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The Ubyssey Oct 28, 1986

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UBC Archives Serial
THE  UBYSSEY
Vbl. LXIX, No. 15
Vancouver, B.C. Tuesday, October 28,1986
J-
1*228-2301
Faculty strike looms over college
By JANICE IRVING
Only a "miracle" will prevent a
strike at Capilano College, said the
president of the College's faculty
association.
Carol McCandless told The
Ubyssey Monday that faculty will
probably walk the picket line at 7
a.m. today if workloads are not
reduced. Faculty are also demanding higher salaries.
Teachers at the college have
assumed "unreasonable" workloads as a result of provincial
education cutbacks, maintains the
college's chief faculty negotiator Ed
Lavalle.
Faculty began teaching nine sections in April 1985-instead of the
normal eight as a result of restraint
measures imposed by the Bennett
government during the last four
years.
On October 16, 81 per cent of
faculty voted in favor of a strike.
The faculty were to walk out at
1:30 p.m. Monday but a strike was
averted when Board mediator Jack
Chapelas called a last-minute
meeting at 3 p.m.
The college board is offering the
faculty a three per cent increase in
1986 and a 3.8 per cent increase in
salary for 1987 at the cost of
Capiiano cutting 100 classes in
1987, said the colleges' president
Douglas Jardene.
The faculty has not received a
salary increase since April 1983.
But McCandless said a salary increase is not the major problem.
She said heavy work loads assumed
by faculty threatens the quality of
education at the college.
Hilda Rizun, chair of the college
board, said it would be "completely
irresponsible" of the faculty to
strike when the education of the
students is at stake.
But Crawford Kilian, a college
communications instructor, said
students are suffering anyway
because the majority of teachers
have to teach nine sections.
"We're (the faculty association)
pretty determined not to see a
severe drop in the quality and effectiveness of our teaching," he said.
But Rizun warned the board
won't give into the faculty.
Imtiaz Popat, communications
co-ordinator of the college's student society, said "It scares me that
the board is not budging on this
issue."
But if the teachers do strike, the
students would be behind them, he
said.
He said Jardene told students at
an information forum Monday that
students would be "compensated"
for the loss of instructional hours
by taking classes well into
December.
"I don't want to take classes over
Christmas," Popat said.
Waters said a strike is a last resort
for faculty members.
Faculty mistrusts
premier's plans
By EVELYN JACOB
UBC faculty who are worried
about the future of education in
B.C. have not been hesitant to pass
judgement on the newly-formed
Vander Zalm government.
Faculty association vice-president
Herbert Rosengarten said in an interview Monday the size of the
Socred majority confirms the
government's belief that education
and education funding are not
priorities of the B.C. electorate.
"The majority given to Vander
Zalm may make the government
believe that the voters of B.C. approved of restraint," said
Rosengarten, who along with faculty association members took out an
advertisement in The Vancouver
Sun newspaper during the campaign to make universities an election issue.
"This raises serious doubts about
possible change to education," he
said.
Soil science professor Jan Devries
said he is "extremely depressed "
about Vander Zalm's victory and
says a Socred government is "bad
news " for education.
"The people who voted for him
(Vander Zalm) are either privileged
or uneducated," said Devries.
"They have fantasies they'll
become millionaires like him. Fantasy has been the key word in this
election."
Asked what Vander Zalm's first
priority on education should be,
Devries refused to comment.
"Don't ask me about that man
with a cartoon face and a cartoon
smile."
Political science professor Phil
Resnick called Vander Zalm a
"snake-oil merchant" with an absolute remedy for everything.
He said the new premier will
build on his success in the short-
term and will be more willing to
listen to the concerns of universities
than Bennett was, but wonders
whether Vander Zalm's interest
will be anything more than
cosmetic.
"Although we won't know for
sure until the provincial budget is
passed down in February, it's
doubtful we'll get any new
funding," said Resnick.
"He was confrontational when
he was education minister, and not
one who produced thoughtful
policy analysis," said political
science professor Paul Tennant.
Tennant compared Vander
Zalm's campaign strategy with Bennett's, complaining that "flashy
campaigns have not produced good
managers."
"Vander Zalm will not be able to
keep up a one-person show when he
is leading a government," he said.
John Waters, president of the
College Institute of Educators'
Association, said Vander Zalm's
political record does not lead faculty or the public to trust him.
"The onus is on him to show that
he can be trusted," said Waters, adding it is hard to evaluate Vander
Zalm's policies because his comments made during the election may
not be promises.
Although Waters was optimistic
about Vander Zalm's pledge to set
up a royal commission on education, he expressed fear it would only
amount to "election talk."
"Faculty are prepared to wait
and see if Vander Zalm really means
what he says about consultation
and conciliation, but we don't have
evidence to be hopeful," he said.
- dan andrews photo
UBC MAN TRIES to use skateboard in attempt to jump into the garden of love. There he hopes to find the one
and only woman he has ever loved and make a lovely green monster baby with her.
Return of grants recommended
By BRAD NEWCOMBE
The Canadian Federation of
Students hopes that education in
B.C. will be given a "fresh new
start" after it submits a report with
student aid recommendations to the
provincial government in late
November.
"The Socreds have opted for a
fresh new start, wilh promises for
broad consultation and an open
style of government," said Steven
Scott, executive officer of the CFS
Pacific Region. "High debt loads is
a crisis that won't go away. The
government has to act."
The CFS report is the outcome of
task forces held on campuses in
B.C., which were created in response
to the provincial government's poor
handling of student aid in B.C.
Local committees comprised of
faculty, student societies, staff support, and Boards of Governors,
heard testimony from students who
suffered financially during their
post-secondary education.
"The idea was to bring the com
munity on to the campuses to make
people aware of the financial state
of students in this province," said
Scott.
CFS statistics show the average
UBC student debt load upon
graduation is $15,000.
Presentations were also heard
from poverty groups, business people and bank representatives.
UBC's Alma Mater Society was invited to take part in the hearings,
but did not attend.
Jean Swanson, co-ordinator of
End Legislated Poverty, who took
part in the Langara hearing, said
many people think of education as a
vehicle to propel people our of
poverty, but after investigation
discover it pushes them deeper into
poverty.
Royal Bank loans manager Dean
Morrissette said the provincial
government was "short sighted" in
eliminating the student grant program. He said his experience in
dealing with student loans confirms
that people in B.C. are unable to
cope  financially under  prevailing
economic conditions.
Reinstatement of student grants
will be high on the CFS' list of
recommendations, according to
Scott.
Scott said that inadequate funding for student aid is a problem for
society at large.
"Access to post-secondary education is increasingly limited. This is a
social problem affecting students
and    non-sutdents   alike."    He
said the CFS hopes to set up an advisory committee on student aid
which  will  review  findings  from
each of the task forces committees.
The final report will be circulated
as widely as possible in order to
heighten public awareness of the
seriousness of the state of student
aid in B.C. Scott believes that as
concern over the province's education crisis spreads throughout the
community at large, there is greater
hope that the CFS recommendations   will   be   addressed   by   the
government. Page 2
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, October 28, 1986
Abuse clinic revitalized
By PATTI FLATHER
A group of students trying to
raise campus awareness of sexual
harassment is setting up an information clinic starting in January.
Christina Davidson, law 3, said
Monday that the clinic will be
located in the UBC Women's
Centre office in SUB.
Davidson said hours have not
been established yet, but the clinic
will likely run four hours per week.
Organizers see the clinic as a place
to record sexual harassment complaints, and to be advised where to
go next.
Davidson and other students
began meeting in September, after a
UBC presidential ad hoc committee
on sexual harassment was formed in
the summer. The students said they
were concerned the four-member
committee has no student or staff
representatives.
Janet Patterson, law 3, said
earlier, "Without widespread
discussion the committee's work
will be in a vaccum."
Davidson said the group plans an
education campaign to coincide
with the clinic's start, and is holding
meetings every Monday at noon in
the Women's Centre.
The   presidential   committee's
mandate is to consider a statement
of policies regarding sexual harassment and to report to UBC president David Strangway on the implementation of these policies.
UBC is one of a handful of Canadian colleges and universities which
has not yet implemented formal
procedures to ensure due process
for both the complainant and the
alleged offender.
The UBC Law School Women's
Committee, the UBC Chaplains
Association, and the UBC
Women's Centre are among groups
planning to submit briefs to the
committee, chaired by UBC
associate vice-president Bertie McClean. Dr. Nadine Wilson, Jean
Elder, and Lynn Smith, all faculty
members, are also on the committee.
An earlier sexual harassment
committee formed in November
1983 dissolved itself the following
spring.
Sexual harassment compaints
now travel through various channels, including the Women Students
Office, deans and department
heads, and the personnel service.
Tory fears fairies
OTTAWA (CUP) — A progressive Conservative backbencher
is calling for "fairies" to be barred
from the Royal Canadian Mounted
Police, "the finest police in the
world."
"Let us keep it that way," Gordon Taylor told the House of Commons during question period Oct.
20. Taylor later said "even the gays
don't like (fairies)," which he said
were "very, very effeminate."
Svend    Robinson,    the   New
Democrat MP for Burnaby who has
long advocated full rights for gays
and lesbians, called Taylor's comments "the rantings of a fading
dinosaur" and "homophobic
nonsense."
"The use of the word 'fairy' has
the same purpose as the word 'nigger' or 'wop'," Robinson said.
"What is disturbing is not so much
the language, but the attitudes
underlying it, which are shared by
too many of Mr. Taylor's colleagues."
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THE    UBYSSEY
Page 3
Goldberg advocates armed struggle
By MELINDA WITTSTOCK
Canadian University Press
OTTAWA (CUP) — Denis
Goldberg understands the letter of
the law.
The South African government
may have varred him from using an
AK-47 to fight for what he believes
in, but that hasn't stopped the
founding member of the armed
wing of the African National Congress from advocating armed struggle as a means of dismantling apartheid.
For more than 20 years, the white
South African was incarcerated in a
Pretoria jail. Convicted of sabotage
in 1963 and sentenced to life imprisonment with Nelson Mandela
and other ANC activists in the
Rivonia Trials, Goldberg was
released last year after signing a
document which stipulates he not
"plan or instigate violence for
political purposes" or make himself
"liable for arrest."
"It doesn't say I can't advocate
armed struggle," says Goldberg,
who helped found Umkhonto We
Sizwe (Spear of the Nation), the
ANC's armed wing, after joining
the ANC 25 years ago. "1 always
have and I always will — it's the only way apartheid will be overthrown."
Since Sept. 29, Goldberg has
been touring a host of Canadian
cities, calling for "people's sanctions", and talking about the ANC,
armed struggle, the future South
Africa, and his experiences inside
apartheid's jails.
Goldberg says the "struggle is going to intensify" unless the regime
"breaks down quickly under international pressure." Comprehensive
sanctions, he says, will weaken the
white minority government's ability
to administer apartheid, "Less
money and equipment to keep the
military machine going means a
weaker military and police force
and a shorter, less bloody
struggle."
Sanctions should be for
"anything and everything" connected to South Africa, he says.
Canadians should boycott all South
African products and corporations
dealing with the regime, as well as
athletes and entertainers with South
African "connections," Goldberg
says.
The majority of blacks in South
Africa have been calling for sanctions since 1959, says Goldberg,
"and only now are they beginning
to be heard."
Goldberg says the support of
Canadians in the struggle against
apartheid "is greatly appreciated."
But, he says, "the solidarity of
Canadians is not a one way thing;
apartheid should open up your eyes
to the institutionalized racism
against native people here."
"It's not enough to be anti-
apartheid. It's good to be against
racism anywhere."
Goldberg is confident apartheid
will   be  dismantled.   "There's  no
doubt about that — the question is
how." Goldberg says a combination of international pressure,
massive political mobilization
"above ground and underground",
and armed struggle "will win the
people their freedom."
He says a "one person, one vote"
system, as specified in the ANC
Freedom Charter — where the
rights of all national groups including whites are protected — will
replace apartheid. "Whites will be
equal to everyone else and it will be
a crime to be a racist."
There will be a redistribution of
wealth and the "major multinational corporations will be broken
up, although there will be room for
some private enterprise," says
Goldberg. "If the multinationals
get out now, there may be a role for
them in the new South Africa. If
not, they shouldn't be dismayed if
they are not welcome."
"Street committees" now administer the townships, completely
autonomously of the local 'official'
government. "Young people have
refused to go to school under the
Bantu education system — a system
that teaches them they are inferior
to whites — but they are not bums.
They are functioning as political-
administrative groups in the bantustans and they are helping the
people."
Goldberg says whites are becoming increasingly divided on apartheid. "Even though Botha's
regime is fascist, some whites have
split off farther to the right. These
Afrikaner liberationists says they'll
fight to the last drop of blood to
keep apartheid, but they'll only
make it more bitter, more bloody."
But the majority of whites, he
says, have "simply withdrawn their
support for the Botha regime.
They're still benefitting from the
privileges of apartheid, but they're
not defending it."
Many whites are dodging the
draft. In 1985, 7,500 out of 16,000
white soldiers failed to report for
duty, even though the penalty for
desertion is six years in prison, says
Goldberg.
"Whites say they are fighting
blacks. Blacks say they are not
fighting whites; they are fighting
the system," he says.
"Some whites, like myself, are
involved in the national liberation
struggle. But there's not enough."
Goldberg says the regime distorts
the nature of violence between
blacks because they "want to
believe blacks naturally fight each
other all the time, and that whites
are needed to keep 'order."
"The French collaborated with
the Nazis, and the French resistance
killed French people who collaborated. But no one ever said
they fought each other because they
were white or French," says
Goldberg.
Goldberg says the Botha regime
straggle
struggle
is now hiring black police officers
for high pay to patrol the bantustans. "The idea is to divide the
opposition," he says, "but it won't
work."
Meanwhile, he says, the regime,
western powers and multinational
corporations are "looking for someone to rule on their behalf"
because they know apartheid is
about to collapse. Both Ronald
Reagan and Margaret Thatcher,
says Goldberg, back Kwazulu Chief
Gatsha Buthelezi as the 'moderate'
alternative to the ANC.
But Buthelezi has said publicly he
doesn't insist on universal suffrage,
says Goldberg, "and has not
hesitated to use violence against
blacks opposed to him."
At Kwazulu University, Buthelezi
followers publicly murdered five
students opposed to Buthelezi's
party, Inkatha. But police reported
no suspects, says Goldberg, because
Buthelezi is the minister of police in
his township and "investigates all
the crimes."
Goldberg says the bantustan
system was set up "to create groups
of highly-paid administrators who
have a vested interest in maintaining the system." He says Buthelezi,
who is often quoted or mentioned
in the Western press, actually has
minimal support within the country.
Goldberg, now living in London
and working for the ANC, is adjusting to life outside prison walls.
"Prison was prison — all 7,904
days of it," says Goldberg, who
read the Bible seven times during
that time "just to occupy my
mind."
Goldberg said white prison
guards "didn't like Mandela, but
could respect him because he was
fighting for his people. But whites
like me are hated — we're seen as
betraying all whites."
Goldberg found "considerable
anti-semitism" among the prison
guards. "Each morning, the guards
would walk by each one of us and
say, 'Good morning Jew, good
morning Jew', even if they weren't
Jewish, as an insult," he said.
Goldberg says he was released
partially because of the efforts of
his daughter in Israel and her Kib
butz, a collective working community. "The Kibbutz is a collective and one person's problem
becomes the group's. My
daughter's problem was getting me
out of jail," says Goldberg.
Goldberg visited Israel immediately after his release, but was
kicked out within two weeks
because he was considered
"dangerous to the state" by the
Knesset, the Israeli parliament.
As soon as he arrived in Israel,
Goldberg was asked of his opinions
on the Israeli government's extensive economic and military links
with South Africa, which is under
military embargo in accordance
with international law. He told
Israelis to "break their state's links
with racist South Africa," which infuriated the Israeli right wing, says
Goldberg.
Goldberg says only one member
of the Knesset publicly defended
him "by saying freedom was a
world-wide problem, not just one
for Jews in Israel."
Goldberg, invited to Canada by
the International Defence and Aid
Fund For Southern Africa and the
ANC, says international pressure is
"hurting the regime. They are going
to have to hurt harder and then
you'll see the ideology of racism doing a somersault.
"The whites will then say, like
they did in Mozambique and
Angola, 'yes, we can live with the
blacks.' "
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THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, October 28,1986
College
It began in 1982.
The Socred policy of underfunding colleges and
universities.
Colleges were once a place where students could
receive greater instructional time and be in smaller
classes than universities. For first year post-secondary
students without the cash to go on to university, for
students unsure of what they wanted to major in, who
needed time to experiment, and for students living too
far from the universities, this provided an ideal environment for tasting campus life.
But no more...
The Socreds have replaced community-elected college boards with their own appointed bodies.
These bodies have overseen the imposition of cutbacks on the colleges, eliminating courses, especially
in the university transfer programs.
UBC, in its own reaction to restraint, has put a ceiling
on the number of transfer students it will accept.
Our college system, has become a system of non-
academic, two-year job training programs. Discrimination against those who live outside of Vancouver and
Victoria, or who would prefer an alternative to an enormous degree machine, has been re-established.
I'LL CTUST HAVH
THE F\RTl F\cif\u CoLOURIh/Q
Commerce student reacts to iessons' editorial
I was particularly irritated by
your lead editorial "Lessons"
marking the 1956 Hungarian uprising. The writer's melodramatic plea
that "we must not rest until
freedom and liberty reigns supreme
over all the earth" is a dangerous
belief system that seems to inhabit
the western mind. This Reaganes-
que view condemns the world to
perpetual conflict, intolerance, and
war (which is what would have happened had we intervened in
Hungary).
If the West has any interest in the
survival of the human race, it must
stop trying to propagate its values
in every part of the world. The
Soviets view this with the same
hostility with which we in the West
view their export of communist
revolution.  What happens within
the communist world should be no
concern of ours (it was President
Carter's petty complaining about
human rights violations that helped
sink detente).
Another implication of the
editorial is that freedom is
necessarily a virtue, or that it correlates posively with human happiness. If this were true, the U.S.
(the freest country in the world)
would be full of happy, contented
people, and the USSR would be a
nation of embittered prisoners (a la
George Orwell). However, if the
two populations were asked to comment upon the quality of their life
in general, it would be discovered
that the opposite is closer to the
truth.
Consider, for example, how
many people in Canada don't like
our system, or significant components of it (everyone who votes
NDP for starters)? By that definition, we have more "dissidents"
than the Ruskies. (I know the
history, I've heard the arguments
and testimonials, and I know three
Soviet exiles living in Canada, so
this is not a naively held position).
A major reason for our discont-
net is that unrealistic expectations
are instilled in us by the media and
other socializing agents. In any
case, "happiness" is not beneficial
to the gene pool if it is a permanemt
conditon. It is the pursuit of happiness that serves the interests of the
gene pool (i.e. society). On that
basis, our system might compare
more favorably with communism.
I don't mean to sound left-wing
(in fact, I worship capitalism), and 1
am far from being a pacifist, but I
consider it important to point out
every now and then how culture-
specific and ideological our view of
world events is. A foreign policy
guided by "conscience" precludes
compromise with the communist
world and should thus be abandon-
ned.
Peter Von Maydell
commerce 3
Lecturer slights native Indians
Review misconducted
Once again, a Ubyssey "critic"
makes her mark, and fails to do her
homework! Anya Waite's review of
the VSO Jubilee series #2 concert
(The Ubyssey, October 21) provides
the standard, uninteresting commentary we've grown to know and
love from the gang in SUB 24IK,
but contains a glaring error. The
conductor on that occasion was
not, as reported, VSO conductor
laureate, Kazuyoshi Akiyama, but
was Maestro Derrick Inouye, the
Principal Conductor and Musical
director of the Regina Symphony
orchestra, previously the VSO's
assistant conductor for four years.
Mr. Inouye is also from Vancouver.
His name, picture and status as conductor were clearly listed in the program provided, and I fail to see
how Ms. Waite managed to mis-
identify the conductor.
Young Canadian artists are having hard enough times with attaining recognition of their talents. It is
irresponsible of the Ubyssey to
publish critical commentary attributing talents to another artist. I
would expect that future reviewers
(and their editors) be instructed to
read their programs for names.
Walter Quan
alumni
On October 22, 1986, in a Canadian cultural geography lecture, a
noted Canadian geographer used
the term "pagan Indians" in referring to those Indian people of North
America in the seventeenth century
who had not yet succumbed to the
Christianizing pressures of European missionaries.
To call a person a "pagan" is to
call them something less then
human, and is often a term used to
describe a person who has no concept of God or a Creator. Therefore
I consider this to be derogatory. I
might even suggest that this racist
slur would contravene the Human
Rights Charter of our Canadian
Constitution, if it were used in a
present day context.
I consider our Canadian university lecture halls to be a place where
social attitudes are either
perpetuated or annuled. Catch
phrases such as "pagan Indian" are
easily transmitted from the university lecture hall to become embedded
in the rest of society. Hence the
racist attitudes of Euro-Canadians
are perpetuated.
Being a prospective educator, I
am distressed. This ethnocentric
pestilence that evidently still, in
1986, thrives in our highest education institution, the university lecture hall, must surely transmit into
Students denied diploma
Tory record corrected
On behalf of the UBC Progressive Conservative Club, I wish
to set Mr. Hugh Richards straight
on the Tory record on employment.
Despite his claim that under our
Being there
In a province better known for its
tourist attractions (e.g. the Butchart
Garden) than its universities, the
election of our new premier
shouldn't come as a surprise. Simply "being there" was all he had to
do.
Now the future of B.C. is left to
chance . . .
Andre Roberge
graduate student
Party's leadership "unemployment
has risen to almost Depression
levels", the fact is that under the
Tories, unemployment has dropped
below 10 per cent nationally,
nowhere near Depression levels. We
submit that this is a result of Tory
policies; however, regardless of the
reasons, Mr. Richards' comments
are misleading and false.
Such extremist rhetoric (expressed in such horrible grammar) appeals to small minds. Mr. Richards'
rabble-rousing is even more •
distressing in view of the fact that
he has lied to the UBC student
population.
Russ Brown
arts 4
I will soon be attempting to initiate a formal review of UBC's
policy toward the International
Baccalaureate (LB.) diploma. As
things stand presently, UBC is one
of only a handful of universities in
Canada that refuse to recognize this
Geneva-based degree as the
equivalent of first-year university
standing.
This means that unlike at UVIC
or SFU, LB. students here are
denied advance placement, and face
having to complete an extra year of
post-secondary studies to qualify
for a UBC bachelor's degree.
Even more disconcerting is the
fact that students who have built on
their LB. studies at other universities have found, upon attempting
to transfer the entire load of credits
over to UBC, that their LB. foundation is knocked out from under
them, and their university standing
reduced by a year.
It's my understanding that a
number of students on campus are
caught in one or the other of these
predicaments.  Any students who
have completed LB. courses in
Canada or overseas and are interested in mobilizing to change
UBC's anachronistic policy should
contact me at 732-5932.
Adam Jones
arts 4
the elementary classroom. In an age
when terms such as "equal opportunity" and "human rights" are
bantered around whimsically, one
might consider at least the university lecture hall to be free of racist
sentiment. I am really distressed.
H. Michel
Native Indian Student Union
Mistreated
In all fairness, I think the
engineers of UBC should hold an
extra Engineer's week on the week
of Nov. 2 and bring back Lady
Godiva. If you have not yet heard
the news, next week is the highlight
of the 7th annual ladies night at the
Pit, 'girls only'. I think it is very
selfish that males do not have the
rights to the same privilege of a
female dancer at UBC. The bottom
line is even if guys don't go see the
stripper they should be entitled to
the same right.
Doug Dang
biology 4
THE UBYSSEY
October 28, 1986
The Ubyssey is published Tuesday and Friday
throughout the academic year by the Alma Mater Society of the University of British Columbia. Editorial opinions are those of the staff and are not necessarily those
of the administration or the AMS. Member Canadian
University Press. The Ubyssey's editorial office is SUB
241k. Editorial department, 228-2301/2305. Advertising
228-3977/3978.
The Evelyn David SvetozarMichael four-headed evil editing machine was eating copy faster than the
poor Ubyssey staffers could type it. "Morel" The hideous monster screeched, "I must have more!"
Dan Andrews (I live robots) was the first to be eaten. No-one noticed when he was gone. Malcolm
Pearson, with uncommon gallentry, threw guest-star Janice Irving to the monster, but the creature
could not survive on bones and beads alone, as did the anorexic sex-goddess Irving. Steve Chan dragged Patti Flather and Brad Newcobe with him into the jaws of the mad beast, wanting to get it over
with. Angie, Norman Chew and Michele 'Tweens managed to escape with the crafty (and dangerous,
don't believe he's "peaceful") James (Captain Pervert) Young. But the monster continued to lurk the
dark, lonely halls of SUB, searching for unsuspecting (virgin) would-be-news writers . . . Tuesday, October 28,1986
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 5
Media portrayal of nurses negative
We, as a group of nurses about to
graduate, are concerned with the
unrealistic image of nursing common among the public sector.
The image of the nurse, as portrayed by the media, is often inappropriate and largely negative,
presenting the nurse as a person
who is dependent upon the physi
cian's orders, and preoccupied with
higher wages, "waiting" on patients, or making "passes" at the
doctors. Nurses as well have unwittingly contributed to the negative
images by accepting the status quo
and remaining nonassertive.
The  public   rarely  receives  accurate portrayals of nurses and nur-
Hospital not university
Your front page story "AIDS
victims refused by dental clinic" is
misleading.
The dental clinic that has refused
to treat AIDS patients is in the
Health Sciences Centre Hospital.
Although the hospital is on campus,
it is not part of the University.
The hospital is administered by
its own Board of Trustees in the
same way as is Shaughnessy
Hospital or VGH. The decision not
to treat AIDS patients is a hospital
decision, not the University's.
I should add that the University's
Faculty  of  Dentistry  does   train
students to treat patients with
AIDS, Hepatitis B and other
transmissible disease. When they
graduate, they are able to treat such
patients safely, with no danger to
other patients.
The quality of teaching and
research in the Faculty of Dentistry
remains extremely high. Your
readers should know that in spite of
cutbacks, the Faculty of Dentistry
has preserved its international
reputation and was recently
designated a Centre of Excellence
by the World Health Organization.
Dr. G.S. Beagrie
Dean
SHALLOW
For zany wigs, masks,
costumes and the best
masquerade make-up,
come and see . . .
Tfee
Darccc Shop"
& The Red Caboose
This year for October only:
A Whole Specialized Store at
1025 WEST BROADWAY
1023 W: BROADWAY
Broadway & Oak
733-6116
■ also as usual al -
The Red Caboose
Kids Only Market
Granville Island
682-1544
554 W. GEORGIA
(Georgia & Seymour)
681-8757
The new home of the Copy Centre is
WITH
DOWNSTAIRS
MORE Coin Operated Machines
MORE Full Service Machines
MORE Services—Binding, Reductions
MORE Card Readers
MORE Operating Hours
BUT Same Great Prices
STUDENT UNION BUILDING
LOWER LEVEL
VISA AND MASTERCHARGE ACCEPTED
228-4388
sing, and consequently overlooks
nurses as independent care givers,
patient advocates, and collaborates of the health care team.
As well, there is minimal awareness
of the nurses in such roles as
educator, researcher, and clinical
nurse specialist.
Nurses must be more conscious
of how health consumers perceive
them. They must demonstrate a
professional assertive approach to
patients and other members of the
health care team, and strive to
discourage unrealistic and mythical
nursing images.
Along   with    this   comes   the
responsibility   for   the   public   to
develop a  critical  awareness  and
recognize the reality of nursing!
a group of UBC student nurses
Jinet Ng
GRADUATION
PORTRAITS
by
Amngrapij
fctuftUjaSfc.
Phone now lor your
COMPLIMENTARY SITTING
Choose from 18 previews (proofs)
732-7446
3343 WEST BROADWAY
Resume photos as low as
75c in colour.
1
ayer s w
A taste you can
call your own.
tSfe&i^i':
Playei
u   +> * ",. $±*   7-
-r     <*?■* **£ ***   u *frV ^ ^P**T
-« **ji
Warning: Health and Welfare Canada advises that danger to health increases with amount smoked - avoid inhaling
Average per cigarette: Player's Light: Regular-13 mg "tar", 1.0 mg nicotine; King Size-14 mg "tar", 1.1 mg nicotine. Page 6
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, October 28,1986
tween classes
TODAY
UBC PERSONAL COMPUTER CLUB
IBM group meeting, noon, Hebb 12.
UBC DANCE CLUB
Practice session, noon. Ball room or Party room.
HAMSOC
Evening meeting, guest speaker on Packet radio,
7 p.m.. Brock annex 358.
JEWISH STUDENTS ASSOCIATION
Lunch, 12 noon-2 p.m., HHtel House.
UNDERWATER HOCKEY
Drop-'n practice, 7 p.m., UBC Aquatic Centre.
AMNESTY INTERNATIONAL OF UBC
Letter writing group, new members welcome,
noon, SUB 205.
INTRAMURAL SPORTS
Pacific Rim badminton, register at Intramural office.
UBC BALLET AND JAZZ
Jazz 1 and 2, 8:30 a.m.-IO a.m.; Stretch and
Strength, noon-1:30 p.m.; Jazz 1, 1:30 p.m.-3
p.m.; five day tickets available, SUB Party room.
UNITED CHURCH CAMPUS MINISTRY
Informal   worship,   all   welcome  regardless  of
denomination, noon, Lutheran Campus Centre.
CAMPUS CRUSADE FOR CHRIST
The Great Debate: "Does God Exist?", 7 p.m..
Wood 2.
THUNDERBIRD VOLLEYBALL
UBC  Women  vs.   Western  Washington,   7:30
p.m.. War Memorial Gym.
EAST INDIAN STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Lecture on interracial marriage, sponsored by the
Sikh Students' Association, noon, Scarfe 208.
PREMEDICAL SOCIETY
Lecture on cancer by Dr. Osoba, noon. Wood 1.
MARANATHA CHRISTIAN CLUB
Bible study and discussion, noon, Brock 304.
UNDERWATER HOCKEY
Drop-in   game,   all   welcome,   7   p.m.,   UBC
Aquatic Centre.
WEDNESDAY
JAPAN EXCHANGE CLUB
General meeting, noon-1:30 p.m., SUB 205.
UBC PERSONAL COMPUTING CLUB
Amiga users meeting, noon, Buch B319; Atari
users meeting, 2:30 p.m. SUB 212A.
PSYCOLOGY STUDENTS ASSOCIATION
Bzzr garden, 4 p.m., SUB 211.
INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS
Seminar:   Canadian  Job  Opportunities  in   East
Asia, by Prof. Copithorne, noon, Buch D339.
UBC SCHOOL OF MUSIC
Wesley   Foster,   clarinet;   Linda   Lee   Thomas,
piano, noon. Recital Hall, Music Bldg.
LA CHALA (SPANISH CONVERSATIONAL CLUB)
Conversational meeting, noon, Buch D202.
WORLD UNIVERSITY SERVICE OF CANADA
Free   film:    "Asian   Images",    "Afghanistan",
"Marastoon", noon, Buch A202.
JEWISH STUDENTS ASSOCIATION
"Making Efficiency and Empaihy Allies" by A.
Saltzman, 5:30 p.m.-7:30 p.m., Hillel House.
CINEMA U
"Mishima: A Life In Four Chapters," 7 p.m. and
9:30 pm., SUB Aud.
UBC BALLET AND JAZZ
Ballet 2 and 3, 8:30 a.m.-10 a.m.; Ballet 1, 3:30
p.m.-5 p.m.;  Beginner Ballet,  noon-1:30 p.m.;
Jazz 1, 5:30 p.m.-7 p.m. Parly room, Jazz 1 in
Plaza North.
CITR
The Best in Dance Music, 8:30 p.m.-1 a.m., the
Pit Pub.
UBC MARXIST LENINISTS
Marxist Leninist literature table, 11:30 a.m.-1:30
p.m., from entrance Buch A.
MARANATHA CHRISTIAN CLUB
Bible study and fellowship, 7 p.m., 1868 Knox
Rd.
UNITED CHURCH CAMPUS MINISTRY
Potluck dinner and discussion, 6 p.m., Lutheran
Campus Centre.
CAMPUS CRUSADE FOR CHRIST
Lecture by M. Horner: The Absurdity of Life
Without God, noon. Wood 6.
THURSDAY
UBC PERSONAL COMPUTER CLUB
Commodore weekly general meeting, noon-2:30
p.m., Buch B319.
CANADIAN AERONAUTICS & SPACE INSTITUTE
Lecture by Dr. C.  Beichman;  "What's left for
Space Science in the 80's", 8 p.m.. Delta river
Inn, Richmond.
GRADUATE STUDENT SOCIETY
Theatresports,    feature    the   Vancouver
Theatresports League, 8 p.m.. Graduate Student
Centre.
AMS INTEGRITY IN ACTION CLUB
Lecture  by   K.   Walters:   "The   Life   Centered
educator," noon-1:30 p.m., Buch B225.
CAMPUS CRUSADE FOR CHRIST
Michael Horner: "Great Sex, Great Love, How to
be a Great Lover," noon. Woodward 6.
UBC SCHOOL OF MUSIC
UBC student chamber ensembles of the string,
wind   and   keyboard   divisions,   noon,   music
building recital hall.
HAMSOC
Annual fall general meeting, noon. Brock Annex
358.
JEWISH STUDENTS ASSOCIATION
Arnold Saltzman: "Social Work vs. Business,"
noon, Buch A 205.
LE CLUB FRANCAIS
Conversational   meeting,    noon.    International
house.
AMNESTY INTERNATIONAL OF UBC
Letter writing group, 7:30 p.m., basement 3549
Arbutus.
GAYS & LESBIANS OF UBC
Speaker series, noon, SUB 211.
BALLET • UBC • JAZZ
Jazz l/ll, 8:30-10 a.m.; Dancercize, noon; Tap,
1:30-3 p.m. SUB plaza south excepi Jazz l/ll in
SUB partyroom.
TOOLS FOR PEACE
Film:   "The  Dirty War,"   on   the  civil  war  in
Nicaragua, noon, Buch A100.
CITR - UBC RADIO
Top Ten Campus Countdown, 8:30 p.m.;  The
besi in dance music, 9:30 p.m.-l a.m.. The Pit
Pub.
INTER-VARSITY CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP
General meeting, guest speaker Justyn Rees, all
welcome, noon, Chem 250.
CAMPUS CRUSADE FOR CHRIST
J.I. Packer, from Regent College on "Knowing
God," noon, Woodward 4.
FRIDAY
INTERNATIONAL HOUSE
Hallowe'en Costume Dance, 8 p.m.-l a.m.. International House.
UBC DANCE CLUB
Practice session today, noon, Ball room or Party
room.
UBC SCHOOL OF MUSIC
Faculty Recital, music for Flemish and Italian
harpsichords, Doreen Oke, harpsichord, noon.
Recital Hall, Music Building.
UBC SCHOOL OF MUSIC
UBC student chamber ensembles, repeat of Oct.
30 concert, 8 p.m., Recital Hall, Music Building.
TUNDERBIRD BASKETBALL
Men in season opener vs. Lakehead U., 8 p.m.,
and SFU vs. Brock U. at 6 p.m., War Memorial
Gym.
UBC STUDENTS FOR PEACE
AND MUTAL DISARMAMENT
NFB film: "Return to Dresden," noon, SUB 205.
CHINESE VARSITY CLUB
Hallowe'en   Dance,   8   p.m.-1   a.m.,   Ramada
Renaissance.
JAPAN EXCHANGE CLUB
HaHowe'en Dance, tickets $4 members, $6 non-
members, at AMS box office, 8 p.m.-12 a.m.,
SUB Party room.
SUBFILMS
Film: f F/X. 7 p.m. and 9:30 p.m., SUB
Auditorium.
CIRCLE K COMMUNITY SERVICE CLUB
Hallowe'en Party tor children at Sunnyhilf
Children's Hospital, 5 p.m.
CAMPUS CRUSADE FOR CHRIST
Michael Homer: "Who did Jesus think he was
anyway." noon. Woodward 6.
ANARCHIST CLUB
Anarchist Hallowe'en, call!, evening, h, j, and
s's.
LE CLUB FRANCAIS
Conversational meeting, noon. International
House.
BALLET UBC JAZZ
Ballet II, III, 8:30-10, Party room.
INTRAMURAL SPORTS
Hallowe'en Dance and Dinner, tickets at Intramural office in SUB, 8 p.m.-2 a.m. at
Ginsberg and Wong's, 1885 York Avenue.
hot flash
The Hadassah Bazaar (PNE
grounds, Nov. 2, 11 a.m.-8 p.m.,
Nov. 3, 11 a.m.-10 p.m.), sounds
exciting, no? And here on our little
village of Anavancouver, you might
say everyone of us is excited about
the Hadassah Bazaar, looking for
great bargains on clothes and
books, and eating fine Jewish food,
without being trampled — it isn't
easy. You may ask, "Why do we go
if it's so dangerous?" That, I can
tell you in one word: Tradition!
VI DO
cafe
Foreign
Nostalgia
Fine Cinema
• • •
movie rentals &
FOR DELICIOUS
SANDWICHES
with Daily Specials
Also
SOUP
SALADS
PIES & PASTRIES
IN SUB LOWER LEVEL
Open daily 7:30 a.m. 5:30 p.m.
734-2233
3420 West Broadway
.s-xdy&v^&dd-yii-
!fe;.
iK^^M^fc^
AUTHOR    V
SHEILA COPPS
OUTSPOKEN LIBERAL MP AND AUTHOR OF
NOBODY'S BABY
WILL BE AT THE UBC BOOKSTORE ON WED., OCT. 29 FROM 12:30 -
1:00 p.m. TO SIGN COPIES OF HER BOOK. ($1995)
If you plan to attend, phone ahead and we will reserve a copy for you to pick up and have personally autographed.
If you cannot attend, we will try to reserve an autographed copy for you but cannot guarantee it.
Call 228-4741.
fflBG BOOKSTORE
THE CLASSIFIEDS
| RATES: AMS Card Holders-3 lines, 1 day $2.75; additional'!
lines, 60c. Commercial — 3 lines, 1 day $4.75, additional lines, .70c. Additional days, $4.25. and .65c.
| Classified ads are payable in advance. Deadline is 10:30 a. m. the day \
before publication-
Publications Room 266, S.U.B., UBC, Van., B.C. V6T2A5
Charge Phone Orders over $ 10.00. Call 228-3977.
5 - COMING EVENTS
S.L. ALUMNI
LOT IS ON!!
Contact Danno immediately
11 - FOR SALE - Private
1974 DODGE COLT exc. running condition.
New brakes and u-joints, some rust. $600
obo. Phone 263-7298.
GUITAR Norman S30. Excellent condition.
$250 obo. Larry 222-1478.
1973 MUSTANG blue with black vinyl top
very good working condition. $975 obo.
Phone 434-0694.
4 10-SPEED APOLLO BIKES. Good condi
tion . $70-$100. 224-5060.
20 - HOUSING
STUDENT
HOUSING
Available in Fairview Crescent, U.B.C.'s
newest single student residence. Occupancy from November 1st. Situated
just behind the University Village, all 4-,
5-, and 6-bedroom townhouses are completely furnished and rent includes all
utilities. Amenities include dishwashers,
deluxe furnishing and satellite television
reception capability. Prices start as low as
$250 per month and applicants must be at
least 21 years of age by December 31st,
1986 in order to qualify. Please apply at
the Student Housing Office, 2071 West
Mall (weekdays 8:30 a.m.-4:00 p.m.I, or
call 228-2811.
ROOM AND BOARD. West 19th Ave. &
Arbutus. Furnished rm. full bathroom,
available imm. Ph 731-8702.
GAGE, TOTEM PARK, PLACE VANIER &
FAIRVIEW CRESCENT: room and board,
and room only: Available for men & women
in the student residences. For information,
apply at the student housing office, 2071
West Mall, Ponderosa Bldg., or call
228-2811, Weekdays: 8:30 a.m.-4:00 p.m.
2 ROOMS AVAILABLE Nov. 1 in a 5-room
shared house. New home, warm, cozy,
fully carpeted. Very quiet street. Close to
campus. $200 and $225 738-8035.
30 - JOBS	
LOOKING FOR 2 PART-TIME staff weekends (Fri, Sat, Sun) for video rentals. Food
preparation, serving. Call Raymond a!
Video Cafe 734-2233.
WORK STUDY: If you are eligible for work
study & would be interested in working on
a project in Law & Education, call Shirley or
Charlotte 228-6629.
THE ARBUTUS CLUB, a private recreational
facility is seeking a qualified, enthusiastic
person to supervise as well as provide instruction for our junior racquetball house
league. Mon. & Tues. 3:30-5:30 p.m.. If interested contact JoAnne Carlson 266-7166.
35 - LOST
WOMAN'S gold-coloured Seiko
watch w/brown strap, in or near UBC
Hospital - great sentimental value. Reward.
Call 738-9734.
40 - MESSAGES
NEW! EXCLUSIVE. Spring/Summer '87
"TRAVEL COMPANIONS CONNECTION!"
Directory of 1000's seeking travel companions throughout North America. RUSH
$8.75 total cost for listing in/receiving
directory & receive complete details with
personal data from Now! TCC, P.O. Box
39356, St. Louis, MO, 63139, USA.
MAY THE SACRED HEART OF JESUS be
praised, adored fc> glorified throughout the
world forever. Amen. Say 6 times a day for
9 days fc> remember to promise publication.
Your prayer will be answered no matter
how impossible it may seem to you before
the 9th day. A.K.
70 - SERVICES
THE ANGLICAN STUDENT
MOVEMENT AT UBC
and
ST. ANSELM'S
ANGLICAN CHURCH
present
CHORAL EVENSONG
7:30 p.m.. Alternate Sundays
SUNDAY. NOV. 2nd
following the service.
The Rev. Canon
DAVID HOLETON
will lead a forum on
WORSHIP in the
20th CENTURY
Everyone is Welcome
ST. ANSELM'S CHURCH
University Blvd.	
PREGNANT?
Free Tests
731-1122
Confidential Help
MULTINATIONALS got you down? Our
members own AGORA FOOD CO-OP.
Small is beautiful at Dunbar fc> 17th.
DISCOVER how you can improve your
grades!
Phone 434-0694
RESEARCH PAPERS
16,278 to choose from—all subjects
Save Time and Improve Your Grades!
Order Catalog Today with Visa/MC or COD
213-477-8226
Ext
49
n'    jsh $2 00 to  Research Assistance
11322 Idaho Ave. 206-SN, Los Angeles, CA 9O025
Custom research also available —all levels
75 - WANTED
GOALTENDER for UBC intramural hockey
superleague team. Contact Philip ai
922 7282, ASAP.
PLAYERS for the UBC Ice Hockey Club.
Contact Michael at 263-7424. We play
Thursdays in the late afternoon.
80 - TUTORING
SPANISH TUTOR, Latin American,
T.A. at UBC. Experienced in teaching
grammar, conversation & translation
733-0441.
85 - TYPING
MINIMUM  NOTICE REQUIRED-Essays,
term   papers,   resumes,   theses,   reports,
UBC location (Village) 224-2662.
ADINA WORD PROCESSING for resumes,
essays, theses. Discount for students. 10th
Et Discovery. Phone 222-2122.
JUDITH FILTNESS. quality typist. 3206 West
38th Ave. 263-0351.
WORD    PROCESSING    SPECIALIST.    U
write,  we  type  theses,   resumes,   letters,
essays. Days, evenings, wknds., 736-1208.
PROFESSIONAL TYPIST. 30 yrs. exp.
Wordprocessor Ef IBM typewriter. Student
rates. Dorothy Martinson, 228-8346.
WORDWEAVERS - word processing
(multi-lingual). Stud, rates. Fast turnaround. 5670 Yew St. at 41st. Kerrisdale.
266-6814.
ACADEMIC and BUSINESS WORD
PROCESSING/TYPING. Quality work,
very reas. rates. Days/evenings. 263-4862.
YEAR-ROUND. Expert essay, theses, typing
from legible work; spelling/grammar corrected. 738-6829, 10 a.m.-9 p.m., King Ed.
bus route.
K.E.R. WORD PROCESSING. 1633 E. 12th
Ave. Using IBC-XT with Word Perfect. Call
Kerry Rigby at 879-2895.
PROFESSIONAL TYPING - essays, theses
resumes, etc. UBC Village. Leave message
224-0763. Student rates.
STUDENT/FACULTY RATES
$1.50/pg. dble. spaced text.
Equations & tables: $14.007hr.
Resumes: $S.00/page
50 personalized form letters only $36.00
Cerlox binding & photocopying.
Fast, professional service.
Jeava's Word Processing
201    836 W  Broadway
876-5333 m/c&visa
Students support
The Ubyssey advertisers Tuesday, October 28,1986
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 7
Letters
Election slips B.C. towards banana republic
I am extremely upset about the
problems many students had trying
to vote at the University Hill
Elementary School polling station
during the provincial election.
Not only was the site hard to
find, it also was located more than
two kilometres from the centre of
campus. There was no adequate
public transportation link to the site
for the more than 5,000 students
who live on campus. Why wasn't a
polling station located in the Student Union Building or in the Gage
Residences as had been done during
the federal election in 1984?
Speakeasy there to help
For those of you who are
unaware of the Speakeasy Peer
Counselling and Information Centre, we provide confidential,
anonymous peer counselling to any
student in need of an objective, caring listener. No matter how big or
Incredible women
Patti Flather said in her Freestyle
column (Friday, October 24) "its
incredible that Social Credit
couldn't find more than six talented
women to run". 1 think she
answered her own question; its even
more remarkable that any woman
would willingly be associated with a
party whose leader "wants more
women in his caucus because they
have intuition and would brighten
up the decor"! A woman who
would be affiliated with such a party is hardly likely to be a champion
of women's issues.
Hu Wallis
graduate student
'     UNIVERSITY OF    V
BRITISH COLUMBIA
FACULTY OF
DENTISTRY
J.B. Mcdonald Building
EMERGENCY CLINIC
is open to
FACULTY, STAFF AND
STUDENTS
for the treatment of
DENTAL PAIN,
INFECTIONS, SWELLINGS,
LESIONS, TRAUMA,
AND SORE TEETH/GUMS.
Diagnosis and Treatment is done
by Fourth Year Dental Students
for a nominal fee.
PHONE 228-2112
. for an appointment *
small the problem, Speakeasy
volunteers are there to offer you a
place to voice your feelings and
concerns, and possibly help you in
finding ways of handling your situation.
In addition, we can provide you
with referrals to other services if
you are in need of more specialized
or professional assistance.
Speakeasy has a vast array of pamphlets and resource materials regarding many of the issues currently
facing students such as stress and
life management, contraception,
health, V.D., eating disorders, and
drugs/alcoholism.
Speakeasy is located on the main
concourse of the SUB, and is open
9:30 a.m. to 9:30 p.m. Monday
through Friday. Please do not
hesitate to drop by or call us at
228-3700 (our counselling line) or at
228-3777 (for information
inquiries).
Beverly Gorden
speakeasy coordinator
More problems awaited those
who did manage to get to the polling station. People who wanted to
vote under the absentee ballot or
section 80 provisions of the Election
Act were waiting upwards of one
full hour and at ore point the station was out of the forms required
for section 80 ballsts for over an
hour. 1 personally have talked to
students who waited ovei two hours
to vote. Many cithers were so
frustrated by the long waits or being
told to wait in the wrong lineups
that they left without voting. At
least one was not told of his right to
vote under section 30.
I would hate to think that his wa<
anything more than bad organization and planning by Elections
British Columbia. However, the
majority of students were expected
to be more supportive of the NDP
policies and therefore the clear
beneficiary of low student turnout
would be the Socreds.
After seeing the results of the
electoral redistribution - which saw
the Socreds take ah but one of the
12 new seats -1 can anly believe that
numiircamm
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the location of the polling station
and the problems that absentee and
section 80 voters had were more
than just a coincidence.
How can a democratic election be
held when some voters are being
denied the same opportunity as
others to exercise their franchise? Is
the only difference between BC and
a banana republic the ingenuity of
the ballot box rigging by the party
in power?
Electoral law in this province
needs an overhaul to eliminate partisan use of the electoral machinery.
Warren B. While
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Date: Wed., Oct. 29th; Time: 5:30-7:30 p.m.; at Hillel House
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THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, October 28,1986
UBC Soccer women rule the pitch
By ANGIE NORMAN
The UBC Women's soccer team
clinched its fourth straight victory
at the Canada West tournament in
Calgary this weekend — the only
four years the championship has
been in existence.
Faced with four games in three
days, UBC got off to a good start,
beating the University of
Lethbridge six to nothing, and the
University of Calgary four to one
on Friday.
The 'Birds scored some spectacular goals in both games but outdid themselves against Lethbridge.
Carole St. Arnaud chalked up two
goals, as did midfielder Mitch Ring.
New striker Nancy Sutherland
tucked a goal away on a breakaway
and Colleen Quee put icing on the
cake by heading the ball into the net
off a free kick by Sarah James.
Although it was UBC's second
game of the day, and U of C's first,
the UBC women were just as
hungry for goals as in their first
game.
Sutherland opened the scoring
with two quick goals and the
defence pushed forward, with
sweeper Angie Norman and stopper
Sarah James each scoring from
twenty-five yards out.
The University of Saskatchewan
put UBC on the run on Saturday by
opening the scoring early in the first
half, but UBC regained its composure and came back to win five to
two.
Goals came from midfielder
Mitch Ring, team captain Kathy
Bockhold, striker Debbie Rotz, and
another single each for Carole St.
Arnaud and Colleen Quee.
Sunday's game against second
ranked University of Alberta was
an exercise in frustration for the
'Birds. U of A scored early in the
first half, but UBC had most of the
action for the rest of the game.
With star striker Nancy
Sutherland injured on the sidelines,
the 'Birds just could not put the ball
in the net, although they narrowly
missed scoring several times. U of A
won one to nothing.
Since Calgary had beaten Alberta
on Saturday, the tournament ended
up in a three-way tie. UBC came
SPORTS
through the championship a winner
with fifteen goals for and four
against. U of A was second with
five goals for and three against.
UBC's head coach Brian Thomson said he was pleased with the
team's performance, but disappointed about the narrow loss to U
of A.
"We have a big mixture of
rookies and veterans this year, and
all in all, I think the team came
together early and played excellent.
We had goal scorers from nearly
every position on the field and that
is tremendous," he said.
Three  of   UBC's   players   were
chosen for the Canada West All-
Star team. Midfielders Wendy
Pease and Mitch Ring, were chosen,
as well as winger Christine Pinette.
Thomson said he was surprised
that no one out of UBC's defense
was picked.
"I'm disappointed that none of
our defenders were picked, because
they all played well and we had a
goals-against average of one per
game," he said.
Next year, Canada West will consist of two tournaments in which
each team collects points towards
the overall championship.
Soccer lads tie-up Islanders
By SVETOZAR KONTIC
The UBC men's soccer team
finished their Canada West University Athletic Association season
without a loss, tying UVIC one to
one on Saturday afternoon at O.J.
Todd field.
UBC held most of the play in the
first half but were unable to put the
ball in the net despite several good
opportunities.
"If we have a weakness at all, it is
a lack of finish. But this game was
very encouraging in terms of
creating opportunities. If we
weren't creating the chances then I
would be worried," said UBC head
coach Dick Mosher.
UBC played its all round checking game to a tee giving the
frustrated Viking team almost
nothing in the way of offence.
"Everybody on this team contributes to the defence. The players
chase around like terriers and don't
give anything away. Eventually they
just wear the other team down,"
said assistant coach David Partridge.
In the second half a mistake by
all-star goalkeeper Brian Kennedy
gave UVIC a penalty shot. Brian
Penk promptly capitalized giving
UVIC a one to nothing lead at the
66 minute mark of the second half.
Kennedy was penalized for
holding a player in the box.
Kennedy, instead of punching a
deflected ball, tried to grab it, missed and grabbed a UVIC player's
head instead.
The resulting goal seem to wake
up the 'Birds and the team began to
press as the game moved into its
final stages.
The 'Birds missed several close
opportunities until their aggressive
play finally paid off. With only two
minutes left in the game defender
Alex Percy scored on a header off a
corner kick.
UBC nearly won the game but a
shot by Gregor Young from right in
front of the net somehow hit the
post.
Mosher had tried to use his entire
lineup during the game, giving playing time to some of the team's
reserve players, but after UVlC's
goal he put some of his first
stringers back in.
"I believe that we have 17 players
fully capable of playing. Today I
played 16 people and they gave it a
good shot," said Mosher.
Partridge said despite UBC's
ability to creat chances the team
must score more goals.
"You're not going to win if you
don't score," he said.
Mosher   had   a   much   more
philosophical   approach   to   the
game.
"Soccer is more like a chess
game. You probe and probe looking for the other team's weakaesses.
Often times the real indicator in a
game is the number of chances a
team has," he said.
UBC's next action is three weeks
from now when the team goes to
Toronto to play in the nationals for
the Canadian Interuniversity
Athletic Union title. The 'Birds will
play in several Vancouver Premier
League matches in order to keep fit
and prepared.
Hockey kids iced
By SVETOZAR KONTIC
The UBC men's hockey team tied
one game and lost the other in
heartbreaking fashion to Manitoba
this weekend at Thunderbird
Arena.
In their home opener on Friday
night the 'Birds played to a four to
four tie with the Manitoba Bison on
the strength of a brilliant three goal
performance from Mark Trotzuk.
It was Trotzuk's first hat-trick in
Canada West University Athletic
Association play.
Trotzuk opened the scoring at
13:08 of the first period, knocking
the puck in over a sprawled
Manitoba goaltender. Three
minutes later rookie Mitch Evanish
scored his first goal of the season
trickling the puck past the
Manitoba goaltender who was
again, flat on his back.
But Manitoba stormed back with
four straight goals before Trotzuk
once again came to UBC's rescue
with two goals in the third period.
Early in the period Trotzuk
skated in on the side and fired a
shot into the lower corner. With less
than three minutes remaining in the
game Trotzuk capped off his stellar
evening when he wheeled out in
front of the net and ripped another
shot into the corner.
"Trotzuk is a versatile forward.
He is very quick and perceptive.
Mark is a real go-getter and he is on
the puck constantly," said UBC
hockey coach Terry O'Malley.
O'Malley said the ejection of
UBC forward Kevin Griffin early in
the game for fighting played a role
in the 'Birds inability to keep their
original lead and intensity.
"When Kevin was in the game we
had four lines going. But losing him
disrupted our pattern and it was
tough to continue hitting and grinding," he said.
On Saturday evening the 'Birds
held a two goal lead midway
through the third period only to
lose in overtime.
Goals by Fred Ledlin, Jeff
Delgarno, Keith Abbot and Oscar
Pozzolo put the 'Birds in front four
to two until veteran Manitoba forward Harry Mahood brought the
Bison back to within a goal at 10:17
of the third.
Manitoba forward Bob Lowes
tied the game five minutes later when
he shovelled the puck in the corner
while sitting on top of sprawled UBC
goaltender Carl Repp.
Lowes victimized the 'Birds again
at 2:46 of the ten minute overtime
period putting the Bison ahead five
to four to stay.
The emotions showed on the
frustrated UBC side after the game
as players threw their sticks in
disgust and kicked the dressing
room door.
"Yeah, its tough anytime you
lose in overtime. We took six
penalties late in the game—marginal
penalties, and it made a
difference," said O'Malley.
The 'Birds play on the road this
weekend against Calgary.
"The boys know they belong in
this league. They have to learn from
their errors," said O'Malley.
— sieve chan photo
UBC FLYING MAN tries to leap over unsuspecting opponent but no such
luck occurs. The ball can fly but man certainly cannot. A lesson learned is a
flight earned.
Basket-'Birds, bigger and belter
By CHEW WONG
Following his first recruiting drive at UBC, second year men's basketball coach Bruce Enns is
highly optimistic about the season which begins this
Friday at War Memorial Gymnasium against
Lakehead University.
Enns said despite the loss of All-Canadian forward Ken Klassen the 'Birds have a better overall
team this year.
"We're going to miss Klassen's average 26 points
and 11 rebounds per game, but we're also going to
have a more balanced scoring attack this year," he
said.
The 1986-87 basket-'Birds have height,
something they have lacked over the past few years.
This year's team has an average height of six feet,
five inches.       '
Enns said the team has a good mixture of talent
and can play either a finesse or bash-your-teeth-out
style of basketball.
"We're trying to re-establish the great winning
tradition that UBC basketball once had," he said.
Followers of last year's team will find a lot of
new faces on this year's squad. Only five starters
return from the team that finished with a six win
and sixteen loss record last year.
Captains Paul Johansson and Kevin Hanson will
fill the backcourt this year. Hanson will man the
point guard position, while Johansson, fresh from
touring with the men's national team this past summer, will be the scoring guard.
The other three returnees are forwards Gord
Matson, Ken Scott, and Jamie Boulding.
Enns said all three players have improved a great
deal during the off-season and he expects them to
make a big contribution to the team's overall performance this year.
Transfer players include former Simon Fraser
Clansman Eric Kristiansen (6'5"), defensive demon
Maurice Basso (6'4"), and Aaron Point. Point, not
a true.transfer, returns after a year's absence from
the Thunderbird lineup.
The freshman stock this year is strickly btae chip.
During the off-season Enns secured four of the top
five high school prospects in B.C.
They include sweet shooting southpaw guard J.
D. Jackson (6'4"), who toured with the Canadian
national junior team this past summer, and three
B.C. under 21 team members: Alan Lalonde
(6'3"), Mike Clarke (6'8"), and John Carlson
(6'9").
These four must make a quick transition from
high school basketball to university ball if they are
going to help the Thunderbirds this year.

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