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The Ubyssey Sep 20, 1974

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Array AMS hack Moore claims NUS in chaos
By JAKE van der KAMP
The National Union of Students
is falling apart two years after it
was formed, says the Alma Mater
Society's external affairs officer
Gary Moore.
Moore told AMS council Wednesday threfr * NUISiss&ecutive
membej^;",ha>VBiiett (dvpri^the
sumpi^r.^htfhave not been hea
fro© Since. Inadditionhecharged
th& the centralnNfSflArffice in
tva iAfiAking direction,
saur Ontario students ..fi
tiyely left the union and^ifre
lobbying for loans, grants/and
student .housing through[tttzir own
organization, the" Ontario
Federation of Students.
NUS was formed in 1972 as a
means of giving Canadian students
a concerted voice.
It's predecessor, the Canadian
Union of Students, floundered in
1969 when several of its largest
members, including UBC, left
charging that CUS has become too
radical and was no longer
representing its constituency.
UBC students currently pay 30
cents each toward NUS. The
money comes from the general
AMS levy.
Moore said he will contact the
three other major members  of
Another
AMS hack
quits post
Alma Mater Society vice
president Doug Brock resigned
Wednesday saying academic
difficulties forced' him to leave his
post.
Brock   told  The   Ubyssey   his
courses are more important to him •
than his executive duties in the
AMS.
"I don't want to be a permanent
hack around here," he said. "I
want my degree."
Brock's resignation is the third
in the AMS executive since the
executive took office June 1.
Treasurer George Mapson
resigned in August to take up a job
at Malaspina College in
Nanaimo.
Co-ordinator Lynn Orstad
resigned because she failed to gain
enough credits last year.
Currently filling the two vacant
positions are Pemme Muir Cunliffe
as treasurer and Ron Dumont as
co-ordinator.
AMS president Gordon
Blankstein said he will pick a
replacement for Brock after
consultation with executive
members.
Brock was elected vice president
as part of the students coalition
slate which swept all executive
positions in February AMS elections.
He was previously AMS internal
affairs officer, a post he won after
a by-election last October.
NUS and ask them to form a
pressure group to force the
organization their way.
He said if NUS does not respond
to pressure, UBC, the University of
Alberta, Dalhousie and the
University of Toronto can threaten
to leave NUS and so ensure it will
collapse.
Tax deduction for student
society membership fees and for
textbooks are the immediate goals
NUS should seek, he said.
Once these goals are achieved,
Moore said more committed
members will be attracted to NUS
and the organization will be able to
fight for larger goals.
But he did not stipulate what
these larger goals will be.
Moore's proposals ran into
opposition from several council
members who said NUS is losing
support precisely because of the
minor ends it is currently striving
to achieve.
Grad studies rep Steve
Mochnacki said B.C. students
should lobby with the provincial
government through the B.C.
association of student unions
rather then lobbying with the
federal government through NUS.
He said UBC students would
have a more effective voice by
doing so because education is a
provincial matter and B.C.
currently has a "progressive
government".
.Vol. LVI, No. 6
Si   i .   :.. ,.
VANCOUVER, B.C., FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 20, 1974
228-2301
Mochnacki agreed with previous
speakers who said Moore's
proposed goals for NUS will only
make it easier for students to get
through university and will do
nothing to bring about political
change.
But Moore countered that
limited goals are all NUS can
currently hope to achieve and said
lobbying through NUS is essential
because the federal government
controls tax deductions and
student loans.
He pointed out the BCASU was
never conceived as a lobbying
organization but only as a means
to help B.C. student councils improve their services to students.
AMS president Gordon
Blankstein said UBC cannot leave
NUS this year because the AMS is
already committed to paying its
fees to NUS.
Faculty union
dissent grows
—marise savaria photo
DESPERATE SUGGESTION to SUB food services is placed in
suggestion box by disgruntled eater Alan Doree, anthropology 4,
Thursday outside SUB area some label a cafeteria. Box appeared over
summer with back-of-napkin complaints dutifully posted with copious
replies.   Sawdust   quality   of   food   and   perverse prices   remain.
By LESLEY KRUEGER
The Faculty Association voted
Thursday to admit new members
without making them sign a card
pledging support of the
association's certification bid.
Association members overwhelmingly supported the motion,
proposed by economics head Ron
Shearer, during the closed
meeting.
The move, along with a bid to
alter composition of the collective
bargaining committee, was part of
a drive spearheaded by senior
faculty to halt the association's
unionization bid.
Frequent motions from the floor
thwarted association president
Meredith Kimball in her attempt to
get faculty approval for executive
membership and collective
bargaining proposals.
But the Sherer motion was the
only point carried by the senior
faculty during the 1-1/2 hour
meeting.
In proposing the motion, Sherer
said the new membership system
in which a person must sign a union
support pledge and pay $1, is "rank
discrimination."
"I am a member of this
organization without signing a
card, but my new colleague is
prohibited from joining because
he won't sign," Sherer told the
audience which packed IRC lecture hall two.
"We should open membership to
all new faculty."
But during the debate, executive
member Nicholas Omelusik of the
library said he doesn't believe the
act was unconstitutional as
charged.
He said a legal opinion received
Sept. 9 states while there is no
specific mention of certification in
the association constitution, the
document charges the executive to
diligently carry out the members'
wishes.
Because of this, the Feb. 14
motion to seek certification
charges the executive with making
all possible moves towards
unionization.
Omelusik said one basis means
to seek certification is prove to the
Labor Relations Board a strong
indication of the commitment of
the membership to unionization.
Therefore, he said creating an
application form which requires
new members to pledge support for
the union is a "superior" means of
proving commitment.
Omelusik also said stopping the
See page 11: Union
Gravity sighted in Gage eviction
ByREEDCLARKE
The administration has evicted
five students from Gage towers
residence The Ubyssey learned
Thursday.
Dan Hicks, commerce grad
student and one of the five ejected,
said they were ejected because
several beer bottles were thrown
out of their East tower residence
during a party on Sept. 13.
"Two visiting students from
outside of residence threw the
bottles," Hicks claimed.
Derek Perry, area co-ordinator
for the towers, served the eviction
notices on Tuesday, Hicks said.
The notices required them to leave
by Thursday although the five have
now been allowed to stay until
Saturday.
Hicks said the administration
maintains that "all students in a
quadrant are responsible for the
actions of any visitors." One
student avoided eviction by
proving he was in Blaine at the
time of the party, Hicks said.
He said the five appealed to the
student liaison committee but the
committee upheld the administration's decision. "They (the
committee) had nothing against us
Debtors appear
Most of the Alma Mater Society club officers faced with freezing of
their funds have approached AMS acting treasurer Pemme Muir Cunliffe
to discuss payment of their accumulated $30,000 debt.
As a result, Cunliffe said, most of the clubs have had the freeze lifted,
although the debt still remains.
One club, Campus Cavaliers, was able to wipe out its debt almost
entirely when it was discovered the AMS had recorded a spending of $366
instead of the actual $36.
Organizations still with frozen funds are: Acadia daycare, all three
campus nurseries, fencing, judo, Navigators, the grad class, chemical
engineers, metallurgical engineers and the Student International
Medical Society.
individually," he said. "We were
judged as a group." Hicks said
none of the students had a record of
previous trouble in the residence.
He said one liaison member told
him, "If we don't make an example
of you, we will have chaos for the
rest of the year."
Liaison committee member
Jean-Marc Philibert said the
committee "did not want to set a
precedent of letting people off on a
serious charge."
The gravity of the action was a
major factor in deciding to evict
the students, he said.
Philibert said that throwing
objects out of apartment windows
is an act which "can be criminally
prosecuted."
Philibert said the committee's
actions "were not repressive since
See page 2: Dubious
malcolm McGregor
supports meeting hall »og* 2
THf      UBYSSEY
Friday, September 20, 1974
Picketing pays off for Peterson
IEC0RATE    WITH    PRINTS
TORONTO (CUP) — It's a little
late now, but picketing the
University of Toronto for day-care
facilities last year had some effect
for Kathryn Peterson.',
She has just been appointed
chairman of the board of the
university's newest day-care
facilities, two renovated coach
houses which will accept 45
children from university staff and
students.
While Peterson's own daughter
is now too old for the centre, she is
confident there will be more than
enough two to five-year-olds to fill
the space when it opens in about
three weeks.
The new centre joins another
centre which is already operating
on the campus.
The controversial Campus Co-op
Day Care Centre has apparently
won its two-year battle with the
university and is continuing to
operate  in  the abandoned club
house which was occupied by a
group of parents and young
children in April 1972.
The new coach house centre will
be called the Margaret Fletcher
Day Care Centre after a retired
teacher  at  the  university's  In
stitute of Child Studies.
While the original funding for the
centre has come from the
university, the provincial government has been approached for
funds under its Bill 160.
'Dubious to facts' claim students
From page 1
the students are not barred for the
full year."
"All were given a chance to
speak," he said.
At the first meeting, Philibert
said the five claimed ignorance of
reports of excessive noise or seeing
any beer bottles being thrown. At
the second meeting, however, they
were prepared to identify the
culprits, he said.
"The committee decided that Hie
students had not done their best to
stop the bottles from being thrown
out the window," Philibert said.
Perry said reports show bottles
were thrown out the window even
after the party had received one
warning.
Administration housing head Les
Rohringer said he acted on the
recommendations of the liaison
committee. Throwing beer bottles
out the window is extremely
dangerous, he said.
grin bin
3209 W. Broadway
738-2311
f(Opp. Liquor Store and Super Valulj
Art Reproductions
Art Nouveau
Largest Selection
of Posters in B.C.
Photo Blowups
from Negs & Prints
Jokes-Gifts, etc.'
FECQRATE   WITH   POSTER!
Leary to spill beans
ra
NEW YORK (CUPI) — Timothy
Leary, one of the men responsible
for popularizing LSD in the '60s, is
reportedly ready to tell all to
authorities in return for a parole.
Part of the information he might
disclose was reported recently in
an article in New York's Village
Voice, which suggests that the
drug aspect of the counter-culture
was a sophisticated corporate
enterprise which netted its
financiers millions in tax-free
dollars.
The article described a transnational LSD manufacturing
operation, complete with a
chemical research department,
bank connections, tax-free corporate status, and, most important, a capitalist to bankroll the
industry.
Leary reportedly functioned as
its advertising arm.
The organization maintained an
LSD factory in northern California,
purchasing agents in Europe and a
system of franchise distribution
centres that operated under the
cover of the Brotherhood of
Eternal Love, a tax-exempt
"religious" corporation.
The finance capital for the enterprise, which virtually cornered
the LSD market, allegedly came
from William Melkm Hitchcock,
heir to the Mellon family fortune.
The operation disintegrated when
Hitchcock and other backers were
indicted for tax evasion.
Leary's convoluted career took
him from the department of
psychology at Harvard University
to the jails of California to the
Algerian villa of Eldridge Cleaver
at
4560 W. 10th.
919 Robson St.
1050 W. Pender
670 Seymour
duthie
BOOKSl
and  finally back   to   prison  in
Southern California.
Leary escaped from his first
prison confinement in 1970
reportedly with the help of the
Weathermen organization.
The latest stage in his career was
revealed last week when it was
reported that Leary had given
incriminating evidence and
statements to the FBI and the
internal security division of the
justice department in return for an
early parole.
Leary has disclosed the names of
at least three members of the
radical group which helped him
escape, as well as the name of a
San Francisco lawyer involved.
He also was said to have turned
over the names of the people involved in the drug business.
Leary pledges that he will go on
"to bigger and better things" once
he is released from prison.
PEG'S POTTERY SCHOOL
2780 ALMA at 12th
MORNING AND EVENING CLASSES
STARTING SEPTEMBER 23
afternoon     • workshops
• practice times
• children's class
Special glazine course Phone 738*912
KELLY'S STEREO MART
An Explanation:
Last Thursdays (September 19th) ad in The
Ubyssey confused a few of our student customers.
We meant to say that all UBC students could buy
records from us for 30% off the full price, if they
presented a UBC AMS card. Many records
ALREADY were discounted in price, and a UBC
student would get either 30% off the original list
price, or the sale price - whichever is LOWER.
Unfortunately, several students felt that they
should get 30% off the already discounted price,
which is NOT at all what we meant to say. We
apologize for the inconvenience and the
misunderstandings that this may have caused.
Remember, if you want to buy records at a good
price, you can still come in this week and save
30%. (Off the original list price).
Thanks. Kelly's Stereo Marts, 2714 W. Broadway.
PROFESSIONAL RESUMES
DESIGNED TO SELL YOU. NOT US
W. D. SERVICES
470 GRANVILLE ST., VANCOUVER 687-7646
"SPECIAL RATES AVAILABLE TO STUDENTS"
^iiimiiinmminmiiuuuitiiiiiiiiiiiiuinuiiiiiinuiiiiiiitiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiifiiiiiiiiiiiim
I   THIS IS THE REAL THING!    |
S        GRAND OPENING SALE      2
| AT THE NEW SOUND ROOM       |
S SAVE   ON   PIONEER,   CONCORD,   LUX,   PHASE-LINEAR,   BGW =
S SYSTEMS, AR, INFINITY, ESS, SHURE, ADC, B&O, DUAL, ELAC, =
S AND MANY OTHER ITEMS. BECAUSE OF SOME VERY SPECIAL S
= PRICING, WE SHALL NOT BE ABLE TO HANDLE ANY QUOTES =
= BY PHONE. WE GUARANTEE YOUR TRIP HERE WILL BE WORTH =
S IT! NO DEALERS PLEASE. PERSONAL SHOPPING ONLY. =
I THE NEW I
1        SOUND ROOM       1
5 CORNER OF BROADWAY & MACDONALD S
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Anatomy of a Root
Fine Canadian Leathers
The soft skins are naturally
finished, so in Roots you'll
look as good as you feel. And
because Roots are designed
and made right here in
Canada, you needn't pay
through the nose for your feet.
Rocker Sole
In a natural stride, weight
moves from the heel, along
the outer side of the foot
then diagonally across to the
big toe. which springs you off
on your next step. Roots
rocker sole helps this shift in
weight, making every foot
step just a little less tiring.
Supported Arch
The city sidewalk can be a
real arch enemy. And fallen
arches hurt. Roots are contoured to support the arch
andthe small recess between
the balls of your feet.
766 Robson Street
Recessed Heel
Walk on sand and your heel
will leave the deepest part of
your footprint. In natural
walking, most of your weight
lands on your heel. Conven
tional shoes-even low
heeled shoes-tilt you forward
and change your basic posture. In Roots, your heel sinks
into a comfortable recess,
giving you a natural walk on
any kind of surface Friday, September 20, 1974
THE      U BYSSEY
Page 3
Group to protest Tanaka policy
in Vancouver where Tanaka will
dine with Premier Dave  Barrett.
An organizational meeting will
be held Monday at Alexandria
House, Seventh and Pine, at 8 p.m.
The protest is endorsed by more
than a dozen conservation groups
including the Scientific, Pollution
and Environmental Control
(SPEC) and Sierra Club.
Petch to
try UVic
reforms
Conservation groups will protest
Japan's whaling policies when
Japan's prime minister Kakuei
Tanaka visits UBC Wednesday.
The Greenpeace Foundation is
demanding that the Japanese and
the Russians agree to a 10 year
moratorium on whaling.
Unless    a    moratorium    is
declared, several species of whales
are in danger of extinction, a
foundation spokesman said.
The Greenpeace will sail from
Vancouver in the summer of '75 to
obstruct a Russian or Japanese
whaling fleet on the northwest
coast of Canada.
Previous Greenpeace boats have
protested the United States Atomic
Energy Commision's underground
nuclear tests at Amchitka Island
and the French government's
atomic atmospheric tests over
Aururoa Atoll.
Tanaka will unveil a plaque on
the site of the Asian Centre
currently under construction on
the southwest corner of the
campus.
The Prime Minister will arrive
on campus by helicopter from
Vancouver International Airport
for a brief ceremony scheduled to
take place at 5:15 p.m.
Protesters plan to demonstrate
at the ceremony and at 6 p.m. in
front of the Hayatt Regency hotel
- -      -^f- v -      -
—marise savaria photo
INDIAN SUMMER LUNCH on the lawn means a pleasant time for weather in the first three weeks of classes follows one of the wettest
two of the older undergraduates around this year. Spell of good       summers in Vancouver history - and that's saying something.
Timbucktoo enters data dispute
Alma Mater Society president
Gordie Blankstein said Thursday
he believes the administration has
good reasons for putting the
proposed library data centre near
SUB.
However, if the administration
has no good reason, Blankstein
said, "they can put it out in Timbucktoo."
Blankstein said Monday the AMS
can legally stop the proposed
centre but said he prefers to settle
any objections students may have
to   the   two-storey   building   by
discussions with the administration.
But Thursday, Blankstein said
he would prefer student
representation on the buildings
committee.
Council passed a resolution
Wednesday demanding parity representation on the committee.
Blankstein said students chosen to
sit on the committee will be chosen
from among council members.
Blankstein again Thursday
emphasized the fact that the AMS
has legal documents protecting the
proposed construction site but said
he was reluctant to take legal
action to stop it.
He said some SUB grounds have
been zoned for building but that the
proposed site has not. Blankstein
also claimed the new facility would
cause traffic congestion in the SUB
traffic circle.
Head librarian Basil Stuart-
Stubbs said Thursday it was
debatable that the building would
cause traffic congestion near SUB.
In answer to Blankstein's charge.
that students have not been con
sulted on the proposed site, Stubbs
said the AMS was contacted the
minute the plans were drawn up.
"I was in touch with Blankstein
in early May before the architects
were called in," Stubbs said.
Stubbs said the building must be
built near SUB because four of the
five proposed sites had to be ruled
out due to cost considerations.
Stubbs also said no other sites
exist on campus that can be serviced by the steam plant.
"I know for sure it's going up,"
Blankstein said.
VICTORIA (Staff) — The
University of Victoria's growth
will require controls;
The UVic board of governors'
meetings should be public;
And the UVic faculty association
should not have to bargain like a
trade union, president-designate
Howard E. Petch, 49, told his first
press conference here Tuesday.
Petch, scheduled to succeed
outgoing president Hugh Farquhar
Jan. 1, said he is arranging a
meeting with Don Save, Canadian
Association of University Teachers
president, to settle UVic's three-
year feud with the union.
A physics teacher and
metallurgist who was previously
president of the University of
Waterloo, Ontario, Petch said he is
used to a university with a strong
faculty association.
"I would prefer to work with a
strong faculty association," Petch
said. "But I would not like to see it
get to the point where there was
bargaining over the number of
hours a teacher spent with his
students or devotion to research."
"I don't think academics can
work like that."
He also discussed increased
enrolment and its effects on UVic,
saying control of the campus'
growth will be absolutely
necessary. He said many people
have expressed concern over
standards and said any dramatic
increase would strain existing
facilities.
One of the candidates considered
for the UBC administration
presidency early this summer,
Petch also said he will recommend
the UVic board of governors open
their meetings to the public, and
said he supports student and
faculty representation on boards.
canned laughter
by alan doree
"Golleeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeee gee
whillikers, jumpin' Jehosephat I'll be as
happy as a pregnant rabbit with a lucrative
Walt Disney contract or my name's not
Zowie Meeker while we cover this hockey
game tonight, where are we anyway,
John?"
"Don't worry about it Zowie, you wouldn't
understand, we pay you by the gallon for
exuberance. Hi folks, this is Johnny Seesaw
and tonight we're treating you to horrible
coverage complete with silly comments of
the Canada-Russia series.
"I don't know what kind of series it is,
perhaps a situation comedy, but we'll soon
know.
"I love it when you talk dirty, John.
Please may I fondle your left buttock?
"Not now, Zowie, you little carbuncle.
Zowie is here to provide childish glee and
color commentary.
"Oh, I just love the red sweaters Team
Canada are wearing in this series which will
be thrilling, thrilling, thrilling, whatever it
is they're playing.
"Time to sing our national anthem, Zowie.
"When the red, red robin comes bob bob
bobbin' along, along . . . Would you look at
Canada's uniforms, John, I haven't seen so
many maple leafs on a human body since
Kate Smith came up here as a draft dodger.
"And look, there's F'ra.nk Mahovlich
stepping on the ice, golleeee, he does that so
well. I have a picture of his thighs sjw my;
wall. -*--.;;*-,.-■
"I'm gonna show that great move to the
kids on slow motion replay. See how he does
it? He puts one foot in front of the other just
like your're supposed to do. Who says the
WHA isn't big league stuff?
"The ref dropped the puck and he's trying
to pick it up again but the players are
knocking it away from him with wooden
things and now he's chasing them around
the ice.
"Hey, John, our computer tells us Bobby
Hull got 93 per cent of that faceoff, isn't that
great?
"I tell you, John, that Hull's got the nicest
insteps I've ever touched while interviewing
a hockey player. He makes sensational beef
stroganoff, too.
"Wheeeeeee, look at Pat Stapleton gob on
the ice, that's a sure sign our boys are up for
this game, John.
"Them Russkies are gonna get creamed
tonight in the interests of international
diplomacy. I can hardly wait till we start
dishin' out the multiple concussions and
fractures that make this game a thing of
beauty.
"I only wish Dave Schultz, John Ferguson
and Eddie Shack were here with shovels. It
would help if our faggot prime minister
would lay into the Russki next to him.
"There goes Paul Henderson on a rink-
length rush.
"Well, John, I heard he was having bowel
problems before the game. Which reminds
me, he and his wife have the most attractive
bathroom in the WHA.
"They also have a fine looking Irish setter
who Paul has already taught to skate. The
youngster has great moves and the Hendersons have high hopes for his professional
career.
"Now on this play here where Gordie
Howe comes out of the John I want you to
notice he's wearing an artificial clay testicle
with a Canada goose painted on it by
Jacques Cartier of Montreal.
"I thought Jacques Cartier died years
ago, Zowie.
"He did, John, but he's been taking
therapy.
"Team Canada's really breaking up those
Soviet rushes tonight, Zowie."
"The Gatling gun in front of our net really
helps, John."
"Do you think Team Canada's legs will
hold up in this third period, Zowie?"
"They should, they were made by the
Ford Motor Company just for this series and
have a 50,000 mile warranty.
"And there's the final buzzer.
"We've had a lot of those tonight, haven't
we, John?"
"Would you care to pick three stars,
Zowie?"
"Certainly, Clark Gable, Bette Davis and
Humphrey Bogart."
"No, read here where it says, 'Tonight's
three stars, as picked by the Mount Palomar
Observatory, are Polaris, Vega and Sirius.'
Jeez, that's not right, either. Maybe we'd
better quit while we're behind, Zowie."
"OK, John. That's it, hockey fans, I quit!
All 22,000,000 of you are gonna have my
letter of resignation in the morning, after I
get up and take a pee-pee." Pag* 4
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, September 20, 1974
Surprise! You're a worker
There were two obvious classes
of people represented at the
Faculty Association meeting
Thursday. First of all there were
the junior* profs. Few of them
spoke and when they did it was
after identifying themselves by
name and faculty.
Then there were the
super-seniors — the department
heads or former heads. They
seemed to feel they didn't need to
name themselves but launched
arrogantly into their speeches
without doing so.
Quite a few of these spoke,
including French head Larry
Bongie, economics head Ron
Shearer, polisci head Alan Cairns,
former anthropology-sociology
head Cyril Belshaw and former
economics head Gideon
Rosenbluth.
In fact, they dominated the
meeting.
But what was interesting to note
was the degree of support given
these seniors by the other
professors there.
The motion to allow new faculty
to join the association without
pledging support for the
certification bid for instance passed
with about 600 in favor and five
against.
What possible reason could these
professors have to join the
anti-union movement when they
stand to gain a say in the running of
departments and in setting up
grievance procedures?
Well two things.
First of all there is the natural
combination of conservatism and
fear which causes them to feel more
comfortable with the familiar than
with any new scheme, although
they may benefit more from the
new.
But second of all they woke up
to the fact, after four months, that
in supporting a union they were
declaring themselves workers.
Now it is rather unsettling to
realize after 30 years of hiding
behind an aura of professionalism
and profesional service that one is a
worker.
Instead of being a white collar
type serving some amorphous god
of knowledge, they are declaring
themselves another set of cogs in
the proverbial societal machine by
unionizing.
That thought has people running
scared — right back to their little
hidey-holes of
professorships/assistant
prof essorsh ips/ lectu rersh i ps.
So the department heads find
ready allies in their fight to stay on
top. People who are scared of
change because it might mean a few
re-definitions on their part. Never
mind that others might benefit.
Obviously the junior faculty
who would benefit from the
proposed head election and
grievance procedure system should
get to work and swing these
middle-ground sitters back their
way.
Former association president
Milton Moore sent out a 14-page
letter denoucing the union.
Another in favor could be
circulated.  And  faculty  members
shouldn't sit back and let the
super-seniors control the
association meetings as they were
doing.
After all, it's in their interest to
see unionization through. And
whether they realize it or not, it's
also in the interests of the ones in
the middle.
Because it might for once give
them the chance to do something
besides echo.
P.S. How do we know about all
this? Well, classics head Malcolm
McGregor might have noticed a
quiet arts I instructor type sitting
just up from him. Hair in a bun,
glasses, sedately taking notes. Heh
heh.
Letters
Cree
course
I cannot agree with some of the
information provided in Tuesday's
CUP article, "Cree Talk Course
Offered". It may be true, as is
claimed by Anne Anderson in the
article, that Grant MacEwan
Community College is offering the
first course in North America on
Cree culture and history; there is a
sad paucity of such content in our
educational systems. However, an
accredited Cree language course
has been offered by at least one
other institution, the University of
Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, since
1969 (and possibly earlier).
The course, formerly Cree 91,
now Anthropology 140, has been
and is being taught by Cree people;
Val Nigh traveller, Ida McLeod and
Keith Goulet have all been, involved with the instruction.
Courses in the methodology of
teaching Cree are offered to native
speakers by the University of
Saskatchewan and by Brandon
University, Brandon, Man.
although the U. of S. course is still
seeking accreditation, partially
due to the same kind of resistance
that Anderson is meeting in
Alberta.
Anderson mentions that she has
to write all of her own books for the
course "because no one else has
ever produced any."
However, there are Cree
grammars   dating   from   1844
(Howse) and 1874 (Lacombe),
although admittedly such works
are not the most useful for teaching
purposes. More practical and well-
respected teaching texts have been
written in 1954 (Edwards) and 1962
(Ellis), among others.
Anderson's problem in finding
suitable materials may stem from
dialect differences between her
people and the other Cree groups
which span an area roughly from
the Rockies to Eastern Ontario.
Anderson's claims about Cree
culture are a bit imprecise.
It would be most difficult, and
not really worth the effort, to prove
that Cree dancers were "the first
to put words into their songs."
There are hundreds of distinct
Indian languages in North
America; establishing that Cree
predates and subsequently influences, for example, the Sioux or
Navaho languages, both of which
are unrelated to Cree, and both of
which employ lyrics in their songs,
would be impossible.
It would also be hard these days
to distill aspects of Plains Indian
culture that originated with the
cree; the diet and travelling
patterns of the several Plains
tribes held much in common.
The resistance that Anderson
mentions she is meeting at the
college is unfortunately all too
common. The men and women
with long academic careers who
inevitably control the curricula are
suspicious of the course content;
our "cowboys and Indians"
socialization doesn't leave us too
open to the story that doesn't get
told in high school texts. The
frequent absence of "Ph.D" behind
the names of native instructors
only adds to their suspicions. They
overlook the unique qualifications
inherent in the native linguistic
and cultural background. One still
finds among the people who decide
the fate of such courses some who
think that Indians "talk Indian",
and that "talking Indian" involves
making one's way through life
saying things like "me no savvy."
Alicia Nokony
linguistics grad student
Library
Your first issue suggested,
among some items headed UBC
Survival Shortcuts, that students
should be slow in paying fines for
overdue books because of a library
tradition of leniency. The implication is that it is acceptable to
keep books beyond the due date. I
must challenge that assumption.
The purpose of a due date is to
ensure that materials are returned
r
muBrsstr
SEPTEMBER 20. 1974
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the
university year by the Alma Mater Society of the University of
B.C. Editorial opinions are those of the writer and not of the AMS
or the university administration. Member, Canadian University
Press. The Ubyssey publishes Page Friday, a weekly commentary
and review. The Ubyssey's editorial offices are located in room
241K of the Student Union Building.
Editorial departments, 228-2301; Sports, 228-2305; advertising,
228-3977. Editor. Lesley Krueger
This week's Rhodes scholarship winners are Rob Harvey, Bob Diotte,
Ron Binns, Ken Dodd, Mark Allan, Kathy Carney, Bernie Bischoff, Eric
Ivan Berg, Boyd McConnell, Dan Miller, Jacob Hellbrom, Duncan
Chlsholm, Geoff Hancock, Gary Coull, Lesley Krueger, Doug Rushton,
Ralph Maurer, Ian Metherell, Marcus Gee, Mark Fox, Reed Clarke and
Ryon Guedes. They will be relieving Berton Woodward, Marise Savaria, Ian
Bray, Peter Cummings, Jake van der Kamp, Mark Buckshon, Sucha Singh,
Alan 'Laugh a Minute' Doree, Rocky Mclvor and Michael Sasges, who are
standing waist-deep in engineer dung.
"All right, you fourth-estate bastards, coffee break's over," said Thomas
Carlyle suddenly. "Back on your heads."
for use by other students. (A book
kept overdue is a book that no one
else can have.) To endorse the
practice of retaining books beyond
the due date, as your columnist has
done, is to condone the kind of antisocial behavior that makes a
communal enterprise like a library
unworkable for its users.
I would urge students to not only
return books on the due date, but
also to return them before that
date, as soon as they are finished
with them in the interests of their
fellow students.
I'll take this opportunity to
mention another problem which
seriously affects the usefulness of
the library to students: theft.
This is the ultimate in
selfishness: to deny access to
needed library materials by
"borrowing" without leaving a
record. Curiously, when we catch
thieves, we find that they have a
double moral standard.
They would never think of
stealing a book belonging to
another student, but to steal a book
from a library they think is different. Yet, since the books in the
library are for users, it amounts to
the same thing.
The library's collections are here
to be used. But the library can only
attain maximum usefulness if
students show consideration for
each other and treat the collections
and the library's reasonable
regulations with respect.
Basil Stuart-Stubbs
UBC head librarian  Of-ghouls, fools, Hawk
By BERNARD BISCHOFF
and  MARK ALLAN
Here we are again with our annual UBC
Film Society's Cinema 16 preview. Filmsoc
is a small collection of intense, dedicated
movie enthusiasts who have been bringing
to campus a large battery of exciting films
under the name Cinema 16.
That is not to say that all of them are good
— some are atrocious.
What these films have in common is that
they are all rare. Cinema 16 steers clear of
the rotten meat dished up by the monstrous
American film industry.
This program operates on the premise
that film can take its place beside other
fundamental art forms. The organizers
search for films that represent the art at its
best — as political statement, esthetic experience, or whatever.
This year there are two international
series. One begins in September, the other in
January. The other two series concentrate
on Humphrey Bogart—one of the great film
actors of all time — and on the classic horror
film now enjoying a successful revival.
Series I: INTER
NATIONAL  A
Sept. 23
TARGETS
Peter Bogdanovitch — USA 1968
Bogdanovitch has earned a reputation in
recent years as one of the most exciting
contemporary   American   directors.   His
films  are replete with  references,  both
explicit and oblique, to past films and past
eras.
Targets was his first effort. It harkens
back to Boris Karloff and Nosferatu. The
film is concerned with the wife of a proper
young  suburban   husband   who   shows   a
harmless interest in guns until he explodes
into a murderous rempage. This storyline is
subtly interwoven with that of an aging
Hollywood monster movie actor.
Oct. 7
THE SUDDEN WEALTH
OF THE POOR PEOPLE
OFKOMBACH
Volker Schloendorff— Germany 1971
Like many contemporary West German
films, it has a strongly political orientation.
Schloendorff uses many of the theories of
Brechtian epic theatre such as song and
dance and spoken narrative to tell the story.
It concerns a group of poor villagers in the
1820's who rob a mail coach. But their crime
is discovered, and even though they have
only  been  using  these  funds   to   try   to
alleviate their miserable conditions,  the
authorities swoop down and massacre them.
It is a grim exploration of human  oppression.
Oct. 21
DODES'KA-DEN
Akira Kurosawa — Japan 1970
Kurosawa is one of the supremely great
film artists, earning his reputation with
such films as Rashomon, a many layered
parable on the subjectivity of truth.a series
of   swashbuckling  samurai   adventure
movies, and Ikiru, the most profound and
far-reaching diagnosis of the problem of
death. Dodes' ka-den examines necessity
within human relationships through a gro,up
of slum dwellers.
Nov. 4
_   OUTBACK
Ted Kotcheff—Australia 1970
Outback is one of Ted (Duddy Kravitz)
Kotcheff's earlier productions. It examines
the bored, dissolute, aimless life-style of a
provincial Australian city. The city's only
cultural activity is heavy drinking. A
traveller finds himself temporarily
stranded and being slowly sucked into the
horrific vacuum of the inhabitants' deadend lives.
Nov. 18
ZERO DE CONDUITE
andL'ATALANTE
Jean Vigo — France 1933
Zero de Conduite studies life in a French
boarding school through a series of scenes in
which the students rebel against the faculty.
It ends with a scene in which the entire
student body rebels.
L'Atalante is the story of the lives of two
lovers on a barge going down the Seine. The
woman is bored and has a series of flirtatious meetings with strangers.
Dec. 2
THE CONFORMIST
Bernardo Bertolucci Italy 1970
Bertolucci (The Spider Strategem, Before
the Revolution, Last Tango in Paris) is the
outstanding new director to emerge from
the    60's. In this film his rich baroque style
gets out of hand at times but serves to create
a staggering picture of the rise and fall of
fascism in Italy.
Through the life of Marcello, a young man
obsessed with conformity as a result of a
traumatic homosexual experience in his
youth,Bertolucci examines the relation
between politics and sex, social conformity,
and upper class decadence. The film may be
flawed but it is a remarkable achievement
for a director as young as Bertolucci, 28,
when he made it.
Series II: BOGART
Humphrey Bogart has4 become a cult
figure of legendary proportions and Bogart
The Maltese Falcon (1941)... Bogart as the famous Sam Spade
film revivals have become amazingly
popular, perhaps even more so than Greta
Garbo or Marilyn Monroe festivals. Many
people today regard him as the star male
personage of American cinema in the '30's
and . '40's. But although certainly considered one of the more important performers in his own day, he was never accorded the royalty status occupied by, say,
Clark Gable or Jean Harlow, in their prime.
He made his name as the most brilliant
exponent of a certain type of role — the
cynical disillusioned, fast-talking tough guy
who usually was compassionate and golden-
hearted beneath his sandpaper exterior. He
specialized in gangster and crime flicks and
his presentation of the dry unflappable
trench-coated private detective has marked
the role forever.
But he should be remembered more
importantly as a magnificent character
actor as witnessed by his masterful personification of overwhelming greed in
playing Fred C. Dobbs in The Treasure of
the Sierra Madre.
This series presents a comprehensive
overview of Bogart including some of his
earlier films, a few from his peak period and
two from the 1950's before he was completely cut off by cancer.
Sept. 30. The Roaring Twenties
Raoul Walsh USA — 1939
Bogart made this film when he was still a
second-rater working his way up through
the ranks and although he has a prominent
part in it the real hero is, believe it or not,
James Cagney. The quintessential gangster
film it came out just as the 1930's and the era
of gangsters (and of gangster films) was
drawing to a close.
The film purports to be a fictional history
of gangsterism in the 20's so all the related
side-effects of prohibition appear. Every
cliche in the book is thrown in.
The story begins with the release of three
American soldiers after the first world war
and follows them through the 1920's. Two of
them (Bogart and Cagney) become
bootleggers because of economic hardship,
while the third follows the straight life by
becoming a lawyer.
See the film not for Bogart's performance
but for Cagney's. The film is corny but is,
because of its sentimentality and its unconscious humor, a supremely entertaining
film.
North lures bush h
By ERIC IVAN BERG
Charles "Red" Lillard, Bush Fever Poetry,
Drunk on Wood and other poems, Sono Nis
Press, Delta. $7.95
For a man moving so vividly along the
interface of myth and reality, the poetry of
Charles "Red" Lillard is the fresh strong
voice that comes from a country of tall
husky timber and rings with the rich aurora
of the north.
Although Lillard was born in Redwood,
California some 30 years ago, he has since
grown up in Alaska and lived long in B.C.
His experience working in the north ("This
country is a woman, a mad bitch!") has
been wide and varied. Since 1960 he has
"roughed it" in both the Alaskan and B.C.
bush working as a faller, rigger, heavy
machine operator, logging truck driver,
boom man and poet.
Cultus Coulee, his first book of poetry
was published in 1971 while he was a
graduate student in UBC's creative writing
department. Further literary kudos include
having been the associate editor of Volvox:
Poetry from the Unofficial Languages of
Canada and co-editor of Contemporary
Poetry of British Columbia, Volume II. One.
of his plays, The Crossing, has been
produced on campus at the Freddy Wood
Theatre.
Lillard always returns to the theme of the
river and the mythical river always returns
to run north. It is this mythical north nearer
to nature that he hails as ideal. Yet he
always manages to cut deeply into it with
the cold bone knife images of reality — cut
from his own particularly intense experiences of carving into the lonely code for
that far country. It is that country that, as he
quotes Melville, ". . . isn't on any map, true
places never are."
Lillard first reflects upon the rugged
emotions of a man living within the naked
grip of landscape and remaining all too fully
conscious of the vise grip of that great lone
land. His first words wedge deeply into the
scab timber:
"Lillard always
returns to the theme
of the reiver and the
mythical river
always returns to
run north.
"Drunk on wood.
With both feet in my condition
I stand,
Drunker for enjoying
This wood,
Waiting for judgment
From others
Who have, in their time,
Tasted wood. ..."
Words that cut into myth with a deep
sensual affinity, with almost a drugged
"bush fever" for the intoxicating freedoms
of nature provided the poet by that powerful
magnetic proximity that is the north:
".-. . Dawn. Hour of the longest watch.
Groping for shape,
An approaching wanderer
Staggers into this chill:
Ritual of fugitive greetings
In the recesses of wood,
Crows rise wearily through
this first light."
For in the true north those pioneers hav
in their time lived with the myth. Yet live
with the chill of cold reality eating into then
in the sub-zero early-morning aurora — the;
have been there, as the poet obviously has
and many have not returned.
In our all too fast society of urbanize
ghettos, overcrowding, massive pollutioi
and all the umpteen other mindless inanitie
of modern life Lillard's poetry stands out ii
stark counterpoint to our modern mess. H<
manages to offer us more than the harpini
environmentalist's woodpecking cliches -
offering an alternative addiction.
Drunk On Wood is sprinkled with notebool
nostalgia pieces of a highly subjective
almost autobiographical style. One i:
struck by the many poems which have <
distinct tone, waxed in somber reflectioi
and in a cold grim reality that quite con
versely cuts through much of the romantic
guffaw and master mythmaking mysterj
that lingers so long of the north.
As the poet picks up the splattered piece!
of his dead drinking buddy the book begin!
picking up the elusive pieces of his jour
neyman past, of his long trekking througl
northern hinterlands of Alaska and B.C
Throughout the book the poet picks up th<
lost names of those far northern places
where he has dwelled:
"We dwell in our own landscape,
The terrain,
A bit of water in our thought. ..."
Names of the storied places he has passed
both colorful and remote, all are poeticalh
logged. These are the geographically poetic
points of transition, the lost checkpoints oi
Page Friday, 2
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, September 20, 1974 and Bogarting falcons
Oct. 14 or 15
The Petrified Forest
Archie Mayo USA — 1935
A most important inclusion in the
Bogartean canon, this was the film that
finally convinced Bogart to give up his stage
career and devote himself to Hollywood.
The movie version was adapted from a
successful Broadway play. The theme
centres around two idealistic young
dreamers (Leslie Howard and Bette Davis)
who meet and become, along with other
victims, trapped in a small service-station
restaurant by a gang of ruthless killers.
The leader of the group is Duke Mantee
played by, of course, Bogart. Only because
he had acted in the stage version was Bogart
by default allowed to have the role in the
movie. He comes across as a brutal ominous
thug and he was typecast in this role for
nearly a decade.
This film catapulted him from obscurity
to some sort of notorious fame though it was
not until his breakthrough with The Maltese
Falcon that he achieved star status.
Key Largo
John Huston USA — 1948
This is The Petrified Forest all over again
done  13  years  later  when  Bogart  hac
achieved title role magnitude. This time he
is the disillusioned dreamer and Edward G.
Robinson is the savage gangster. Lauren
Bacall also appears.
Oct 28
Casablanca
Michael Curtiz 1942
This film received the academy award for
best picture of the year and earned HB his
first nomination as best actor. But chiefly it
solidified Bogart's spiralling prestige by
extending his range from that of the sarcastic, reluctant hero to that of romantic
leading man of the    40's.
It is in fact a period piece — an exemplar
of the best and the worst of the 1940's film.
Although lauded at the time it is firmly
rooted in the times — nothing more than a
sophisticated second world war propaganda
film.
In this film Bogart becomes, along with
Gable, one of the great celluloid lovers.
When I saw the film recently I thought it
highly overrated but it should still be seen —
if for no other reason, just to find out that
rd
e rites of passage, and faded datelines and
rgotten pinpricks of his personal "map"
at charts the bare emotional geography of
ore than a dozen years in the woods. The
>rth is detailed as a rough hewn and rip-
wed landscape of pack trails, logging
imps, trap lines, broken whiskey bottles,
unken Indians, dead prospectors, rivers,
d lovers, great liars, mad trappers and
nely poets.
It is this distilled strength of the real
irth, one shorn of myth by the poet's own
laginative powers which circumvent
tual and heighten reality. Yet it seems to
e that after reading the poems several
nes over (and there are some 53 of them)
at it is the magnetic northern "myths"
at I am tempted to rember most vividly.
is north is not the frontier ribaldry of
jbert Service's north, but a deeply per-
nal one — no matter how close they lie
gether in connotation.
'One is struck by
he . . . sombre
•eflection and . . .
;old grim reality.
Drunk On Wood never pretends to be a
eat new book of cold hard Canadiana yet
like the river, always returns emerging
ith a very strong and richly authentic
rrent of powerful poetry. One simply
nnot restrain oneself from urging that it is
least one book of strong poetry that should
: read by anyone interested in good poetry.
Bogart never actually does say: "Play it
again, Sam" anywhere in the film.
Nov. 12
To Have And Have Not
Howard Hawks USA — 1945
It sounds like it should be great but it
isn't. It has Bogart and Lauren Bacall and is
directed by the great Hawks. The screenplay is adapted from the Ernest Hemingway
novel and one of the screenwriters is (are
you ready? William Faulkner. It also has a
quaint interest as Bogart's very first film
with Bacall who became of course his most
famous leading lady. The results are not all
that impressive. Basically it is only a
remake of Casablanca.
Nov. 25
The Caine Mutiny
Edward Dmytryk 1954
This film earned Bogart his third
academy award nomination. A first-class
example of the later Bogart, it shows him
when he has finally broken free of his Sam
Spade image and demonstrated his
unrecognized talent as an interpreter of
complex and demanding roles.
Dec. 9 or 10
The Maltese Falcon
John Huston 1942
This is the basic Bogart film. It was shown
in last year's Cinema 16 series but deserves
to be shown again.
This is the film that introduced the stock
Bogart character to the screen who has
subsequently eaten his way into legend. It
was also incidentally Huston's first directorial triumph. It was adapted from Dashiell
Hammett's sensational story which introduced the hardboiled detective to the
pulp magazines.
Bogart plays the inimitable private eye
Sam Spade who becomes entangled with a
group of desperate felons.
The plot is too intricate to unravel here.
Once more: this film is the kernel of the
whole Bogart myth: here he perfects the
character that became the hallmark of his
fame.
Beat The Devil
John Huston 1953
"It stinks" is what Bogart himself said of
this film and so it seems a fitting way to end
this series. Bogart himself wouldn't have
wanted it any other way.
Series III: INTER
NATIONAL B
Jan. 6
Zazie dans le Metro
Louis Malle — France 1960
One of Malle's early comedies, this is a
zany collection of trick-camera sight gags,
crazy characters popping in and out,
pointless chases and quick changes. These
comedic devices are hung around Zazie, an
ll-year-old girl on a visit in Paris who wants
to ride a subway and gets sidetracked, to
say the least. There is no rhyme or reason to
this nonsense, there isn't supposed to be, it's
anarchism on film. In fact, it ends with a riot
of food throwing and the destruction of a
cafe.
Jan. 16
The Story of Goopy and Bagha
Satyajit Ray — India 1969
Ray is best known for his remarkably
sensitive portrayals of daily existence in
India. He is far and away India's top
director, virtually the only one to gain international recognition.
Ray's films are often troublesome to
Western viewers with their slow, simple and
quiet pace marking off a different sense of
time. Unfortunately The Story of Goopy and
Bagha is not representative of Ray's
greatness.
Feb. 3
Hunger
Henning Carlsen — Denmark 1966
Only eight years old this film already has
been accorded status as one of the seminal
films of the century. It is based on Knut
Hamsun's book of the same name — the
pioneering tour-de-force of the naturalist
novel.
The central character is a poor, young
would-be author who is slowly dying of
hunger. The whole film, washed in phantasmagoric, bizarre combinations of black
and white is a delicate fusion of reality and
starvation-induced   hallucination.   Per
Casablanca (1943)... Bogart "playing it again Sam" with Ingrid Bergman
Oscarsson's face alone, a wasted mask of
burned out eyes, hollowed cheeks, and
fleshless chin resting on solid bone, is a
vision to be remembered.
Feb. 17
End of Summer
Yasujiro Ozu — Japan 1961
Probably Ozu's best known film in North
America is The Tokyo Story, bringing us a
contented elderly couple examining their
fading relationships with their children. End
of Summer is also an examination of a
family structure. Ozu's use of low-level
camera work makes for a proximity and
evenness found with no other Japanese
director.
March 3
Inside the Reflection
Tom Braidwood — Canada 1973
This is a Canadian film, so I suppose we
should build it up. Unfortunately, according
to informed sources (we won't say who) it is
absolutely atrocious. It concerns the life of
legendary ballet dancer Nijinsky and that's
all we can say, since neither one of us has
seen it.
March 17
How Tasty was my Little Frenchman
Pereira dos Santos — Brazil 1973
This is just great. A pseudo-
anthropological film featuring assorted
Portuguese and French colonialists and
Brazilian natives, all of whom are constantly at one another's throats. A French
colonialist gets caught by the Portuguese
and then 'rescued' by the natives. He's
taken into the tribe and lives with the chief's
daughter, although he's always a prisoner.
The film spends much time exploring the
life of the tribe and pays particular attention
to their cannibalistic rituals. It ends with his
lover and the rest of the tribe eating him
without a shred of ill will.
Series IV'
HORROR FILMS
Jan. 13
THE CABINETOFDR. CALIGARI
Robert Weine — Germany 1919
This film is a classic. It is the oldest film in
this series and one of the finest horror films
ever conceived. This work is important not
only  as  a  pioneering  horror  film    but
because    of    its    stunning    technical
breakthroughs,  its sophisticated and intricate narrative structure  and its daring
raids on contemporaneous developments in
modern painting.
The characters move through a
bewildering dream-like maze of geometric
patterns. This film was one of the first —
and still one of the only — to adapt the cubist
techniques in art that Picasso, Braque, and
others were developing in Paris at that time.
The film's techniques were borrowed not
only from recent French developments but
from German expressionism.
The original story came from a young,
unemployed German screenwriter, Hans
Janowitz.
A young man, Francis, is sitting on a
bench with an older man, in an unnamed
location. The older man remarks that there
are evil spirits surrounding .them. At this
moment, a young woman, dressed in white,
walks past in a dream-like trance. Francis
explains that she is his betrother and tells
the older man that they have gone through
the most terrifying experience, and|
proceeds to tell his story. Now the actual
Caligari episode begins.
A travelling circus is playing in a small
German town when an evil mountebank and
con-man, Dr. Caligari, arrives attended by
his assistant Cesare, who has amazing
fortune-telling powers. It soom becomes
apparent that Cesare is a sleepwalker who
has been hypnotized by Caligari and is
completely in his power. When the
mysterious pair arrive, they have trouble
receiving permission to perform at the
carnival from an arrogant municipal official. The next morning, this pompous
bureaucrat is found murdered.
Francis and his friend, Alan, enter the
story as young students, attending the
circus. Soon Caligari is threatening Francis'
beautiful fiance, Jane. It is, of course, the
old Svengali routine, of an evil hypnotist
who uses those in his power to commit
dastardly acts.
DRACULA
Tod Browning— USA 1936
Frankenstein, Dracula and the mummy
are three archetypal figures who cast
their shadow on almost all horror films.
Frankenstein and the Mummy are not
represented in this series, but Dracula gets
his 'due.
In fact this is the first and the greatest of
all Dracula films, starring^ Bela Lugosi in
the title role. Dracula is Bela Lugosi, and
Bela Lugosi is Dracula. The man and the
role are inseparable and every subsequent
Dracula film has to measure itself against
this one, as against a touchstone.
Oddly enough, Lugosi got the role by
accident. Browning had been hired to do a
screen adaption of the Bram Stoker novel
and naturally wanted Lon Chaney, the first
of the great masters of terror, for the title
role. Unfortunately, Chaney died of cancer
just as production of the film was about to
begin. Browning hired an obscure
Hungarian actor Arisztid Olt, who had done
a 1927 stage version of the story, to play the
title role. Olt's stage name was Bela Lugosi.
Surely we don't need to repeat the story —
anyone who has ever been a devotee of
drive-in movies must already know the
history of this neurotic vampire by heart.
Looking back on the film from the per-
See pf. 5: More freaky
Friday, September 20, 1974
THE       UBYSSEY
Page Friday. 3 Ceramics span the witty to bizarre
By DAN MILLER
The UBC fine arts gallery contemporary
ceramic sculpture exhibit opened this week,
fulfilling the expectation of lively works.
The title does not mean the traditional
collection of vases and plates as might be
expected in this first fall exhibit, but
generally imaginative and at times complex
molding and kiln work. Most of the 52 works
exhibited are by artists from the Western
provinces, exploring a craft relatively new
to the Canadian art scene.
Many of the pieces in this show tend
toward the witty, with clay freely formed to
suggest ramblings of an idle and at times
humorously neurotic imagination.
A group of more surreal moldings include
a set of blue and green musket pistols with
fish scales and a pair of breasts hanging on a
wall above a thorned heart.
Tam Irving's more abstract forms give
the impression of lightness, contrasted with
the rough, ceramic surface of the object.
Santo Mignosa, however, offers more
conventional pieces that are abstract, but at
least recognizable as vases.
But, though most pieces show expertise at
the kiln, lustrous glazes and sometimes
startling realism, the exhibit on the whole
lacks a more penetrating and profound
imagination. Of some of the wittier pieces, it
seems easy to take a piece of
clay, throw it, and then let the hand work
with it for a minute, but the result is similar
to simply taking any idle thought, throwing
it out of the head and not setting it in a
context, to evolve into something more
complex.
And nothing in this exhibit seems
characteristically Canadian, no spoof of a
Canadian symbol, very little suggestion of
nature, or of some ethnicity.
But the presence of ceramics in Canada as
an art form and not a craft is so new, that
the somewhat derivative exploring is expected.
The exhibit continues till Oct. 12. Hours
are Tuesday to Saturday 10:30 a.m. to 5
p.m., and Thursday evenings, 7 p.m. to 9
p.m.
Words unbarred in prison poems
By RON BINNS
George McWhirter (ed), Words from Inside.
$1.50.
Words from Inside 74 is the latest edition
of an annual collection of stories, essays and
poems by Canadian prison inmates, edited
by UBC creative-writing professor, George
McWhirter.
Although sponsored by the Canadian
Prison Arts Foundation — "a charitable
organization" — the collection avoids
blandness. The deadliness of life inside jail
is well expressed in Etienne Boisjoli's
Times, which moves from direct confession to a more detached vision of
"a man whose shin is the color of silver
walking
thru the walls the locked doors."
At the end this dream of freedom crumbles and we are left with the image of a
solitary man feeding on memory:
he thrives
ori the whispers he embalms
the dead toes he lowers
the shades he sprinkles
the lime in season
& out of season
his quarters are always filled.
Equally forceful is Norman Poole's
'Halfway to the Factory with its account
of the random violence of prison life
"he ate his lunch, washed his cup
and tray, stacked them neatly by
the door then hung himself.
The other poems in the collection have a
less immediate impact, playing variations
on familiar themes of loss, memory and
longing.
Of the four stories included, Children's
Aid and particularly Me and the Bouncer,
both by Frank Guiney, are outstanding
comic narratives.
Me and the Bouncer hilariously
satirizes psychoanalysis and dream-interpretation in relation to the sexual
deprivations involved in prison life.
R. L. Emkeit's Excerpts from the
Naidanac Chronicles offers an unusual
mock-Biblical satire on Canadian politics
while The Pinch Tree by Allan Mann
touchingly explores a child's view of the
"pinch-tree" or penitentiary.
Words from Inside is also exceptionally
well illustrated. Copies are available from
UBC's creative writing department.
It is unfortunate that so few of the
hundreds of entries could be included, but
apart from this the collection compares well
with similar publications from those living
outside such a grey and hostile environment.
THEY'LL KNOCK
YOUR SOCKS OFF.
Permit us this momentary bit off self- indulgence, because our intentions are pure: to assist you in choosing
the best stereo equipment for your hi-fi system, within the practical limitations of your audio budget.
*     top quality
discount prices
courteous service
Page Friday. 4
THE      U BYSSEY
Friday, September 20, 1974 More freaky body snatchers
From pf 3
spective of 40 years of horror melodramas,
it does not come off that well. Even Lugosi's
acting seems stilted and overdone. But still
it is interesting in the way that old fossils are
interesting — as showing where it all came
from.
Jan. 27
THE PHANTOM OF THE OPERA
Rupert Julian — USA 1925
Another of the all-time great horror films
and certainly the best of this series, this is
the original screen adaption of Gaston
LeRoux's 1908 mystery romance novel, with
Lon Chaney as the phantom who haunts the
Paris Opera House.
The sympathetic monster fails in love
with the beautiful (and always frail) woman
and is led by his love for her to his death.
The film slowly builds through fleeting
appearances of the phantom then takes off
when the phantom's love for the girl leads to
violence. He tries to win her by helping her
advance her career as an opera singer,
threatening to kill Carlotta, the prima donna
of the opera, unless his love Christine is
given the lead part. With this the phantom
steps into the foreground in the lives of the
people of Paris and in the film itself. The
phantom kidnaps Christine, carries her
through the catacombic sewer system under
Paris on a horse, releases her, appears at a
ball in one of the greatest scenes in film
history — the Masque of the Red Death —
three minutes of colour in a black and white
film, and finally is discovered and chased
through the streets of Paris to his death in
the Seine.
The entire repertoire of horror film
techniques can lie found in this classic,
marked by Chaney's make-up — ranging
from pins in his nostrils to expand them, to
special discs in his mouth to disfigure his
cheekbones, the ball scene, and the unmasking of the phantom.
Jan. 27
Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde
Rouben Mamoulian— USA 1931
One of the many film versions of Robert
Louis Stevenson's novel, this is probably the
best overall, although film buffs argue over
the performances of Frederic March in this
version and that of John Barrymore in the
1920 silent attempt.
The transformation from Jekyll to Hyde in
this film is, however, unsurpassed by any of
the others. As the story of a doctor who
brings out the evil side of himself, the film is
just not that interesting. The good/evil split
is there but it simply isn't developed to the
extent that it might be.
Feb. 10
THE ISLAND OF THE LOST SOULS
Erie G. Kenton — USA 1932
This is a loose film adaptation of H. G.
Wells'  classic science-fiction  story,   The
Island of Dr. Moreau. It actually uses Mary
Shelley's old Frankenstein plot, with a few
minor   variations.
Feb. 10
FREAKS
Tod Browning—USA 1932
Until recently this film was known to few,
but is now acknowledged an another of the
classics.
It centres on the f eaks of a circus sideshow
— midgets, Siamese twins, half-men/half-
women family of pinheads and so on. The
story focuses on Cleopatra, star of the flying
trapeze, and Hans, a midget. Cleopatra
learns that Hans has inherited a fortune and
sets out to marry him with the intention of
poisoning him afterwards and sharing the
fortune with her lover.
The film's horror derives largely from its
grim and tragic realism. It treats the freaks
and their internal relationships with sympathy and sensitivity, in fact, it is the normals who are the monsters in this film. It
relies not on any physical horror but on the
plight of these misshapen humans  with
whom one cannot help but empathize and
the horror of their existence.
Feb. 24
Cavalcanti, Crichton, Dearden,
andHamer — England 1946
DEAD OF NIGHT
Cavalcanti, Crichton, Dearden, andHamer
England 1946
A mid-forties example of the Tales From
the Crypt genre — several short tales are
strung together by a further story, always
with a cute, trite twist at the end.
In Dead of Night, the stories all revolve
around psychic experiences. Four people,
connected through a dream one them had,
meet in an English country home. The
dreamer gets the other three to relate their
experiences which leads into two trick
endings.
Feb. 24
DEMENTIA
John Parker — USA 1955
Back in circulation after being widely
banned for nearly 20 years, this is the story
of a  girl  with  a  rejection  complex,  a
surrealistic exploration of her mind as she is
driven to butcher her father in a graveyard.
Originally   decried   for   its   "pictorial
crudities", this is the very reason Cinema 16
is bringing it to you now.
March 10
INVASION OF THE BODY SNATCHERS
Don Siegel — USA 1956
Treading a thin line between horror and
science-fiction, this adaptation of Jack
Finney's The Body Snatchers is just terrible
(no pun intended). The acting is of the incredibly   over-excited   variety   found   in
Reefer Madness. The townspeople are
always non-entities, ranging from insipid to
hysterical to dead and back, essentially, to
being insipid.
March 10
THE BODY SNATCHERS
Robert Wise — USA 1956
Based on another Stevenson story, this is
the tale of an Edinburgh cabbie (Karloff)
who   goes   around,   looking   deliberately
ghoulish, digging up graves and taking the
bodies back to the ever present Bela Lugosi
and his doctor-master played by Henry
Daniel.
Daniel gives an incisive characterization
of a dedicated scientist, driven and converted into a haunted murderer. Karloff is
superb as the shabbily dressed villain. In the
film's most notable sequence a young blind
girl is seen singing on a dark and foggy
street corner, Karloff pulls up in his cab and
the song is cut short.
Mar. 24
NOSFERATU
F. W. Murnau — Germany 1922
This is the Dracula theme all over again.
Though directed by Murnau, one of the
greatest of the German expressionists, this
film is not one of his best works. It is more
sedative than terrifying and has little to
recommend it but Murnau's special effects
— negative film strips and stop-start-stop
techniques.
March 24
THE ABOMINABLE DR. PHIBES
Robert Fuest — England 1971
It's questionable that this is even a horror
film. With Vincent Price, who simply can't
be taken seriously, Joseph Cotten and Terry
Thomas, comedy might be more accurate.
Price places a brooding old vaudevillean,
knocking off a surgical team who botch an
. operation on his wife. Even as fun it's flat.
Submarines
Pizza
Ice Cream
Where ?
PAYMENT OF FEES
THE DEPARTMENT OF FINANCE, GENERAL SERVICES
ADMINISTRATION BLDG., WISHES TO REMIND
STUDENTS THAT THE
First Instalment is Due On Or Before       ,
Friday, September 20, 1974
SUBFILMSOC presents
Sept. 19-22
ROGER JAMES
MQpBE BTOID
liveandletdIe
Thurs. & Sun 7:00
Fri. & Sat. 7:00,9:30
Please show AMS Card
75c SUB Theatre
FREE PASS FOR TWO . . . FREE PASS FOR TWO . . .
The TAP Has Been Turned On At
JACK'S HANGING TREE
DRAFT BEER
To celebrate the arrival of draft beer at Jack's Hanging Tree Cabaret, we
would like you to be our guests, just bring in this ad, good for two
admissions. Nightly entertainment featuring:
LEE MORIN
"GUITARIST"
Mon. - Thurs. - 9:30 - 1:30
BLUE'S GAZOOS
5 PIECE ROCK
6 ROLL BAND
Friday & Saturday
COMING... COMING... COMING i
"- REGENERATION
SOUND
9 MUSICIANS & SINGERS
ON THE AAALL S.U.B.
12:30 P.M., TUES., SEPT. 24
SPONSOR: CHARISMATIC CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP
Info. 263-8219
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CANADA'S FIRST
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For reservations call 224-3711
JACK'S HANGING TREE "ON THE MALL" - 900 Block Granville
FREE PASS FOR TWO . . . FREE PASS FOR TWO . . .
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Friday, September 20, 1974
THE      UBYSSEY
Page Friday. 5 Page 10
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, September 20, 1974
■w—
Hot flashes
Aussie speaks
en Hitler
Achtung, those interested in
the Thousand-year Reich.
John A. Moses, history
professor at the University of
Queensland, speaks on "Hitler
Between Prussianism and Mass
Hysteria — Some Post-War
German views" noon Wednesday
in Buchanan 104.
The event is sponsored by the
UBC history department.
More UEL
Politicians look at them and
waffle.
City planners look at them and
dream.
The endowment lands regional-
park committee looks at them and
says "Let's walk."
Through the endowment lands
this Sunday, that is.
The committee has been
carrying on a campaign to save the
endowment lands from
destruction for more than a year.
As part of its campaign, the
committee has sponsored Sunday
walks which have attracted a total
of more than 1,500 persons to
date.
During the two-hour walk,
participants will get a first-look at
the threatened parkland which
hides behind a fringe of scruffy
looking bush designed to numb
potential conservationists.
Walkers are to gather at 2 p.m.
at 16th and Sasamat and then
head into the bush for a glimpse
of what may soon be gone.
Intelligent
If you are at all interested in
"Cartographic Display Operations
on Surface Date collected in an
Irregular Structure", then CB
6120 Simon Fraser University is
the place to be Monday.
On Monday at 10 a.m., Doug
Cochrane of SFU's Geography
department will defend his
controversial master's thesis.
Wood €humps
Next week is Forestry Week.
Activities take root Wednesday
in SUB mall with axe-throwing, a
chokerman's race and
double-bucking.
Events branch out to Empire
Pool on Thursday, when budding
Foresters     can     participate     in
log-birling and broomstick racing.
Equipment will be provided, but
dry clothes are your problem.
Boat races will be held Friday
in SUB mall.
All activities begin at 12:30,
and everyone is invited to
participate. Beer prizes are
promised for all events.
Shake a limb and make it out
to SUB cafeteria Saturday night,
Sept. 28, for Undercut '74 with
Hank and the Hobos.
Ski club
The Pacific Ski Club will hold
its first meeting at 7 p.m. in the
Mt. Pleasant Lawn Bowling
clubhouse at Robson Park, St.
George and Kingsway.
Ski films will be shown and all
UBC students are welcome to
attend. The club plans group
skiing trips as well as social events.
Tween classes
TODAY
MEN'S SQUASH TEAM
Team tryouts, 3-^p.m., rhunder-
bird winter spoiW centre squash
courts.
UBC SKYDIVERS
First jump course meeting, noon
SUB 215.
REVOLUTIONARY
MARXIST GROUP
Forum and discussion, Portugal, the
coming explosion, 8 p.m., Fishermen's hall, 138 East Cordova.
CHINESE CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP
Lecture, Christianity and the modern man, noon, SUB ballroom.
ITALIAN CLUB
General meeting, noon, International House 406.
PROGRESSIVE CONSERVATIVE
STUDENT FEDERATION
General meeting, noon, SUB 213.
ALLIANCE FRANCAISE
General meeting, noon, International House lounge.
YOUNG SOCIALISTS
Vanguard forum, Ruth Bullock on
the   matriarchy  among  West  Coast
Indians, 8 p.m., 1208 Granville.
GAY PEOPLE OF UBC
First general meeting, noon, SUB
105B.
SATURDAY
CVC
Shenanagabana
p.m., SUB 212.
TUESDAY
LUTHERAN STUDENT MOVEMENT
Supper meeting with Pastor Muen-
del speaking, 6 p.m., Lutheran
campus centre.
CHARISMATIC CHRISTIAN
FELLOWSHIP
David  Johnstone  and the regeneration sound, noon, SUB mall.
UBC KAYAK AND CANOE CLUB
General meeting, noon, SUB 209.
UBC LIBERALS
General   meeting  and   election   of
convention    delegates,   noon,   SUB
211.
GERMAN CLUB
Oral   German  practice,  7  p.m.,  IH
406.
HISTORY STUDENTS ASSOCIATION
General meeting, noon, Buch. 2225.
variety    night,    8
SUNDAY
LUTHERAN STUDENT MOVEMENT
Worship,     10:30     a.m.,    Lutheran
campus centre.
MONDAY
UBC ABORTION ACTION
Planning meeting for the visit of Dr.
Henry Morgentaler, noon, SUB 215.
UBC MY JONG KUNG FU CLUB
Demonstration     and     registration,
noon, SUB ballroom.
CCCM
Supper and  discussion,  4:30  p.m.,
Lutheran campus centre.
UKRAINIAN STUDENTS CLUB
General meeting, noon, SUB 215.
THE SCIENCE
UNDERGRADUATE SOCIETY
Announces Openings For:
TREASURER
AMS REPRESENTATIVE
SECRETARY
PUBLIC RELATIONS OFFICER
PUBLICATIONS OFFICER
ATHLETIC COORDINATOR
Nominations open Sept. 24 and close Oct. 1, 1974.
Elections to be held Oct. 8, 1974.
Please submit nominations to Box 178 SUB.
For information call Charlene Moriarity
733-2284
or Ron Walls 684-2056
Spectacular Stereo
SAVINGS
at
RHODES
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Commercial - 3 tine** 1 day $1.80; additional lines
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Classified ads are not accepted by telephone and are payable in
advance. Deadline i$ 11:30 a.m„ the day before publication.
Publications Off he, Room 241, S.U.B., UBC, Van. 8, B.C.
5 — Coming Events
10 —for Sale — Commercial
TEXAS  INSTRUMENTS
CALCULATORS
Price Reduction
SR-11 Now $114.95
TI-2550   Now   $84.98
(with memory)
TI-2500 $59.95 — SR-10 $94.95
Available immediately from
MARV NIDER
In   Pharmacy   Lounge,
Cunningham  Bldg.
Dally 12:30-1:30 or call 325-4161
for information.
PAPPAS   BROTHERS   FUR  SALE
300 Trade-In Fur Coats $20.00 and up
AU sizes: Muskrat, squirrel, mink. Persian lamb,  etc.
On sale one day only. Sat., Sept. 21st
9:00 a.m. — 9:00 p.m.
PAPPAS BROTHERS' FURS
459 Hamilton St. 481-6840
IVi blks. N. of Queen Elizabeth Theatre
, 11 — For Sale — Private
'71 YAMAHA 360 ENDURO. Excellent
condition, good cheap transportation.
Phone 263-8478 after 5.
RUSSIA CANADA hockey game tickets.
Game: Sept. 23. Phone Colm at 224-
0916.
185 SUZUKI MT3. Cheap to run, easy
to park, beautiful cond. Offers 224-
9921.
HANC GLIDER, Eipper-formance, Custom color sail. Must sell for fees.
Sacrifice.   Offers.   224-9921.
FOR SALE at 25% off. Mint new encyclopedia Britannica. Still in packing
cases. RE 3-4806, evenings. $450 instead of $614!
IS —Found
20 — Housing
NEED ROOMMATE — Female graduate
to share furnished one bedroom
suite, modern, good location. $107.50.
228-9557.
25 — Instruction
EXPERT ACCORDION lessons on campus, beginner to advanced. Rentals
available. 224-7797 eves.
PIANO   LESSONS by  grad  of JuilUard'
School   of   Music.   All   grade   levels
welcome.   731-0601.
30 - Jobs
STUDENT—2 hours per day, 3 days
per week—clerical work.
Apply   Ubyssey   Advertising   Office,
Room 241 S.U.B.
STUDENT FOR LIVE-IN position faculty home, to assist with light housekeeping and to prepare evening meal.
Some child supervision. R & B plus
$50/month. 224-5056 eves.
CAN. PUBLISHER seeks part-time,
help calling on libraries, bookstores.
Call 874-0511 during bus. hours.
35 — Lost
LOST: SMALL BLACK PURSE with
crocheting and hook. Am desperate.
Phone 732-7718 after 6 p.m. Lani.
WILL THE PERSON who borrowed the
typist's posture chair from Hillel
House, please return it A.S.A.P. I'm
getting backache.
40 — Messages
WOULD THE GUY who ran into me on
the bike-path Tuesday, 5:30 please
phone  228-0903,   Katrina.
60 - Rides
65 — Scandals
DISCOUNT STEREO: Example: A.G.S.
AM-FM stereo receiver, 2 speakers,
base, cover, cartridge, list $200, your
cost $125. AM-FM digital clock-radio.
$35. 8-digit calculator AC-DC functions ( + , —, X, —) list $79, your cost
$49. Also Corry, Akai, Sony. Call
325-0366 after 6 p.m.
70 — Services
85 — Typing Friday, September 20, 1974
THE      UBYSSEY
Pag* 11
Cairns rejects UBC corporation
'Union means bosses vs. workers'
From page 1
pledge procedure would weaken
the LRB application because it
would cast doubt on the commitment of members signing
forms previously.
But political science head Alan
Cairns said this procedure placed
members in an intolerable
situation, because many who
wanted to join or rejoin the
association could not out of opposition to certification.
"There has been in all a serious
mishandling of the issue," he said.
"The faculty members on leave,
who totalled 131 last year, received
an application headed 'application
for membership.'
"It read 'I hereby reaffirm
active membership in the
association and reapply. . .'
"You can't do both. You can't
reapply and reaffirm."
Cairns also said he disagreed
with what he called an unconstitutional exclusion of deans
from the Faculty Association.
"In effect this presents the view
of those who interpret university
government as being modelled on a
corporation.
"Assuming that is true — and I
don't, necessarily —this will
make the university seem more
like a corporation which those like
me don't wish to see it become."
Cairns also said he objected to
the "great stress laid on the rights
of the minority" in proposals
prepared by an ad-hoc committee
on department head election and
establishment of grievance
procedures.
The report proposes department
heads be elected to three-year,
renewable terms and steps be set
up for faculty members to settle
grievances with their superiors.
But Omelusik said he objects to
Cairns' statement that deans were
"undemocratically" removed
from the association.
He said at the last association
general meeting a two-thirds
majority passed the motion to
remove deans from active
membership.
"I don't think any deprivation of
rights was done in an undemocratic manner," he said.
Omelusik was supported by civil
engineering prof Richard Spencer,
who said that at the Feb. 14
meeting then-president Ian Ross
ruled a motion to seek certification
out of order because he received no
advance notice of motion.
"There were 600 people there
and more than two-thirds voted to
overturn the chair," Spencer said.
"If since then faculty members
have had a change of heart, instead
U.B.C.
KUNG FU
CLUB
instructed by master
RAYMOND LEUNG
(Paksing, Futga style)
Mon., Tues. Upstairs of SUB
Wed. GYM E.
4:30-6:30 p.m.
NEW MEMBERS WELCOME I
One Free Lesson Available
one-to-40 ratio) should be deferred
until after the certification vote is
taken."
Under the B.C. Labor code, a
certification vote is usually conducted among members of a
defined bargaining unit before
certification is granted.
More than 50 per cent must
support the unionization during the
vote.
But Kimball said the board can
decide to certify the association
without taking the vote, even
though the executive asked that
such a vote be taken.
But she said she is certain the
vote will be taken.
The association must then
conduct at least one information
meeting so members can discuss
the unionization proposal.
French head Larry Bongie asked
that each member be supplied with
the certification application in
preparation for the meeting.
FACULTY MEMBERS ... at meeting
of attacking the motives of the
executive you should consider
redirecting the executive."
"Others before me have spoken
of a feeling of shame and said they
are made to feel uncomfortable at
the unionization move.
"Well, I feel uncomfortable
because I see the executive
carrying out the directions of the
membership and being attacked
for that."
After the membership debate,
former economics head Gideon
Rosenbluth moved to change the
make-up of the proposed collective
bargaining committee.
A proposal circulated during
August by the executive sets out a
35-member committee, composed
of 31 faculty representatives and
four ex-officio members.
But Rosenbluth said the system
follows easy lines rather than
logical ones, buy reflecting the
current faculty set-up.
He proposed instead the committee try to represent different
interest groups by having one
member for each 40 full-time
faculty members.
He was attacked by a sociology
professor, who said if the committee was set up to mirror interest groups, it should instead
have some members elected by
junior faculty and others by the
senior faculty members.
"The assistant professors, the
instructors, those without tenure
should band together in a group to
protect themselves," he said.
But discussion was cut off by a
professor saying "I do autopsies
only after I have the body."
"This amendment (to set up a
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THE       U BYSSEY
Friday, September 20, 1974
Army coup looms in Gr. Britain
By PHILLIP WEST
Alternate News Service
LONDON — Politicians uniformly agree
that Britain is facing its "gravest economic
crisis" since the Second World War. Another
election (scheduled for Oct. 10) is not about
to change that fact. -
Inflation is running at more than 17 per
cent and is expected to climb to 20 per cent
next year. The trade deficit will probably
total $10 billion this year, bankruptcies have
increased and unemployment may jump to
one million within months — only the stock
market is falling, in a slump equalling that
in 1929.
"We're    heading    straight    for    a
depression," says one merchant banker.
"When? Well, we live in an exponential
world, where everything happens faster
than you think, so, whenever you say, it'll be
sooner."
All this promises the British people a long
winter of discontent with the workers
bearing the brunt.
The Labor government has so far led a
charmed existence with the unions,
flaunting a rather vague "social contract"
to avoid inflationary pay claims.
Whether it is a Labor or a Conservative
victory in the upcoming election, that
"contract" is likely to collapse with
demands for massive pay raises. The only
alternative for any government would be to
reintroduce severe pay controls.
What happens then is a hazardous guess,
but a point somewhere between a general
strike and armed rebellion is not, according
to those in the city, an unfounded possibility.
"I happen to think," one British company
director is quoted as saying, "that, before I
die, I shall be out there hiding in the fields.
We shall slip slowly toward Marxism
without a revolution, or it could be amrect
confrontation and we could be there very
quickly. Then the question would be, would
the army step in? If not, we'd be lost."
Such reactions to the current situation
from the British establishment have not
escaped the royalists and other assorted
reactionaries left over from the empire.
Many have started breathing phrases like
"save Britain" and "saving the Crown";
there are numerous indications that some
army officers, active and retired, are
seriously considering intervention in any
politically stalemated government — a most
likely outcome of the election.
The Investors' Review has reported that
one top general apparently took three
months leave of absence "to write a manual
on how, and in what circumstances, the
army would take over." And Brigadier
Frank Kitson, in his book "Low Intensity
Operations" says "already there are indications that such a situation could
arise. . ."
"If a genuine and serious grievance arose,
such as might result from a significant drop
in the standard of living, all those who now
dissipate their protest over a wide variety of
causes might concentrate their efforts and
produce a situation which was beyond the
power of the police to handle.
Should this happen the army would be
required to restore the situation rapidly.
Fumbling at this juncture might have grave
consequences, even to the extent of undermining confidence in the whole system of
government."
Kitson should not be easily discounted. His
book rated a foreword by chief of the
general staff, General Sir Michael Carver,
who was regarded by former Prime
Minister Edward Heath as the man to keep
the country running during any disruption.
In the foreword, Carver described the book
as "written for the soldier of today to help
him prepare for the operations of
tomorrow."
Another brigadier, Kenneth Hunt, of the
Institute of Strategic Studies, believes it
would be comparatively easy to accomplish
the first stage of a coup in Britain.
"There are enough men and equipment
within range of London. There are the troops
used at Heathrow, with the help of a few
tanks from Tidworth: that's enough to go
straight to the BBC, Downing (home of the
PM), and Parliament."
Hunt's mention of the troops at Heathrow
is particularly relevant to any discussion of
a British coup d'etat. The joint exercise of
troops and police at the airport was
originally staged under the Conservative
government in reaction to a wrongful report
that Arab terrorists had stolen a missile
from NATO.
Since then the exercise, complete with
deployment of tanks, has been repeated on p»
number of occasions, and it was Kitson who
suggested that it should be extended to the
docks, railways and coal mines.
A series of other notable army exercises
have been reported. One in Corby, Nottinghamshire, by members of the Fifth
Royal Anglican Regiment, was part of a war
game between two rival factions in "aid of
the civilian power."
One massive exercise in civilian control
that has been going on all the time is in
Northern Ireland. It was from there that
Kitson announced in 1971 that the army and
other forces would be ready to take on the
workers in Britain within two years.
But in his book he found one fault with the
"professionals" as the modern British army
is called.
Kitson wrote of the need to maintain
specialist units within the army to enable
essential civil services to be maintained in
the event of civilians being unable or unwilling to maintain them. The army's lack of
specialists was graphically illustrated
during the Ulster workers' strike of May this
year, when after 13 days the army occupied
21 petrol stations but was unable to operate
electrical, gas, water and sewage installations deserted by the workers.
It is into this breach that two old soldiers
of impeccable qualification have lately
marched with plans for organizations to
replace workers during a general strike.
Most impressive is Colonel David
Sterling, founder of the special air services
during the Second World War in North
Africa. He earned himself the nickname
"the phantom major" and the Distinguished
Service Order before imprisonment in
Colditz.
After the war, he was involved in the
Capricorn Africa society, an unsuccessful
attempt to maintain a white presence in the
east and centre of the continent by allying
with any Uncle Toms that could be found; he
helped Yemeni terrorists against the
Russians; established a commercial
organization to provide Third World heads
of state with bodyguards and intelligence
agents, and in 1970, was involved in a
scheme to release several score of Libyan
political prisoners from the main jail in
Tripoli.
Now backed by British arms dealers and
millionaire Geoffrey Edwards and.other
interested industrialists, Stirling has plans
for a volunteer organization that will "round
up" militant unionists and jump across
picket lines by helicopter to maintain
production at the strikebound installations.
The operating schedule for "Great Britain'
75" plans to have volunteers undergoing
initial training by mid-October for effective
use in November.
"I do think Britain is heading for real
disaster," he says. "The Communists are
out of the woodwork after all these years
and they have declared themselves.
"It is not our aim to bash the unions but
simply to protect the country from the worst
effects of chaos caused by politically
motivated actions. And that's what this
country faces — chaos — if the militant
revolutionary trade unionists have their
way."
Geoffrey Rippon, a Conservative party
foreign affairs spokesman, has admitted
that the project by retired army officers of
recruiting private civilian armies for
Britain would be realized if the Conservatives win the next election.
His speech was the first indication from
the Conservatives that they are trying to
seize the initiative on the law and order
issue from former army officers who have
announced similar volunteer forces in the
past weeks.
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