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The Ubyssey Jan 15, 1985

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Array THE UBYSSEY
Vol. LXVII, No. 29
Vancouver, B.C. Tuesday, January 15,1986
*>?■;  48 228-2301
Faculty morale down
Faculty morale all over the university is dropping, says an associate education professor, while the
administration is pressuring faculty
to retire early and negotiations on
how to fire faculty in the event of a
financial crisis drag on.
"Everyone is being apprehensive.
Morale has lowered across the university as a whole," Donald Fisher,
a Committee of Concerned Academics member, said Monday.
Fisher said the UBC administration's recent advertisement in UBC
Reports is designed to encourage
people to come forward and negotiate a deal to leave UBC. "The
pressure is on a little," he said.
"Everyone who is thinking about
what is happening is worried," said
Fisher. He added faculty are concerned whether staying at UBC is
the right career decision.
He said unfair dismissals due to
UBC's financial crisis are a real
danger but that the faculty association should get safeguards against
this.
The recent advertisement which
encourages faculty to voluntarily
retire is only part of an administration policy begun two years ago,
said associate education professor
James Gaskell.
Gaskell said this policy is one way
the university is trying to meet next
year's shortfall, which may reach
$18 million if provincial funds are
cut five per cent again.
'The early termination policy
may or may not help prevent an exigency," he said.
Faculty association president Elmer Ogryzlo said the association is
also encouraging voluntary retirement to prevent firings. He said for
firings to occur the university must
show there is a financial exigency
which cannot be solved without
forced retirements. "(The adminis-
Completion prop
comes to debate
tration) can't force people to retire
but it's hard to accommodate a five
per cent cut in other areas," he
said.
Ogryzlo refused to say how many
faculty might be eliminated if UBC
receives another five per cent cut.
The faculty association and the
administration are in the middle of
negotiations on a process by which
people are fired, Ogryzlo said.
Faculty members are worried that
without a clear procedure academic
freedom and fair dismissals are
threatened, he said.
Administration officials were unavailable for comment Monday.
• Ill
al
By PATTI FLATHER
Major proposals on letting
students complete programs that
are cut and on suspending admission to the first year bachelor of
education are coming before senate
this. Wednesday.
Grad centre talks
show progress
By DAVE STODDART
Both the university administration and the Graduate Student Society are optimistic about the future
of services for graduate students,
although disagreements remain over
a proposed hike in the graduates'
fee levy.
Representatives from both sides
said Monday there are important
developments in the prolonged dispute which began when the university closed the Graduate Student
centre last spring.
Brian Bain, GSS executive secretary, said recent dialogues with the
university have been positive.
"Things are going in the right direction now," he said. "We may still
have disagreements concerning
some of the particulars but at least
we agree in principle."
Bain said the GSS is striving to
preserve good prices and accessible
service at the centre. "I'm confident now that we can maintain the
sendees we've had in the past," he
said, adding the GSS wants to expand services in the future.
Neil Risebrough, associate vice-
president student affairs, said recent talks with the GSS have been
fruitful. But he added the society
should re-evaluate their current fee
levy, which has remained at $11 per
student since 1958.
"It's not realistic to assume that
SI 1 will buy the same services today
as iv. did 27 years ago," Risebrough
said. "We can't continue to pay
their bills. We don't want to service
their debt either." The university
cited an alleged GSS deficit of more
than $80,000 as one reason for the
centre takeover.
Risebrough said the board of
governors will be asked to levy a fee
on the graduate students. "This will
be similar to the recent fee levy on
the (Engineering Undergraduate
Society)," he said. "The university
See page 3: GRADS
A motion by lawyer Grant Bur-
nyeat asks for a review of senate
budget committee's December
recommendation that students
enrolled in programs should not be
guaranteed to finish them.
"People who are already enrolled
should be allowed to complete their
program before the cuts are implemented," Burnyeat, a senate
convocation member, said Monday. He said he introduced the motion because senate as a whole
should discuss how cuts due to
UBC's financial shortages are implemented, not just committees.
The university may be legally
liable if it does not endorse the so-
called grandfather clause which
allows students to finish their
chosen degrees, he added. Burnyeat
said senate must take a strong
stance affirming that "under no circumstances" is anyone already in a
program forced out of it.
The motion calls for senate's curriculum committee to review budget
committee's report, but Burnyeat
said he will accept requests for a
friendly amendment to have senate
debate the issue directly. The debate
will probably happen at Wednesday's meeting at 8 p.m. in the law
building, he said.
"It's a crucial meeting," said
Don Holubitsky, a student board of
governors' representative. He said
if UBC will not let students finish
See page 3: FACULTY
Anarchist advocates personal change
JOANNE DEVLIN REACHES for basket during game last weekend at
UBC. See story page 8.
By RICK KLEIN
People will continue to be exploited until they begin to take control of their own lives, an eminent
anarchist philosopher and social
ecologist said Sunday.
"The question of empowering
people to take control of their own
lives is the central question of our
times," Murray Bookchin told 400
people in SUB auditorium Sunday.
Bookchin said we are witnessing
the decline of citizenship. He spoke
of an acquaintance in New Yo'rk
"who refuses to clean up his street-
front. He pays taxes and says the city should do it. Meanwhile, he lives
in filth. We are losing citizens and
gaining taxpayers," he said.
The economic situation today is
similar to that in the 1930's
Bookchin said. "Back then we were
fighting in the streets. Ii never oc-
:urea to us that there was nothing
*e couid do "
But Bookchin said the raaicai
protests of that day are no ionger
■■eievant   in   '.odav's   world.'"   The
left-right divisions of class, the emphasis on economic exploitation,
one can't talk of workers anymore,
but of fathers, mothers, people.
The traditional concept of revolution is gone, we need broader
definitions of change."
Bookchin said the women's
movement represents an attempt to
do this. "Feminism has led to a
reexamination of our lifestyles and
the old social categories — domination is something that extends
beyond economics." There are
deeper issues being raised today,
Bookchin said, such as the relationship oi men to women, of humans
to nature, and the significance of
hierarchy. Domination will not
disappear unless our bronze warrior
mentality is replaced with a more
cooperative, survival-oriented attitude he added.
Bookchin spoke on the European
green movement.
"In Germany the old boundaries
are becoming blurred." he said.
Old conservative farmers are join
ing with student radicals,
housewives are protesting with hippies  all  under the green  banner.
Bookchin said the greens share
common convictions on peace,
ecology and grassroots democracy.
"But their politics is largely intuitive, they lack a unified theory."
Bookchin said he feels socialism
and capitalism are converging,
noting the case of China. Under
both capitalism and socialism
technology is seen as the savior that
wiil free mankind from toii. he said.
The old ideologies profess eventual
freedom based upon domination,
pressing the nose to the grindstone
and submitting to the organizational hierarchy," said Bookchin.
But he added: "It is nonsense
that someone is going to come
along with a key and unlock the
jail. You cannot have freedom
evolving from domination."
Bookchin will speak again today
at 12:30 in Buchanan A100. Page 2
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, January 15, 1985
"mm
ISfStT.!
Intelligent life found in Maritimes
I find it hypocritical that your
solicitation for letters includes "No
sexist or racist letters, please."
when you publish articles such as
"Cuppies suffer Maritime rednecks
and green lobster" and include pictures with an obvious Maritime
backdrop, subtitled "There's no intelligent life here," in your paper
(Jan. 9/85).
If you find the prejudices of
small town Maritime folk unappealing, you should also object to the
prejudices your reporters express
towards the inhabitants of the East
Coast equally repulsive. How dare
Charlie Fidelman and Chris Wong
condemn these people for their nar-
rowmindedness, when their own
tolerance for cultural differences is
also sorely lacking.
Perhaps the money spent to send
your delegates to the conference
could have been put to better use
improving their journalistic skills
and   broadening   their   views   on
Canada's various cultural groups.
Grant R. Loeb
Forestry 1
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COMPUTER USING EDUCATORS B.C. (CUE-BC)
WOMEN IN TECHNOLOGY CONFERENCE
DATE: Saturday, January 26, 1985
LOCATION: Asian Centre, U.B.C, Gate 4 on Marine Drive
COST: $40.00 (includes lunch at the Faculty Club)
$20.00 for students (with student card)
0900-0930
0930-1030
1030-1100
1100-1200
1200-1330
1400-1500
1500-1545
PROGRAMME
Registration, coffee
Keynote address: Ron Jeffels, Principal, Open Learning Institute — "Trends, Techniques, Technologies, and the Work
Force"
Coffee
Dr. Betty Collis, University of Victoria — "Sex Differences in
Secondary School Student's Attitudes Towards Computers"
Lunch — Faculty Club
Speaker — June Bower, Marketing Business Products, Apple
Corporation, Cupertino, California, author of "Computer
Confidence — a Women's Guide"
Dr. Joyce Matheson, Ministry of Education "Computers to
Improve the Quality of Life"
Panel Discussion
—Ron Jeffels
—Betty Collis
—Joyce Matheson
—Maggie Benston, Women's Studies Centre, S.F U
REGISTRATION:
Joan Collins, Field Development,
Faculty of Education, 2125 Main Mall,
UBC, V6T 1Z5 Ph: 228-2013
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C1984TI Tuesday, January 15, 1985
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 3
Holubitsky says we
must stand firm
From page 1
their programs, "we'll unquestionably establish ourselves as an institution without integrity. We can't
allow budget pressures to strip our
morals."
Holubitsky said if senate decides
to accept their budget committee's
advice then senate's decision will influence the board of governors to
also scrap the grandfather clause.
And Holubitsky said senate
should seriously consider the senate
admissions committee's proposal to
suspend admission to the first year
of the elementary and secondary
education program as well as to
both first and second year special
education.
"If you're preventing people
from enrolling in a program then
you're cutting it at least temporarily." He said this is the first major
proposal for program cuts, adding
elementary and secondary education comprise a large portion of the
education faculty.
Senate must establish guidelines
before it decides what to cut and
this has not yet been done, Holubitsky said, adding the whole of senate
and not just committees should
decide what is cut.
Cy Finnegan, an admissions committee member and science dean,
Make Yourself
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5765 Agronomy Road
Live without rush hour.
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Rooms are NOW AVAILABLE FOR RENT
Please phone either David Kety or
ErikMadaonat   224-9930 for detajte.
Any Deke  wil tel you:
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refused Monday to discuss the committee's proposal, saying it
originated with education dean
Daniel Birch.
Birch earlier denied the proposal
is a first step to cut back his faculty.
He said students will enter arts or
sciences now before entering education, adding he would be very surprised if his faculty was cut.
Grads oppose
fee increase
From page 1
cannot ask all UBC students to pay
for the GSS debt.
Risebrough also said not enough
students use the centre so a large
percentage of their revenue must
come from an increased levy.
"The faculty club could never
operate from a fee levy so low."
Brian Bain denied an increased
levy is needed. But he said he is confident GSS proposals can be implemented.
"Because we've kept up such a
struggle over the past six months we
can argue from a position of
strength," Bain said. "This should
demonstrate that students can in
fact bring about positive change."
FASCINATED BY SOCRED vision of high tech enamored student relaxed during break.
AFTER UBC?
BRIEFING FOR THE REAL WORLD
A series of seminars to help students re-enter the non-academic world
Wednesday. January 23, 1985
11:30
Interview Skills
Paying Back a Student Loan
Communication Skills and Dealing with People
12:30
Writing A Resume
Personal Goals and Career Planning
Women in the Labour Force: Dealing with Traditional Stereotypes
1:30
Women in the Labour Force: Nontraditional Occupations
Starting Your Own Business
Managing Your Personal Finances
Thursday. January 24, 1985
11:30
Personal Goals and Career Planning
Finding a lawyer, an accountant and a bank manager
Writing a Resume
Volunteer Work - A Means of Gaining Career Experience
12:30
Women in the Labour Force: Nontraditional Occupations
Business Etiquette
Time Management and Project Planning
Job Search Techniques
1:30
Time Management and Project Planning
Communication Skills and Dealing with People
Interview Skills
Friday. January 25. 19B6
11:30
Business Etiquette
Volunteer Work —a means of gaining Career Experience
Managing Your Personal Finances
12:30
Paying Back a Student Loan
Starting Your Own Business
How to get into Graduate Studies
1:30
Women in the Labour Force: Dealing with Traditional Stereotypes
Grants and Scholarships for Graduate Students
REGISTER AT THE A.M.S. BUSINESS OFFICE
(SUB ROOM 266)
211
213
215
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University of British Columbia
FREDERIC
WOOD
THEATRE
. . . presents . . .
A Comedy with Music
by Mo lie re
THE IMAGINARY INVALID
Directed by Mavor Moore
with
Simon Webb
JANUARY 18-26
(Previews—January 16 & 17)
Curtain: 8:00 p.m.
Matinee — Thurs., Jan. 24th at 12:30 p.m.
Student Tickets — $4.50
Previews/2 for the price of 1 Regular Admission
BOX OFFICE • FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE * Room 207
Support Your Campus Theatre
THE THUNDERBIRD SHOP
SECOND $EME$TER SUPER-DUPER
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STARTS TUES., JAN. 15
PRICES SLASHED ON SUBSTANDARD, FLAWED & DISCONTINUED LINES OF
CLOTHING, GIFTWARE & CARDS
QUANTITIES LIMITED        NO REFUNDS OR EXCHANGES        ALL SALES FINAL
Lower Level
Student Union
Building, U.B.C.
Hours: Mon.-Fri.
8:00 a.m. 7:00 p.m.
Sat. 10 a.m.-5:00 p.m.
Telephone: 224-1911
Visa & Mastercard
Accepted Page 4
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, January 15,1985
It's up to us
There are many among us who believe democracy to be the best, albeit
most difficult, form of government, and proudly preach (if not dictate, like
our southern neighbors) the virtues of our governmental ideology.
There are fewer of us who realize the problems of popular rule within
Canada itself. That the cruise missile is being tested in northern Alberta
despite national polls showing a majority opposed to it is an example.
There are no doubt even less of us, the student body, who are aware
that the failure of democracy extends to the campus itself.
Democracy depends on informed and concerned participants, yet when
only seven per cent of the student body voted for their representatives on
the board of governors and the senate last year, we can only blame
ourselves when the decision-making process becomes arbitrary, exclusive,
and obscure.
One wonders if the majority of students actually advocated student
funds being used to recarpet the Alma Mater Society executive wing of
Spaceship SUB last fall.
The debate continues whether students or student leaders are to blame,
but all agree that most students are unaware of the importance of their representatives.
Few understand that their two representatives on the board of governors
are the sole student voice within the group that sets the university's budget
and tuition levels. The board has more say in the future of the university
than the president.
When so few participate in the decision-making process, the concerned
minority are forced to overcompensate with dramatic acts, as when several
students held a symbolic funeral march in protest of tuition hikes before
last January's board of governors budgetary meeting. The less than optimum results echo the stress placed upon the democratic process.
As the Students for a Democratic Society of yesteryear becomes the
Students for a Democratic University of today, which boasts about two
dozen concerned members, it is obvious students need to show they care
in order to make democracy work here, and now. Vote. It's the least you
can do.
THE UBYSSEY
January 15, 1985
The Ubyssey is published Tuesday and Fridays throughout the
academic year by the Alma Mater Society of the University of British
Columbia. Editorial opinions are those of the staff and are not
necessarily those of the university administration or the AMS.
Member Canadian University Press. The Ubyssey's editorial office is
SUB 241k. Editorial department, 228-2301/2305. Advertising
228-3977/3978.
What do Ubyssev staffers Charlie Fidelman, Gordon Clark, Sarah Millin, Hui Lee and Rorv Allen
have in common? It is more than slurred speech and dumbstruck expressions. Robert Beynon, Monte
Stewart, Robbin Robertson, Dave Stoddart and Patti Flather share more than a perverse pleasure in
late night bouts of the printers. And Yaku, Dave Magowan and Denise Coutts' Weil the clue can be
found in that hole in the ground where slick slime has been known to cluster.
Letters
PM's peace support just more baloney
During and immediately after the
recent federal election campaign,
the Progressive Conservatives
pledged, if elected, to make disarmament a top priority. Prime
Minister Brian Mulroney said his
party would support a bilateral
U.S.-Soviet freeze and claims that
the Tories "take second place to no
one in our committment to secure a
durable and lasting peace for all
Canadians and for the world".
External affairs minister Joe
Clark said; "I believe the nuclear
threat is so serious that having some
impact on reducing the buildup of
arms and trying to reverse the pattern of destruction in which the
world has sunk must be the most
important priority."
The words of the new Tory
government on the subject of peace
are admirable; their actions are not.
In November, Canada was one of
only 12 countries in the world to
vote against a bilateral and
verifiable U.S.-Soviet nuclear
weapons freeze, including two
NATO countries and all Warsaw
Pact countries. As well, four other
NATO nations refused to vote no
and abstained.
Canada's negative vote on the
freeze not only breaks a Tory campaign promise, it also makes
Canada one of only 12 countries in
the world to be officially on record
as being in favour of a continued
arms race.
The Conservatives have also announced that the U.S. air-launched
cruise missile will be tested three
more times in the next two months.
The modern cruise missile is a
serious and destabilizing escalation
of the arms race.
Canada has already been asked to
contribute one billion dollars, as an
initial payment only, to help
upgrade NORAD's air defences,
primarily to meet the expected
threat posed by modern, long-range
Soviet cruise missiles now in
development.
Canada's security and economy
would be greatly improved if, instead of participating in the
development of cruise missiles, it
took a stand on banning this new,
destabilizing weapon.
The Conservatives have also announced that they hope to deal with
the unemployment crisis by greatly
increasing military spending. Yet,
study after study has shown that the
military is the least efficient type of
government spending for job creation.
Large increases in wasteful and
capital intensive military spending
will not solve our economic and
employment problems — they will
only make them worse.
In addition, the new minister of
national defence Robert Coates
claims he wants to be the "Caspar
Weinberger of Canada". Canada is
enthusiastic about Canada getting
involved in Reagan's Star Wars
scheme; but seems unconcerned
about revelations that the U.S. has
contingency plans to deploy nuclear
weapons in Canada (apparently
unknown to Canada) in a crisis.
The actions of the Tory government, in its early days in office,
clearly contradict the public
statements about the "top priority"
of disarmament.
Because the government is new, it
is probably sensitive to public opinion, and may be receptive to
public pressure. Such pressure is
especially warranted at this time,
because the government is currently
reviewing
policy.
its foreign and defence
One proven and effective way of
applying pressure is by writing letters to politicians. Politicians claim
that each letter they receive is
generally counted as representing
200 persons who have the same opi
nion but don't bother to write letters.
UBC Students for Peace and
Mutual Disarmament are holding a
special letterwriting meeting on Friday, Jan. 18th at 12:30 p.m. in SUB
205.
We will also be discussing other
Reps with spine needed
During the next year UBC will be
in a state of serious contraction.
Many departments will be cut, and
tenured faculty will likely be
dismissed.
This has never happened at a major university in Canada or the
United States before, and there will
be quite a lot of fighting over just
who or what gets cut.
I urge you to consider voting for
those students who have the guts to
stand up and speak out, clearly and
persuasively, on students' behalf.
Now is not the time for sycophants
or timidity.
Your student representatives,
especially on senate, may not be
able to form strong enough voting
blocks to resist faculty self-interest,
Election machine in gear
Again, the election machinery is going full-tilt to prepare for the
upcoming elections. The senate and board of governors elections is
the first matter of business, this Wednesday, Thursday and Friday,
Jan. 16, 17 and 18.
Firstly, I would like to remind candidates that they must present a
budget and a copy of their poster to the elections commissioner
before polls open on Wednesday. Each candidate is allowed to have
one poster within five metres of poll stations, and if a supply of
posters (20) is submitted along with your budget, they will be
displayed at poll booths.
Secondly, we still need many poll clerks for this Wednesday,
Thursday and Friday, and for the AMS executive elections Jan. 30,
31 and Feb. 1. These are paid positions.
Finally, a reminder to all board and senate candidates that all campaigning must cease by 5 p.m. on Tuesday. Any publication or
distribution of material after this time may result in candidate disqualification.
Any questions? Contact Don Mustard at the elections office: SUB
246/228-2361.
Don Mustard
AMS elections commissioner
tactics and strategies we can employ
to protest the government's two-
faced policy on the arms race. As
Edmund Burke once said:
"Nobody made a greater mistake
than (s)he who did nothing because
(s)he could only do a little."
Gary Marchant
grad studies
but they may be able to remind
senate that the interests of the
university and the student body
should come before their private interests.
It's going to get nasty. I suggest
you pass on sweet naivete or personal friendship.
For the first time since I can
remember (starting in the mid-60s)
who you have on the board and
senate is really going to count. It
may be up to the students to be the
conscience of the university.
Basically I'm saying that the
game has changed now. It's much
more serious, and in order to stay in
it students should go with their
heavy hitters.
Let's assume they've been around
longer probably held responsible
positions out in the real world, and
have the moxie and the authority to
make the vested interests on senate
open their myopic eyes.
Being nice and quiet and sweetly
receptive will waste our best forum
for being heard. Interesting times
ahead. I hope your course isn't
cancelled so that you can stay
around to observe them.
Peter Kendall
student law senator Tuesday, January 15, 1985
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 5
The Ubyssey
wants
you
stop
If interested attend staff meeting at one
in Ubyssey office SUB 241k Wednesday
stop
Or attend feature writing seminar by
Tom Hawthorne
in Ubyssey Office at three
Friday afternoon
stop
Hawthorne
has written for the Globe and Mail, This
Magazine and the New Internationalist
stop
Ubyssey needs writers, cartoonists,
photographers stop See you there
stop
mi
CREDIT UNION
An invitation to all UBC faculty, staff and students
Come to our
Open House
January 21, 10 a.m.-3 p.m.
IN THE STUDENT UNION BUILDING
You could win one of
several great door prizes.
■ $25 gift certificate to Orestes
■ $25 gift certificate to Earl's Place
■ Calculator wallet
■ 1985 executive daytime planners
■ One of 12 "Exchange" design umbrellas
We also invite you to enquire about
our many special services and
competitive rates.
• Student loans • Mortgages • Term Deposits • Personal Loans
• Chequing Accounts • ATM s • Safety Deposit Boxes
• RRSP's • Daily Savings Accounts
Bring this coupon into TCU Credit Union at U.B.C. Student
Union Building to be eligible for the draw at 3 p.m. on
January 21.
Name      - :	
Address : -. .	
Phone	
Refreshments will be served
B.C. Teachers Credil Union
Purple puss pumps through my purple, pubescent pulmonary artery, pulsating with pride at sight of
pink porcupines populating ponds with porky offspring who pulverize and chew pastel colored roots from
Patagonia in this period's quiet moments.
CALL FOR NOMINATIONS
for A.M.S.
Executive Positions
President
Vice-President
Director of Finance
Director of Administration
Coordinator of External Affairs
Close of Nominations:
4:00 p.m., Monday, January 21
Nomination forms can be obtained from the A.M.S.
Admin. Asst., SUB 238
Submit Nominations to the A.M.S. Administrative Asst., SUB 238
HA JUANA TILLY'S ATTRACTS
UNIVERSITY CROWD
A POPULAR NRHTCIUB
THAT CATERS 10 STUDENTS
Tia Juana Tilly's, one of
Vancouver's newest but
already most popular
nightclubs, is now appealing to students. On
Wednesdays it's Mexican
"Margarita Night."
Students get in free, and
Margaritas are a specialty.
At special prices.
"Tilly's," as most people call the club, is located
in the former "Ankor" at
99 Powell Street in
Gastown.
Students get in free on
Margarita Wednesdays
Since opening in October, Tilly's has quickly
become one of Vancouver's "IN SPOTS" for
fun and a good time.
Billed as a "California
Social Club," Tilly's
claims to be "the place to
meet people" and "the
casual alternative" to
some of the more formal,
pretentious clubs and
pubs.
The place to
meet people
Judging from the
crowds that Tia Juana Tilly's regularly attracts, they
are well on their way to
fulfilling these promises.
Tilly's has the best prices
in town, as well, and early
evening offers "2 tacos for
only$l."
Owned by the same people that have Cisco's Mexican Restaurants, Tia
Juana Tilly's has a huge,
reasonably   priced   ap
petizer menu, with giant
gourmet burgers as well.
Owner Gary Gardiner
says, "We want students
to forget going to P.J.'s,
Earl's and Fogg n' Suds,
and come to us instead,
have all the same things at
the same prices, and stay
for the action."
The cheapest price*
 in town	
With a huge multi-tiered
space that seems to attract
more than its fair share of
good-looking people, a
casual dress policy, good
food and reasonable
prices, Tia Juana Tilly's
seems to have the success
formula that will definitely
appeal to students.
ADVERTISEMENT Page 6
THE   UBYSSEY
Tuesday, January 15,1985
Tuesday, January 15,1985
THE    UBYSSEY
Page?
IN THE RUNNING FOR:
Senate elections run Jan. 16, 17
and 18, with evening polls Jan. 16.
Each faculty elects one senate representative and all students elect five
at-large senators.
Senate is a body of 87 faculty and
students, ail UBC's deans, and
alumni administration members.
Senate makes all the major academic decisions on this campus and
will choose which faculties, programs or departments to cut if UBC
has to cut- programs. Many of
UBC's important academic policy
decisions are made in its committees, especially the budget committee, which recommends budget priorities.
All the candidates running for
this body were asked to write replies
to two questions:
. What are the most important
issues facing senate next year and
how do you propose to deal with
them?
. If program cuts had to be
made would you fight for across the
board cuts or selective cuts and
why? If selective, where would you
cut first and what would happen to
the students enrolled in the program?
At-Large
Sean Bickerton
The university must be prepared
to mount an effective campaign
against any further erosion of provincial funding for university funding — no more cuts! We must be
active in suggesting alternative
sources of revenue for education,
and, I believe, must become more
actively involved in fund-raising.
Secondly, UBC must institute a
program of women's studies
courses. Senate must take a stand
against any move to erode faculty
tenure — the one sure guarantee of
academic freedom.
We must lobby for renewed funding for the commonwealth student
exchange which makes good university education available to students
in third world countries. I would
seek to reverse the student loan
policies of the Bank of Montreal,
and would insist on restoring fun
funding to the UBC Law Library.
I will fight any attempt at further
reductions in funding for this
university.
Donna Chow
The most important issues facing
senate next year arise from an anticipated $18 million shortfall in the
operating grant from UCBC and
how senate must ensure that
academic excellence is maintained
while minimizing its obvious
defeats.
The current issue senate faces is
the university's moral and legal
obligation to allow students enrolled in degree-granting programs to
the best of my ability, I'll make sure
that the power structure at UBC
. , remembers that there are 20,000 living, breathing students out there,
and that without them the whole
structure becomes meaningless.
(Hill missed his photo  session
because of a funeral).
Jane Ingram-Baker
Compiled by PATTI FLATHER
complete their programs before it is
cut. Senate must affirm that this
obligation still exists irregardless of
empose an across the board cut of
five per cent and faculties with their
own specific knowledge regarding
their programs could make their
own decisions. Faculties should be
able to make their own decisions.
Faculties should be able to make
their own decisions regarding their
own faculties.
Danica Gleave
The upcoming year for senate
will be a difficult one as funding
cuts continue, and increasingly difficult decisions are made about the
allocation, of financial resources.
Faculty layoffs as a result of program cuts is one option being con-
students are informed about decisions made concerning their education.
I believe that cuts in funding
should be equally distributed
throughout the university. Removal
of programs and faculties narrows
the scope of the university, and further increases inaccessibility problems. If the decision to cut a particular program is made, the program should be gradually phased
out, thus guaranteeing those enrolled in the program a degree in it.
Deidre Moore
Budget cuts are here; they're going to get worse. Major cuts are due
in UBC's academic programs.
Senate will wield the surgeon's
knife.
■ The student body speaks through
its senators, who must be forceful,
articulate and experienced students.
Senate is facing decisions which
will affect students mainly through
course or faculty deletions and ac-
Starting Wednesday, you will be barraged with a campaign blitz the
likes of which has never been seen. It's O.K.; take it easy, read this
section and you'll do O.K. Just remember, these people are being
given responsibility to make decisions on your behalf. PLEASE take
the time to remember where each candidate stands long enough to
vote. Then what you do is up to you.
the current financial crisis.
Senate has already established
further program cuts to be selective.
It is through this method that the
university will be able to maintain
and strengthen the quality of those
programs that have reached a high
degree of excellence. The alternative would result in mediocre programs and undoubtably, mediocre
degrees.
Factors such as quality, cost and
enrolment must be taken into consideration in making program cuts.
Unique B.C. and Canadian programs and those that are of world-
class distinction and high quality
must be maintained. If program
cuts are made, students currently
enrolled in programs must be given
the opportunity to complete their
programs prior to its elimination.
Jennifer Chow
The expected loss of $18 million
in funding next year will result in
another 33 per cent rise in tuition,
.cuts in entire faculties, along with
cuts in programs, classes, and in
library hours and services. Professors will most likely lose their
tenureship and thus will depart for
better wages and tenureship. We
will have even more crowded classes
and a loss of choices in programs—ultimately a decline in our
money's worth studying at this
university.
I would fight for across the board
cuts. I'm against selective cuts
because it is subjective decisionmaking — who will decide which
faculties are more important than
others?
For example,  the senate could
sidered to save money, which will
require persistent student input as
professors become more concerned
about their jobs than the quality of
education.
Any program cuts will, of course,
adversely affect students as well as
faculty, but I would rather see
broad scale small cuts to the elimination of entire small departments.
The reasons are varied, but essentially, a small group shouldn't pay
the price for everyone else; a good
university offers a broad spectrum
of areas to study; and the more people affected, the more pressure
there is on the provincial government to face the crisis in university
funding. Senate then is faced with
staying within current budget limitations, but maintaining quality and
reputation of the university.
(Gleave refused to b£
photographed).
Steven Hill
Students are almost powerless in
the university hierarchy. Although
they are the fundamental raison
d'etre of the university, their opinions are usually unsought and, if
expressed, largely ignored. Upon
returning to UBC this fall after a
decade or so working in the "real"
world, I was first struck by the long
lines of students outside the
Bookstore, patiently waiting to
shell out their hard-earned bucks
for textbooks. .Here was tangible
evidence of student status—would
Duthies make any profit if they
operated that way? Bookstore lines
are just an obvious manifestation of
the position of students at the very
bottom of the heap at UBC.
Student senators have a unique
opportunity, and thus responsibility, to forcibly press the student
position in policy decisions.
Although we are outnumbered on
the senate, this is a forum where we
can at least make our views known
to the university community and
public.
I have come to UBC after several
years of being treated as a mature,
responsible adult with rights and
responsibilities, and this is the attitude I will take into the senate. To
They must not be afraid to confront
the issues, nor must they be intimidated by the academic interests
on the senate. This is no time for
wimps or naive sweeties.
I spent five years earning my
Ph.D. in biochemistry and I have
seen departments squabbling to
protect their vested interests. I am
prepared to be honest and direct in
challenging the faculty senators
should they permit their departmental interests to override their
responsibility to the entire university. Faculty dead wood must go
first.
Budget cuts must be selective to
maintain UBC's academic reputation. Non-selective universal cuts
can only undermine the whole institution and devalue our education. Students caught by cuts must
have the right to choose realistic
alternative programs.
Ruth McDougall
cessibility to the university. I will be
an active, informed voice in order
to ensure that these and other matters will be dealt with in the student
interest.
Students must become aware of
academic issues. I want a more effective way to communicate to
students. A required assembly for
first year students would be a start.
Program cuts must be selective so
that UBC's high quality education
is maintained. Guidelines must be
reasonably set for these cuts.
Larger, professional faculties
should remain while smaller programs be cut, depending upon
numbers involved both academically and administratively. The
availability of the program in
Canada and perhaps the number of
students unemployed after graduation in the specific program should
be considered. Students must be
allowed to complete a program
once enrolled, but in an alloted
number of years.
Joanne Sasvari
The most important issue facing
senate next year is the continuing
cuts to the university's budget.
These yearly cuts are lowering the
quality of education UBC is able to
provide to its students. The board
of governors has chosen to pass on
some of the budget cuts in the form
of greatly increasd tuition fees. This
is decreasing students' accessibility
to a university education.
Student senators must address
these issues by raising student concerns in senate — either by lobbying
senators individually, or by acting
as a group in presenting motions to
senate. It is also crucial that student
senators bring university business
back to the student body so that
During the course of the next
year, UBC senate will have to face
some very serious and very difficult
decisions. Of these, the most important will be dealing with the issue of
program cuts. It is unrealistic to expect that a university can maintain
its academic standing when students
have no guarantee that they can
finish a course of study into which
they have entered. Such a university
would attract neither good
students, nor good professors. As
senator, I would like to be able to
say that there would be no program
cuts at all.
IN THE RUNNING FOR:
Interviewed by STUART COLCLEUGH and GORDON CLARK
Board of governor elections are
Jan. 16, 17 and 18, with an evening poll Jan. 16. Students elect
two board members to represent
them.
The board is the ultimate authority on this campus. It can veto
senate and presidential initiatives.
It sets tuition and wages. It hires
and fires. It sets university policies. It has 15 members, eight of
whom are government appointed
business people who dominate the
board. UBC's president and chancellor, two faculty representatives
and a staff representative also sit
on the board.
The five board candidates were
asked a variety of questions relating to how they saw a student
board member's duties, what they
thought of provincial university
policies and what they would like
to initiate on the board next year.
Phil Bennett
next year. He is against cutting
faculties or raising tuition fees and
says instead he will push for a
short term budget deficit and interim government funding for
"the next couple of years." UBC
is presently bound by the Universities Act to run a balanced
budget).
In the long term, Bennett favors
setting up a self-supporting endowment fund from tax deduc-
table private donations and
government grants. He says such a
board-controlled fund would give
the board needed autonomy and
allow the university to engage in
more long term planning.
"Middle of the road, maybe
social democratic depending on
the issues," is how- Bennett
characterises his political perspective. He says he does not approve
Socred restraint policies in general
and feels "(universities minister
Pat) McGeer's conduct is
deplorable."
Bennett believes it is important
student realize "the issues facing
the university now are probably
the most serious in its history.
There is a real crisis . . . and you
must get out and vote ^nd vote for
someone who will take a stand on
these issues."
Steven Harris
Phil Bennett^ an astronomy
Ph.D. candidate, thinks his position on the graduate student society executive, his work as a program analyst and member of the
UBC research community, and his
involvement "in various student
debates and battles over the last
two years," has given him the
qualifications necessary for a student board representative.
Bennett believes the Socred-
dominated board is unnecessarily
secretive. -"There's no need for all
that confidentiality . . . some yes,
but most of the issues do not need
that . . .it's just a bureaucratic
cover-up." He says if an issue
were important enough he would
break board secrecy and report its
proceedings to the public.
Bennett says government cuts in
university funding will be the most
important issue facing the board
Board hopeful Steve Harris,
economics 4, favors eliminating
tenure and making large faculty
cuts based solely on merit if worst
case scenarios of a $20 million
budget cut are realized next year.
"(Faculty) cuts will be
necessary," says Harris, Inter
Fraternity Council president and
former chair of the Canadian Federation of Students No commit-
However, as it is almost certain
that there will be cuts in funding
again this year, it is just as cei 'am
that some cuts will have to be made
in programs already existing at
UBC. I feel that implementing
restrictions on first and second year
enrolment, rather than axing programs already in their third or
fourth years would be the most effective recourse to be taken by
senate. Remember, though, that for
senate to be effective in preventing
drastic cuts from being made in our
education, it is the students' voice
that must be heard.
Justin Williamson
Financial cutbacks. Although
this is theoretically a board of governors matter it seems the senate
will be making many pertinent decisions. Two important areas are
fee hikes and program cuts. Many
students, including graduate students like myself, will not be able to
afford to stay at UBC if the fees are
raised as much as expected (33 per
cent for the next two years). If fees
rise too much UBC will lose money
because students will go elsewhere.
Across the board cuts have already cut department budgets to the
bone. It seems selective cuts must be
made. Without having estimates of
possible savings it is futile speculating which programs should be
cut.
It should be possible to let all students finish their programs. UBC is
morally bound to let them have
their education, and may also be
leaving itself open to legal action, if
this is not done.
I believe my picture is irrelevant.
Applied Science
Jim Hamilton
The dominant issue for senate
will be the guarantee to students
that they will be able to complete a
degree program once enrolled.
There has already been a proposal
suggesting no guarantee be given,
but this is really unacceptable, for
this assurance is a fundamental requirement for a successful university, and must be maintained.
As for program cuts, it is not a
question of if they come, but how
severe they will be. If across the
board cuts are made, there is a real
danger of departments losing accreditation and respect in the aca-
tee. "It's better to take one big
punch rather than several little
ones."
Harris admits eliminating
tenure (a move unprecedented in
North America and requiring
special government legislation)
will likely discourage talented professors from applying at UBC
when more secure positions are
available elsewhere. But he explains: "We just won't be able to
attract the kind of people we've
had in the past." As for the laid
off faculty members, "We will
have to tell them I'm sorry but this
is the way it is."
As further cost-cutting
measures, Harris favors streamlining all degree programs to four
years in length and instituting sessional library hours in which book
withdrawals would be suspended
after 7 p.m. leaving the libraries
open for research. These measures
would allow further reductions in
faculty and staff and-thus more
savings, he says.
Harris says the role of the student board representative is to get
along with the other government
appointed board members and
"broaden their understanding of
student interests."
Harris, who describes himself as
"the right wing candidate," says
next year will be a critical one for
the university's future and he
hopes students will get out and
vote, but he believes a small turnout will work in his favor, adding "I figure if I get 1,200 votes
I'm going to win."
Allan Pinkney
"I guess you could call me a
right wing radical," says board
candidate Alan Pinkney, law 2,
adding he has strong left as well as
right wing views. "I believe in
helping people who deserve to be
helped," says Pinkney, "but the
guy that's a bum on the street and
just has no desire . . . except to be
a leach on society, that person I
don't have much sympathy for."
Pinkney believes his four year
involvement with Alma Mater
Society politics gives him a solid
background for serving students
as a board representative. His
experience includes a 1983-84 stint
as AMS director of administration
in addition to involvement on the
budget and management committees of the Thunderbird sports
complex, the Aquatic centre, and
the AMS budget committee.
Pinkney feels student board
representatives should strive to
maintain their ideals and represent
students' interests. But he says
they must also be on the 14
member board and that they must
get along with the majority to be
effective. "They (the government
appointed board members) think
in a conservative, business
oriented sense and to be effective
you have to use their own attitudes to reach them."
Program or department cuts
and tuition fee hikes will be inevitable next year, in Pinkney's
opinion, if the government proceeds with another five per cent
cut in university funding as is expected. He says any student who
has academic mobility would be
crazy to come to UBC if fees are
raised another 30 per cent. On the
other hand, Pinkney notes, "we
do have a lot of faculty who really
ought not to be teaching at this
university and the board should
take the opportunity to get rid of a
lot of those."
Pinkney says undesirable faculty could be purged without
eliminating tenure by asking the
government for money and
legislation to "buy them out." In
addition the remaining faculty
could be made more efficient by
having their' teaching hours increased from the present average
of six hours per week to nine
hours as is the norm in some other
universities.
See page 9: BOARD
demic community. Concerning selective program cuts, I think that
students presently enrolled must be
allowed to complete their degrees,
and if necessary, there should be restrictions in further enrolment.
other programs. The decision as tp
which programs to cut.will be decided by the senate as a whole in consultation with the individual
faculties and the board of governors.
Kenneth Shaw Joe Ringwald
The most important issues facing
senate currently and during the next
year will be money related matters
arising from an anticipated five per
cent budget cut from the provincial
government. This problem and the
side effects created by a shrinking
budget will certainly be the key
topic in future meetings. I intend to
work with a cooperative, friendlly
approach rather than with a confrontational attitude. University
cutbacks have resulted because of
the large reduction in government
revenue. Unfortunately money
doesn't grow on trees, and we must
all deal with this problem in a
mature fashion by trying to
minimize the short and longterm effects to all parties affected.
If the provincial government continues to reduce the university's
grant, there is no other alternative
than to make selective program cuts
in order to maintain the quality of
The most important issue facing
the senate next year is eliminating :a
deficite that could exceed $18
million. To date, the only suggestions have been program cuts and
tuition hikes; I intend to look for
alternatives. There must be better
ways of eliminating the deficit other
than sacrificing the education of
thousands of students.
However, if program cuts must
be made' they should be selective
cuts in areas where the fewest
number of students will be affected.
Regardless of where the cuts are
made students must be permitted to
complete the programs they have
started.
Mike Maslechko
It is my sincere belief that manly
of the most  important problems
See page 11: ELECTING THE   UBYSSEY
Tuesday, January 15,1985
By DENISE COUTTS
In the first Canada West action
last weekend in War Memorial
gym, the UBC women's team
demonstrated their ability to play
tough basketball. But lack of experience prevented UBC from winning either game.
Friday the Thunderbirds lost
56-50 to the University of Calgary
Dinnies. On Saturday night, UBC
let their first conference win slip
through their fingers, losing 55-54
to the highly rated Lethbridge Pronghorns.
The Thunderbirds played a poor
first half Friday. The team rebounded back strongly in the second to chip away at Calgary's huge
lead, but was unable to overcome
their first half deficit.
This was not the case in Saturday
night's match-up against
Lethbridge. UBC came out strong
and played a solid first half, both
offensively and defensively, taking
a slim lead with them into the second half.
Lethbridge, known for their
tenacious defense, gradually changed the game's tempo in their favor
in the second half.
UBC began to lose their edge and
by the 10 minute mark held only a
one point advantage. The two
teams exchanged baskets but turnovers, inconsistent free-throw
shooting and "forcing the ball inside" were responsible for the
Thunderbird's demise.
UBC's centre, six foot Colette
Pilloud, and ex-Langara rookie
Joanne Devlin were standouts for
UBC in the game. Pilloud consistently hit clutch shots to keep
UBC in the game offensively,
leading the 'Birds with 18 points.
On defense, Devlin, an excellent
all-around player, supplied a solid
game for UBC. Her fine shooting
abilities failed her as she had a
chance to win the game with a last
second shot. Devlin's attempt missed and the young UBC team fell
just short of defeating the number
three rated Pronghorns.
The team must now rally back to
meet Alberta and Saskatchewan
this weekend on the road. Victories
this weekend would keep UBC in
the running as a possible contender
for a playoff berth.
The UBC JV's lost to the visiting
Grande Prairie College team, 51-45,
in preliminary action on Saturday
night. Marion West scored 14
points to lead UBC scorers.
Like skier
like team
The Thunderbird ski team was
perfectly satisfied with its Whistler
weekend.
The T-Birds continued to reap
success on the slopes in the quest
for a second consecutive appearance at the National Collegiate
Ski Association finals. UBC
dominated a Northwest Collegiate
Ski Conference meet at Whistler
last weekend.
Stu Gairns led the UBC men to a
first place victory in the alpine combined portion of the competition.
The Ail-American won both the
slalom and giant slalom events for
the second week in a row.
UBC women also glided away
with the combined alpine title.
Caroline Johnson recorded a double victory, capturing the two alpine
events.
The men won the combined nor-
dic and alpine title despite a poor
showing in the nordic category.
Dan MacDonalld won his second 15
km cross country race in as many
weeks. Gairns was the best
Thunderbird, finishing ninth.
As the individual mens champion, Gairns won his second sk-
kimeister award, almost guaranteeing himself a spot in the NCSA
championships in Idaho in March.
•     •      •
UUUU £T
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BICKERTON
for SENATE at large
• Fight Funding Cutbacks
• Establish Womens Studies
Courses
• Restore Law Library Funding
• Reverse Student Loan Policies
of Bank of Montreal
vote BICKERTON jan. i6-is
Committee to Elect Sean Bickerton
A disciple once jokingly asked Rabbi Brown Jr. of Fresno, a Reform
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Tues. Jan. 15—
"Over Coffee" - News from Israel In Hebrew - 12:30 -
Sandwich Bar Open
Wed., Jan. 16-
Our weekly Hot Lunch returns — 12:30
Thurs., Jan. 17—
1st session of Issues in Israeli-Palestinian Relations series
with Dr. Shmuel Sandler, visiting professor from Bar Man
University, Israel. This week's topic — "Jews and Arabs in
Mandatory Palestine, 1919-1948"
-12:30 - lunch available
Sun., Jan. 20-
Israeli Dance Workshop for beginners — 1:30-4:30 p.m. International House. $2.50/student, $5.00/non-student.
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WESTERN
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Professor Larry Wynant
Chairman, MBA Program
will Host a Discussion
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DATE: Thursday, January 17, 1985
TIME: 9:30 a.m.-11 a.m.
PLACE: Room 415, Angus Building
Anyone Interested in Discussing
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Invited to Attend Tuesday, January 15, 1985
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 9
Board hopefuls talk
From page 7
Nancy Bradshaw
Nancy Bradshaw says as the
Alma Mater Society external affairs
coordinator last year, she attempted
to involve students in AMS decision-making processes. Now she's
running for a seat on the board of
governors and her campaign revolves around a similar theme of
student participation.
"The one thing I've emphasized
in my campaign and as external affairs coordinator is the importance
of student input," she says. Bradshaw sees her role as a member of
the board of governors as "effectively and persuasively presenting
students' opinions."
Bradshaw says the board is comprised of business people who do
not fully understand the needs of
students at UBC. "The board of
governors are the people from
downtown. We have to get them interested in the university and concerned for students," she says.
Bradshaw plans to bring board
members to meet students. In this
way she hopes to present the direct
concerns of students. Through this
process of consultation, Bradshaw
feels the best decisions will be
made.
"I feel it is important to touch as
many people as possible," she says.
Bradshaw says the most important issues facing the board next
year will concern the university's
underfunding. She doesn't agree
with the provincial government's
attitude towards education and calls
for increased funding.
Bradshaw feels students should
take a more active role making the
government aware of the importance of education. She thinks the
engineers' writing campaign last
year is a good example.
"Governments are political," she
said. "And they respond to community pressure."
Bradshaw says another huge tuition fee increase at UBC will not be
effective in dealing with UBC's financial crisis, adding UBC lost $1.3
million in income last year because
of a high no-show rate due to the
higher fees.
Bradshaw argues for the cutting
of programs as a means to save
money. But she does not know
which departments should be sacked.
"I haven't talked to a whole lot
of students on that issue," she explains.
Although she doesn't pretend to
know the best solutions for UBC's
financial problems, Bradshaw said
she is prepared to put in the time
next year to make the board more
aware of students' particular concerns.
"I mean it, I really do."
(Bradshaw failed to bring in a
picture).
Don Holubitsky
As the only incumbent running in
the board elections Don Holubitsky
argues he knows the problems facing the board of governors next
year.
"The main issues next year are all
financial," he says. "They are all
mitigated by the fact the university
will lose 40 per cent of its real budget over the next four years," Holubitsky, medicine 4, is particularly
concerned by the possible $18
million shortfall next year.
"By law we can't run a deficit
budget, and so we must find that
$18 million in our budget. How we
make the cuts will affect the entire
shape of the university," he says.
Holubitsky says the university
must avoid looking for "easy
money" as a way of dealing with
the cutbacks. He cites tuition fee increases, cuts in student aid and services, and cuts to the athletic department   as   examples   of  saving
money without addressing the real
issues.
Holubitsky stresses any cuts must
be made in the open using rational
priorities.
Last year the board made an
across the board cut in the university budget. Holubitsky says this
was a bad decision which should
net be considered again because it
affects the quality of the university
as an institution.
Holubitsky refuses to say which
programs should be cut except that
"less important" departments
should go first to protect departments with a good reputation.
"We have to preserve our areas
of excellence. For example, our
commerce faculty is the second best
in Canada."
Holubitsky says UBC was losing
its top professors because of the declining reputation of the university,
adding it is important to keep these
people at UBC even with the problems of funding.
If he is re-elected, Holubitsky
promises to push the board to take
input from more people before
making financial decisions affecting
the entire university community.
(Holubitsky missed his photo session.)
U.B.C. DEPARTMENT
OF STUDENT HOUSING
Invites Applications for
Residence Advisors for 1985-86
These positions are open only to full-time registered U.B.C
students. Successful applicants will be required to live in the
residences. Application forms and detailed job descriptions
are available at the Ponderosa Housing Office and at the
Front Desk of each single student residence area: Totem
Park, Place Vanier and W. H. Gage.
Applications will be accepted from January 7 to January 18,
1985 at the Front Desks of the Single Student Residences, or
at the Ponderosa Housing Office.
rams
rams
CENTRE
BINDING now available
Free for the entire month of
January '85. Still free collating and
stapling.
Self Service Coin-Op 5$
STUDENT UNION BUILDING
228-4388
U.B.C. THUNDERBIRD WINTER
SPORTS CENTRE
PRESENTS
1
1
SUPER
BOWL '85
GAME
BIG 48" TV
1.
SUNDAY, JAN. 20
STARTING 2:00 p.m.
BZZR ONLY 1.25
ELECT/ON
STUDENT REPRESENTATIVES TO
SERVE ON GOVERNING BODIES
Evening Polls, Wednesday, January 16, 1985
as follows:
4:00 p.m. to 7:00 p.m.
(Board and Senate At-Large Elections Only)
Totem Park Common Block
Place Vanier Common Block
Walter H. Gage Common Block
Sedgewick Library Panhellenic House
Daytime Polls, Wednesday, Thursday and Friday,
January 16, 17 and 18, 1985, as follows:
9:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.
VGH (16th & 17th only)
S.U.B. • Woodward Library
Buchanan Sedgewick Library
C.E.M.E. Building MacMillan
Computer Science Law
Education Henry Angus
Hebb Theatre War Memorial Gymnasium
(Subject to students being available to run these polling
stations.)
BRING YOUR A.M.S. CARD
BOARD OF GOVERNORS
Candidates from which TWO are to be elected:
Phil Bennett (Ph.D. candidate — Astronomy)
Nancy Bradshaw (Third Year Commerce & Bus. Adm.)
Steven Harris (Fourth Year Arts)
Don Holubitsky (Fourth Year Medicine)
Alan Pinkney (Second Year Law)
SENATORS AT-LARGE
Candidates from which FIVE are to be elected:
Sean T. Bickerton (First Year Arts)
Donna Chow (Third Year Arts)
Jennifer Chow (Third Year Arts)
Danica Gleave (Third Year Agricultural Sciences)
Steven Hill (Ph.D. candidate-Oceanography)
Jane Ingman-Baker (Second Year Law)
Ruth McDougall (Third Year Agricultural Sciences)
Deirdre Moore (Second Year Arts)
Robert Sanzalone (Third Year Arts)
Joanne Sasvari (Unclassified)
Justin Williamson (M.A.Sc. candidate-
Civil Engineering)
SENATE REPRESENTATIVES
FROM INDIVIDUAL FACULTIES
APPLIED SCIENCE
(one to be elected)
Jim Hamilton (Third Year)
Joe Ringwald (First Year)
Kenneth L. Shaw (Third Year)
(Voting will take place in the C.E.M.E. Building only)
ARTS (one to be elected)
Mike Maslechko (Third Year)
Terry Orr (Third Year)
John Whyte (Second Year)
(Voting will take place in the Buchanan Building Only.)
COMMERCE AND BUSINESS
ADMINISTRATION (one to be elected)
Claudia Gilmartin (Second Year)
Adrian Kimberley (Third Year)
Kellie Lawson (Third Year)
(Voting will take place in the Henry Angus Building only.)
(one to be elected)
FORESTRY
Clarke Friis (Second Year)
Rene Thomsen (Third Year)
(Voting will take place in the MacMillan Building only.)
GRADUATE STUDIES(°n*;%be
Frank Frigon (Ed.D. Candidate) eiecieoj
Ron Yaworsky (Ph.D. Candidate — Civil Engineering)
(Voting will take place in Sedgewick, Education and
C.E.M.E. only.)
LAW (one to be elected)
Paddi Arthur (First Year)
Kathy Kerr (Second Year)
(Voting will take place in the Law Building only.)
SCIENCE  (one to be elected)
Kirk Hancock (Second Year)
Peter A. Lankester (Third Year)
(Voting will take place in the Computer Science Building
and Hebb Theatre only.)
NO PROXY VOTING WILL BE
ALLOWED AND STUDENTS
REQUIRE THEIR A.M.S.
CARD TO VOTE
(It should be noted that any allegation or irregularities with these
elections must be submitted in writing to the Registrar within 48
hours of the close of polling (exclusive of weekends or public
holidays) and must include the signatures of at least three students
eligible to vote.)   	 Page 10
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, January 15, 1985
TUESDAY
AMS ART GALLERY
Installation by Judy Prire. 1(M p.m.. AMS art
gallery, SUB.
UBC SAILING CLUB
Exec meeting, all members welcome if interested, 7:30 p.m., SUB 206.
INSTITUTE OF ASIAN RESEARCH
Films,  Bird of Passage,  Enemy Alien,  noon,
room 604, Asian centre.
UBCJUDO
Learn  to defend yourself,  7:30 to 9:30 p.m.,
Osborne gym.
BALLET UBC JAZZ
Registration, noon, SUB 216E.
UNDERWATER HOCKEY
Practice, 7 p.m.. Aquatic centre.
DEPARTMENT OF POLITICAL SCIENCE
. Talk   by   Murray   Bookchin,   noted   anarchist
thinker, noon, Buch A100.
SOCIALIST EDUCATION SOCIETY
Book table, 11:30-2:30 p.m., SUB concourse.
PRE MEDICAL SOCIETY
Lecture, family practice, speaker Dr. Grantham,
noon. Woodward 1.
WEDNESDAY
GAYS AND LESBIANS OF UBC
Time out, newcomers meet in 237A, 4:30 p.m.,
Gallery lounge.
NDP CLUB
General meeting, noon, SUB 119.
ISMAILI STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Badminton night, 4:30 p.m., Osborne gym A.
VOLUNTEER CONNECTIONS
Information booth on volunteer opportunities,
noon, SUB concourse.
AMS ART GALLERY
Installation by Judy Prire,  10-4 p.m., AMS art
gallery.
LATIN AMERICAN SUPPORT COMMITTEE
Lecture-slide show on El Salvador by activist
photojournalist Jim Marney, noon, Buch B214.
AMNESTY INTERNATIONAL
General meeting, noon, SUB 211.
INTEGRITY IN ACTION CLUB
Lecture:   Creative   life   cycles,   speaker   Dale
Maranda, noon, Buch B317.
CAMPUS PRO-LIFE
Meeting to discuss agenda for pro-life week,
4:30 p.m., SUB 215.
VANCOUVER ADVENTURE TRAVEL CLUB UBC
Organizational meeting, noon, SUB 205.
BALLET UBC JAZZ
Registration, noon, SUB 216E.
THUNDERBIRD VOLLEYBALL
Men's match vs B.C.  Olympics, 8 p.m.. War
Memorial gym.
THURSDAY
GAYS AND LESBIANS OF UBC
General meeting, the meeting to top all others,
noon, SUB 119.
REBEL SPECTACULAR
Film Uranium: the political genocide in N. Saskatchewan, and speaker, noon, Buch A100.
CAMPUS CRUSADE FOR CHRIST
Weekly meeting, everyone welcome, noon,
Brock Hall 302.
CUSO-UBC
Development education series, appropriate technology: small is working, 7:30 p.m., International
House, upper lounge.
PHILOSOPHY STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Philosophy and politics, Ronald Dworkin, noon,
Buch B214.
CHINESE CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP
Time management talk with Christian perspective, noon, Scarfe 206.
PSYCHOLOGY STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
General meeting, noon, Peter Suedfield lounge,
Kenny building.
LE CLUB FRANCAIS
Conversation meeting, 1:30 p.m.. International
House.
ISA
Religious lecture cancelled.
STUDENTS FOR A DEMOCRATIC UNIVERSITY
Forum:   Hidden  ideologies  in  the  classroom,
noon. Law 101.
BALLET UBC JAZZ
Registration, noon, SUB 216E.
UBC AMATEUR RADIO SOCIETY
General meeting, open to all, noon, Brock extension 358.
FRIDAY
UBC SCHOOL OF JOURNALISM
Feature writing seminar, newcomers welcome,
freelance writer Tom Hawthorn, 3 p.m.,  SUB
241K.
AMS ART GALLERY
Installation by Judy Prire,  10-4 p.m., AMS art
gallery.
UBC STUDENTS FOR PEACE
AND MUTUAL DISARMAMENT
Letter  writing  and  strategy  workshop,   noon,
SUB 205.
LE CLUB FRANCAIS
Conversation    meeting,    noon,    International
House.
PROGRAM FOR CORRECTIONAL EDUCATION
RESEARCH TRAINING ETC.
Seminar: Identifying and treating learning disabilities of federal inmates, 1:30 p.m., Adult Education Research centre.
THUNDERBIRD BASKETBALL
Women vs Saskatchewan, 6:45 p.m., men vs
Huskies, 8:30 p.m.. War Memorial gym.
ETHNIC STUDIES COMMITTEE
Jack Murta, minister for multicufturalism speaks
about multiculturalism and the media, 1 p.m..
Graduate centre dining room.
Hairy puce blorgs in this tiny
island community clogged their ears
with puce sluce this week as Pango
politicians bombarded them with
literally snotioads of verbal slush.
"I loath lazy lethargic blorgs,"
spouted Stalin Pink Knees. "I hate
lowly blorgs cause they wear lowly
clothes!" sniped Tweed Harris. "A
good politician is a photogenic politician," chirped Paunchy Flab-
shaw. "But please — no hard questions!" Dreary Moore said that
politics were not part of some hairy
brained scheme.
elect
JENNIFER
CHOW
International Relations 3
Against:
—cuts in programs
—increases in tuition fees
—cuts in library hours and
services
For:
—tenureship for professors
—alternative funding from
corporate and private
sectors
Vote for Jennifer Chow
on January 16, 17, 18
GOOD LOOK
Compare our quality
and price to all
the rest.
QUALITY COPIES
E3
kinko's copies
5706 University Blvd.
Vancouver, B.C.
V6T1K6
(604) 222-1688
Willaim G. Black
MEMORIAL PRIZE
William . Black Memorial Prize — a prize
in the amount of $1,250 has been made
available by the late Dr. William G. Black
for an essay on some aspect of Canadian
citizenship. The topic will be designed to
attract students from all disciplines. The
competition is open to all students who
are enrolled in undergraduate programs
and who do not already posses a graduate
degree. A single essay topic of general
nature related to Canadian citizenship will
be presented to students at the time of the
competition. Duration of the competition
will be two hours.
Time and Place:
SATURDAY, JANUARY 26, 1985
BUCHANAN 104
9:30 a.m.-l 1:30 a.m.
CUSO-UBC
1985 Development Education Series
"PROGRESS IN PERSPECTIVE"
Jan. 17—Appropriate Technology: Small is working
Jan. 24—The Environment: Whose backyard is this, anyway
Jan. 31—Multinationals: Controlling Interests
Feb. 7—Human Rights: Freedom and Development
Feb. 14—Fisheries: Salmon Enhancement
Feb. 21—Famine and Progress: Ethiopia
Feb. 28—Family Planning & Birth Control: The Social Factors
Mar. 7—Education: Colonialism
Mar. 14—Land Reform: They aren't making it anymore
EVERYBODY WELCOME
Every Thursday night, Jan. 17th—March 14th
7:30 p.m., International House, UBC
FREE ADMISSION
The 18% RSP. From DSP.
Much more than "numbers."
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This top-performing investment Fund is up an
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To learn more about
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can mean to your RSP, call
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return the coupon below
Today.
Choosing us could be your
most important RSP
decision.
For details call:
Alex Vishniakoff
682-4424
DSP) Dominion Securities Pitfield
' Date ot inception December 19ti~. All figures to December I. IM4. dividends rem vested. <Xfer unit/ /it/ nm-i/\rtus.
IBROWNLEE OFFICE OUTFITTERS LTD.      732-3331
 1774 WEST 2nd AVE., VANCOUVER, B.C. V6J 1H6 •
[^TYPEWRITER RENTALS
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—►SPECIAL STUDENT PRICES-*	
Rental Payments Can Be Applied
Towards Purchase
iivonaercuts)
Greets 1985 with our LOWEST EVER
Price for a Perm. $19.95 with Coupon
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All Coupons Valid Till Feb. 10th
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GET SMART—BE SMART
AT WONDERCUT PRICES
Kerrisdale
5540 Dunbar
(Bet. 39th & 40th)
Tel. 263-3120
South Granville
2543 Granville
(Bet. Brdwy. & 10th)
Tel. 738-9353
Kitsilano
3615 W. 4th Ave.
Bet. Alma & Dunbar
Tel. 734-3841
Also at North Burnab) & Coquitlam
"THE CLASSIFIEDS1
RATES: AMS Card Holders — 3 lines. 1 day $2.50; additional
lines. .60c. Commercial — 3 lines, 1 day $4.50 additional lines, .70c. Additional days, $4.00 and .65c.
Classified ads are payable in advance. Deadline is 10:30 a.m.
the day before publication.
Publications Room 266, S.U.B., UBC, Van., B.C. V6T2A5
Charge Phone orders over $10.00. Call 228-3977.
COMING EVENTS
40 - MESSAGES
WOMENS' RUGBY. Local team needs new
players. No experience required. Social
team sport. Call 733-3877.
11 - FOR SALE - Private
ARMSTRONG FLUTE, silver head, plated
body. Best offer, Marc (on campus)
228-4794.
JOBSI JOBSI JOBSI Can't find one huh!
Why not get valid work experience through
volunteering. Come to Volunteer Connections No. 200, Student Counselling Cntr.,
Brock Hall.
60 - RIDES
20 - HOUSING
AVAILABLE FEB. 1st (or sooner), room &
board in friendly family home in Kerrisdale.
Suit woman student. 266-8275.
ROOM & BOARD - faculty family in
Kitsilano in exchange for circa 20 hrs/wk
childcare including 4 mornings, 9 a.m-1
p.m. Feminists preferred. Ph. Doug Ross,
Nicki Strong-Boag, 228-6595 or 731-7437.
URGENTLY NEEDEDI N/S female to share
house w/same. Master br., own bath, f/p,
5 appl. $288 & $12 util. Rmd. Call Marian
271-5017.
25 - INSTRUCTION
LSAT, GMAT. MCAT preparation. Call
National Testing 738-4618. Please leave
message on tape if manager is counselling.
CAR POOL from Abbotsford to UBC. To
join us call 859-1805 ater 6 p.m.
STUDENT SEEKS CARPOOL member(s).
Lower Lonsdale area of North Van. Call
Gwen, 985-4816 after 6:00.
85 - TYPING
Let Us Prepare You For The
March 2. 1985 LSAT
on Feb. 1. 2, 3/1985
For information call free
LSAT/GMAT
PREPARATION COURSES
112-800-387-3742
30 - JOBS
NEEDED: After school care plus light
housekeeping, $4.50 /hr. Ref's req'd.
228-1584 eves.
CATERING CO. requires occassional help
for parties, weddings. Call 921-8506 & leave
message for Louise Arid.
VANCOUVER OFFICE requires p/t clerical
worker. No exp. necessary. Training provided. Please call John at 251-3571 bet. 6
p.m.-9 p.m.
EXPERT TYPING. Essays, term papers,
factums, letters, manuscripts, resumes',
theses, IBM Selectric II, reasonable rates.
Rose 731-9857.
YOUR WORDS PROFESSIONALLY
TYPED - TO GO. Judith Filtness, 3206
W. 38th Ave., Van. 263-0351 (24 hrs.). Fast
and reliable.
WORD    PROCESSING    SPECIALIST.    U
write, we type theses, resumes, letters,
essays. Days, evenings, weekends.
736-1208.
TYPING — Fast accurate, reasonable rates.
734-8451.
DOTS WORD PROCESSING offers reasonable rates for students for term papers,
essays & masters. 273-6008 eves.
UNIVERSITY TYPING-Word processing.
Papers, theses, resumes, letters. P-U & del.
9 a.m.-11 p.m. 7 days/wk. 251-2064.
MINIMUM NOTICE REQUIRED. Typing
essays & resumes. Spelling corrected.
224-1342.
WORD PROCESSING (MICOM). Student
rates $14/hr. Equation typing avail. Fast
professional service. Jeeva, 876-5333.
WORD PROCESSING/TYPING. Student
rates. Ideal for students on North Shore.
Days, eves., weekends. 985-8890. Tuesday, January 15, 1985
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 11
Electing new
From page 7
facing this univrsity will be tackled
by the senate next year. Among
them, I see the cutting of programs,
and the overcrowding of classrooms
as major difficulties to be resolved.
Also, I firmly believe that this
university has a moral obligation to
allow students to complete their
degree programs even in the event
of their programs being cut from
the university's curriculum.
I have been an arts student for
three years, and during this time I
have seen a significant deterioration
in the quality of education. I am
tired of massive lecture halls where
the quality is so watered down that
the education received is no longer
worth the money put into it. As arts
representative in senate, I am determined to address these issues and to
make our voice heard.
will therefore try to restrain tuition
hikes as much as possible but concentrate more on increasing student
aid and improving enrolment accessibility.
John Whyte
As I see it, there are two vital
issues in this election. The most im
portant is the threat of the elimination of degree programs while
students are still enrolled in them,
or taking the program's prerequisites. I say we must draw the line
at sudden program elimination, and
I will fight to make sure that no student is stranded this way.
See page 12: SENATE
Terry Orr
If elected, I will cut through the
bullshit. We must face the reality of
tightening budgets and sort out the
clamoring, competing needs of each
faculty which tend to obscure the
true priorities of the university.
The senate must look beyond
tenacity and persistence when
evaluating the academic requirements of the university, using
a combination of objectivity and rationality instead. This can be
achieved by first clarifying the
following issues: 1) The security of
program completion must be
guaranteed or UBC faces the erosion of its legitimacy as a degree-
granting institution. Without this
guarantee the shadow of doubt
hangs over all students. 2)
Realistically, I believe that tuition
fee hikes are inevitable in consideration of more government cutbacks
and the UBC $18.9 million deficit. I
rv_fcTWC   As
'Sh COVV)
LEGISLATIVE
INTERNSHIPS
Competition for the 1986 British Columbia
Legislative Internship Program is now open
WHO IS ELIGIBLE
Honours or Majors graduates in fields of
Political Science, History, Economics,
Sociology or Geography from a B.C. university.
WHEN
1 January to 30 June 1986.
APPLICATION DEADLINE
15 February 1985.
HOW TO APPLY
Programme literature and application forms are
available from the eligible Departments at the
University of British Columbia, Simon Fraser
University or University of Victoria or from:
Dr. R. K. Carty,
Department of Political Science,
University of British Columbia
OR
Office of the Speaker, Room 207,
Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
4HAIT5. l>E£k3N
^
The January Special
Shampoo, Cut, Blowdry
9
3621 W. 4th Ave., Van.      733-3831
■>
i~->
INTRAMURAL SPORTS
War Memorial Gym
Room 203
GREAT TREK
OUTDOORS
Downhill   skiing   at  Whistler/Black-
comb.   Sat.,  Jan.  26.
Register  by Jan. 24.
NOON RUNS
All runs begin at Race Center/S.U.B.
Concourse 12:35. FREE
Frostbite Road Run, Friday, Jan. 18.
4 km—6.5 km
West/East Mall Road Run,
Friday, Jan. 25. 3 km—4.5 km
CO-REC PROGRAM
Recreational, fun and FREE!
Drop-In Badminton
Tuesdays, 6:30-8:30 p.m.
Sundays, 6:00-8:00 p.m.
Osborne Gyms
Drop-In Volleyball
Thursdays 7:30-9:30 p.m.
Sunday 8:00-10:00 p.m.
Osborne Gyms
RACQUET SPORTS
U.S.    Open    Tennis    Grand    Prix,
Registration January 21-25.
Round III
Buchanan Badminton Grand Prix
Register Jan. 28-Feb. 1
Round III
Alpine Squash Grand Prix
Register Jan. 14-18
Play Jan. 26-27
If you've made any New Year's
Resolution, why not do it with fun
times and good people.
JANUARY
SUN
MON
TUE
1
WED
THU
FRI
SAT
2
3
4
5
NEW YEAR'S DAY
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
Frostbite
13
14
15
16
17
4  Q Road Run
X O 12:35 Race
19
Alpine Squash
Drop-in
Centre SUB
Reg'n Begins
Badminton
Volleyball
Co course
Grouse Mtn.
6:30-8:30 p.m.
7:30-9:30 p.m.
Alpine Squash
Ski Challenge
Osborne Gyms
Osborne Gyms
Reg'n Ends
Reg n Begins
Drop-in     j
Grouse Mir
West/ East
Great Trek
*} f\ Badmintonl    *% <
£1/6:00-8 00   ;   £X
22
23
+% A Ski Challen
JeOC Mall
£ 3 Road Run
0£ Downhill
£ U Skiing
p.m. Osborne Gyms
Triathlon
Reg'n -  Downhill
12:35 Race Centre
At Whistler/
Drop-in                     1 U S- °Pen
Badminton
Training Clinic
Skiing
/SUB Concourse
Blackcomb
Volleyball                j Tennis Tourney
6:30-8:30 p.m.
12:30, War
Drop-in Volleyball
U.S. Open
Alpine Squash
8:00-10:00 p.m      I Reg'n Begins
Osborne Gyms
Memorial Gym
7:30-9:30 p.m.
Tennis Tourney
Tournament
Osborne Gyms      j
Room 211
Osborne Gyms
Rea'nJJFnds
Begins
Drop-in      !
O T Badminton!   O Q
£ / 6:00-8:00   ■   ^O
29
30
31
Badminton
Rexj'n Ends
p.m. Osborne Gyms
Drop-in
Drop-in                      . Buchanan
Volleyball
Volleyball                j Badminton
6:30-8:30 p.m.
7:30-9:30 p.m.
Centipede
8:00-10:00 p.m.      - Reg'n Begins
Osborne Gyms
Championships
Osborne Gyms       |
	
SPECIAL EVENTS
4th ANNUAL GROUSE MOUNTAIN SKI CHALLENGE
Thursday, January 24
Dual Giant Slalom Challenges for Novice, Intermediate & Advanced. Followed by an Evening of Ski
Movies, Banquet, Awards & Dancing. Register by January 18, 3 p.m.
TRIATHLON III
Training, Diet & Preparation Clinics Begin Wednesday, January 23, 12:30 W.M.G. 211
CENTIPEDE CHAMPIONSHIPS
Registration Begins January 25-February 1. A unique and fun race where teams are connected with
a "skin". Women run 3 km, men run 7 km. Prizes for best costume!
SKI VACATION
SERVICES
Mid Term Ski Holidays!!!
Our ski agents can help you with all
of your ski vacation needs. They may
be contacted at 228-6688 or in Room
203A War Memorial Gym.
Here are some of the packages
available.
Whjst[ejJWountain
Any day to the end of the season
$35/person.    Package   includes
transportation, lift, picnic.
Blackcomb
Any day to the end of the season
$35/person.    Package   includes
transportation, lift, picnic and race
Todd Mountain
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I Page 12
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, January 15,1985
Basket birds third as season starts
Bill Edwards must be getting
tired of this.
For the past three seasons the
men's basketball team has recorded
strong performances at the Canada
West Classic. In most cases, the
coach would expect the 'Birds' impressive pre-season showing against
Canada West Universities Athletic
Union opponents to transcend into
a similarly respectable regular sea
son display against the same teams.
But for the past three seasons that
expectation has not come, to fruition.
This year's third place performance at the Victoria tourney was
slightly below that of seasons past,
although the 'Birds beat two nationally ranked clubs.
Saturday UBC beat Lethbridge
82-81 in the consolation final. Dale
Olson led the UBC with 24 points
while Paul Johansson furnished 17.
Murray Hanna paced Lethbridge
with 17 points.
The Pronghorns then fell from
third to fourth in the national rankings released Monday.
UBC opened the tournament
with a 91-71 win over Alberta
Thursday night. Olson led the
Thunderbirds with 30 points, effect
ively compensating for the absence
of leading scorer Ken Klassen, who
sat out the tourney with an ankle injury.
Eventual champion Victoria Vikings, five time Canada West and national victors, defeated the 'Birds
78-66 in the semi-finals.
UBC has finished second the past
two years and then gone on to finish
with identical 3-7 records in regular
season play. The 'Birds must finish
at least fourth to qualify for the
playoffs.
This weekend, the Thunderbirds
open their Canada West season
with two home games. Saturday
they host the Saskatchewan Huskies
at 8:30 p.m. at War Memorial gym.
Saturday the 'Birds face another encounter with Alberta.
Candidates present views
From page 11
The second issue is more general
— the lack of student involvement
in UBC affairs. I will set up regular
public forums involving the student
body, to keep students informed on
senate issues and to use their input
to represent them more effectively.
As to the problem of program
cuts, I think that our government
will continue to cut our funding,
and that a longer-term plan must be
implemented to deal with them.
While using across-the-board cuts
as a short-term idea, I would see
warnings issued to students that cer-:
tain programs be cut a year later, so
•hat they wouldn't be stranded, and
:hen proceed with selective cuts based upon demand and availablility of
the program elsewhere. I think we
need this prgamatic approach to
deal with these issues.
Claudia Gilmartin
The most important issues facing
=enate next year stem from maintaining quality education in the face
of severe budget constraints. In
allocating resources, senate must
not sacrifice student conditions in
the name of research or political
favor. As senator, I would remind
senate of the impact and ramifications of policies on students.
Watered down programs, limited
enrolment, overcrowding, inequitable exam periods and lack of
student aid are all issues which must
be addressed. I would ask that
issues such as these be addressed in
she appropriate standing committees.
Program cuts need to be made.
The cuts must be selective to
preserve the credibility of the programs that survive. I do not
however, endorse eliminating entire
programs to cure cancerous waste.
Before entire programs are cut
senate must evaluate what it is to be
a university. Denying students opportunity for a liberal arts education would be as much a travesty as
reacting solely on the basis of
employment opportunity.
Economic conditions necessitate,
however, scrutiny of the best environment for the provision of
liberal arts and professional
schools. Under no circumstance
should students enrolled in a program be legislated out of opportunity to finish their degrees.
Adrian Kimberley
The most important issues facing
senate this year will be program cuts
and accesibility. Due to the projected shortfall of 18 million dollars
program cuts are a real possibility.
it is important that the university-
make selective cuts as opposed to
across the board cuts so as to maintain quality of education.
What I intend to do about these
problems is to work with other
members of senate to achieve a
mutually satisfactory agreement. It
is important to realize that we have
to accept that cutbacks will occur.
Therefore we have to make the
most of a bad situation so as the
minimum of people will be affected.
If program cuts have to be made I
would favour selective cuts as opposed to across the board cuts. It is
important for the university to
maintain its quality of programs. If
across the board cuts are made the
quality in all programs will be hurt,
as opposed to maintaining the
quality in most but eliminating a
few.
I am not going to commit myself
and say something definite such as
"trash arts". Instead it is best to
wait for an evaluation of all programs before making any concrete
decisions.
The thing that is important to
remember is that we have to fight to
maintain quality education as opposed to quantity education.
Kellie Lawson
The most important issue facing
the students, faculty, and administration is the fact that the
university is running at a deficit. It
is imperative that the budget be
reviewed, alternatives be generated
and analyzed, and action be taken
immediately. Cutbacks are not pretty, yet they are reality.
Where these changes occur are
not for one person to decide but
rather for a collective voice to determine. As a representative of the
commerce faculty I hope to represent that voice. Other issues include
library funding and hours and the
continuation of quality education at
UBC.
1 believe that cuts are a reality
and selective cuts are a more effective way of dealing with the problem. At this point it is difficult to
determine which faculties should be
cut because this is not a cut and dry
decision.
Some of the criteria I would use
in the evaluation would be: which
faculties have already experienced
cuts, the ability to consolidate
classes, the faculties' contribution
to the reputation of the university,
and their ability to operate on less
money. I also feel the university has
a moral obligation to allow students
to finish their programs. Means
must be found to accommodate
them in this transition.
tinue to grow through my second
term.
Studies
Ron Yaworsky
The important issues facing
senate next year are essentiallv
those that I have been dealing with
as the present senator. Currently,
we are grappling with the impact of
financial restraint — resulting in a
variety of pressures on students, including TA funding reductiops, tuition hikes and program cuts.
I plan to continue with my actions on senate — working as a
member of the senate committee on
student awards, ensuring tuition increase effects are minimized and ensuring students are dealt with fairly
in academic matters, I would continue as a member of the senate
committee on academic appeals.
With respect to program cuts, I
regard protecting those presently
enrolled as paramount. 1 have
established a rapport with, and the
respectful acceptance of, many
other members of senate, wno
welcome continuity, and thus my
influence ana effectiveness will con-
Paddi Arthur
The most important issue facing
senate next year will be the management of the budget. As a student
representative I feel that it is imperative that student senators
become organized so that they can
be an effective power base. The major function of the student senators
will be to see that student concerns
are articulated in the policy-making
committees and that these concerns
are recognized by the committee
and hence by the senate.
If I am elected to senate it will be
as the student senator for law so my
constituency will be the law
students. I would, therefore, be interested in' looking after the interests of law students first and all
students second. On the surface,
across the board cuts appear to do
less harm than selective cuts in the
sense that we all suffer a little as opposed to some suffering a lot. In the
long run, across the board cuts will
detract from the excellence that the
university could provide. If selec
tive cuts have to be made I would
expect a guarantee that those
students already in a program will
be allowed to complete their programs.
Kathy Kerr
The most important issues facing
the senate are: student cutbacks,
tuition fee increases, library hours
and employment opportunities.
One must examine the present
allocation of funds within the
university to ensure that they have
been distributed most efficiently.
Also new sources of funding (other
than students) must be sought.
The government must be contacted and made aware of the
students' concerns over the above
issues. (The Conservative government has already chopped the
COSEP and the RCMP summer
employment programs). A strong
and persistent voice for the students
is required.
If program cuts had to be made
then I would fight for across the
board cuts.
Science
Kirk Hancock
The most important issue facing
the senate is dealing with the repercussions of budget cuts. Eliminating
courses, entire programs and guarantees are the top of the agenda.
The short and long-term effects affect every student, staff and faculty
member on campus.
As science rep, I propose to work
with the senate by attending all senate and science undergraduate executive meetings. Secondly, I plan
to keep students informed about
issues through student publications
and associations. I expect to receive
student responses to be communicated to the senate.
Although all programs should be
evaluated equally, program cuts
must be made selectively. Decisions
will have to be based on a variety of
factors: current and expected enrolment, staff and special equipment
requirements and the needs of the
community that supports this institution — no matter how niggardly.
Students enrolled in programs must
be allowed to finish the full course
of studies.
Robert Sansalone, running for
senator-at-large, and Clarke Friss
and Rene Thomsen, both running
for senate forestry representative,
were   unreachable  for   comment.
Frank Frigon, running for senate
graduate representative, said his letter in the Jan. 11 Ubyssey speaks
for him.
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