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The Ubyssey Jan 21, 1992

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 the Ubyssey
N
Happy motherhood, Corinne!
Founded in 1918
Vancouver, B.C., Tuesday, January 21,1992
Vol 74, No 29
EUS nEUSlettre
Engineers back
in court over
$15,000 penalty
by Paula Wellings
In an attempt to avoid paying
$15,000 to the AMS for damages
incurred by a discriminatory 1990
edition of nEUSlettre, UBCs Engineering Undergraduate Society
(EUS) returned to a hearing at
Student Court for an interpretation ofthe AMS ruling made two
years ago on the payment. But
Student Court will not render a
decision until after February 6.
The controversial nEUSlettre,
published March 14, 1990, contained racial slurs toward Natives
as well as statements deemed sexist and homophobic.
On Friday, Student Court
decided it would hear statements
from two students-at-large, Ellen
Pond and Sandee Doxdator, who
are represented by attorney Allan
Price.
Last July, at a summer
.Students'Council meeting, the
AMS passed a motion submitted
by EUS vice president Gary Chan
to refer the matter of "whether or
not the $15,000 fine on the EUS
should be collected in light ofthe
fact that the Board of Governors
did not collect EUS fees for the
1990/91 academic year" back to
student court.
Student Court heard on Friday arguments from Michelle
Simpson and Alison Taylor from
the AMS Office of Prosecution, and
from EUS defense lawyers Sandra
Dhillon and Dan Redekopp.
Student Court refused arguments in court from Price, but allowed Price to submit his arguments in writing on Thursday. The
submission will be transferred to
EUS defense council for response
in two weeks and judges will deliberate on all submitted statements
for their final decision.
Chief justice Robert Wai described Price's request, as an additional independent prosecutor,
made allowable by AMS by-laws,
as "a very unusual scenario."
Price said it was "under
strenuous objection'' that he agreed
to the early one-week submission
date. In a post-court interview with
The Ubyssey, Price said he was
disappointed that Student Court
would not allow him verbal interaction with the court.
"We make our [written] submissions', the defense will make
their submissions and we have no
rebuttal, and we have no opportunity to dialogue with the judges or
no opportunity to [speak with the
witnesses]. This is a very, very
limited form of representation. In
court, I referred to it as a token
pittance."
Chan had "no comment" on
the matter.
According to Price, the issues
which he will bring forward have
potential to move this case into the
Supreme Court of British Columbia if necessary. He suggested in
court that trust laws may have
been violated by the AMS.
In court, the prosecution and
defense argued over conflicting
statements made by judges re-
gardingthehearingofApril 2,1990,
AMS by-law interpretation, and
double jeopardy.
Prosecutors and defense lawyers focussed on an oral statement
presented by chief justice John
Anderson to AMS Students'
Council on April 4,1990, regarding
the original Student Court decision. Anderson stated that Student
Court's decision to charge the EUS
$15,000 was contingent upon the
absence of any further disciplinary
action.
In this memorandum of May
28,1991, he wrote, "The decision of
Student Court with respect to the
restitution amount was contingent
upon the decision being the only
fine, penalty or sanction imposed
on the EUS. Specifically, the imposition of the restitution amount
was contingent on the EUS being
allowed to collect student fees for
the 1990-1991 academic year."
Neither the written decision
ofthe court nor the ratified judgement of the Students' Council reflected Anderson's statements.
And        justice David
Wotherspoon's sworn affidavit of
January 14,1992, directly contradicts Anderson.
"It was never agreed by the
court that our decision was in any
way contingent on later disciplinary actions taken against the EUS
by any other administrative body.
Had this been the case I would
have included it in the judgement."
In a supplementary affidavit,
Wotherspoon also states that
Anderson had told him he had
"winged it" when he told the Students' Council that the judgement
was "contingent."
The prosecution questionned
whether oral statements are part
of a written judgement, referring
to a Student Court Rule Of Procedure which states, "the Court shall
in any case submit a written decision and reasons therefore [to
Students' Council]." The rule does
not elaborate if "reasons" can be
orally submitted.
Defense lawyers argued that
Anderson's oral explanation ofthe
written decision must be a part of
the Court's ruling—both of which
are finalized together at Students'
Council. Thus when the Students'
Council ratified the Court's written
decision, the prosecution argued
they also ratified Anderson's oral
explanation.
The prosecution called AMS
president Jason Brett as an expert
witness on AMS by-laws and
Robert's Rules of Order. In a letter
to Student Court, Brett wrote: "In
effect, only the actual decision of
council—as recorded in the minutes—is binding upon the society."
The busking business is perhaps not quite as brisk these days but an ambitious
musician's enthusiasm is at an all time high.
SFU business programme
accused of discrimination
BURNABY(CUP)—A Simon
Fraser University student councillor has filed a complaint with the
British Columbia Council of Human Rights, charging that the university discriminates against international students.
Haje Protais said he filed a complaint based on the higher grade
point average requirements for international students for admission
to the business faculty.
"These students are already admitted to the university and registered in the same courses as Canadian students, yet for them to get
into Business Administration they
need a higher GPA," he said. "Why
should they need a higher GPA to
get into the faculty?"
The council would not confirm if
a complaint had been filed because
information is confidential until a
report is released.
There is a seven per cent university-wide quota for foreign students. In addition, the business
and computing science faculties
have quotas limiting international
students to ten per cent of total
admissions.
The higher GPA requirement
is simply a reflection of supply and
demand, said Christine Hamblin,
a business faculty programme coordinator.
"In my opinion any cutoff is
discriminatory but whether or not
I think it is discriminatory does
not matter," she said. "It is Senate
policy.
"There is a ten per cent quota
for foreign students so there is a
higher demand for a fewer number of seats."
The business department receives approximately 1,100 applications each year for 500 positions, said Robert Rogow, undergraduate programme faculty director.
While the number of applicants
vary from semester to semester,
about 15 per cent are from foreign
students.
Some international students
were made an early offer of admission to the faculty based on their
previous academic performance,
and the department's estimate of
the rate of attrition. They had been
required to complete division re
quirements with a GPA equal to
the cutoff which applied to Canadian students. The faculty was
obliged to admit students who
qualified under the criteria, even
though the number of them exceeded the quota.
"We had a moral and legal obligation to honour the commitment
made at the time of admission to
the university," Rogow said.
Under the new system, students
are no longer made an offer at
registration, but must compete for
the' positions based on their academic performance at SFU.
The new system is fair because
there will only be two streams of
students—foreign and domestic—
with different cutoffs, he said. Under the old system, some international students were admitted to
the university with a GPA of 4.0,
but dropped to 2.7 and entered the
faculty, while excellent students
without an early offer did not get
in, Rogow said.
The new system will take effect
this summer but early commitments made to students will be
honoured, said Rogow. Classifieds 822-3977    ^n^
RATES: AMS Card Holden - 3 line*, $3.00, additional lines, 60 cents, commercial - 3 lines, $5.00, additional lines
75cents.(10%discounton25Usuesorrnorv)Classifiedadspayableinadvance.Deadline4^0p.Tn.,twodaysbefore
publication. Room 266, SUB, UBC, Van., B.C. V6T2A7, 822-3977.	
11 - FOR SALE - Private
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5247, 8 400 ft rolls. Stock # 5296 5, 400 a
roll. Phone 946-5177.
1988 FORD ESCORT, $4500 automatic, 4
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ROOM FOR RENT, large bright in shared
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25 - INSTRUCTION
Overcome shyness and anxiety
Speak up more in groups
A 4-session training program (free)
offered as part of counselling research.
Please call 822-5359 NOW!
30 - JOBS
SAILING INSTRUCTORS.
Sea Wing Sailing School is seeking candidates for the 1992 Spring C.Y.A. Instructor's
clinic. Successful candidates will be offered
emp. with Sea Wing. Call 669-0840.
ZALKO SPIRIT 2660, W 4th Ave. opening
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resume directly to Okayama Academy, #604-
1020 Han-rood St., Vancouver, B.C., V6E
4R1.
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Well pay the GST on resumes (new
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Room 60, Student Union Building
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3RD OR 4TH YEAR
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Call 689-8933.
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BROTHERS & SISTERS NEEDED!!!
Pairs of siblings needed for a paid study of
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Please call 822-7957 for more
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Between
Deadline for submissions: for
Tuesday's paper is Friday at
3£0pm, for Friday's paper,
Wednesday at 3:30pm.
NO LATE SUBMISSIONS
WILL BE ACCEPTED.
Note: "Noon" m 12:30 pm.
Tuesday, January 21st	
GSS & WSO open house-3:30pm,
WSO Lounge, Brock Hall.
UBC Student Counselling & Resources Centre workshop. Skills
assessment for career direction.
Noon-l:20pm, Brock Hall Rm 200.
Inst, of Asian Research. Seminar,
Noon-2:00, Seminar 604, Asian Ctr.
Pre-medical society. Radiology lecture, guest speaker Dr. Szasz.
Noon, Family & Nutritional Sciences, room 60.
Lesbian Survivors of the Mental
Unhealth Industry. Meeting, 7:00
pm, SUB 130.
Assoc, for Bahai Studies. World
Religion Day Symposium. "Religion
Today: Paths to Peace?" Spkrsfor
8 religions incl. Native spirituality.
7:30pm, SUB Theatre.
WSO. (Group) Mature Women
Students. 1:30-2:30. WSOLotinge,
Brock 261.
UBC Library. Learn to use the
online catalogue. Drop-in session.
Command-mode searching (experienced users). 3:30pm.
Menu mode searching (introductory-intermediate). Noon, Arts
Computer Terminal Room,
Sedgewick Library.
Hillel/Jewish Students'Assoc. Famous hot lunch. Noon, Hillel Hs.
Wednesday, January 22nd
Women & Development. "Images
in Front and Behind the Camera:
Representations of Women of Cf>-
lourinMedia."Noon-l:30,Lasserre,
Rm 107.
UBC Student Counselling and
Rsrcs Ctr. Film-Test taking strat
egies. Noon-l:20, Brock Hall 200.
Gays & Lesbians of UBC. General
Meeting. Noon, SUB 212A.
School of Music. Concert. Panormo
Guitar Trio. Noon, Recital Hall,
Music Bldg.
WSO. (Group) Mature Women Students. Noon-l:30, WomenStudents'
Lounge, Brock 261.
WSO. Sexual Abuse Survivors'
Group (women). 12-2:30. Preregis-
tration: 669-5069.
UBC Library. Learn to use the
online catalogue. Menu mode
searching (introductory-intermediate users). 3:30 pm, Arts Computer
Terminal Room, Sedgewick Library
Sikh Students' Assoc. Kirtan/Dis-
cussion. 5:30 pm, SUB 211.
Medical/Legal Club. Jerry White
from Russel DuMoulin. litigating
a medical malpractice case/health
law practice in BC." Noon, Curtis
bldg., 180/81.
Global Development Center. Gen.
mtg. Noon, SUB 100D.
Hillel/Jewish Students'Assoc. Torah Study with Rabbi Benarroch.
All welcome. Noon, Hillel House.
Hillel/Jewish Students'Assoc. Advanced Hebrew. Noon. Hillel.
Hillel/Jewish Students' Assoc.
Jewish Mysticism Class with Rabbi
Dubrowsky. 5:00 pm. Hillel House.
Thursday, January 23rd	
UBC Student Counselling and Rsrcs
Ctr. Resume preparation. Noon-
1:20 pm, Brock Hall, Rm 200.
Christian Science Org. Meeting —
All Welcome! 1:30, Buch B334.
School of Music. Concert. Distinguished Artists Series. Leigh H.
Stevens, marimba. 7:15pm Prelude lecture; 8:00 Concert. Recital
Hall, Music Bldg.
Internat. Socialists. Meeting—
Quebec: Why we say yes to distinct
society. 7:30 pm. SUB 215.
Life Drawing Club. Weekly Draw-
WORD PROCESSING on laser; essays, proposals, theses, resumes, etc. & editing. $2/
pg&up. Donna « 874-6668.
WORD PROCESSING, professional and fast
service, competitive rates. West end location, call Sue 683-1194.
99 - PERSONALS
ISNT THERE a special someone you'd like
to send a message to — are you too shy?
Here'B your answer.
•MAMMA CORINNE»
Congratulations on becoming a mother from
the staff of the Ubyssey. Now you'll have to
make the rounds here with the little one.
ing Session. Noon-2:20, Lasserre
Building, Room 204.
WSO. Worryingaboutyour weight?
4-6 pm. Women Students' Lounge,
Brock 261.
WSO. Managing school related
Stress (for women). Noon-l:30.
WSO lounge, Brock 261.
Ambassadors for Jesus. Rhythm 'n
News with David Short. Noon, SUB
Theatre.
UBC Library. Learn to use the
online catalogue. Menu mode
searching (introductory-intermediate searchers). Noon, Arts Computer Terminal Room, Sedgewick.
UBC Assoc, of Christian Clubs.
"God, Sex & You. Pursue the Best."
David Short/Rhythm 'n News Rap-
Accapella. Noon, SUB Theatre.
Students for Forestry Awareness.
Bruce Devit, RPF-Executive VP
Assoc, of BC Prof. Foresters
"ABCPF Perceptions/Response to
the Changing Demands upon Foresters." Noon, Macmillan 166.
Sikh Students' Assoc. General
Meeting. Noon, SUB 212.
International Relations Students
Assoc. Round table discussion on
Free Trade. Noon, BUCH DUO.
Hillel/Jewish Students' Assoc &
History Dept. Speaker-The Wansee
Conference: The Holocaust SOyears
after. Dr. L.E. Hill, History Dept.
Noon, BUCH A102.
Hillel/Jewish Students'Assoc. Beginners' Hebrew. Noon, Hillel
House.
Friday, January 24th	
StudentCounsellingandRsrcs. Ctr.
Workshop—Study skills strategies.
Noon-l:20, Brock 200.
UBC Library. Learn to use the
online catalogue. Command mode
searching (experienced searchers).
10:30am, Arts Computer Terminal
Room, Sedgewick.
Students of Objectivism. Wkly discussion: "Is environmentalism a
threat to human welfare?" Noon,
SUB 215.
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SPONSORED BY THE WOMEN STUDENTS' OFFICE
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Weekly discussion and support groups for
mature women students
Group 1 Drop-In Tuesdays 1:30 - 230 pm
January 21 to March 10
or Group 2 Drop-In Wednedays 1230 - 130 pm
January 22 to March 11
Women Students's Lounge (Brock Hall #261)
U^IMMIMMM^PIMMIMIMIMMMIMMIU
Student Health Services
presents a display on
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from January 29-31
Jan. 30 at 12:30: Open Forum
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Jan. 31 at 12:30: Panel
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SUB Main Concourse
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2/THE UBYSSEY
January 21,1992 NfWS
Co-op housing idea challenges rent hike
by Charlotte Parsons
Families living at the Acadia
Parkfamilyhousingresidencesare
concerned they will be hit with
smother rent increase that lower
income families cannot afford.
The proposed hikes were discussed at a meeting of the Joint
Residence Budget Advisory Committee on January 9. How great
the increases will be has yet to be
determined.
"I can't afford to pay any more,"
said Pam Rogers, budget-representative for Acadia and single-
parent resident. -"There are a lot of
people like me, people who can't
afford to pay one more red cent."
The last increase, of five per
cent, was imposed in July 1991.
Residents circulated a petition and
held a protest rally at the time.
Rogers said part of the problem is that many ofthe residents
can afford to pay more, and according to Canadian Statistics released in 1986, as many as 30 per
cent of the families enjoy an annual income greater than $50,000,
with ten per cent topping the
$100,000 mark (figures do not include "President's Row" tenants).
According to Rogers, the majority of these wealthy students
are returning to university to do
graduate work after several years
as working professionals. Many
have a high-income spouse to support them.
At the other end of the spectrum are struggling families,
barely able to eke out a living.
"Families earning $100,000 a
year are living side by side with
families earning $10,000 a year,"
Rogers said, "The poor families are
getting squeezed out."
Rogers cited her own financial
situation as an example. She receives $10,700 per eight-month
school yearinfinancial aid. Of this,
approximately $6,000 is absorbed
by the cost of rent and electricity,
while tuition claims another $2,000.
The leftover portion must feed and
clothe her two children.
Cindy Sutherland, president
ofthe Acadia Tenant's Association,
described the plight of lower income tenants, including herself, as
"a pretty big problem."
"Some families at UBC do go to
the food bank. Some tenants risk
CHERYL NIAMATH PHOTO
Women-only newspaper
defends publishing policy
by Stephanie Nolen
HALIFAX(CUP)—The Nova
Sicotia Human Rights Commission
is holding hearings this week into
an allegation of sexual discrimination against a feminist newspaper
in Halifax.
Glen Keyes, a researcher and
former assistant political science
professor at the University of
Brandon, made the charge against
Pandora after volunteers who
publish the periodical refused to
print a letter from him.
He was angered by an article
in the March issue of Pandora that
said men should never be given
custody of their children in divorce
cases.
Keyes, who is divorced and
does not have custody of his children, contacted Pandora and asked
the newspaper to publish arebuttal
he wished to write.
In accordance with Pandora's
women-only editorial policy, the
newspaper refused. Keyes then
rejected Pandora's offer to have a
female reporter write about his
concerns, and filed a complaint
with the Human Rights Commission in June 1990.
Pandora is written and produced exclusively by women. The
members of the publishing collective say women are a disadvantaged group who need an alternative media source that can address their specific interests.
Keyes told the commission Pandora
had violated two sections of the
Nova Scotia Human Rights Act, by
denying him a public service because of his sex and by discrimi-
natingagainst him in a publication.
He also charged that Pandora pub
lishes hate literature about men.
Pandora lawyer Ann Derrick, who has also represented
Donald Marshall Jr., and Henry
Morgentaler in Nova Scotia, told
the inquiry Pandora's policy is
justified under the Charter of
Rights and Freedoms because
the publication is attempting to
improve the position of a disadvantaged group, and as such is
not discriminatory.
Keyes and the lawyer repre-
sentingthe commission, Randall
Duplak, told the inquiry noncustodial fathers are a disadvantaged group.
Duplak called Pandora's
statement that all men are
advantaged a "broad-brushed,
stereotyped generalization." He
claimed some men are disadvantaged and Keyes was entitled
to use the newspaper to present
his case."I suffered the disadvantage of not being able to
participate in the socio-political debate," Keyes told the inquiry.
But hearing chair David
Miller rejected their submissions, saying the issue was not
the concerns of non-custodial fathers, but Pandora's editorial
policy.
Rev. Darryl Gray, a Halifax
racial equality activist, testified
as a commission witness. Gray,
the editor of Nova Scotia's only
black newspaper, The Monitor,
told the inquiry his newspaper
would accept submissions from
white writers, and that decisions
about publication were made
solely on content.
But Gray also pointed out
that because The Monitor receives
money from government advertisers, it is obliged to accept submissions from everyone. He also said
his policy was for The Monitor
alone, and that he could not judge
the editorial policy of any other
publication.
A coalition of women's groups
supporting Pandora has released
a statement condemning the human rights commission for even
holding an inquiry into the charge
against Pandora.
It said the commission is "in
the ironic position of representing
the interests of a white, highly
educated and privilegedmale, and
prosecuting; a small volunteer
women's newspaper which exists
as a way to advantage the disadvantaged situation of women."
Coalition member Lara
Morris, ofthe Dalhousie Women's
Group, said the commission has
shown it does not understand the
nature of discrimination.
"In my understanding of discrimination, there is someone in
a position of power who discriminates against someone who is in a
position of disadvantage," Morris
said. "In this case, we're talking
about a women's volunteer collective not printing a letter from a
man.
"The man is in a position of
power, so it can't be discrimination."
A judgement is not expected
for several months. Should
Pandora be found guilty of discrimination, collective members
say they could be forced to change
their editorial policy.
eviction by doing things like renting out their living rooms. We have
to cut corners so we don't buy extras like insurance and clothes."
Mary Risebrough, director of
Student Housing, said the alarm
over possible increases is premature. "The budget won't be ready
till mid-February. It's really too
early to say anything," she said.
But according to the minutes
ofthe committee meeting, the potential fee hikes have already been
discussed and a hand-out distributed by Risebrough indicated draft
fee increases were slated for
preparation and review by the end
ofthe month.
In reference to the rent hikes,
Rogers said, "She [Risebrough] told
me that if housing doesn't do it, the
board of directors probably will."
Rogers proposed a cooperative
housing system be established to
overcome the problems created by
the inequity of income at Acadia.
"Rent would be scaled to income. Those who can pay more,
pay more."
If her idea is accepted, Acadia
could become the only university
co-op in Canada.
Sutherland said that the proposal is worthy of investigation.
"Rent scaled to income...is a valid
idea to at least look into and discuss. There would have to be a
minimum and a maximum ceiling.
I don't know how the higher income people would feel about
it...but it's possibly one workable
solution."
But housing accountant Len
Goossen said the co-op idea was
impractical. "They're difficult to
manage and admini ster.. .Down the
road someone has to pay for it."
Risebrough also criticized the
proposal, saying it would be an
inappropriate system for university housing. "Fm not opposed to
the idea of co-ops per se. But in
student housing I don't think it's a
good idea to charge some more
than others so that students are
subsidizing students."
Risebrough said such a system
could lead to neighbours turning
in neighbours for cheating on their
income declarations. "I don't want
to be in the business of dealing
with that kind of situation. It's not
good for the social environment."
Risebrough added that the
solution to the problem lies with
student financing, and that adequate funds are available for those
in need.
But according to Carol Gibson,
director of financial assistance, the
equation is not that simple.
"Need is defined in relation to
the government of BC's student
assistance programme and in relation to the availability of funds. A
student who is a recipient of a
government loan submits a budget
assessment and the government
determines what their need is."
She also said there is a maximum ceiling on student loan allowances, and some students have
needs that exceed this limit.
"Most ofthe students in housing are graduate students and
graduate students' expenses are
higher. And the figures used to
assess the need have not been adjusted for inflation since 1985."
There is little that financial
assistance can do to improve the
situation. A sharp increase in the
number of loan and bursary applications has cut into the funds
available.
"Because of the increase in
tuition, we were given a fund of
$450,000 to be used to supplement
existing bursary funds. I have just
been told that we are now at the
point at which we will have spent
the $450,000 and we may go into
the hole," Gibson said.
Gibson blamed a depressed
summer job market for the increased demand.
Tax could cost
universities a ton
by Marlsa Celll
MONTREAUCUP)—A proposed
tax to secure employee wages in
case of university bankruptcy
could cost Concordia more than
$1 million, the Association of
Universities and Colleges of
Canada (AUCC) reports.
Bill C-22 is aimed at having
employees contribute to a fund—
collected as a tax on insurable
wages—to ensure financial protection in case of bankruptcy. But
AUCC's director of government
relations said this type of protection is not needed because universities do not go bankrupt.
"The universities and colleges'
view is that if the government is
to create this new tax, they (the
universities and colleges) should
be exempted from it because
bankruptcies do not arise in the
public sector and their employees
would never receive any benefit
from the fund," Bob Best said.
The AUCC estimates if Bill C-
22 is passed, it could cost each
university more than $1 million
in the first year alone. The bill
means employees must pay 10
cents off their weekly wages,
which is $5.20 per year. But Best
said universities can expect this
figure to inflate, which means
tuition fees and other university
services will increase to foot this
bill.
Best said AUCC is concerned
the quality of education will suffer because universities will have
to spend more without a revenue
increase.
"This will allow less and less
money to go towards the 'raison
d'etre' of the universities," Best
said.
Professor Tony Costanzo,
president of Concordia
University's Faculty Association
(CUFA), said although he was
not informed of the bill, he endorses AUCC's position.
"I don't see why a university
andits employees should pay this
kind of tax," Costanzo said. "As a
public institution, we (the universities) get funded by the provincial government. The only way
universities could go bankrupt is
if the government went bankrupt."
He said AUCC has a strong
case against the bill because university employees will not be
compensated by the fund.
Costanzo said he will be going to
the Canadian Association of
University Teachers (CAUT)
meeting next week in Ottawa.
He said he will push to have the
bill included on the agenda if it is
not there already.
In a joint effort to avoid the
enactment ofthe tax, the AUCC,
the Association of Canadian
Community Colleges, the Canadian School Boards Association
and other public institutions sent
a statement last November to
Felix Holtmann urging him to
find an alternate solution to protect employees of bankrupt firms.
January 21,1992
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The Week of Prayer for Christian Unity
An Ecumenical (Service of Thanksgiving for the life of
Father Albert Xsigmond 6TD, PHL, S6B (1919-1991)
♦ 24 years Pastor of &l Ignatius of Anlioch
Qoman Catholic Church
♦ Member of Faculty, Anglican Tlieofogical College
and Vancouver School of Theology
♦ friend and spiritual guide to many on
the UBC Campus
♦ Ecumenical pioneer
1230 pm. Friday January 24
Vancouver School of Theology Chapel
6050 Chancellor Blvd
-Sponsored by ANSELM'S
St Anselm's Anglican Church • St Mark's College (Doman Catholic)
Vancouver School of Theology • The Anglican Community at UBC
The Lutheran Campus Ministry • United Church Campus Ministry
Diabetes: causes and cures
by Charlotte Parsons
The Vancouver Institute
kicked off its spring lecture series with a visit from Dr. David
Pyke, one ofthe world's leading
authorities on diabetes.
In his lecture entitled
"Diabetes: What Causes It; Can
We Cure It?" Pyke traced the
research history of the disease
back to the 17th century, when
the urine of a diabetic was first
tasted and discovered to be
sweet(diabetes causes an excess
of glucose in the blood, which
eventually spills over into the
urine). "Fortunately, we now
have more advanced methods,"
the British physician said.
Mankowski.researchingin
1889, removed the pancreas of
a dog and induced diabetes,
connecting it for the first time
with this organ.
It was another 30 years before Canadians Frederick
Banting and Charles Best made
one of the greatest medical
breakthroughs of our century: the
discovery of insulin.
With the help of insulin, sufferers of the more severe Type 1
diabetes — who would previously
have wasted away and died—could
now live full lives. Development of
the treatment marked a turning
point in diabetes research.
Pyke's own research is based
on the study of 660 identical twins,
one or both of whom have diabetes.
He was surprised to discover that
in only one third of the pairs did
both twins develop Type 1 diabetes.
He concluded, "There must be
something non-genetic that one has
had and the other has not." He also
observed that the milder, Type 2
form of diabetes almost always
struck both twins, indicating it is a
predominantly genetic condition.
Diabetes is produced by an
immune process: the body attacks
its own pancreatic tissues until
the pancreas is no longer able to
produce sufficient insulin.
A certain tissue type has been
linked to the occurrence ofType
1 diabetes. This alone is not
sufficient to cause the disease,
but it does create a genetic predisposition which, when occurring in tandem with an unknown environmental trigger,
causes diabetes.
Pyke closed his lecture on
a positive note by predicting
future medical breakthroughs
in the field, including an orally
ingestible form of insulin, an
artificial pancreas and immunosuppressive drugs designed
to prevent diabetes from developing.
Imparting his information
with wit and style, Pyke presented an overview of his topic
that was very accessible, even
to those completely ignorant of
biology.
James Delago will lecture
for the Vancouver Institute next
Saturday on "The Archeology
ofthe Atomic Bomb."
Military play games on Native land
by James MacKinnon
VICTORIACCUP)—The Toosey
band will not rest until the Department ofNational Defense stops
exercises on land adjacent to their
reserve.
Bomb blasts rattling windows
and waking babies are only one of
the band's concerns over use of
territory they say is unceded.
According to chief Frank
Laceese, the 144 square mile
'military lot', located several
kilometres from the Toosey reserve
near Williams Lake, is Uttered with
razor wire and bomb craters, and
has been the site oflow level flights.
An eight hourinformation blockade
on January 7 was the latest in a
series of protest actions over the
land use.
Described by Chilli wack Base
information officer Ron Mall as
"strike-like tactics," the protest was
a response to the DND's refusal to
cease operations in the area despite
the advice ofthe courts.
On September 3, 1991, 15
Ts'ilhqot'in were charged in contempt of court after a series of
blockades.
The court date was postponed
on October 29 to late April, in the
hope that "through dialogue and
the interchange of information and
ideas that this dispute can be resolved." The court statement also
recommends "the military should
reassess its position with the
knowledge and appreciation ofthe
case for the native people," and
encouraged the DND to allow the
Toosey band to carry out an environmental assessment ofthe area
without further disturbance.
Laceese said the assessment
would "prove to everyone just
exactly what kind of damage is
being done."
Citing blasting of lake ice as
an example of environmental
threats posed by the exercises,
Laceese said"you can just use your
imagination as to what kinds of
chemicals are left lying around."
Laceese said the band has the
support of many non-native people
in the area, particularly in the
ranching community.
"We won't be satisfied until
the military finds a new place to
play their games," he said. Laceese
said the military completed their
own environmental assessment at
the request ofthe courts following
an earlier protest by the band.
The assessment, described by
Laceese as "basic", was accepted by
the judge.
"He didn't even know what a
trapline was, yet he made a decision on that iand," said Laceese.
Mall said the situation is being
exaggerated.
Activities like officer training,
basic training, and winter survival
camps comprise the majority of
activities in the area, he said. "We
have very little need to blast ice ...
we use so little explosives up there
compared to what people are saying that I really don't think it is a
concern."
Mall said the DND's baseline
environmental study would determine "what procedural or physical
changes were necessary," and that
it contained no surprises.
The main problems had already been anticipated, he said.
"Over the years we've realized our
control of petrol and oil hasn't been
so good."
Mall said confusion is the main
reason the military is unlikely to
review the use or ownership ofthe
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land.
"The military's point of view is
that we have fee simple ownership
of a tract of land," he said, adding
the position of the Ts'ilhqot'in nation has not been made clear to
him.
He added that, as far as he
knew, the Toosey land claim submission had not even cleared the
lowest level of procedure. Mike
Sakamoto, who works for the land
claims registry ofthe Department
of Indian Affairs, said the Toosey
band has not made a comprehensive land claim submission other
than a declaration that the band
considers the land unceded.
Chief Saul Terry ofthe Union
ofBC Indian Chiefs said neither the
military's attitude nor the lack of a
land claim submission are surprising. "The Department of National Defense certainly doesn't
appear to want to talk to Indian
people," he said, citing military
lots near Comox and Chilli wack as
other examples of land conflicts
between aboriginal -people and the
military.
Terry said aboriginal people
are "very reluctant" to submit land
claims due to the threat of extinguishment of land rights upon
resolution ofthe claims.
"It would be very foolish of us
to make a deal that would provide
dollars for our pockets now but
leave nothing for our children."
Terry added the government's
policies on land claim resolution
do not lead aboriginal people to
believe their concerns will be given
the same weight as powerful groups
like the military. "The Indian Affairs department certainly doesn't
want to tread on the big boys' toes
at the DND."
Feeling alone
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universe?
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4/THE UBYSSEY
January 21,1992 FEATURE
AIDS education and research ignores lesbians
by Frances Foran
Local lesbian activists are
challenging misleading notions
about women and AIDS perpetrated by the medical establishment. Faced with alack of research
about women and HIV, activists
reject the notion that AIDS is not
women's concern. Consequently,
more information about women's
health is coming from grassroot
organizations than the medical
institutions.
The Vancouver Lesbian Connection, the first lesbian counselling and testing centre in North
America, is informing women of
the HIV conce rns that official safer-
sex discourse neglects.
Panelists at an HIV/AIDS
discussion last Thursday explained
how current "AIDSspeak" reflects
heterosexist, racist and sexist biases of research institutions.
Despite documented HIV
cases pointing to oral sex between
women as a cause of HIV transmission, woman-to-woman transmission is not included in the
breakdown of AIDS cases at the
American Centre for Disease
Control. The CDC sets the AIDS
research agenda, and by isolating
target groups, it indirectly decides
who receives medical attention.
"If a woman who sleeps with
women engages in other HIV-
transmitting activity, like intravenous drug use, the syndrome
will be attributed to that activity.
The research for that target group
will include men and be male-biased." said Janet Noade, panelist
and VLC activist.
HIV positive lesbians who do
not use intravenous drugs or who
have not slept with men since 1977
are assigned to "unknown causes."
As a result, women are left off the
agenda, and HIV/AIDS research is
misleading women to death.
Woman-to-woman transmission is not an official cause of AIDS
"because according to their
spokesman, lesbians do not have
much sex, and the sex they do have
is low-risk [non-penetrative],"
Noade said.
"There is no way to know how
many women are transmitting to
each other."
The lethal lack of information
about lesbians and HIV supports
the myth that women cannot
transmit the virus through sex and
that women are inherently safe as
sex partners.
"In the absence of information,
people will believe what they want
to believe," said panelist Nikola
Marin.
"The CDC definition of HIV
syndrome is based on male symptoms. Sixty percent of women who
die of AIDS hadn't been diagnosed
[before death]."
The lack of attention given to
lesbians and HIV indicates the
social status of women, Marin said.
The situation of people of colour
with HIV is even worse.
"A white man diagnosed with
HIV can expect to live for an average of three years. For a black
woman, life expectancy is just two
to three weeks from the time of
diagnosis," she said.
The myth that lesbians are
invariably safe is reinforced by non-
representation in safer-sex campaigns.
"When women are discussed
in AIDS education material, there
is only a footnote reference about
woman-to -woman transmission,"
Marin said.
The latex industry, "the
semiotics of condoms" as Marin
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calls it, is heterosexist and male-
biased. No condom manufacturers
make products for women's use
with women, which implies women
cannot transmit HIV, which instills afalse security in women and
their partners.
Marin attributed this to a cul
tural desire to think women are
viable sex partners, rather than a
genuine lack of information about
women's biology. While semen is
known to be a "high risk" HIV
substance, as of 1989 the HIV concentration of vaginal secretions
was not known.
"Much more research is done
on semen, but the composition of
semen and vaginal secretions are
similar," she said.
Oral sex between women is
believed to be "low risk." But low
risk does not mean "no risk."
On Campus with Time on Your
Hands? ...
No Money, But a Taste for Fun? ...
Why Not Visit the Fireside Lounge at
the Graduate Student Centre?
Mondays
Free Video Nights
January 27 -- New York Stories
and When Harry Met Sally
February 3 -- The Icicle Thief
and Open City
Fridays
Live Bands (No Cover)
January 24 -Colleen Eccleston
Duo (Folk Music)
January 31 -- Hazel Motes
(FolkSRock Band)
The Fireside Lounge also offers pool, ping-pong
and shuffleboard facilities to clients.
For more information concerning Fireside Lounge events, contact the GSC
office at 822-3203.
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E-Mail Address: computer@bookstore.ubc.ca
Apple, Macintosh and the Apple logo are registered trademarks of Apple Computer, Inc.
System 7.0 is a registered trademark, licensed to Apple Computer, Inc.
January 21,1992
THE UBYSSEY/5 Upcoming Films:
Wednesday & Thursday (jan 22 - 23)
7:00 My Dinner With Andre
9:30 The Blues Brothers
Friday-Sunday (Jan 24 -26)
7:00 & 9:30 Dead Again
Next Week: Frankie & Johnny
+ The Fisher King
———
nix
fCCMTV
All Screenings are in the SUB Theatre
Call for 24 hour recorded info; 822-3697
Elections
Polling
Stations
Day Polls
Angus
Computer Science
Chemistry
Law
Music
Sedgewick Library
Wesbrook
Night Polls
Place Vanier
Gage
Sedgewick Library
Buchanan
CEME
Hebb Theatre
Macmillian
VGH
Student Union Building
Woodward/IRC
Totem Park
Student Union Building
Day Poll Hours: M.T.W 10:00am - 4:00pm
Night Poll Hours:    M     4:00pm - 7:00pm
All poll locations and hours subject to
poll clerk availability
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ACTS
Lost love and death
by Jonathan Wong
and Bianca Zee
A   piano. A cello. An
infestation of rats.
In her flat, she awakes. In
her flat, she waits.
Did he really die?
Nina (Juliet Stevenson), is
locked up, heartbroken, in the
womb of her flat.
Its still life—the motionless
mobile, the grand piano, her true
love's cello in its coffin-like
case—provide contours to the
purity of Nina's love for Jamie, a
deceased loved one, but tragically amplify the magnitude of
her loneliness.
FILM
Truly, Madly, Deeply
Royal Centre
Interior skylight enhances
Nina's beauty and serenity, and
effectively augment her emotional wavelengths—so much so
that we too feel a connection to
Jamie's unseen presence.
Electric lights are seldom used.
Cinematic apparitions do not
bear a semblance of artificiality,
there are no special effects, a
tribute to Emmy award-winning
director-writer Anthony
Minghella's strict style of realism
in his thrift BBC production of
Truly, Madly, Deeply.
Nina's emotions, isolated
and suffocated by Jamie's
absence, overwhelm her so much
so that she must see a therapist.
Stevenson (an alumnus of the
Royal Shakespeare Company)
taps deep into her emotional
swamp, mastering the Method,
as she cries a decade before an
indifferent psychologist.
Death has not altered Nina's
deep love for Jamie (Alan
Rickman). Eventually, he
returns because he cannot
endure her grief.
Without special effects,
Jamie's ghost appears more
natural (more convincing) than
supernatural. Rickman, superbly
relays the coldness of his post-
rigor mortis state.
We also feel life, vibrancy,
when his ghost plays the cello
like a jazz bass while Nina
dances with a raw vitality in her
once tomb-like abode.
Minghella has a forte for
quick composite sketches. He
makes you feel what characters
feel—whether dead or alive—
beyond visual provision.
He establishes Nina's non-
materialist nature and hints at
her lost joie de vivre. Her life is
far from exciting, but her passion
for life gives her fulfillment and
enjoyment from anything she
does.
But Minghella's subtle
flirtations with emotional
dynamics—which include a
magic act to relieve a fierce
restaurant row—eventually
backfires, though only in the
end.
His film ends quite
unconvincingly. Like a light-
switch, Nina, who exhibits so
much passion toward Jamie
throughout the film, instantly
changes her emotions for
another man with whom we fail
to sympathize. Minghella does
not sufficiently develop his
character to warrant such an
emotional gear change.
Faust is infernal fun
"There is no god; therefore we
make it up as we go along."
—opening line, Faust
Yukie Kurahashi
Oh, hell.
I'll be honest with you.
I went to see Sook-Yin Lee,
okay? (So I'm a die-hard Bob's
yer Uncle fan. Wanna make
somethin'ofit?Huh?)
And as dynamic as she
always is...well...I don't know
what I expected. But I expected
something explosive. Something,
you know—BIG.
THEATRE
Faust
Vancouver East Cultural
Centre
until February 1
Each ofthe main characters
is represented by a singer-dancer
pair of performers. The singer
tends to represent the actual
physical presence ofthe character, while the corresponding
dancer embodies his/her moral,
psychological state and expresses
the (sub)conscious lust, sympathy, aggression, tenderness,
confusion, timidness, and
passion.
The visual dichotomy
between the two parts of each
character infuses the production
with insane tension.
Now—I know this all sounds
really heavy—but there are some
points at which even the artsy-
fartsy opening night crowd
couldn't help bursting out in
decidedly undignified guffaws (as
Mephistopheles seduces Faust—
"Come closer. Take my hand,"—
the theme from Beethoven's
So I got to the Van East
with expectations so huge they
were almost unfair. Almost.
After all, besides Lee being part
ofthe cast, Faust is an innovative collaboration of Vancouver's
two big creative names: the
Karen Jamieson Dance Company and Tamahnous Theatre.
I was also mad with
curiosity to see how this
vanguard of artists had
(reinterpreted the legend of
Faust.
And oh—if s a blast.
On the most superficial
level, Faust is about Dr. Faust's
insatiable thirst for knowledge
and his selling his soul to the
devil (Mephistopheles—played
with malicious glee by my hero,
Lee) in exchange for the promise
ofthe quenching of that thirst.
But "be not deceived by
appearances," my mom always
said.
Ian Weir's adventurous
libretto is a weird, irreverent
amalgamation of Goethe's (and
Marlowe's, and Muller's, and
Winger's, and Bergman's, and
Gounod's, and...you get the idea)
Faust, Milton's Paradise Lost,
the book of Genesis, and god
only knows (ha ha) what else—
which means a lot of religious,
moral, philosophical, mythologi-
Fifth ["Fate"] echoes in the
pregnant pause).
Although the programme
informs me that the materials
for the set were donated by the
completely morally/politically
reprehensible Alcan (shudder), it
is an inventive construct used to
suggest moral righteousness,
political ascendancy, celestial
glory and the height of a mountain top, as well as psychological
imprisonment, spiritual repression, and socio-religious conformity (Don't ask. Just go see).
The costumes are wild; they
somehow manage to invoke
everything from the protestant
reformation to drag-queen
culture.
The not-so-subtle undercurrents also manage to explore
sexism, racism, feminism,
homoeroticism, intersexual/
interracial relationships—
Uh, yes. It's wickedly witty.
Furniture art—
not to be sat on
by Charlotte Parsons
"...furniture, as part of our most
intimate environment, contributes
to the memories that make us who
we are."
So writes Mike Lee, one ofthe
artists in the One Off exhibit. Lee
is one of nine BC artists who were
asked to create a work of art using
furniture as medium.
ART
One Off
Charles H. Scott Gallery
until February 9
Their results challenge the
traditional definition of furniture.
Several of the artists juxtapose
natural and synthetic materials,
creating a symbolic tension between the two. Keith Spivak's
driftwood and plankwood chair was
one such work.
The Lawn Table by Mark Ostry
transports lawn furniture inside; a
slice ofthe lawn is viewed through
the tables' glass surface.
Stephanie Robb's contribution, The Changing Table, lives up
to its name. Made of steel and
wood, this piece is designed to follow an unborn child through its
life cycle; the table can be transformed from a diaper-changing
counter to a dresser to a computer
table or bar. The materials are also
symbolic: steel and wood represent
the female and male genetic contributions. The bars of metal are
crossed, symbolizing the x-chro-
mosome, while bubble shaped cutouts in the wood represent amniotic fluids.
Often poetic texts on the walls,
written by the artists, supplement
each work by providing insight on
the motivating forces.
The exhibit, though small, is
well worth a visit. It puts a fresh
twist on familiar objects, and
proves Spivak's argument that
"furniture can be as expressive and
thought-provoking as any other
medium in the art-world."
6/THE UBYSSEY
January 21,1992 ?^^:■^^:^^^:^^;^:^:•^H■^•!^^!■:^;^^;^;■!^-^■:^:^y^^!^^■H'T^^ff^T■ff^
Women basketbirds clear .500
by Mark Nielsen
What a difference a year
makes.
Twelve months ago the UBC
Thunderbirds were burdened with
8i 2-8 won-lost record and seemed
destined to be the doormats ofthe
Canada West in women's basketball.
Granted the Thunderbirds
did make the playoffs in the end,
but only after winning their last
four games of the season. And
then they were promptly bounced
out of post-season action by the
Calgary Dinosaurs.
Turn the clock back to the
future and surprise, surprise, the
Thunderbirds are currently
sporting a 6-4 record and hold
down second place.
Happy New Year.
In her third year of coaching
at UBC, Thunderbirds coach
Misty Thomas says much of the
turnaround is a case of youth
maturing and patience paying off.
"Unless you're incredibly
lucky and have just the most
amazing players you're going to
have a hard time turning around
the players," she said.
"This is the first year that all
the players on this team have
played only for me at the univer-
isity level. And because of that,
they're feeling more comfortable
because they don't have to learn a
new system every year."
The Thunderbirds vaulted
above a .500 winning percentage
with back-to-back two-game
sweeps of the Lethbridge
Pronghorns and, most recently,
the Alberta Pandas last weekend
at War Memorial Gym.
After downing the Pandas 82-
74 on Friday night, the
Thunderbirds cruised to an 80-58
victory on Saturday.
Akey factor in both wins was
5'9" guard Cheryl Kinton. She followed up on a 18 point 16 rebound
performance on Friday night with
a 24 point 16 rebound game on
Saturday and leads the team in
rebounds.
One of three Thunderbirds
who played in the highly competitive BC College Athletic Association last year Kinton was a first-
team all star at Capilano College.
Carrie Carlsen, a 5'11" forward who scored 41 points and
hauled in 17 rebounds over the
two games against Lethbridge,
was a starter for BCCAA champion Douglas College last season.
And while Douglas College went
on to finish second at the national
championships, Carlsen was
named to the All-Canadian team.
And 5'10" forward Tracey
Smillie came to the Thunderbirds
via Cariboo University College in
Kamloops where she earned an
All Conference award and the
Female Scholar Athlete Award.
"We were very fortunate to
get Cheryl Kinton, Carrie Carlsen
and Tracey Smillie from the college system," Thomas said. "They
tend to be a little more mature
than the players who come
straight out of high school."
With the prospect of limited
floor time at Victoria or Simon
Fraser, both powerhouses in
women's basketball, Kinton said
UBC was a natural choice.
But that is not to say Kinton
thought UBC was a last option,
especially with Thomas—aformer
national team member—at the
helm.
"They have alot of talent here,
and a really strong programme,"
she said. "I know a lot ofthe girls
and Misty knew about me and
wanted me to come here."
The Thunderbirds are at
home again this weekend as they
host the Saskatchewan Huskies
in a two game set this Friday and
Saturday nights at War Memorial
Gym. Game time is 6pm both evenings.
Lisa Nickie encounters opposition on the way
to the basket during action against Alberta.
BOB FORCIER PHOTO
DEPARTMENT
OF THEATRE & FILM
GOODNIGHT DESDEMONA
(GOOD MORNING JUUET)
by Ann-Marie MacDonald
A Rollicking Comedy
Directed by Edel Walsh
January 21-25
January 29 - February 1
2 for 1 Preview - Tue Jan 21
DOROTHY
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KENNY OYE SPORTSWEAR HOTLINE:
875-1245
January 21,1992
:^vlyf*se then A.ivri> rsr«zrw
2xvnvnNrEi* of
ACADEMY AWARDS
CINEPLEX ODEON FILMS presents
MARLON BRANDO ROBERT DUVALL MARTIN SHEEN
APOCALYPSE NOW   FREDERIC FORREST ALBERT HALL
SAM BOTTOMS LARRY F1SHBURNE «i DENNS HOPPER
P-odira) art D«*d by FRANCIS COPPOLA
wnta t, JOHN MIUUS a„j FRANCIS COPPOLA n*** t, MICHAEL HERR
coProducei b, FRED ROCS, GRflC FREDERICKS0N art TOM STERNBERG
o«ta oi pmct*, vmORIO ST0RAR0 product™ oe^r DEAN 1AV0ULARIS im RICHARD MARKS
sound De^nb, WALTER MURCH to b, CARMINE COPPOLA „, FRANCIS COPPOLA
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f^ZOETROPE STUDIOS
Copyng«©i*jeo Zoatrop*
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855 GRANVILLE ST
684-4000
THE MAGIC AM) THE MADNESS
OF MAKINGk APOCALYPSE NOW
"THE BEST FILM OF THE YEAR!"
- Gene Siskel, SISKEL & EBERT
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YOU'D BE CRAZY TO MISS IT."
- David BiancuUi, NEW YORK POST
"RIVETING...ALREADY BEING
DISCUSSED FOR OSCAR
CONSIDERATION..."
- Peter Stack, SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE
A Filmmaker's Apocalypse.
ELEANOR FRANCIS FORD ROBERT DENNIS GEORGE JOHN MARTIN
COPPOLA COPPOLA  DUVALL  HOPPER  LUCAS MILIUS SHEEN
CINEPLEX ODEON FILMS presents HEARTS OF DARKNESS
^GEORGE ZAL00M andLES MAYHEM
iffiDOUG CLAYB0URNE and FRED R00S | ^MICHAEL GREER and JAY M1R\CLE
SS TODD B0EKELHEIDE W,^K CARMINE COPPOLA and FRANCIS COPPOLA
"^.^KMICKEYHART ""SSMtSSSTEMNHEWTTT SS1 FAXBAHR,
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STARTS FRIDAY, JANUARY 24th
GRANVILLE
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855 GRANVILLE ST
684-4000
(14 YEARS)
some very coarse language
scenes of ritual animal slaughter
THE UBYSSEY/7 ELECTION
STUDENT
REPRESENTATIVES TO
SERVE ON THE BOARD
AND SENATE
Evening Polls
Monday, January 27,1992
4:00pm to 7:00pm
(Board of Governors Election Only)
Totem Paik Common Block
Place Vanier Common Block
Walter H. Gage Common Block
S.U.B.
Sedgewick Library
(Subject to students being available to run these polling stations.)
Daytime Polls
Monday through Wednesday, January 27-29,1992
9:30am to 4:00pm
Hairy Angus
Buchanan
C.E.M.E. Building
Chemistry
Computer Science
Hebb Theatre
Law
Music
Scarfe
Sedgewick Library
S.U.B.
MacMillan
Wesbrook
Woodward/I JI.C. Lobby
V.G.H. (Wed only 9:30 am - 2:00 pm)
(Subject to students being available to run these polling stations.)
BRING YOUR AMS. CARD
BOARD OF GOVERNORS
(Two to be elected)
Gary H. K. Chan (Fourth Year Engineering)
Jaret F. Clay (Fourth Year Science)
Wendy King (First Year Law)
Tim Lo (Firth Year Unclassified)
Derek K. Miller (Dip. Prog, in Applied Creative Non-Fiction)
SENATE REPRESENTATIVES
FROM INDIVIDUAL FACULTIES
COMMERCE AND
BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
(One to be elected)
Michael Fuoss (Second Year)
Tina Louie (Second Year)
(Voting will take place in the Henry Angus Building only.)
PHARMACEUTICAL SCIENCES
(One to be elected)
Amin Janmohamed (Second Year)
Emile Woo (Third Year)
(Voting will take place in the Woodward IJi.C. Lobby only.)
SCIENCE
(One to be elected)
Dennis Chow(Third Year)
Christopher Sing (Third Year)
(Voting will take place in the Chemistry Building,
Hebb Theatre and Wesbrook)
NO PROXY VOTING WILL BE
ALLOWED & STUDENTS REQUIRE
THEIR AM.S. CARD TO VOTE
(It should be noted that any allegation or irreg ularities with these elections
must be submitted in writing to the Registrar within 48 hours ofthe close of
polling (exclusive of weekends or public holidays) and must include the
signatures of at least three students eligible to vote.)
Scott Frizzell (23) and Grant Delcourt charge out of the zone in their 3rd
win over Regina on Friday night.
UW douses swimbirds
The UBC Thunderbirds ended
up one win short of edging out NCAA
powerhouse University of Washington Huskies in men's swimming
at the Aquatic Centre on Friday
night.
Heading into the last race—
the 400 metre freestyle relay—UBC
needed a first and a third place
between its two teams but came up
with a win and a fourth place finish
to lose a close one 93-90.
The UBC women's team,
meanwhile, was overwhelmed 116-
67 at the same meet.
Individually, Turlough OTIare
won the men's 400 freestyle in
3:56.38 and the 800 freestyle in
8:15.63. Teammate Kevin
Draxinger won the 200 backstroke
in 1:59.68.
On the women's side, UBC's
Anne Barnes won the 200 backstroke in 2:21.03 and Sally Gilbert
BIRD DROPPINGS
was first in the 400 freestyle in
4:27.12.
Icebirds split with first place
Regina
The UBC Thunderbirds
bounced back from a woeful Canada
West hockey performance against
the Manitoba Bisons one week
earlier to upset the Regina Cougars
5-1 at the Winter Centre on Friday
night.
But the Cougars, first in the
Canada West standings, replied
with an 8-5 victory over the
Thunderbirds on Saturday night.
"It goes to show that on a given
night we can beat any team in the
league," coach Mike Coflin said.
However, Coflin said the loss
on Saturday shows that as soon as
the Thunderbirds stray away from
a disciplined style of play, they run
into trouble.
"In relation to the other teams,
<   i.
COTTHE
JANUARY
BLAHS?
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AT
J THE ROXY!
The Groove- Wed thru Sat     Surreal McCoys- Sun thru Tues
Raise money for your group! Hold a Roxy
fundraising party! Call the party hotline at 684-7699
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SIOBAHN ROANTREE PHOTO
we don't have as much talent, so to
win games we have to work them
and be completely committed to
defensive hockey," he said.
The Thunderbirds had a 3-1
going into the third period on Friday, but let the Cougars outshoot
them 18-1 in the first period ofthe
loss on Saturday.
Goalscorers for UBC were
Darren Kwiatowski, Dean
Richards, Grant Delcourt, Kevin
Hoffman and Rob Gagno on Friday
night.
On Saturday, Len Nielsen led
the Cougars with three goals while
the Thunderbirds got two goals from
Gagno and singles from Dave Bond,
Dave Cannon and Delcourt.
Climbing contest set for SUB
Get ready rock-jocks.
The Varsity Outdoor Club will
be hosting a climbing competition
on the indoor climbing wall in SUB
on March 14-15.
Categories range from beginner to expert and is open to both
women andmen. Contest coordinator Mike Spagnut said those without climbing experience can enter
as well.
Entrance fee is $12, which includes a complimentary t-shirt.
Spagnut also plans to have the
competition videotaped and to show
the footage in the Pit Pub afterward
in conjunction with the awards ceremony.
Entry forms and waivers can
be picked up from the VOC office
located in room 85-86 in the SUB
lower concourse.
Superbowl on big screen at
SUB
The SUB Ballroom will be the
scene of a Superbowl party this
Sunday and it will feature a very
big "big screen."
The game will be shown on a
14-foot high screen and while admission is free, organizers are also
hoping to raise funds for "Colin's
Smile Campaign."
The campaign was set up to
raise funds for bone marrow transplant and research after four-year-
old Colin Beechinor, a UBC daycare
child, was diagnosed with a terminal form of leukemia curable only
through abone marrow transplant.
A donor with a matching marrow type has since been found, but
Beechinor's parents need additional
funds to help pay for the operation.
The party gets underway at
2:30pm.
8/THE UBYSSEY
January 21,1992 SPORTS
AIDS prominent issue
in sports arena
by Tracy Nishimura
VI CTORIA( CUP) —Magic
Johnson's November announcement thvt he tested HIV positive
made AIDS a prominent issue in
the sports arena.
In an honest confession,
Johnson said he contracted HIV
by "having unprotected sex with a
woman who has the virus."
Yet he also said "after I arrived in LA in 1979,1 did my best
to accommodate as many women
as I could—most of them through
unprotected sex."
In response to Johnson's disclosure, University of Victoria
men's basketball coach Guy Vetrie
said he has had informal, one-to-
one discussions with members of
his team about the issue.
"I have not taken any drastic
measure to lecture my team to
date," he said.
Vetrie added UVic athletes
are ambassadors ofthe university
when they are travelling and have
to be responsible for their
behaviour.
Though the team lacks the
high piofile and celebrity status
of an NBA team he said, "at all
levels, you still have to be responsible, whether you are in
sports, or not."
The Canadian Academy of
Sports Medicine published a
pamphlet called "AIDS and the
Athlete." The pamphlet discusses
the concern with the possible
transmission of the HIV virus
through sports activities themselves, and states that athletes
are not at greater risk.
Joan Shanks, the education
co-ordinator for AIDS Vancouver
Island, said risk of contracting
HIV through sports related activity comes from "steroid use if
Men
hoopsters
now 8-2
A trio of Thunderbirds hit
double figures in scoring as UBC
defeated the Alberta Golden Bears
96-86 at War Memorial Saturday
to improve their league-leading
Canada West record to 8-2.
Senior guard J.D. Jackson
scored 28 points and forwards Jason Leslie and Bob Heighten contributed 24 and 21 points respectively for UBC.
The Thunderbirds defeated
Alberta 82-74 on Friday behind 19
point efforts from Jackson and
guard Derek Christiansen.
The win on Saturday was also
a coming of age for Heighten as he
was 9-for-13 from the field and 3-
for-3 from the freethrow line. He
also hauled in four rebounds while
playing 34 minutes—the most floor
time he has seen this season.
As well, Leslie was 10-for-10
from the freethrow line.
The Thunderbirds host the
Saskatchewan Huskies this
weekend at War Memorial. Game
time is 7pm on Friday and Saturday.
nT-
Ubyssey Women's
Caucus
will have our first meeting of
1992 on
Thursday, Jan. 23 at 12:30pm
in the office.
January 21,1992
[the athletes] are sharing needles"
and through "any sports activities that involve sexual contact."
"There is no data to indicate
that any sport is implicated in the
transmission of HIV," she added,
a fact supported by the CASM
pamphlet.
The pamphlet states extensive travel to different cities or
countries, which may raise the
number of sexual contacts, is the
link between sports and increased
contact with the HIV virus.
Johnson's announcement
brought to the forefront the promiscuity that may accompany a
high profile athlete's lifestyle.
Martina Navratilova replied
to Johnson's statements, pointing
out that a female athlete who had
slept with hundreds of men would
had been labelled a slut, not a
hero.
AIR TIME—Jason Leslie gets some
hours towards a pilot's license during
basketball action over the weekend.
MA CHIA-NIEN PHOTO
^s^ fformarlv Frnmtl
(formerly Frams)
99.3
The FOX &
Timesless
Productions
present
4 Live Metal Bands
Thursdays Student Nite
No Cover Just bring your looneys
Alternative Music Night Starting Jan. 30th
Jan 21-25 Hot Persuit
Jan31-Feb1 Neverland
Our nev/ enterance is dowstairs M side of hotel
F/V5er/\fW5 Hotel 1150 S.% ffam Dr. Vancouver • 261-7277
Alma Mater Society
The Grad Class Council
is now accepting Proposals for the
1992
GRAD CLASS GIFTS
Proposals must:
1) Be as specific as possible
2) Include the following information:
• name of group requesting funds
• Number of people working on project
• Name of a contact person (include telephone #)
• Who will benefit from the project
• Description of the project in detail
• A summarizing paragraph including the
most salient points
• The amount of money requested
• Sources of other funds if applicable
There is a limit of one proposal per particular group
of graduating students.
There is an upper limit of $3,000 for each proposal.
Each group must be prepared to give a short
presentation of their idea to the members of Grad
Class Council at the end of February.
The deadline for proposals is 4:00 p.m. Friday
February 14,1992 and is final, no proposal will be
accepted after this date.
Proposal applications are available
for pickup and drop off at the
AMS Business Office.
Please contact Caireen Hanert c/o SUB 246, 822-2361
if you have any questions.
34 day EUROPEAN TOUR
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with TOP DECK- tours for 18 - 35's
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THE UBYSSEY/9 Round and round
The BC government has just raised the
minimum wage 50 cents to $5.50 an hour for
people over the age of 18.
Well whoopdy shit.
According to End Legislative Poverty, a single
person in normal circumstances needs at least
$8.30 an hour for forty hours a week to live at the
poverty line. Which, of course, means that people
working for $5.50 an hour either have to work
two jobs, or are forced to live below the poverty
line.
How does this affect you, the student? Well,
it doesn't.
Whom it does affect is the people of modest
means who cannot even think of going to university because they earn only $880 a month
(before taxes). After expenses (rent $400, food
$100, transportation $50 childcare $600 and so
on) this leaves...um...less than nothing. This
seems to be an incentive to live on welfare.
The result is that only middle to upper class
young people can realistically go to university.
The cycle is obvious: you can't afford to get an
education, so you can't get a job that requires
post-secondary credentials, so you can't get paid
well enough to go to school.
Of course this cycle is simplified—there are
people without post-secondary education who
earn quite good money, but on the whole this is
rare.
But the cycle is also simplified in another
way. The budget above leaves only $100 for food
for you and your child—hardly enough to fully
nourish a child. A hungry child can not learn as
efficiently as a well-fed one. The child will be
distracted, tired, poorly tempered and will not
develop as well as a nourished child.
Undernourishment leads to high drop-out
rates and usually, to second generation poverty.
And the cycle does not stop.
With tuition fees rising and wage rates not
keeping up, the problem is only going to get
worse. Universities will be more and more the
bastions of the wealthy, and the divisions will
become deeper and more entrenched.
Until education is opened to all social classes
there will never be any sense of equality. Minimum wage must be raised so that people can
afford a decent life. A bursary programme must
be established and tuition fees lowered to ensure
all economic classes can have access to education.
Will this solve the world's problems? No, but
it is a small start.
the Ubyssey
January 21, 1992
The Ubyssey is published Tuesdays and Fridays by the
Alma Mater Society ofthe University of British Columbia.
Editorial opinions are those ofthe staff and not necessarily those of the university administration, or of the
sponsor. The editorial office is Room 241K of the
Student Union Building. Editorial Department, phone
822-2301; advertising, 822-3977; FAX 822-9279
The Ubyssey is a founding member of
Canadian University Press
Now here's a story. One lazy Sunday afternoon, Sam Green was
wandering through the universe. She fell on top of Martin
Chester, who squealed like a stuck pig, or like Yggy King's
impression ofthe film "Deliverance". Having recently viewed the
film, Carla Maftechuk was deeply upset. She asked Effie Pow to
stop him. But suddenly, rob emmerson stepped in. Yukie
Kurahashi, who just happened to be flying overhead after her
bicycle was flipped by Beck Bishop, tittered maniacally, thus
causing Chung Wong to toss his cookies all over Raul Peschiera's
recently completely Van Gogh rip-off. Charlotte Parson and
Bianca Zee, both collectors of alternative art, instantly fell in love
with the newly transformed masterpiece. A serious dispute
ensued until Robert MacDonald blurted "But what about Sage
Davies and Diane Rudolfs brother under the sheets at that Frat
party?" This outburst triggered flashbacks in Michelle Mason,
who launched into her Elvis impersonation. But it wasn't Elvis,
it was Tortelvis! Tabe Johnson and Paul Gordon broke into a
rendition of "Black Dog", causing Cheryl Niamath to bang her
head on the wall repeatedly. Sharon Lindores flew into a rage and,
thinking she was Frances Foran, bandaged her head with dis
carded Twinkies wrappers. Paula Wellings dodged them both but
witnessed Frances Foran getting sucked by a leech. Mark Nielsen,
obliviou s to it all, downed a beer in preparation for the Superbowl.
We are Fish.
Editor*
Paul Dayson  • Sharon Lindores • Carla Maftachuk
Raul Peschiera  •  Effle Pow
Photo Editor • Paul Gordon
Letters
Veiled racism
still hurts
In Robert Christian's
reply to Ian Weniger's letter
(Jan. 7) on January 14, he
states that, "the passages
quoted by Mr. Weniger [from
W. Gairdner's The Trouble
With Canada] as "racist"
simply aren't racist, with no
mention of racial determination of culture or of racial
superiority."
Hey "Bob," what kind of
person (wanting to publish a
book) do you think would
speak outright in these
terms—unless, of course,
they wanted to get charged
with writinghate literature?
Someone like Gairdner has
to veil his racism with
phrases like, "the core heritage and culture of this nation which is...," and "they
should be expected to assimilate...." In the same way,
the Reform Party uses
phrases like, "the mainstream of Canadian life."
On first glance these expressions may seem almost
reasonable, but, considered
again, their racist implications are impossible to deny!
Itis precisely this subtle
kind of racism that we cannot tolerate. After all, just
because it isn't in the same
clear-cut terms of racist Nazi
doctrines, does not mean it
isn't wrong or detrimental.
Cornelia Boytinck
Arts 2
Finally, a feelgood letter!
Lately, there has been a
lot of attention given to discrimination. There are many
forms of discrimination, and
most of us know a few of
them. We live in a physical
world that is constantly
changing, and getting
smaller because of increasing technology in communications and transportation.
We as humans must also
change because we are a part
of this world. Changing is
part ofthe natural course of
evolution, and humansmust
continue to evolve. I do not
understand howa person can
dislike or hate another person because of the way they
look, the colour of their skin,
their religious beliefs, or
their abilities. I have pity for
those people or organizations
that promote discrimination.
It must be awful for them to
SEE...  I  TOLD  YOU  THER
ARE    SEA   nONSTERS/
The Ubyssey welcomes letters on any Issue. Letters must be typed and are not to exceed 300 words in length. Content
which Is judged to be libelous, homophobic, sexist, racist or factually Incorrect will not be published. Please be concise.
Letters may be edited for brevity, but It is standard Ubyssey policy not to edit letters for spelling or grammatical mistakes.
Please bring them, with Identification, to SUB 241K.  Letters must include name, faculty, and signature.
live in fear and hate all their
lives, when they can live in
happiness, love, and sharing. We all have the common
denominator that we share
the same planet. So, let us
start working together for
the world, for humankind,
and for all the other life forms
that share this planet with
us. It really is quite wonderful to learn about another
person's uniqueness, and to
be accepted for what we are.
The responsibility is ours to
promote acceptance, love
and understanding. The way
to do this is simple. Set an
example to the people around
you.
Rick Klemm
Science 1
Mikey Mike
magical... not!
Remember October,
1991—it was a "magical"
time. The election was on and
the NDP promised to be everything to everyone. They
would supply loggers with
jobs, yet save the forests for
the environmentalists. They
would increase the quality of
the province's health-care;
yet not increase the tax
burden on its citizens. And,
most important to students,
they would increase funding
for post-secondary education; yet legislate a tuition
freeze. It seemed all Mikey
Mike had to do was wave his
"magical" socialist wand and
anything was possible...
But now it's January,
1992—the election is over—
time to wake up and come
back to reality. Surprise,
surprise, the NDP has "discovered" that the government coffers are bare. (Which
shouldn't be so surprising to
them, considering that's exactly the situation the NDP
claimed existed before the
election.) The social services
ministries have been instructed to set their budgets
with no funding increases—
which means a cutback in
services when inflation is
factored in. It now seems the
NDP won't be able to increase their funding for post-
secondary education; nor will
they be able to implement
their promised tuition freeze.
BCs students are finding out
now what the province's
teachers, trade unionists,
and government employees
will soon discover themselves:   the   NDP   isn't
magic .
We may have been
dreaming when we elected
the NDP, but it's time to
awaken to the realities of
our action.
Ryan Reynoldson
Artsl
Movie elicits
understanding
As the lights dimmed
and the film started to roll, I
found myself nervous, not
knowing what my reaction
wouldbe for Jacobovici's film
"DEADLY CURRENTS."
As images of war and
pain were splashed in front
of my eyes, my mind started
to turn, wondering whether
all the pai n and sufferi ng was
really worth the fighting.
Emotionally, I grew confused, as my Middle Eastern
blood told me to sympathize
with my own people while
something else in the back of
my mind forced me to search
for the truth in the Israeli
soldiers' confessions of pain
and anguish.
As the film neared the
end, I saw injured Palestinian children lying unconscious on their hospital beds
and heard a soldier's story of
fear and loneliness, I found
myself crying, this time not
only for Arab people but also
for their families and loved
ones who must be suffering
too. And I grew sadder as I
was reminded that at the
end everyone is a loser, and
the winner becomes a politician somewhere counting
his earnings.
The lights were lit agai n
and I stared blankly into the
fading screen. I knew that
"DEADLY CURRENTS" did
not show me anything I
hadn't known before. Instead
it forced me to stretch the
stubborn walls of my mind
just enough to let my eyes see
the blood splattering from
both sides. And although my
opinions remained the same,
my unforgivingness for the
Israelis diminished, my love
for the Palestinians deepened and my tears were a
little drier.
Nadine Araji
APSC2
Joia the.
Diatribe from
wonderland
The following is what I
have seen in the responses
to the questions that I had
asked. The basis given for
the right to choice is an atheistic, humanistic view ofthe
world. An argument based
upon this view of the world
will not be convincing to a
person who believes that that
world view is not the real
one.
Another thing that is
revealedis the inconsistency
in the basis for rights. Human understanding and development are given as a
basis, but nothing is given to
judge which views are better. Thus all views have
equal validity, both pro-
choice and anti-abortion.
Would you be as eager to
uphold human development
as a basis for morality if it
led to saying abortion was
wrong? Thus my question
regarding why opposing
abortion is wrong has not
been answered.
The third point is that
every argument for the right
to abortion presumes that
the fetus is not to be treated
in the same way as a human
being. The possibility of the
fetus being human and the
implications of that are not
even considered. This is very
important, because making
an argument based upon
viewing the fetus as
nonhuman is not going to
convince someone who views
the fetus as human.
For an argument that
morality can't be a human
creation I suggest reading
Mere Christianity by C.S.
Lewis.
David Voth
Engineering
I HOT
Flash
President's Service
Award
for Excellence
To recognize excellence in
personal achievements and
outstanding contributions
to UBC. Open to all university staff, faculty, and
administrative personnel.
Nominations due Feb 28
Call 228-2484 or 228-
5414 for more info.
10/THE UBYSSEY
January 21,1992 X   *    >    i     V   S    (   J   >   H.;*   ?
Happy anniversary
war-monger
War is a reality that all of us
physically and emotionally confront in the course of our lives. The
fact that we are joined geographically to the United States intensifies this reality. When the States
goes to war, the Canadians are sure
to follow in one form or another.
This was evident in the conflict
that took place in the Middle East
exactly one year from last Friday.
I find it necessary to bring
attention to this grim anniversary,
so that we do not easily forget the
injustices that our "civilized"
Western society has wrought. Fm
sure everyone has heard about the
innocent civilians that were killed,
and the civilian towns that were
devastated. All because one man
threatened to control the one resource that we
hold so dear: oil.
lector cards?
dandies were
When I examine the circumstances that
led to the declaration ofthe war, I
become bewildered and confused.
Is our way oflife so dependent on
oil that we must kill thousands of
people to conserve it? I think not.
Maybe the solution was not in war,
but in the plans of hundreds of
scientific projects that had all been
shelved, just to prevent major oil
companies and petroleum investors from taking an economic dive.
Surely everyone has heard of solar-
powered heat and electric cars. I
have a friend who said that her
junior high school science teacher
had constructed a primitive electric automobile completely by
himself. If this is true, imagine
what coul d be accompli shed by our
government research teams.
Imagine if they took those millions
and billions of tax payers' dollars,
which they pour into the armsrace
every day, and invested in technology. Pollution would decrease,
transportation would become less
expensive and no one would have
to die in a bed of hot desert sand.
Of course this is a fairytale
and you've probably heard it all
before. Still, it needs to be said. We
need to realize that there are always alternative solutions to killing and destroying. Most of us in
Canada would gladly support any
alternative solutions which would
prevent a war, especially if we were
involved. Now, if we could only sell
this to the States! But how can you
sell concepts of peace to a country
that actually has a logo designed
for a war before it is even declared?! Yes, the Gulf War was a
moneymaker, and we can't stop
the progress of a positive economic
event just because of a few morals,
now can we? I mean look at all the
revenue! We made millions on yellow ribbon, plastic flags, Hussain
voodoo dolls, magazines and Gulf
War collector cards. Gulf War col-
Perspective
Yes! Those little
inserted in every
convenience store in North
America. Of course, they were
eventually pulled from the shelves
because kids weren't that stupid,
yet. When I was growing up, the
role-models were football and
hockey players. The American kids
of today get to aspire to General
Schwartz-mop or the legendary
"Tomcat" F-14 fighter! "Wow
Martha, let's go buy junior a gun so
he can practice for his career!"
But seriously, this is no joke.
It's no secret that the United States
boasts more murders per-capita
than anywhere else, with hundreds of killings in cities like
Houston, New York and Detroit
every year. It's also no secret that
in America,
personal handguns are easily
accessed and in
frequent use for
the purposes of protection and foul
play. It's no wonder that those
Claude Van-Damm-kill-the-
commies-type-Rambo movies are
still selling cat box offices; all
America seems to love Arnold
Swarzeneggar.
I think it is feasible for one to
be slightly worried when his
neighbour exhibits such an appetite for violence. It's on our doorstep, and may soon be in our homes.
We've seen how our government is
dictated by the commands ofthe
"New-Order" ofthe United States.
The question lies in how soon we
Canadians will all be carrying
hand-guns to protect ourselves.
How soon until our way oflife is
the "American" way oflife.
I do notintend to present these
views as a self-righteous Canadian who thinks that hiscountryis
perfect. If I did, that would be
hypocritical. I am an American
citizen as well as a Canadian citizen. I was born in California and
am still American in some of my
mannerisms and speech, as is my
family. Though I cannot deny that
living in Canada for most of my life
has affected my outlook, I bring
attention to these issues more as a
human being than as a citizen of I
some country. If we think about
these things a little more, and perhaps put them into perspective,
maybe we can slow down this hunger for violence. I believe that we
should not ignore the wars and
injustices of our past, but learn
from them. Perhaps then we will be
more successful in creating a positive future, and the reality of war
will become just a chapter in some
history book.
Have an unhappy anniversary.
From the teachings of Jello.
Shannon Sternloff
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January 28th
January 21,1992
THE UBYSSEY/U NEWS
Oka: call it the Canadian injustice system
by Michael Kaiser
MONTREAL(CUP)—Prime
minister Brian Mulroney claims
that Canada has the "greatest
judicial system in the world." To
Mohawk activist Kahn-tineta
Horn and Mohawk Nation
spokesperson Dale Dione, this
same system imposes genocide.
In addition, they say, the
system has neither "legitimate"
nor "legal jurisdiction" in
Mohawk territory or on the
Mohawk people. Horn and Dione
particularly condemn the 59
charges brought against
Mohawks Ronald Cross, Gordon
Lazore and Roger Lazore in the
Quebec Supreme Court.
The trials began last October, and are based on Canada's
claim that the defendants violated Canadian criminal law
during the 1990 Oka standoff.
According to Horn, counts
57 and 59 have received "permanent stays" due to the Crown's
withholdingof evidence (referred
to as non-disclosure). Other
counts have been dropped due to
lack of evidence.
The defendants now face a
remaining 49 charges. This
outcome signals a small victory
for the defendants and the
Mohawk Nation. But it must not
"overshadow the question ofthe
legitimacy ofthe charges in the
first place," warns Horn.
The real question to be asked
is whether Canada has any legitimate or legal right to charge
the defendants under the Canadian Criminal Code.
"The criminal charges belittle the Mohawk case, in addition to undermining the
government's 1982 proclamation
granting native nations the right
to self-determination," said
McGill anthropology professor
Toby Morantz.
According to the 1982 Constitution Act, "The existing aboriginal and treaty rights of the
aboriginal peoples of Canada are
hereby recognized and
affirmed."Mohawk Nation supporters have interpreted this as
the right to continue developing
as a distinct society within territorial boundaries defined by the
Treaty of Ghent, the Jay Treaty
and the Two-Row Wampum. In
the latter treaty, made with the
Dutch, both parties recognized
each other's sovereignty and
agreed on "non-interference in
the other's internal affairs." The
Mohawk have never surrendered
these rights.
In the case of Oka, Morantz
argues that the Mohawkwarriors
were defending their land and
rights in accord with these treaties, which are protected by the
1982 Constitution.
The question of whether or
not Canada has a legitimate or
legal right to charge the Mohawk
is virtually irrelevant, said
Morantz. In the charges against
the Mohawk, legitimacy arises
from "might is right," with the
mightier Canada dictating laws
to the Mohawk Nation.
During the Oka standoff, it
meant facing police and military
forces. Now the Mohawk face the
expensive and drawn out process
of the judicial system.
Horn and Dione said
Mulroney's "greatest judicial
system" imposes genocide on the
Mohawk Nation by tying up the
Mohawks' time, money, and re
sources while criminalizingtheir
actions.
The aftermath of the 1990
standoff means hardship for the
Mohawk people. Unemployment
has surged. The Nation office,
once run by paid staff, is now run
by volunteers. Cigarette sales
and gambling have been effectively stifled. The high court costs
drain what little money the community has left for social pro
gramming. Harassment from the
police and the public continues.
"What did we ever do to deserve this treatment we're getting?" asks Horn. "A man gave us
a simple answer, *You upset us.*"
Activists accuse gov't AIDS
conference of ignoring people
by Kate Stewart
MONTREAIXCUP)—Members of
AIDS Coalition to Unleash Power
(ACT UP) disrupted a government-
sponsored conference on AIDS last
month, accusing it of ignoring the
reality of people living with HIV.
The activists got into the conference at the Palais de Congres
with phoney press passes. As soon
as Madame Denise Laberge-
Ferron, head ofthe Centre Quebecois de Co-ordination sur le SIDA
started speaking, 18 ACT UP
members started blowing whistles
and yelling "Assassin!" Then they
took over the microphone and the
stage.
According to Michael Hendricks,
an ACT UP member, this led
Laberge-Ferron to tears. After activist Daniel Begin spoke, she asked
for a minute of silence in memory
of those who have died of AIDS.
Hendricks said the move was only
to give herself time to "control herself."
ACT UP did not expect a positive reaction from people attending
the conference.
But they were pleasantly surprised to see their complaints met
with sympathy and applause from
many ofthe health system workers
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attending the conference.
ACT UP was angry because it
felt the conference did not address
the concerns of people with HIV.
"We demandfree medicine, enough
food to feed ouselves, adequate
housing, public access to information, and dignity and respect,"
read the pamphlet handed out by
ACT UP at the conference.
The focus ofthe conference was
on technology and AIDS treatment.
According to Hendricks, the
conference was badly planned and
geared towards the needs of the
"AIDS Industry." He feels more
attention was given to drug companies than to people with HIV.
"We don't oppose the exchange
of information," said Hendricks.
"We just wanted to draw attention
to the lack of consultation with the
AIDS community by the organizers ofthe conference."
Matthew Perry, another member of ACT UP, thinks the positive
reaction was from people who work
with AIDS and HlV positive people
and get their funding from the
government. "A lot of the groups
who had delegates at the conference have to go to Laberge-Ferron
for money," he said. "So raising
problems with her or the CQCS
might be difficult."
Laberge-Ferron said that since
the conference the CQCS has
started a consultation campaign
with 350 sero-positive people in
Quebec. The programme is meant
to establish working groups which
will make recommendations on
prevention, care of sero-positive
people, research and services.
Hendricks questioned Laberge-
Ferron's understanding of consultation. "She would rather have
them inside the tent pissing out
than outside the tent pissing in,"
he said.
When asked whether the ACT
UP demonstration contributed to
the decision launch the campaign,
Laberge-Ferron said it did not.
"What they were asking for was
free medicine. They already have
80 per cent of their medicine paid
for by the government."
"That's a lie. It's proved that
she knows nothing aboutbeingHIV
positive," Hendricks said. "Eighty
per cent is a very generous estimate."
Hendricks noted that a friend
who has tested HIV positive recently contracted shingles, spends
$24 a day on medication.
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12/THE UBYSSEY
January 21,1992

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