rushes.
The Canadians controlled every
facet of the game getting 70 per
cent of the lineouts, 60 per cent
of the sets and completely
dominating the loose.
The 'Birds scored seven tries in
the     second    half    as    their
conditioning and ball-handling
controlled the play.
Chris Hinkson scored first,
chasing a cross kick from the
backs for the try.
Ten minutes later Bill
MacKenzie scored on a three line
rush with Spence McTavish
making the break. Minutes later
UBC backs again displayed good
ball sense and sent MacKenzie
over for the try.
The 'Bird's next try came from
a Washington scrum. As
scrum-half Rod Holloway covered
a Washington back, Leigh Hillier
picked up the loose ball and
bulled this way over for the score.
A fullback-in covered 40 yards
for the Canadians' next try;
finding the gap, winger Spence
McTavish raced for the posts to
score.
Good scrum work resulted in a
five yard try by Eric McAvity at
the 35 minute mark.
Banks converted six of seven
tries in the second half.
Final score, 65-0.
By MIKE GIDORA
In the space of one short weekend the UBC
Thunderbirds lost a basketball game, won a series
and established themselves as contenders for the
Canadian University basketball championship.
The weekend in question is last weekend and
the series is the WCIAA basketball championship
series against the University of Saskatchewan
Huskies.
The 'Birds went into the series with an 11-1
record at home and promptly proceeded to extend
that record to 11 wins, two losses Friday night by
dropping the opener 74-71.
That was the only one they lost though as they
came back to take the next two games by scores of
105-88 and 97-75.
Friday night's loss was more the result of
over-confidence than of poor play on the part of
UBC.
This was about the only mistake they made all
weekend, and even it proved not to be fatal.
Saskatchewan jumped to an early lead and with
only 16 minutes left in the game they were ahead
by 22 points, mainly on the strength of the
performance of 29-year-old guard Bill Lacy. The
UBC charge, was enough to make the game the most
exciting to be played at UBC this season, but still
not enough to win the game.
It may seem strange to call the second and third
games of a three game series anti-climatic, but that's
what Saturday's and Sunday's games were, in light
of Friday's action.
Guard Ron Thorsen and his comrade at arms
beneath boards, centre John Mills have been
carrying the 'Birds through rough water all season
long,  and this weekend they  were at their very
impressive best.
Mills is probably more familiar with his
opponents' jerseys than the faces above them.
That's because a 6'3" centre rarely comes up against
an opponent whose face is the same height above
the floor as is his own.
Mills doesn't let little things like this bother
him though as he consistently picked apart his taller
counterparts from Saskatchewan over the weekend.
The guy can drive, and better than that, he can
put the ball through the hoop after his drive. It was
a good thing and accounted for many of his 30
points in Sunday's game.
Saskatchewan wasn't without a star or two
itself. Bill Lacy was a star or two by himself. Lacy
came to Saskchewan from Southern Illinois
University where he played on the same team as
New York Knickerbocker star Walt Frazier. His
experience with U.S. college ball showed against the
'Birds.
Thorsen labelled Lacy as one of the best he's
ever faced.
"He had great body control. He'll come right at
you until you're sure he's going to foul then he'll
stop and still get the shot away with accuracy."
The 'Birds were somewhat subdued after the
win on Sunday. They are a bunch of winners and
took the weekend win as such.
And as winners there is still one more series left
for them this year. That's the Canadian
championships that go this weekend at UBC.
Thursday night the Ontario champion
University of Windsor plays UBC in the feature
game. The earlier, contest will put McGill of
Montreal against Acadia of Wolfville, Nova Scotia.
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THE       UBYSSEY
Tuesday, February 29,  1972
QUEBEC REPORTS
labor front forms; national ties doubtful
By NICK AUF DER MAUR
Last Post News Service
MONTREAL — The Canadian Labor Congress
and the Quebec Federation of Labor are drifting
further apart, the ironic consequence of the
increasing solidarity of the Quebec labor force.
For many years, the Quebec labor scene has
been scarred by internecine battles between
international unions and homegrown Catholic,
sometimes reactionary "nationalist" unions. Later,
so-called professional workers such as teachers
preferred to remain aloof from the established
union centrals and go it alone.
Today all this has changed. The international
and Canadian unions, through the Quebec
Federation of Labor, and the independent
Confederation of National Trade Unions, have
joined with the Teachers' Union (CEQ) and other
groups to form a common front to fight for the
interests of the Quebec working class. They have set
clearly socialist goals for themselves.
Early in February, it was revealed that CLC
president Donald MacDonald regards this
development with alarm. It is reported that in a
secret speech at Toronto's Valhalla Inn, he declared
war on the "clearly Marxist" policies emanating
from Quebec. He told a private meeting of key CLC
officials that the organization's Quebec employees
had better toe the line or be fired.
Somewhat perplexed, QFL president Louis
Laberge called on MacDonald to verify the reports.
He denied them, prompting Laberge to issue a
statement saying, "It is false to assume the CLC has
engaged in a battle against what is presumed to be
Marxist thinking in unions affiliated with the QFL."
But later, at a meeting of the QFL's ruling
general council, five Quebec CLC employees present
at the Valhalla Inn speech confirmed the truth of
MacDonald's threats. The QFL delegates were
incensed.
CLC organizers are important to the QFL since
they co-ordinate activities with the QFL and the
various local and regional labor councils, helping to
put into effect the resolutions and goals set by the
QFL convention last fall.
The organizers reported the hostile reception
they received from CLC officials. They were greeted
QFL PRESIDENT LOUIS LABERGE
. . . solidarity forever?
with questions like: "Are you a separatist?", "Are
you a nationalist?", "What's all this Marxist stuff?".
The CLC men were cool to the "Common Front",
regarding it almost as collaborating with the
"enemy" CNTU. They were told by MacDonald and
others there was no place in the CLC for the
sentiment coming out of Quebec, that it was
contrary to their policy.
The QFL general council, including
representatives from unions previously regarded as
conservative, immediately voted full confidence in
the Quebec organizers. The QFL also decided to
keep its participation at the CLC's May convention
to a minimum. The Quebecers are not anxious for a
war with the CLC, but are determined to pursue the
path they regard as being in the workers' best
interests.
Some QFL officials do not regard the feud as
primarily ideological, but rather view it as a power
play, one that has been simmering for the past four
years.
At the 1967 CLC convention, the QFL asked
for greater powers and a autonomy in such areas as
education so they could more effectively provide
the services needed by the labor force, services
rapidly being developed by the CNTU. The CLC
convention refused the necessary constitution. It
still has not been ratified by the parent CLC. The
QFL is not worried, saying their mandate comes
from the bottom rather than the top.
In other provinces, with the exception of B.C.,
the provincial labor centrals do not assume an active
leadership role, preferring to leave that to the CLC.
The QFL is bucking the trend, and consequently the
CLC sees its influence declining, since it is reluctant
to adapt to the changing working-class reality in
Quebec.
The QFL intends to press on.
"The last convention has given the leaders of
the organization precise mandates," says Fernand
Daoust, QFL secretary-general. "The members
unanimously expressed the wish to have us
co-ordinate actions likely to bring about profound
changes in the economic system that oppresses
them. Today, amongst all the disastrous
consequences of this system, based upon profit for
large financial groupings, unemployment is one of
the heaviest burdens weighing down on the entire
working class."
The QFL counts on CLC employees to help
organize such activities, the success of which
depends heavily on political education. If the CLC
continues to consider these activities as
unacceptable Marxism and fires its employees, the
QFL and its affiliates will have to reconsider their
position.
MacDonald's blunt talk has already stirred old
dreams of forming one big labor central in the
province.
Vallieres: out of the cold, under the heat
By NICK AUF DER MAUR
Last Post News Service
MONTREAL - Pierre Vallieres has come in
from the cold of clandestinity, into the heat of
political controversy. His decision to renounce
violence and the FLQ and to embrace the Parti
Quebecois has won him praise and condemnation,
friends and foes.
Thus far, it is safe to say that just about
everybody on the left in Quebec agrees with him on
the first point. Those who supported the FLQ
naturally welcome Vallieres into the fold of
democratic opposition. (Ironically, the greater part
of the criticism against Vallieres on this point comes
from English Canadian new-lefters and Quebec
radicals who had always stood on the sidelines
cheering.)
The decision to join the Parti Quebecois has
raised more serious criticism. Opponents of this
point argue that the PQ is a petit-bourgeois
nationalist party, representing the new middle-class
mandarins seeking to replace the English Canadian
managerial class.
Supporters of Vallieres' decision argue that his
critics don't really understand the context of
Quebec today. First of all, they explain that
Vallieres has not abandoned his original goal, the
establishment of a revolutionary, egalitarian,
socialist state. His tactics have simply changed.
A broad coalition is developing in Quebec,
encompassing left-wing and nationalist forces. On
some points, these forces are in complete harmony,
on others they are in contradiction. Vallieres argues
that independence, and the accompanying political
His decision to work
in the parliamentary
sphere irks some
and cheers others
and social development needed to accomplish it, is a
necessary preliminary step to bringing about more
profound changes. The fact that so many people
and organizations are now seemingly willing to
make this preliminary step, he says in effect,
requires that all available energy be put into its
support.
Vallieres likes to quote Che Guevara, who
explained that armed struggle can never work unless
all legal forms of protest, including electoral
struggle, have been exhausted.
"But the PQ?" his critics argue. "Yes!" say his
supporters, who point out that there are already
four parties in the province and that the dream of
establishing a workers' party is "to dream in color"
("rever en couleurs").
Since most charges against the author of White
Niggers of America were dropped, it was said a deal
was arranged with the authorities. "The people who
say this," countered a CNTU political action
organizer, "are some of the same people who always
said Vallieres was being railroaded, that he was
innocent and was being charged because of his _
beliefs.   Besides,  the  Crown has had  an abysmal
conviction rate on charges of a political nature and
has lately been dropping such charges. They've been
humiliated in front of juries too often."
Vallieres is now working with a citizens' group
in Mont-Laurier, northwest of Montreal. He was not
hired by the federal government, as some
Opposition members in Ottawa have charged,
although his specific project is funded through the
Local Initiatives Programme. He was hired by one of
the co-ordinators, a woman who got the idea while
watching him talk on television. (In the past year,
Mont-Laurier has been a hotbed of citizens' activity
because of the high unemployment rate resulting
from the closing of wood plants in the area.)
It is interesting to note the reaction of the
other members of the "Big Five" arrested during the
War Measures Act. Charles Gagnon, now working
with CNTU, agrees an active FLQ is no longer
useful, and even counter-productive. But he
disagrees with supporting the PQ.
Michel Chartrand, just released from jail after
serving a one-month contempt charge, refuses as
always to argue with "an honest decision". Robert
Lemieux, the radical lawyer, refuses to comment
publicly but is known to share Gagnon's view. He
also views it somewhat as a betrayal of those being
held in jail. Jacques Larue-Langlois has remained
out of the argument, and has opted instead to study
hog-raising at an agricultural college in
St.-Hyacinthe, just east of Montreal.
While the debate continues unabated, it appears
that whatever remains of the FLQ and its
sympathizers has opted for non-existence — for the
moment.

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