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The Ubyssey Jan 20, 1970

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Array Page 2: A special birth control questionnaire.
Page 4: Some groovy little Vietnam horror
stories.
Page 8: Computer burnings are just part of
the Canadian way of life.
7
Vol. LI, No. 26       VANCOUVER, B.C., TUESDAY, JANUARY 20,  1970
228-2305
"It is not the purpose of the university to serve the community"
—UBC senate, Jan. 14, 1970
lawyer
Fouks versus Sun
UUUULA* IVICII, BKUWN
lawyer
director, Crown Life Insurance
lessee of Fouks-Bonner penthouse
lawyer
Insurance Bureau of Canada
1
APARTMENT
partnership between Bonner and Fouks
ARTHUR FOUKS
lawyer
UBC Board of Governors
*
director
B.C. Brewers' Institute
lawyer
Insurance Agents of B.C.
•
A
▼
ROBERT BONNER
former
attornev-aeneral
▼
administrator
B.C. liquor laws
administrator
B.C. insurance laws
The above diagram illustrates some of the connections that exist between UBC board of governors
member Arthur Fouks, former attorney general Robert Bonner and lawyer Douglas McK. Brown.
Bonner and Fouks have long been friends and associates ever since the days years ago when they
teamed up to win the debating championship for UBC. But we question their wisdom in entering into
a partnership in a business enterprise when Fouks was intimately connected to the liquor and insurance
industries and Bonner was administrator of the laws concerning both.
McK. Brown is icing on the cake, as director of one insurance company and counsel for the Insurance
Bureau of Canada, while at the same time being a tenant in the Bonner-Fouks apartment. It is not
surprising, therefore, to see McK. Brown acting as counsel for Fouks in his libel against The Sun Publishing Company and Sun columnist Al Fotheringham.
Neither is it surprising to discover a relationship such as the one outlined here. Such things are quite
common in corporate societies where company directorships, club affiliations and political preferences
mingle and merge.
We see no place for such activities at UBC. Board chairman Walter Koerner continually refers to
the university in terms of a business, a factory, a "plant". If this is the way business operates, we'd
rather declare bankruptcy. Page 2
THE      UBYSSEY
Birth Control Questionnaire
It's a fact that while men students can obtain contraceptives on campus by merely dropping into the
men's room in SUB, there are no similar facilities for
women.
Officially, according to student health service director Dr. A. M. Johnson, the decision of the service
whether or not to distribute contraceptives to women is
entirely up to the individual service doctor.
In an effort to discover the opinion of students on
campus on this situation the women's liberation group
at UBC has prepared the following questionnaire.
Do you feel that Health Services should provide
a contraceptive clinic? (i.e. give information and
advice on and prescriptions for contraceptives).
Yes             No 	
If such a service was available, would you use
it? Yes No
If no, why not?
(a) already practicing contraception ...
(b) do not want contraception	
If such a service had been available at the time
you first obtained contraception, would you have
usedit?        Yes No
Have you ever approached Student Health Services to obtain contraception?
Yes No
If yes, did you obtain contraception?
Yes No
Are you married ? Are you under 21 ?
Yes No Yes No
Your sex:
female
male
What to do with it
Boxes will be set up in Wesbrook Building, in the Buchanan
lobby, in the Old Auditorum cafe, in the Education Building lobby, in front of the bookstore, and main floor SUB,
to hold your completed questionnaire. Those who complete
the forms after today can turn them in at the SUB information booth.
OPPORTUNITY
Incorporated Group of
Senior Students engaged in
diversified revenue projects
has an opening for ambitious student. Shareholding
investment required. Send
inquiries to Box No. 6343,
Postal Station 'G', Van. 8,
B.C.
CONTEMPLATION, MEDITATION,
RELAXATION
WORRY BEADS
For details see January 23 Ubyssey
Tuesday, January 20, 1970
MAX DEXALL
OFFERS
10% Discount
to UBC Students
2609 Granville at 10th
A complete stock of all the popular makes
of shoes for the college student, as well as
Hosiery, Handbags, Boots —
both Men's & Women's
Whatever your need in footwear you'll find it at
Dexall's. Pay them a visit — see the exciting new
styles — and ask for the 10% discount.
Better Shoes for less
DEXALL'S - GRANVILLE BETWEEN 10th & 11th - 738-9833
Visit Our New Varsity Branch
4517 W. 10th Ave.-(1 blk. from UBC Gates)
ffrbanki
10% Special UBC Discount-Students & Faculty
APPLICATION
FOR GRADUATION
"Application for Graduation" cards are now being mailed to all students in Fourth Year Arts, Music, Science,
Commerce and Fourth Year Elementary and Fifth Year
Secondary Education, anc will be available in departmental offices for students in the graduating years of
all other faculties. All Students who expect to graduate
this spring are requested to complete and return both
cards to the Registrar's Office (Mrs. Kent) as soon as possible, but not later than  February 16,   1970.
"Application for Graduation" cards are available in the Registrar's Office and students in
these graduating years who do not receive
cards in the mail should check their addresses
in the Registrar's Office.
PLEASE NOTE: It is the responsibility of the student to
MAKE APPLICATION FOR HIS DEGREE. If the student
does not make application, his name will not be put forward
for approval by his Faculty and by Senate.
NO APPLICATION - NO DEGREE Tuesday, January 20, 1970
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 3
^~C*£&U«&w>s&i&s-C*« * <&$£
UBC, Eastern profs ask pay increases
SUB comes
tumbling
down . . .
SUB is crumbling.
Little more than a year
old, the student union
building is already showing
cracks in the plaster and
brick of its walls and
ceilings.
The damage is most
apparent on the second
storey of the building.
There are fissures of varying
width in the newsroom and
darkroom of The Ubyssey
and the Photo Society
darkroom has bricks loose
enough to allow an
appreciable amount of light
into the room.
Dave Grahame, AMS
co-ordinator, offered a
partial explanation for the
decay. He said that the
outer walls of SUB are the
only ones embedded in the
foundations, and therefore
are more susceptible to
settling.
SUB building manager
Graeme Vance was in
conference at press time.
Professors at the University of
Toronto, York University, and the
University of Western Ontario
have begun jockeying for sizeable
pay increases for the 1970-71
academic year.
U of T professors are
demanding a 22 per cent pay
raise, York faculty wants an 18
per cent increase while UWO
professors are asking for an 17 per
cent raise. If successful the UWO
profs will have boosted their
wages by 30 per cent over two
years.
U of T and York also hope to
abolish their right to strike, both
faculty associations want formal
machinery set up to negotiate
salaries, with the right to strike
replaced by arbitration.
If granted, the pay boost
would raise the average salary for
all ranks of faculty at Toronto to
$19,520 from $16,000; average
salaries at York would rise to
$15,930.
Cohn-Bendit
in Canada
for a visit
MONTREAL (CUP) - Daniel
Cohn-Bendit, student non-leader
in the French revolt of May-June,
1968, arrived in Montreal Friday
for a Canadian visit of unknown
length.
Cohn-Bendit's visit was
arranged by the Canadian
television network (CTV), to film
a program for their
" Face-To-Face" series.
Cohn-Bendit is expected to travel
to Toronto today to take part in
the program.
Although the 25-year-old
student activist is still persona non
grata in France — during a
one-hour stop-over is Paris on his
Frankfurst-to-Montreal flight, he
was not allowed to step off the
plane — Cohn-Bendit whisked
through Canadian customs and
immigration in 15 minutes.
He was met at the airport by
former McGill political science
lecturer Stanley Gray and
immediately retired into seclusion
until his scheduled Toronto
appearance.
Cohn-Bendit, formerly a
sociology student at the
University of Nanterre, is also the
co-author with his brother Gabriel
of the book "Obsolete
Communism - A Left Wing
Alternative." A description of the
tique of Leninist party structure.
He is also rumoured to be
making a cowboy movie with
French film-maker Jean Luc
Goddard.
OVer his own protestations,
Cohn-Bendit was elevated to the
status of "Leader" of the May
rebellion by the French and
international press.
The current wage scale at
Western is: Full professors,
$21,688; associate profs, $15,823;
assistant profs, $12,495.
UBC faculty, who have the
sixth highest wage scale is also
negotiating   with   its   board   of
governors.
The UWO wage demand breaks
down to five per cent to meet
inflation costs; seven per cent to
"raise UWO faculty to the level of
—maurtMn gam photo
SLOW RESPONSE was order of the day at aggie-sponsored
pancake and sausage luncheon outside bookstore Monday. Carol
Morrow was one of those who shelled out 50 cents a plate. Lunch
continues today from 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Proceeds to House
of Hope farm for retarded children in Ladner.
Grape meeting asked
Grape boycott organizers have asked Canada Safeway Ltd. to
discuss Safeway's policy of selling California table grapes with them.
"A delegation of public figures and myself request a meeting
with you any time between January 26 and 30," said Pamela Smith,
B.C.'s United Farm Workers' representative in a telegram to Safeway's
regional director Mr. W. J. Kraft."
The delegation will include Vancouver alderman Harry Rankin,
B.C. Federation of Labor representative Ray Haynes, Burnaby MLA
Irene Bailey, and evangelical church minister Bob Christie. Various
priests and rabbis will also be included.
New Democratic Party leader Dave Barrett and Rankin will also
address an information-picket line outside the safeway store at
Kingsway and Joyce Road Saturday, Jan. 24 at 2 p.m.
other professional educators;" and
five per cent "merit pay."
According to a UWO faculty
association spokesman, the merit
pay provision is only an average,
with money being paid to faculty
on a scale "determined strictly by
the merit of the work or research
in which he was involved."
Western student council
president Ian Brooks termed the
wage demand "extremely
unreasonable", and suggested that
if the increase is approved, "either
there should be a 17 per cent
decrease in tuition fees to offset
inflation and provide merit pay
for students, of there should be a
17 per cent increase in marks for
the same reasons."
Bring it in line
Wayne Sumner, chairman of
the salary committee for the U of
T faculty association, said
Thursday the pay hike is
necessary to "bring the university
salary structure in line with other
teaching salaries.
A salary committee report
presented last month to the U of
T budget committee claimed that
teachers at Ontario colleges of
applied arts and technology are
"better off financially over both
the short and medium run" than
teachers at U of T.
Sumner also said the decision
to ask for formal bargaining
procedures is a "compromise
between hard-line unionism and
the old tradition of having tea
with the president and handing
him a brief on salaries while
discussing other things."
UBC situation
UBC faculty association
president Dr. W. D. Finn said a
brief is being prepared for
presentation to the board of
governors which will contain
1970-71 salary demands.
"We don't release the figures
we ask for," he said, "but we we
are certainly aware that the
Ontario faculties are asking for 20
per cent increases."
"There is often quite a
disparity between our demands
and what we get."
Full profs at UBC receive
approximately $19,000; associate
profs get $14,200; and assistant
profs are paid $11,300.
When asked to comment on
the decision at U of T and York
to give up the right to strike Finn
said the UBC faculty has never
considered striking.
"Striking is not even covered in
the faculty handbook."
Only two candidates still in running for LSA pres
By SANDY KASS
The Law Student Association held its
monthly free-for-all Monday noon.
The role of the LSA, scheduled to be
the main topic of discussion, was passed
over in favor of campaign speeches for
the executive election held today.
The positions of external
vice-president, internal vice-president,
treasurer, and secretary have been filled
respectively by A. B. Gibson, law 1, Dave
Donohue, law 2, Sean Hogan, and
Margaret Fairweather, law 2 (by
acclamation).
Candidates for president were heard
first, but only two of them are staying in
the election.
"I am withdrawing my application for
president because two distinct groups
have formed in this faculty," said Peter
Brock, law 1.
"There are the people in here for the
money, and those that are just political
reformers. It is tragic that this should
happen to the legal profession," he said.
Presidential candidate Ian Meiklem law,
2, said: "It's time we started to gather
ideas of what the role of the LSA should
be. We have to do more than think — we
have to get to work on it."
Candidate John Parks, law 2, said the
role of LSA president should be one of
co-ordinator and initiator, rather than
that  of instigator.
Candidate for ombudsman Mark
Krotter, law 2, said the main qualification
for the job is to be "a real bastard."
"My friends, I feel that I am
qualified," he said.
He than presented the Carey Linde
public relations award (a jar of vaseline)
to LSA president Carey Linde.
A motion to postpone discussion on
the LSA until the new executive have
taken office was withdrawn.
Spokesman for the anti-LSAers, John
Schmitz, law 2, asked of the LSA: "Do
we need it? We have the LSA, but do we
want to keep it? Where does it lead us?"
He proposed establishment of a one
community set-up, where faculty, staff
and students meet together to discuss
matters of concern to all.
"We have tried representative
democracy, but it doesn't work. It is time
we realized this," he said.
Asked one student: "If we cannot
examine a small institution like the LSA,
what are we going to do when we get out
of here?" Page 4
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, January 20,  1970
EAT IN .TAKEOUT*. DELIVERY-
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Why Do You
Have A Poor
Memory ?
A noted publisher in Chicago reports there is a simple technique
for acquiring a powerful memory
which can pay you real dividends
in both business and social advancement and works like magic to give
you added poise, necessary self-
confidence   and   greater   popularity.
According to this publisher, many
people do not realize how much
they could influence others simply
by remembering accurately everything they see, hear, or read.
Whether in business, at social functions or even in casual conversations
with new acquaintances, there are
ways in which you can dominate
each situation by your ability to
remember.
To acquaint the readers of this
paper with the easy-to-follow rules
for developing skill in remembering
anything you choose to remember,
the publishers have printed full details of their self-training method
in a new booklet, "Adventures in
Memory," which will be mailed free
to anyone who requests it. No obligation. Send your name and address
MEMORY STUDIES
835 Diversey Pkwy.,
Chicago, III. 60614.
A postcard will do
UBC FILM SOCIETY
which in 1967 brought
you the un-cut "High"
now presents:
LARRY KENT'S
FACADE
Fridays: 23, 30
Saturdays: 24,31
7:00 & 9:00
Sundays: Jan. 25,
Feb. T
7:00
$1
Special   admission
for this  presentation  only
SUB AUDITORIUM
MO A0MITTANCI TO MRSONS UNDM It
Warning:    VERY    FRANK    TREATMENT  OF   SEX
R. W. McDonald, B.C. Censor
"Son, I know he's a VC
by the nine bullet holes
in his chest."
Journalist Orville Schell writes about his experiences during four trips to Vietnam, and discusses
the vagaries of the comercial press war correspondence. From the New Republic.
Early in September 1967, I returned to Saigon on an AID
helicopter from Quang Ngai Province, just below the DMZ in I
Corp area, a province that has come to prominence because Mylai
is there. I had spent several weeks flying with the FACs (the
Forward Air Control), and investigating on the ground the
"pacification camps" for "refugees": men, women, and children
whose villages had been bombed, shelled and burned in the huge
free-fire zones.
The whole of Chiang Ngai and Quang Tin provinces was
devastated except far.a narrow cordon on either side of coastal
rout No. 1, and small areas around the provincial and country
capitals. The rice-growing region on the coast looked like the moon
- pockmarked by millions of craters, napalm burns, splintered
trees and destroyed houses. In two counties, Due Pho and Mo Due,
the local U.S. battalion commander estimated (conservatively) that
more than half of th-j^opulace was displaced. The all-too-few
civilian hospitals we^ygrei3ltow&^ with patients "generated" by
the war. The pacific|ti^pt!^|i|*'ere so full that food, shelter, and
in some instances eWn po^^fe-i*1yvater, were not available. The
situation was so sever|^ma£'oi|ipr6ops in the;field were ordered to
cease "generating refugees' so-as to take pressure off. Search and
destroy operations continued! howevfer, as did the ceaseless air
strikes and shelling of the land by artillery and by the Navy off the
coast. The province chief, Lt. Col. Maang Dinh Tho, when asked
what plans he had for civilians who were yet to be displaced by
military operations, said: "No refugees this time, unless they ask to
come."
By day, I flew over these provinces observing the endless air
strikes, sometimes "put in" simply because an aircraft had "some
stuff on it and wanted to land. There was a rule that no aircraft
could land with any unexploded ordinance. Churches, thatched
huts, bomb shelters and bunkers, rice fields, any sign of life
whatsoever, were cause enough for an airstrike. A man plowing a
rice field in a free-fire zone was a target for strafing. I remember
flying with a FAC when we guided in an F-4 strike, dropping four
750-pound bombs simply because the pilot had seen a small basket
of vegetables drying in the sun in a completely destroyed village.
"When you see something like that," he explained to me, "you
know they're down there." He did not say, perhaps he did not
know, that many people had found the overcrowded pacification
camps unbearable and gone back to their villages in the free-fire
zones, where they lived in holes.
On the ground.at night, talking to enlisted men, some of
whom had reservations about our conduct in the war, one heard
stories of "squirrel hunting": a man would put a small calibre
machine gun on a door stanchion of a "bubble chopper" and go
out over the fields for sport to "pop me some Dinks". Stories of
torture to make suspects talk were so commonplace they attracted
no attention, except from an outsider unfamiliar with the ways of
war in this area. Any dead "Gook" was said to be a VC. One
captain, when asked how he knew that the man he had just shot
running out of a hut was a VC, said "Son, I know he's a VC by the
nine bullet holes in his chest."
On our massive base, at Chu Lai, GIs lounged in the officers
club over gin and tonics, watched stateside movies, or surfed on air
mattresses in the beautiful blue ocean. The piecemeal destruction
of the Vietnamese and their villages had become so much an
accepted fact that not one person I encountered in the military had
the slightest compunction about showing me, a journalist, whatever
I wanted to see.
That September afternoon, unshaven and covered with mud, I
walked with my brother into JUSPAO in Saigon to catch the end
of the "Five O'clock Follies," the daily military briefing to the
press. Some 40 corrspondents were present. Ambassador Robert
Komer, highest ranking American official in the pacification
program, was just finishing talking. A Japanese correspondent
asked him what areas could be rated successes for the pacification
effort. He mentioned Binh Dinh Province, and then went on to say,
"Another place where clear-and-hold has been proceeding
remarkably well is Quang Ngai. I think Quang Ngai is going to turn
out to be one of the success stories of 1967." Not one
correspondent challenged him. He concluded by saying his remarks
were "off the record".
That was 1967. By now it is fairly clear that atrocities, on a
previously unimaginable scale, have been committed for years by
U.S. forces against the Vietnamese people — who to American
troops are not distinguishable from the enemy. When I was in
Vietnam, there were almost 550 correspondents registered and
cleared with the American military. How was it that so few saw
what was happening, or, if they saw, failed to report it? One would
like to think that the destruction of Mylai was "wholly
unrepresentative," as Army Secretary Resor says, and something
which might have escaped the attention of correspondents. One is
forced to conclude otherwise. For during the short time I was in
Vietnam in 1967, I personally witnessed the destruction of villages
and their people from the air.
One rarely found a soldier who felt (or allowed himself to feel)
the horror of what weat on - what was happening to others as
distinguished from v^nat was happening to himself. If asked what
he thinks about killing and destruction, a soldier usually only says,
"I don't bother with that. I'm just here to do my job." The terms
of his job, of course, are set outside and above him. Accept them
or reject them, he must continue to operate, and above all, to
survive.
For many members of the working press in Vietnam, the
situation was similar. Few American correspondents I know and
talked to seemed to question the basic assumptions of the war.
(This was not true of the foreign press.) There was much written
about strategy, body count, the success or failure of an operation,
progress in Revoluttonaiy Development, or the stabilizing of the
current Saigon regime, But few seemed to be asking, in 1967, if the
whole notion of pacification was desirable or tenable, whether
Westmoreland was in touch with the realities of the war, whether
Americans should be in Vietnam to begin with. Many
correspondents had opinions, complaints, and criticisms, and in
private would talk about them. But they would seldom write about
them. Like the soldiers, they too, needed to stay in favor, keep
official sources open, and avoid antagonisms between themselves
and the military, who were at once their guides and protectors in
the field.
Everything had a number or a slang nomenclature.
Vietnamese were "Gooks", "Slopes", "Dinks"; the napalm
cannisters were "napes"; a gun ship helicopter was "Puff the magic
dragon"; Vietnam was "Nam"; 20mm aircraft cannon were "mike
mikes". One masters this languate, or is an outsider; just as one
masters control of himself as he watches men and women strafed
from the air, peasants swept from their villages and left in a hot Tuesday, January 20, 1970
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 5
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Vancouver photographer Kenneth McAllister's interpretation of U.S. Vietnam policy.
field for two days with sand bags over their heads, their hands tied
behind them while waiting for helicopter evacuation to a
"collection point". If one does not master the lingo and those
feelings of revulsion, one does not last long in the field. One learns
to view what is happening from an immediately acceptable
perspective or risks being totally at odds with a dangerous
environment. It is difficult to describe one's feelings, having just
flown in from Hong Kong three days before, sitting in a FAC
Cessna 02 which is shooting phosphorous rockets into a defenseless
village, as markers for an airstrike, even when one knows that there
is Vietcong in the area. I wanted nothing more in the world than to
stop what was happening or somehow purge myself of any critical
judgment. Unfortunately, I could do neither.
Back in Saigon, one is protected, though you could hear and
see bombs and flares on the city's outskirts. Here there are many
other journalists with whom to drink and gripe. One can very
quickly get wrapped up in local affairs. There is either the threat of
a palace coup to cover, or a pseudo election overseen by a troop of
presidential observers who stand conspicuously but dumbly beside
a ballot box and have their pictures taken. There is the Five
O'clock Follies in a neat air-conditioned auditorium. There are new
operations going out, and myriad press releases from hundreds of
governmental agencies, which are distributed from a huge rack at
the press office. There are giant new computer schemes to tell us if
we are winning the hearts and minds of the people.
There are black market scandals, corruption in the Vietnamese
government, apathy in the ARVN forces, to be reported. There are
students in jail, Buddhists protesting, human interest stories about
prostitutes and shoeshine boys adopted by kindly GIs. Most
correspondents must file a story of some kind every day. The folks
at home want progress reports. If a reporter dug too deeply into
official assumptions, the chances were (and probably still are) that
his story would be cut or dropped and that he would get nothing
but the bitter ainimosity of the Vietnam military apparatus, upon
which he was dependent for future stories, travel, and all the other
assistance he needed to keep on top of the news.
One correspondent for a Washington paper, with whom I
talked upon returning from Quan Ngai, claimed that he knew all
about what was happening up there. Yet he wrote little which
spelled out the significance of the fact that the U.S. had destroyed
two provinces without anyone's noticing it. The correspondent
himself seemed unmoved by what he had heard and claimed to
know. Perhaps he had seen so much of the same kind of
destruction in other areas that it hardly seemed newsworthy.
But even if a correspondent had been horrified by what he had
seen and learned of the war, there were few newspapers or
magazines that seemed disposed to print such unsettling reports.
One Newsweek correspondent told me on returning from Quang
Ngai that he was shocked by what was going on in the countryside.
Having had experience in Europe during World War II, he said that
what he had seen was "much worse than what the Nazis had done
to Europe". Had he written about it in those terms? No.
The press has, of course, on many occasions bravely ferreted
out news, despite official resistance. Newsmen have reported
examples of ghastly U.S. errors and of cruelty for which
Vietnamese civilians paid. But more often than not, incidents of a
* city destroyed to save it, or a village accidentally bombed, or of
torture in government prisons, are portrayed as exceptions to the
rule, rather than the rule itself. They are duly regretted, those
involved are instructed to be more cautious, and the American
public rests assured that they will not be repeated. That, at least,
has been the case up to now.
w d  e d y,     /I
e n  s as *-^
a multi-cultural series
jan.21
music
jan.28
dance
feb.U
poetry
feb.ll
fashion
international  house
Wednesdays at  7:30 pm
HONG KONG
CHINESE FOODS
Just One Block from Campus
In The Village
(Next to  U.B.C.  Barber Shop)
WE  SERVE  GOOD  CHINESE  FOOD
AT  REASONABLE  PRICES
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UBC FILM SOCIETY
which in 1967 brought
you the un-cut "High"
now presents:
LARRY KENT'S
FACADE
Fridays: 23, 30
Saturdays: 24,31
7:00 & 9:00
Sundays: Jan. 25,
Feb. 1
7:00
$1
Special   admission
for this  presentation only
SUB AUDITORIUM
MO ADMITTANCE TO MRSONS UNDM It
Warning:    VERY    FRANK   TREATMENT OF  SEX
R. W. McDonald, B.C. Censor Page 6
Published Tuesdays and Fridays throughout the university year
by the Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C. Editorial
opinions are those of the writer and not of the AMS or the
university administration. Member/ Canadian University Press.
The Ubyssey subscribes to the press services of Pacific Student
Press, of which it is a founding member. Ubyssey News Service
supports one foreign correspondent in Pango-Pango. The Ubyssey
publishes Page Friday, a weekly commentary and review. City
editor, 228-2305; editor, 228-2301; Page Friday, 228-2309;
sports, 228-2308; advertising, 228-3977.
JANUARY  20,  1970
BoG gets its man
As we all know by now, Walter Gage has been
named to serve as UBC administration president for the
next three to five years.
This represents the crowning glory for the kindly
grandfather figure who has been patting students on the
head for as long as anyone can remember. Right?
Perhaps, but it also represents the crowning glory
for the board of governors' long career of backroom
power plays.
The whole charade, began last February, when the
board established a presidential search committee to
find a successor to Ken Hare.
The committee was about as democratic and as
representative of the university community as the board
itself. It consisted of three members of the board, three
members of the alumni association (who play in the
same big business league as the board members) four
"members of the faculty", three members of the senate
(more faculty), three deans (still more faculty), one
member of the administration bureaucracy and, in ^the
true tokenist spirit of our time, four students appointed
by the AMS.
The committee, which was supposed to
recommend criteria and a list of candidates, met once
(that's right, once) and recommended good old Wally
for the job.
The understanding at the time was that Gage
would be a caretaker president until this spring, when he
reaches the "compulsory retirement" age of 65. The
committee was to continue searching for a more
permanent president.
The committee wasn't heard from again until late
November when its chairman, Chancellor Allan
McGavin, said he would fill some vacancies and call a
meeting "in the near future."
A month later, the committee was disolved and the
board suddenly announced that Gage would remain as
president on a year-to-year basis for as long as five
years.
It suddenly became all too obvious that Gage was
the man the board wanted from the start. The only
reason he was not appointed immediately after Hare's
resignation was to give the impression that a search was
made and Gage was found to be the best man available.
Gage was the man the board could count on not to
rock the boat. They knew that Gage, the man students
regarded as "a good guy", would convince the students
not to cause trouble and perhaps even to return to being
unquestioning servants of the university.
The fact that Gage is scheduled for retirement
seems to bother no one. After all, rules are only hard
and fast when applied to students and aren't meant to
cramp the board's or the administration's style.
Few people dislike Gage personally, but he
represents the kind of paternalistic administrator we all
hoped had disappeared with pep rallies and panty raids.
Any hopes some people may still have had for
making this place into something other than an
academic production line have been smashed.
It's business as usual for the next five years.   ,N.S.
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, January 20, 1970
Editor:  Michael  Finlay
News            Paul   Knox
City      Nate Smith
Managing               Bruce  Curtis
Photo   Bruce Stout
Wire         Irene   Wasilewski
Sports     Jim  Maddin
Senior - John Twigg
Ass't News    Maurice Bridge
Ass't City     John Andersen
Page Friday —  Fred Cawsey
Norbert Ruebsaat
Ganglia of the political nervous
system forced Jim Davies to stay away
from nubiles Jan O'Brien, Lesley
Minot, Wanda Lust, and Ginny Gait.
Sandy Kass heard Christine Krawczyk
finally say "no" to Tim Wilson and
Shane McCune. Bev Gelfond refused to
believe it. So did Brian McWatters
(who knows). Maureen Gans ran Into
the darkroom followed by jocks Dij
Buddin and Tony Callagher. Jennifer
Jordan, Robin Burgess, and Fran
McGrath threw a "liberated" hen party
for newcomer Charlotte Crane.
FRESH
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LETTERS TO THE  EDITOR
Biafra
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
The picture on the last
edition's Page Friday title page
was both very meaningful and
very beautiful. Unfortunately the
headline and the caption which
followed were detractions and
didn't come close to what the
child was saying. His eyes alone
said it all.
The sarcasm of the headline
was passe and inappropriate. It
was, however, the attached
caption which was most abusive.
Indeed, the association of such a
caption to that picture was, to say
the least pitiful.
Does anyone really believe that
all that the Biafran child wanted
was "a little freedom to govern its
own affairs"? Was there ever such
a thing as a "last post of freedom"
for any of Biafra's children? Who
Tiad those "dreams" that Cawsey
was talking about? The child, or
Ojukwu, or maybe himself? Not
the child.
Cawsey is critical of politics in
the caption yet it is enveloped in
them. Cawsey, and those who
agree with him, have misplaced
"shame" and "disgust" when they
refer it to Nixon, a Canada sitting
on its ass, Russia, or Nigeria. The
child wasn't thinking about any of
these. He was thinking about the
whole world — and of us, and he
was wondering why.
CALVIN WHITE
More AAC
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
I am writing with regard to the
AAC issue. In a discussion on
Wednesday, during which the
participating AAC member was
b^ing occasionally questioned (as
must happen for a fruitful
discussion) on the genetic theories
which he was spouting —
apparently endlessly — he became
enraged at his opponent and
threatened to "punch hin in the
nose if he interrupted again!" This
he claimed was for his opponent's
"own good," as he was "sick."
(His sickness being blatantly
evident in the opposing of a
Communist doctrine, of course).
To pile it higher and deeper, he
than proceeded to call his
opponent, among other things, a
fascist! This I found to be a
ludicrous situation — as was
obvious to all but the AAC.
My experience with the AAC,
though limited, but supported by
hearsay of other events,
(specifically the science
symposium) indicated this event
to be typical of them.
I find them to be extremely
dogmatic, and in the advent of
any rational opposition, they
reply by shouting down,
interrupting, slandering or
ignoring their opponents. They
seem to have no concept of
discussion other than a loudly
voiced monologue delivered by
themselves.
Thus, I have come to the
conclusion that I must support
Hodge's action in this dispute, as I
cannot make them out to be any
more than a political front.
ROSS HEDLEY
arts 2
Library
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
I recently picked up and read a
copy of your primary competitor,
UBC Reports. On the front page
of its latest issue was an article
"Library outlook dark". The
article read: "UBC's present book
collection just over 1,000,000
catalogued volumes ... will have a
2,000,000 volume book collection
by 1975-76."
I found this number to be
enormous. At that point I asked
myself why, with so many books,
the library is considered to be
inadequate for a university this
size.
Again my mind whirred into
action as I recalled a discussion I
once had with a prof. "When
making up your bibliography,
take books no older than 1955
unless they are primary sources,"
he said. "If there are two books
on the same theme, take the most
recent as it will have most likely
incorporated the former."
It seems to me that the quality
of information kept in a library
should be a greater consideration
than the quanity of books it
holds. It does not take an expert
in a field to know that certain
books are overlapping or out of
date.
The library has on its staff a
large group of people who run
around from desk to desk and
whose primary purpose seems to
be to make noise. Maybe if these
people were given the job of
evaluating the quality of
information    in   the   library   in
consultation with departmental
committees, the problem of
having an inadequate overcrowded
library could be solved.
GERRY CANNON
arts 4
AAC holes
His Highness,
Lord Editor-in-Chief, Sir:
My initial reaction to the
Academic Activities Committee
was similar to that of most
students in that I was angered and
dusgusted. But perhaps this value
judgement was too hasty and
colored by prejudice. At any rate,
my attitude now is one of
agreement with their actions,
which I whole-heartedly endorse.
After all, assholes are assholes,
and will continue to act as
assholes even if they spell it
AAChole. Thus, my faith in the
first law of personality has been
reaffirmed.
Secondly, what would happen
if assholes weren't all segregated
into the AAC? They would
probably be wandering the
campus at night, causing
imaginable trouble. Isn't it better
to have them isolated, rather than
dispersed? Surely an organization
as useless as the AAC can be
sacrificed for the total betterment
of the students at large. An
AAChole by any other name
would smell as shitty.
The Hairy Planaria
Fan club
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
As much as I have enjoyed
your paper in past years, I find
myself increasingly disturbed by
the addition to your staff of one
James Davies.
It was bad enough when he was
prattling about graffitti groupies
and assorted forgotten trivia of
the decade past. But the
collection of inane blatherings
which has bejnjn to appear under
the name of Davies' Ravies is just
too much.
GEORGE KERSCHBAUM
Much as we tend to agree with
your analysis, we are consistently
faced with the problem of Davies
crying, screaming and threatening
to hold his breath until he turns
blue whenever we decide not to
run something he writes—Ed. Tuesday, January 20,  1970
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 7
EVENT: (see title above) The End of the Life of a Sovereign.
CREATOR: Playwright Eugene Ionesco of France.
TIME: Evenings (8:30) January 16 to 24.
PLACE: The Fredercik Wood Theatre (UBC)
INITIATOR: Klaus Strassmann of UBC.
When a man dies, his world - presumably - dies also.
As far as he is able to perceive, his world comes into existance
on the moment of his birth, and receeeds out of existance at the
moment of his death. And the order which he imposes (projects)
upon this world - to secure his own equilibrium - crumbles in
direct proportion to his approaching death.
And so when a king dies, his kingdom dies with him.
And all of this obviously applies in the same way when a
playwright - in this case Eugene Ionesco - deposits an imaginary
character in an imaginary world. The King exists (dies) when the
play is over.
"You will die in one hour and thirty-five minutes, at the end of
this piece," his queen informs him.
The traditional model for this, one of the latest plays of
Ionesco, is the medieval morality play of Everyman, the sombre tale
of the man facing death totally unprepared for it.
But Ionesco merely says it: he does not pity, he does not
melodramatize. It is fact: the world, your "kingdom", and any
over-riding system of order you have managed to erect, all die when
you die. There is no before, there is no hereafter. When the play is
over it is over forever.
Klaus Strassmann's production has many high points. Eric
House's performance is one. William Louis' objectifying narrative -
to us, the watchers - is another. And many others: A total, cosmic
theatre-filling heartbeat as we watch the king die; a dissolution of
the stage at the king dies. And many more.
Go see, watch it happen.
-NR
page tuesday
Packs
Punch
BOFORS GUN
Seven men have as their "raison d'etre" the guarding of the
Bofors gun. If any of the six gunners guarding the gun shirk their
duties, they are liable for five years in prison. If there are any lapses
in the guarding, the lance-bombardier in charge of the operation will
have his military career ruined.
The Bofors Gun has been obsolete for twenty years.
Events While Guarding The Bofors Gun, a play by John
McGrath, had its North American premiere at the Playhouse on
Friday, Jan. 16. The action takes place in a British army camp in
North Germany during the winter. It is not what one expects in a
military play. There is no confrontation with the enemy. There no
pitched battles with the omnipresent explosions one so often
associates with military plays. And, above all, there is no flag waving.
However, this is not to say the play is simply a moralistic
treatment of the evils of war. The truth is that it is concerned not
with soldiers, but rather with people — who just happen to be
soldiers.
Although the play's cast has no weak links, two of the actors'
performances can be singled out as particularly brilliant.
Wilfred Downing, as the lance-bombardier in charge of the
operation portrays the human frailty of weakness as if it were a
, virtue.
In directly contrasting him is Alan Scarfe, who as gunner
O'Rourke, is as overbearing and comically vulgar as is possible for
man. It is O'Rourke, seemingly with the fullest life of the men
guarding the gun, who tragically realized the utter meaninglessness
of his existence. His tragic realization of this futility creates a
chaotic situation, disrupting the guarding, making that winter night
his last.
Events While Guarding The Bofors Gun is an excellent play.
The acting is brilliant, and the message is provoking.
See it if you can. .- JAMES DAVIES
San Francisco
Weekend for
YOU & A FRIEND
For details-See Jan. 23 Ubyssey    I* IC EEi
Pf Records
It's always interesting to see . . . hmmm,.
.. well, yes. Actually whenever a reviewer begins
with a phrase like that, one gets the feeling that
he is being asked to appreciate a record which is
only a historical interest or which is otherwise
unenjoyable on its own merits. You know, some
collection of junk that some weird reviewer likes
for some weird reason but which is really just
plain av/ful. Not so in this case. The Johnny
Winter Story, (London NAS 13516) gives us a
look at not only early Johnny winter but also a
look at the blues and rock of the Old (1959)
South.
The fourteen cuts on the record are reprints
of 45's which Winter made about ten years ago
on small Texas labels. Sure, there's a lot of what
(what seems) slushy early rock, but don't let the
teen-age voice trip fool you. The power that
Winter displays today is only barely hidden here
and on occasion you would think you're listening
to 1969 and not 1959. Winter's guitar work is
not as polished and the timing not as intricate as
it is today, but he has a few riffs that will still
excite you. Songs like "Crying in My Heart" and
*'Oh My Darling" are examlples of slow, lyrical
(the motion, not the words) rock that will still
give anyone a lift.
The Johnny Winter Story is not great blues
or great rock but it's Good Something. I guess if
you can still dig Buddy Holly you'll love this
one. -JIM MITCHELL
A potentially ambitious musical treat awaits
those of you mobbing the Stereo Marts for
Bangor Flying Circus, an esoteric trio -
remember, there are only three of them — heard
on Dunhill S 50069.
However, may I stress the word "potential."
It's not that the Circus is not as good as a
thousand other average rock groups — they could
be a shade better. The complaint lies in howthey
do their trip musically, not whatthey do.
Recent FM and AM smash sounds such as
vocals initating traffic, guitar riffs reminiscenr of
The One way Street, blues wails in the style of
Fred Glichstein of The Flock, organ-bass jams a
la Blood, Sweat and Tears, and Mose Allison
musical hog-calling abound throughout the
album, all of which is musically bearable,
tolerant, and not impotent.
-"HENDRIX" PAKASAAR
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m Page  8
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, January 20, 1970
Computer smashings and other
violent protest actions shouldn't
surprise anyone, says Leo
Johnson. Here he tells why
.eo  Johnson   is  a   University  of  Waterloo   history   professor,
rom   Canadian   University   Press.
WHEN Canadian historians compare Canada to the
United States, they unanimously agree that one
fundamental difference between the two peoples is
the non-violent nature of Canadians in contrast to the
crime-ridden, six-gun-toting, negro-lynching Americans.
Thus when a computer was smashed and a building
damaged during anti-racism protests at Sir George
Williams University, Canadian leaders, such as John
Diefenbaker, react in shock and anger to this
"un-Canadian" resort to "mob rule".
"Because. Canadians are a non-violent people," they
concluded, "such violence must have been inspired and
carried out by communists, marxists or paid agitators."
Yet further investigation by police has demonstrated
that no such "foreign" (except for the presence of a
number of black, foreign-born students) inspiration was
present.
Why then did the press and authorities claim that
"communists" and "foreigners" were responsible? A
further examination of Canadian history is necessary
before any answer can be given.
Is Canada a "non-violent" country? Every labor
union member who has faced police protecting
strike-breakers, every Canadian Indian who has to break
through the barriers of legal discrimination, every French
Canadian who has attempted to exercise his inherited
language and cultural rights, knows that violence and
repression exist in Canada.
But the authorities who claimed that the result of the
protest at Sir George Williams was "un-Canadian" were
right in one respect at least — Canadian workers and
Canadian minorities (including students) have seldom
protested against discrimination and oppression in a
violent manner. It has been the "authorities" —
government, business and civic leaders — who are most
often responsible for violence when it occurs.
Moreover, when these authorities declare that
extra-parliamentary protests (that is; demonstrations,
marches and strikes) are unconstitutional or un-Canadian
their leaders cynically neglect to point out that the chief
offender against the ideals of the British constitution in
Canada has been the government itself.,
This is not to say that such authority-directed
violence is necessarily illegal. If anything the opposite is
true in Canada. As John Porter pointed out in his book,
The Vertical Mosaic, a strong stable elite controls the
Canadian government, civil service and judicial sytem.
The key to this control, of course, is money.,
Since both the Liberal and Progressive Conservative
parties are dependent on big business for funds to get into
office and remain there, these parties must pass laws
satisfactory to their financial backers or be removed from
power.
This control, however, does not end with an ability to
pour money into election campaigns. Since the elite owns
the newspapers and controls the radio and television
stations it can and does distort the news to serve its own
selfish ends.
The importance of this control of the government
and news media cannot be too strongly stressed. Since the
news media shape public opinion, and since they are our
source of information, by concentrated propaganda, the
public can be persuaded to demand laws which work
against its best interest, and destroy its rights and liberties.
Two such instances, the passing of Section 98 of the
criminal code in 1919 and Quebec's Padlock laws, show
how fragile our civil rights are, and how the facts are
manipulated to allow their destruction.
In 1919 Canada was experiencing a severe post-war
depression. Farm and labor unrest was widespread because
of the profiteering and corruption which had occurred
during World War I. When government and business
leaders refused to recognize the desperate condition of the
laborers, farmers and returning soldiers, they decided to
force concessions by means of a general strike, which was
touched off in Winnipeg on May 1, 1919, and quickly
spread to other major cities.
In all some 54 unions including police, firemen, and
civic employees voted to strike, although the police,
firemen, waterworks employees and bread and milk
deliverymen remained on the job with the approval of
other strikers.
Although a Manitoba Royal Commission to
investigate the strike later concluded that the causes of
the strike were unemployment, low wages, bad working
conditions and the rejection of basic union rights by
employers, the Winnipeg newspapers mounted a vicious
propaganda campaing declaring that the strike had been
caused by communist agents paid with "Moscow gold".
After several weeks of this propaganda, the federal
government, responding to the demands of the
manufacturers and the brainwashed public, passed the
notorious section 98 of the Criminal Code.
Section 98, passed by these devious means,
completely reversed the most ancient of British legal
traditions — the rights of an arrested person to be
considered innocent until proven guilty. Thus, until 1937
when section 98 was repealed, the accused person was
considered guilty until he could prove himself innocent.
This, of course, was not easy to do when you were locked
in jail waiting your trial.
In addition to Section 98, the government amended
the Immigration Act so the the immigration department
could deport anyone, who belonged to a "subversive
organization", without trial by jury. By these laws the
government could accuse a striker of belonging to a
"subversive organization" and if he failed to prove that he
JR.S&
THE DAIL3
did not, then they would deport him.
Between 1919 and 1935, more than 10,000 men and
women were deported under these immoral laws - laws
which could only have been passed and maintained
because of the communist scare propaganda of 1919.
A similar use of newspaper propaganda was made by
Maurice Duplessis in 1938. Duplessis wanted to destroy
opposition to his corrupt control of the Quebec
government, and to do this it was necessary to close the
few small newspapers who dared to expose him.
His answer - like that of the government in 1919 -
was to claim that the opposition was communist.
AFTER a lengthy campaign which repeated, over andl
over, that communists killed nuns and priests, and:
that Quebec "Bolsheviks" were out to destroy the;
Catholic Church, the state and public morality, Duplessis;
convinced the Quebec electorate that an anti-Communist;
"anti-subversive" law was needed.
The Padlock  law gave the Quebec government the
right to close buildings, jail editors and confiscated the
files    of    any    organization    which    the    Quebec
attorney-general     declared    to    be    subversive    or
"communistic" — no proof would be required other than
his   statement.    Not   only   did   Duplessis   silence   his
with the Padlock law, he used it to harass such groups as
labor unions, Jehovah's Witnesses, and the Liberal party.
The similarities between the methods used to pass
section 98 and the Padlock Law, however, are not the
only   common   aspects   of   the   behavoir   of  the  two
gobernments. In both cases, having passed the laws to
silence the opposition, the governments resorted to a
program of calculated terrorism to subdue their critics.
Businessmen and strikebreakers, who were sworn in as
special   constables,  armed,  and   led by  regular police,
smashed   any   protest  which   was  raised   against  these
[dictatorial methods, nor is "smashed" too strong a word.
In Winnipeg on "Bloody Saturday", police attacked a
peaceful demonstration, and killed a man and a boy.        '"'
Over the years, these episodes have been repeated
again and again — in Stratford in 1933, in Oshawa in
1937, in Asbestos in 1949, and in Murdockville in 1957. Tuesday, January 20, 1970
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 9
part of the Canadian way of life
In each case the tame press justified the use of the police
or army to crush protest against exploitation by greedy
owners by raising the communist bogeyman.
Nor are the workers the only groups against whom
violence is used.
Everyone knows that European settlers destroyed the
Indian civilization, but few people know that this
oppression continues today.
Not satisfied with having stolen a continent from the
Indian, now the RCMP and government officials are
attempting to steal the few remaining acres left to the
Indians and to repudiate the rights they were promised in
exchange for their freedoms. In Brantford in 1952 and in
Buffalo Narrows, Saskatchewan, today, the Indian's battle
still goes on.
The 1952 Brantford Reserve "rising" illustrates the
present-day use of the RCMP to crush resistance to the
Indian Affairs Department's dictatorial rule.
The Iroquois Indians, having been England's allies in
the American Revolutionary War, had been forced to
come to Canada in 1784 when England lost the war. They
came, however, not as a subject people, but as a free and
independent nation which had been granted lands in
exchange for those which had been lost in England's
cause.
With them they brough their own religion and form
of government, a hereditary council, which they
maintained into this century. The hereditary council,
however, resisted Canadian attempts to reduce their status
quo from that of a free and independent people to that of
•nere dependencies — just another band of Indians to be|
sullied and dominated by the Indian affairs department.
In  1923 the Indian affairs department decided to|
Dreak the ancient treaties and enforce their domination.
To do so, the officials pursuaded  parliament to  passl
egislation which would allow Indian bands to substitue an
sleeted council for their traditional councils, if they sol
lesired.   This  act  was  passed,   but the  Brantford Six
-.'ations people still decided to keep their old government)
md laws.
Not at all nonplussed by the fact that the new law!
illowed the Indians to decide if they wanted an elected
•.ouncil, the Indian affairs department now imposed a
tame elected council on them. For almost thirty years the
Six Nations people did their best to return to their own
form of government, but to no avail.
In 1952, with hope of justice gone, the Indians
decided that a symbolic act was necessary. Late one night
the hereditary chiefs and their supporters occupied the
council house in hopes that the ensuing publicity would
bring them public support. Unfortunately they
underestimated both the willingness of the RCMP to use
violence to disposses them, and the honesty of the press.
The next day the RCMP moved in with riot guns and
tear gas and made mass arrests. The press, in its usual
fashion talked, not of the frustrating years of seeking
justice, but of the "irresponsible Indian lawbreakers".
Today the Mohawk Workers, as the traditionalists call
themselves, still are a majority on the reservation and still
dream of a day when justice and freedom will return to
them.
DESPITE the power that control of parliament, the
press and the police give the elite, still this is not
enough. Their manipulations and control reach into
even the so-called courts of justice. Trade unionists are
very familiar with two situations in which the courts are
abused: the political use of the conspiracy charge, and the
ex parte injunction.
The charge of conspiracy is one which is seldom laid.
First of all, it is difficult to prove. Secondly, it is more
just to charge a criminal with his crime, than it is with his
conspiracy to commit that offence. There is, however, one
aspect of the conspiracy charge which lends itself to abuse
— as strange as it may seem, the penalty for conspiracy if
often more severe than that for the offence.
Since any planning which results in so minor an
offense as spitting on the sidewalk can be called a
conspiracy — punishable with heavy jail sentences —
unionists manning picket lines can find themselves
charged, not merely with obstruction (a handy catch-all
which generally results in a small fine), but with
conspiracy to obstruct, and therefore, are liable to long
years in jail. Since it is the crown attorney, a political
appointee of the elite interests, who decides which charge
to lay, it's not hard to understand why it is used
politically against the elite's enemies.
As students have recently discovered, the conspiracy
charge can be levelled against them, as well. Students at
Sir George Williams University are now standing trial on
such charges, and as students at the University of
Waterloo recently discovered, authorities here are anxious
to use such charges to remove those who are criticizing
mismanagement.
Four weeks ago when radical students held a one-day
study-in at the university library to draw attention to its
inadequate budget and facilities, administration president
Howard Petch, although he was informed otherwise,
claimed publicly that the intent of the students was to
take over the administration building and disrupt the
university.
The most serious aspect of these charges was
president Petch claimed that the Radical Student
Movement met secretly to make its decisions - a
necessary precondition to the laying the conspiracy
charges.
Equally significantly, professor W. K. Thomas in the
March 31 Kitchener-Waterloo Record is reported to have
charged that students at the University of Waterloo were
part of an international communist conspiracy under the
"guidance of Chairman Mao and the spirit of Che
Guevara."
Such McCarthyite red-baiting could be lightly
dismissed were it not for the fact that is has been just such
crude propaganda that has preceded the end of civil
liberties in the past. Indeed, president Petch has already
forecast just such an end to liberty with his demands for a
"code of conduct" at the university.
The ex parte injunction is perhaps the best known of
legal abuses in labor affairs. The essence of the ex parte
injunction is that the judge is asked to make decisions
and issue court orders after having heard only one side —
invariably the owner's side — in labor disputes.
All the owner has to do is satisfy the judge that
violence is likely to occur if strikers continue, to picket his
premises. The fact that the reason that violence occurs is
that the owner is bringing in strikbreakers to take the
workers' jobs, and that these scabs are assisted by the
local police in breaking the picket line, has no bearing on
the decision. The justice or injustice of such a decision is
not the question that matters. Indeed, we do not have
courts of justice, we have courts of law - law that is
politically made and, too often, politically administered.
These few examples of the way violence and
oppression operate in our society could be extended
almost without end — from Alan McNab's rampage
through Ontario's Norfolk County in 1837 to the
expulsion of the Japanese from B.C. in World War II.
But why then, if violence has been so common in
Canada's past, do its leaders continue to propagate the
image of Canadians as a non-violent people? What would
you do if you were in their position?
If Canadian press, radio and TV told the truth, if
Canadians realized how law is used to oppress them, and
violence used to uphold those unjust laws, Canadians
would rise up and demand an accounting.
But so long as Canadians can be fooled, and so long as
the lying press can convince them that it is "un-Canadian"
to throw off their yokes and demand such an accounting,
Canadians — Canadian workers and Canadian students —
will never be free. Page  10
THE      UBYSSEY
Operation Doorstep gives
free campus chest x-rays
Tuesday, January 20, 1
970
Operation Doorstep is here
again.
The free chest X-ray and TB
test clinic is at UBC for the
second year in a row, and is
available to everyone over 6
months old.
"About 3,000 people came to
us last year, and we hope to do at
least that well this year," said
survey, organizer Ed McLachlan.
"Response at UBC is generally
very good. It's usually hard to get
young people to respond to such
medical services," he said.
The   clinic   can  detect  other
Epp resigns Pit job
SUB Pit manager, Erwin Epp
announced his resignation
Monday.
"I quit because I got another
Vietnam film
The Vietnam Action
Committee will sponsor Emile de
Antonio's film "In the Year of the
Pig" Thursday at the Olympic
Theatre, 2381 East Hastings, at
7:15 and 9:30 p.m.
Admission will be $1 for adults
and 50 cents for high school
students.
job," said Epp. He is now the
executive secretary of the British
Columbia Union of Students.
Alma Mater Society president
Fraser Hodge said he doesn't
know who will succeed Epp as Pit
Manager.
'The decision on this will be
up to the Pit mamagement
committee," he said.
Those who wish to continue
drinking beer under Epp should
sign the "Erwin come back
petition" at the SUB information
desk.
Worry Beads:
HOME CALLS THEM
Anti-Up-Tight Baubles!
For details see January 23 Ubyssey       !
THE MANY FACES OF FOLK VOL. I
B'NAI BRITH HILLEL FOUNDATION
AND
SPECIAL EVENTS
presents
Tiff FANTASTIC
SINGING RABBI
Shlomo Carlebach
Don't miss the man who turned on U.B.C. students for
the last two years — it started out as a 1-hour Folksong Concert and turned it into a 2'/2-hour happening.
Wed., Jan. 21, 12:30 p.m.
SUB   Ballroom admission 50c
EDMONTON PUBLIC SCHOOLS
ATTENTION
Industrial Arts and
Vocational Teachers
Due to expansion the Edmonton Public School Board will
require a number of qualified Industrial Arts teachers in
the multi-phase program at the Junior and Senior High
School level.
Vocational teachers in Beauty Culture, Food Preparation
& Services, Graphic Arts-Lithography, Commercial Art,
Merchandising, Institutional Services, and Horticulture
will also be needed.
For application forms and employment information contact:
PLACEMENT OFFICE
UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
VANCOUVER, B.C.
ailments besides TB.
"Often cases of lung cancer
and heart ailments are discovered.
We've even found people with
stomachs upside-down," said
McLachlan.
The clinic is serviced by
Women's Hospital Auxiliary
Volunteers.
The clinic will be located in
front of SUB Monday, Tuesday,
Wednesday and Friday for the
next two weeks. On Thursday it
will be parked in front of Acadia
Camp, and on Jan. 29, it will be
located at the corner of Dalhousie
and Allison Road.
Test results are available in
SUB 130, 48 hours after the test
is taken.
YOU ARE INVITED TO ATTEND
A PREVIEW MEETING
of the
DALE CARNEGIE COURSE
WED., JAN. 21st - 8 P.M.
HOLIDAY INN - 1110 HOWE ST.
Presented by
LEADERSHIP TRAINING INSTITUTE
T. W. "Thorfie" Thorfirmson
535 W. Georgia St. Phone 688-8277 (24 hrs.)
AQUA   SOCIETY
S.C.U.B.A. COURSE
N.A.U.I. Certification
Starts  Now
—First  Paid  First  In
—Sign  in Club's Lounge, S.U.B.
3261 W. Broadway     736-7.788,
Weekdays to 1 a.m.
Fri. & Sat, 3 a.m.
THE PIT
Open TUESDAY, THURSDAY
and FRIDAY
4:30 p.m. - 11:30 p.m.
THURSDAY NIGHT
folknight with the RAIBLE BROTHERS
FRIDAY NIGHT
dance to a LIVE BAND
a
GETTING INTO THE
»
(appearing Sat. Jan.24 at the Coliseum)
mm
ALSO AVAILABLE   IN 8 TRACK  AND
CASSETTE STEREO TAPES
ALSO AVAILABLE   IN 8 TKACK
IS GETTING INTO A
TOTAL EXPERIENCE
ON   RC/I Tuesday, January 20, 1970
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 11
American ad minis trators
confident they're winning
HOUSTON, Tex. (CUPI) - A feeling that "the
worst is over" for campus administrators prevailed
at the annual convention of the Association of
American Colleges, which ended here Jan. 13.
"My own view is that we have reached the crest
in student disputes," said Edward Bloustein,
administration president of Bennington College. "At
this meeting last year, you saw the most frightened
group of men you've ever seen. They were asking
everyone for advice, including the bootblack outside
the hotel.
"But we do not see that today - we are
beginning to meet the problems." he said.
Among factors cited as contributing to the
new-felt confidence were:
• a feeling of "expertise in handling student
disorders;"
• an apparent shift in student activism toward
Wjhat administrators considered "more constructive"
protests, especially over environmental problems;
• greater administration preoccupation with
money in the face of a squeeze in government and
private funds for education.
At least one conference delegate was
disappointed by the apparent decrease in
anti-administration activity on campus: George
Wald, Nobel prize-winning biologist from Harvard,
argued that students are justified in their attacks on
a "corrupted" older generation.
"When it gets warm, I kind of feel the students
will go into the streets again," he said.
Prof predicts Bay area end
SAN FRANCISCO (CUP-CPS) - A Stanford
professor has predicted that the Bay area "will die
soon.
"Ecological catastrophe is here now and we
only need to open our eyes to see it," Dr. Robert
Dreisbach, a professor at Stanford's medical school
claimed.
He called for legislation to control population
growth in the San .Francisco area, reusing present
post-resource fuel sources rather than consuming
more     natural     resources,     banning    individual
automobiles,  and taxing combustible engines 50
cents per mile.
Two Panthers surrender
after escaping raid
OTTAWA (CUP) - Two Black Panthers who escaped an Ottawa
police raid last September surrendered to Chicago police January 14.
Robert Bruce, 23, chairman of the west suburban Chicago
branch of the Panthers, and Nathaniel Junior, 24, Panther Field
Secretary, were the objects of an Ottawa search in September, along
with Panther Captain of Defence Merill Harvey, 23.
Police claimed to find weapons and explosives in their Ottawa
dwelling.
American officials had charged Bruce with jumping bail,
kidnapping and assault with intent to commit murder. Junior was
charged with bond default for failure to appear in court in connection
with an alleged attempt to purchase machine guns.
No clues about bomb
The bomb explosion in the math building remains a mystery.
The bombing Jan. 9, caused an estimated $600 damage to the
building.
"We are still continuing with an investigation, but have found
nothing we can make public at this time," said RCMP Sgt. George
Strathde.
"Our report will only be made public when our findings are
finalized and charges can be laid," he added.
WE'RE FLYING HIGH
(FINALLY)
Thursday, 12:30, SUB 211
"Flying CF-104's and
other light aircraft"
U.B.C. FLYING CLUB
SWING IN
PSYCHEDELIC
SOPHISTICATION
Back   Ely   Popular  Demand
The Fabulous
Good Fortune
Wed. to Fri.
8:30 p.m. to 2 a.m.
Sat. - 8 p.m. to 1 am.
5th Ave. at Fir - 736-4304
THIS COUPON GOOD FOR
$1.00
OFF REGULAR ADMISSION
WITH  STUDENT CARD
MONDAY THRU THURSDAY
ZOOLOGICAL LOVERS:
FEEDING HOURS AT THE SAN FRANCISCO ZOO
(Sloat Blvd. & Ocean Beach):
Lions 2 p.m.  except Mondays
Leopards & Small Cats 2:35 p.m.
Elephants 3:30 p.m. daily
Could send you there FREE.'
For details see January 23 Ubyssey
THE MANY FACES OF FOLK VOL. II
SPECIAL EVENTS
presents
Russ
Thornberry
—Formerly  of  the  Pozo   Seco  Singers  and   New  Christy  Minstrels
—Already  with   an  Album   released,   he   is  a   favorite  in   Eastern
Canada
Tues., Jan. 27,  12:30 p.m.
SUB BALLROOM admission soc
NOTICE
Re-Late Payment of Fees
A late payment fee of $20 additional to all other fees will
be assessed after JANUARY 15, 1970, this fee will be increased to $30 after January 30, 1970. Refund of this fee
will be considered only on the basis of a medical certificate
covering illness or on evidence of domestic affliction. Students who are unable to pay their fees on time owing to
new Canada Loan or Bursary arrangements not having
been finalized should see the Finance Department prior to
January 15, 1970. Appeals must be made by February 15.
If fees are not paid in full by February 16, 1970, the registration of students concerned will be cancelled and they
will be excluded from classes.
If a student whose registration has been cancelled for
non-payment of fees applies for reinstatement and his
application is approved by the Registrar, he will be
required to pay a reinstatement fee of $10, the late
fee of $30, and all other outstanding fees before he
is permitted to resume classes.
OFFICIAL  NOTICES
Alma  Mater  Society
Elections for A.M.S. Executive will be held as
follows:—
FIRST SLATE:
President,  Secretary,  Ombudsman,  Co-ordinator  of
Activities
Nominations Open - Jan. 28
Nominations Close - 12:00 Noon Feb. 5
Election - Feb. 11
SECOND  SLATE:
Vice-President,  Treasurer,  Internal Affairs  Officer,
External Affairs Officer
Nominations Open - Feb. 4
Nominations Close - 12:00 Noon Feb. 12
Election - Feb. 18
ADVANCED LEARNING PROGRAMS
^VCATIONS
TRAIN YOUR MIND TO STUDY
685-7929
(FOR FREE INFORMATION) Page  12
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, January 20, 1970
THIS    WEEK    IS
1EM
SIX DAYS DEVOTED BY
AGRICULTURE TO FUN AND
CHARITABLE CAUSES,
ENDING ON SATURDAY
WITH THE GREATEST
DANCE OF THE YEAR:-
TICKETS   FROM   AMS   BUSINESS
OFFICE OR ANY AGGIE. Tuesday, January 20,  1970
THE      UBYSSEY
.Page  13
EVENTS    THIS    WEEK:
today:
BOOKSTORE
-CHUCKWAGON      PANCAKE
SALE      IN      FRONT      OF
BOOKSTORE.   ALL   PROCEEDS
TO    HOUSE    OF    HOPE
-12:30, FREE FILMS IN SUB.
CAMPUS
Wednesday: -APPLE    DAY    ON    CAMPUS.
B PROFITS  FROM THE SALE OF
LUSH B.C. APPLES GO TO THE
CRIPPLED CHILDREN'S
HOSPITAL. BY DONATION.
LIBRARY
thursday:     -SEE     THE     DEATH     OF     A
QUASI-AGRICULTURALIST-
AND HIS BURIAL. IN FRONT
OF LIBRARY AT NOON.
friday:
Saturday:
LIBRARY
-INTER-FACULTY BOAT RACE
AND BALE RACE. AT THE
POND IN FRONT OF THE
LIBRARY AT NOON.
SUB
-THE FARMER'S FROLIC-OUR
GIFT TO THE UNIVERSITY.
LIMITED NUMBER OF TICKETS
AVAILABLE. Page  14
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, January 20, 1970
TUESDAY
UBC FLYING CLUB
Ground school lectures, 7:30 p.m., Wei-
son Air Service, Old Airport.
IWW
Alex Ferguson will speak, noon, SUB
211.
GEOGRAPHY CLUB
Discussion, noon, Geo.-Geol. 300.
PROGRESSIVE   CONSERVATIVES
Meeting, noon, Council Chambers, Rm.
aoe.
GERMAN CLUB
Meeting, noon, IH.
BILL  WILLMOTT'S  LECTURE
SERIES ON VIETNAM
Lecture, noon, Ang. 104. ,
INTERNATIONAL   HOUSE
Hot meals daily for 85 cents.
DAY CARE CO-OP
Urgent meeting, noon,  SUB 213.
CIASP
Mexican summer training meeting 7:30
P.m.,  4630 W.  5th.
SCIENCE   FICTION
Meeting, noon, SUB 105A.
WEDNESDAY
ECO
Bob Hunter speaks, noon, Bi -Sc
2000.
REHABILITATION MEDICINE
Rehab, med. vs. B.C. Paraplegic Basketball Team, 9 p.m., Kitsilano Community Center, 12th and Larch.
THUNDERBIRD MOTORCYCLE CLUB
Meeting,  noon,   SUB 211.
IWW      *
Mordecai Briemberg, noon, SUB Party
Room.
EXPERIMENTAL COLLEGE CLUB
OF  UBC
Seminar,  noon,  SUB  125.
SPEAK  EASY
Mon., Wed., and Fri., 12-9 p.m. SUB
218.
LEGAL AID
Campus legal aid panels, every Mon.,
Wed,   and  Fri.,   noon,   SUB  237-237a'
CUSO
Film, noon,  SUB 211.
NEWMAN   CENTER
Meeting, noon, SUB 1051*0
'tween
classes
THURSDAY
UBC  FLYING CLUB
Capt. Horn speaks, noon, SUB 111.
PRE-SOCIAL   WORK  CLUB
Orientation   tour  at   school   of   social
work,  noon,  School of Social Work.
ALLIANCE   FRANCAISE
French  film,   noon  and  7:30,  Bu.   100.
THUNDERBIRD WARGAMERS
Meeting, noon, Rm.  130.
STUDENTS   INTERNATIONAL
MEDITATION   SOCIETY
Information,   every   Thurs.   and   Fri.,
SUB main floor.
CAMPUS  CRUSADE   FOR  CHRIST
Teach-in, noon, Ed. 202.
CAMPUS   CAVALIERS
Square dancing, noon, SUB 207-209.
VIETNAM MOBILIZATION COMMITTEE
Film, noon, SUB Aud.
IWW
Panel  on  Women's  Liberation,   noon,
SUB 211.
UBC   FLYING   CLUB
Lecture-meeting, noon, SUB 211.
INTERNATIONAL   HOUSE
Discussion  on  DDT in  Africa,   noon.
IH.
VARSITY   ROD  AND  GUN
Meeting, SUB 117.
POLITICAL SCIENCE UNION
Meeting, noon, Political Science Common Room, Angus.
FRIDAY
IWW
Films, noon, SUB Aud.
ALLIANCE  FRANCAISE
Meeting, noon, I.H.
WEDNESDAY
UBC   SAILING   CLUB
Film  and meeting,  noon,  Bu. 217.
GALLIMAUFRY  THEATRE
Theatre, Wed., Thurs., and Fri., noon,
SUB ballroom.
SUZUKI
MOTORCYCLE
CENTRE
World Champion Lightweights
SALES - SERVICE
PARTS - ACCESSORIES
For Complete Service Call
2185 W. Broadway 731-7510
AQUA   SOCIETY
S.C.U.B.A. COURSE
N.A.U.I.   Certification
Starts   Now
—First Paid  First  In
—Sign  in  Club's  Lounge,  S.U.B.
E & B RESTAURANT
Deluxe
Western Cuisine
4423 W.  10th
COLLEGE LIFE
TONIGHT 9:00 P.M.
Place Vanier Common Block Lounge
DOOR PRIZE & REFRESHMENTS
Come Sing & Share with  us
SPONSORSHIP: CAMPUS CRUSADE FOR CHRIST
.>«.
i ENGINEERS and
I CABLE CAR BUFFS
I You  could tour  the  San  Francisco
| Cable  Car  Power House    ^^^.
I and Car Barn courtesy of   HOME
■HM
j For details see January 23 Ubyssey
CLASSIFIED
Rates: Students, Faculty & Club-3 lines, 1 day 750, 3 days $2.00
Commercial—3 lines, 1 day $1.00; additional lines 250;
4 days price of 3.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone and
are payable in advance.
Closing Deadline is 11)30 a.m. the day before publication.
Publications Office, STUDENT UNION BLDG., Univ. of B.C.,
  Vancouver 8, B.C.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Dances
11
DOUBLE DANCE AT PLACE
Vanier with the Crosstown Bus
and Tomorrow's Eyes. Fri., Jan.
23.   9-1.   Non-res.   $1.50,   Res.   $1.25.
TRADITIONAL, POLKA PARTY,
Friday, Jan. 23, 9-1, live band, refreshments. Great fun. $1.25 each.
International   House.
Greetings
12
GOT   A   QUESTION?
GOT  A  HANG-UP?
SPEAK   EASY,   SUB   Rm.   218,   228-
3706.   Mon.,   Wed.,   Fri.,   12-9   P.m.
J ARTS
CONTEMPORARY
 1970
-A* watch Campus posters each week
* for  new  Festival  announcements.
* TODAY: 111. lecture in LAS. 104,
12:30, by British artist Bernard
Cohen: "Art and the Structure
and Function of Creative Learning".
+ this Thurs., 4:30 in Lasserre lobby:    "Sound    Sculpture*'.
ir this Friday: 12:30 in Music Recital Hall: "Random Tape Performances".
-A* next week Gallimaufry! (Beckett
&    Pinter).
Wanted Information
13
HELP FIND MY DOUBLE-WOULD
the guy who completely mistook
me for someone else he knew on
Thurs. 15 in SUB. Please leave
the double's name etc. with D.
Jeffery, 403 Robson PI., Van. or
call  224-9720.
Lost & Found
14
LOST: "HELLO DOLLY" POST-
ers left in VW convertible. Wed.
afternoon by boy, girl hitchhiker.
Leave at MUSSOC office, SUB,
or   call   228-9203.
Rides & Car Pools
15
Special Notices
16
HAVE A SPACE ODYSSEY WITH
Guided   Meditation.
A highly creative way—two step by
step Instructions on a 12" LP record
— 16.60,  by a Western  Yogini:
Swami  Sivananda  Radha
sharing   ancient   techniques   studied
in India under Swaml Sivananda in
the   Himalayas.
Ashram   Records,   Box   S,
Kootenay  Bay,   B.C.
OUT IN THE COLD?
DATES + SKI
•
Phone P.Y.C. - 434-2636
•
FREE  Ski  Membership  Girls  18-23
Beginners Welcome!
SAVE ON BLANK TAPE PHILIPS
C-90 Cassette $3.15. Call or see
Peter Jim 320 Okanagan House.
Phone  224-7876  or  224-9062.	
THEATRE
10   filles,    5   Hommes,    Requis.
Linda,  277-7193, De 6 p.m.  A  9 p.m.
WHY PAY HIGH AUTO INSUR-
ance rate if you are 20 years or
over and have good driving record you may qualify. Phone Ted
Elliott.   299-9422.	
AQUA SOC BEER NIGHT THIS
month is Jan. 22. 4-8 p.m. Slides
shown   too.   Hut   M-27.	
AQUA SOC GENERAL MEETING
Thurs., Jan. 29, Brock room 303.
Discussion   of   election.	
BOB HUNTER SUN COLUMNIST
speaks about Sociological Implications of Pollution. Wed., 12:30,
Bio-Science   2000. 	
ANGLICAN-UNITED CHURCH
CHAPLAINCY
AH interested students and faculty
are invited to an afternoon of discussion on the future of chaplaincies on campus. Saturday, January
24, at 1:30 in the Lutheran Student
Centre,   58SS  University   Boulevard.
Special Notices (Copt.) 16
WHISTLER   MOUNTAIN   YOUTH
HOSTEL OPENS
Special weekend packages available
for ONLY $8.00 — Includes two
nights accommodation and a 1 1
meals. Open 7 days a week, beautiful location on Alta Lake —
skiing, snow shoeing, ice skating,
fishing,   etc.
Reservations   and   further   information   can  be  obtained  at   the  Canadian    Youth    Hostels   Association,
1406   West   Broadway,   Vancouver
9.   738-3128.	
WE ARE ALIVE AND WELL IN
SUB 211, Thurs., 12:30. UBC Fly-
ing Club Office 216G.	
- Double' Dance -
•
TOMORROW'S  EYES
&
CROSSTOWN  BUS
•
Fri.,  Jan.  23 — 9-1
PLACE   VANIER
•
Non-Residents $1.5*0
Residents   $1.25
Travel Opportunities
17
YOU COULD FLY FREE FOR A
Free weekend in San Francisco.
There will be six available. De-
tails   Jan.   23.	
TRAVELLING OVERSEAS ON A
BUDGET?
Then   visit   your   Youth   Hostels   information desk which is open every
Wednesday from 12:30-1:30 p.m. opposite   the   information   desk   in   the
Students   Union   Building.
Canadian Youth Hostels Association
1406 West Broadway
Vancouver  9,   B.C. Tel.   738-3128
Wanted—Miscellaneous
18
AUTOMOTIVE
Automobile For Sale
21
'62 V.W. DE LUXE. GOOD CONDI-
tion. $450. Contact George 435-
5733,   6-8  p.m.	
1960 VAUXHALL, 42,000 MILES.
Excellent condition. 325-0488 between 4 and 10 p.m., radio 4 dr.
$490  cash.	
1963 NSU PRINZ. RUNS CHEAP.
45 ml./gal. Best offer. Phone John
Room 434,  224-5214.	
'62 CHEVY II, EXCELLENT
mechanical condiion. $450.00 phone
224-9045 ask for Rm. 470 after 7:00
p.m.	
*58 PONTIAC. RELIABLE RUN-
ning condt'n. Only $120. Call 224-
9662,   Philip.
Motorcycles
25
1965 HONDA S90, HELMET. MUST
sacrifice to pay fees. First offer
$125  takes.   John   224-4146.
BUSINESS   SERVICES
Dance Bands
31
Miscellaneous
33
ARTIVORK POSTERS DRAUGHT-
ing and photographic darkroom
work done very cheap. John Kula,
224-4146.
Photography
34
THE VIEW OF SAN FRANCISCO
at night from Telegraph Hill is
spectacular! You could see it
FREE!   Details   Jan.  23.
Rentals—Miscellaneous
36
Scandals
37
VERONICA   LAKE:   WOULD   YOU
spend a weekend with me in San
Francisco if I win one of the SIX
FREE   trips   from   Home?
R.  H.   McL.
. 400-505    Burrard    St
WITNESSES OF ACCIDENT AT
Wesbrook and Agronomy Thursday a.m. January 15. Please contact Kathie at Black Cross Table
or   731-T540.	
DON'T SIT AT HOME AND SULK
tonight. Come to Place Vanier
and dance to Tomorrow's Eyes
and the Crosstown Bus. 9-1. Non-
res. $1.50.  Res.  $1.25.
Sewing & Alterations
38
Typing
40
FAST ACCURATE TYPING—MRS.
Treacy, 738-8794 — 35c page, 5c
copy.
"COMPETENT TYPING (Documents, theses, essays, general) my
home. Sr. Legal Secretary-Bookkeeper, excellent references. 946-
4722.	
EXPERT IBM SELECTRIC TYPIST.
Experienced essay and thesis
typist. Reasonable rates. 321-3838.
Forestry Term Papers.	
TYPIST   —   ELECTRIC    .
Please  call  224-6129
ESSAY    TYPING,    35
Ave.   733-5922.
West   19th
EFFICIENT TYPING — MY HOME
20" carriage desk model typewriter. Phone Ruth — 731-8578.
"EXPERIENCED ELECTRIC
home typing. Essays, theses, etc.
Neat accurate work, reasonable
rates.   Phone  321-2102.	
ACCURATE   EXP.   TYPING   FROM
legible  work;  reas.  rates;  728-6829
after  nine  a.m.  to  nine  p.m.	
THESES TYPED. EXPERIENCED
typist IBM-machine. Call Jenifer
Tomlin, days 668-8572, eves. 682-
5380.	
TYPING, PHONE 731-7511 — 9:00-
5:00,   after  6:00  phone  266-  6662.
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted—Female
51
PART-TIME SALES HELP, WEEK
days and weekends. Aggressive,
fashion minded sales gals for
young groovy boutique shops. Previous sales experience preferred.
Apply In writing to 1178 Hamilton,
Vancouver 3.	
PART-TIME TELLERS WANTED
by Bank of Montreal, S.U.B. Mondays and Fridays. Prev. exp. is
required. Phone Mr. Fisher 228-
9021  or call at the office.
Help Wanted—Male
52
Male or Female
53
PART TIME HELP WANTED. NO
soliciting. Please phone Al Tarbet
521-7731.	
DO YOU HAVE A CAR? CAN YOU
use an extra $100.00? Can you
spare 5 hours a week? Phone
522-3011 betweeen 3 p.m. and 5
p.m.   for   interview.
Work Wanted
54
GRAPHS AND CHARTS EX-
pertly done for theses, publications, etc. Call Vana 298-6805 eve.
INSTRUCTION
Language Instruction
61A
SPANISH 200 STUDENT WOULD
like to practice Sp. conversation
with anyone interested. Ph. Judy
435-9604.
Music
62
Tutoring
64
WANTED THIRD OR FOURTH
year Eng. major; Geog. major to
tutor second year student, 942-
4281.	
EXP. TUTOR IN 1ST AND 2ND
year Math & Chemistry by gradu-
ate.   Phone   738-5603.	
TUTORING IN MATH - PHYS. -
Stat by instructor (Ph.D.) $5 per
hour.   Ph.   733-6037.   Eve.	
PSYCH 206 TUTOR NEEDED.
Prefer grad student. Phone 261-
5290   aft.   6.
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
Typewriters & Repairs
39
BIRD CALLS
Your  Student  Telephone
Directory
STILL AVAILABLE — $1.00
al the Bookstore,
AMS Publications  Office
and Thunderbird  Shop
100% DOWN SKI JACKETS AND
imported track suits still available Memorial Gym 305, Mondays
and Thursdays, 12:30-2:00 or phone
683-3442. Ask for Hank lowest
prices.
Misc. For Sale (Cont.)
71
NEAR NEW STEREO. HALF
price. Great condition and sound.
Phone 738-7447 between 6 p.m.
and   7   p.m.	
LANGE BOOTS, HEAD 360's,
poles, canvas cover, all one season old. Phone 261-0394 after 6:00
p.m.	
LADIES AFGHAN SHEEPSKIN
coat. Size 14. $80. 321-6954 (before
9:30   p.m.)	
BLUEPOINT MALE SIAMESE
kitten 3 months, ^ery good natur-
ed. $20.00. Call 321-6954 before
9:30   p.m.	
HEAD COMPETITION GS SKIS 210
CM and Lange boots, size 10 M.
Phone  Ralph  224-9016.	
1 PAIR 215 CM KNEISSL RED
Stars, never used. What offers?
$179.00  new.   263-4390.	
FRENCH MADE BLACK MAXI
coat, hardly worn $65. Call 733-
1531.	
NEW PR. DYNA SPEAKERS
(never used), 2 Wharfedale speakers (3 mo. old), 2 pr. RSC speak-
ers   in   walnut   cabinets.   224-5194.
FRIDGE, GOOD CONDITION, $20.
228-3471,   Diana.
RENTALS & REAL ESTATE
Rooms
81
2 LARGE BEDSITTING ROOMS,
kitchen privileges, use of phone.
$50.00  month.   Call   733-9762.	
ON CAMPUS ROOMS, STUDY
lamps, mirrors, towel hangers,
w/w carpets, shoe cupboards,
large bunks. Sigma Chi House,
5725  Agronomy,  224-9620.	
ROOMS, STUDENT HOUSE USE
of house facilities. $35.00 month.
Ph.   873-1117.	
LHK ROOMS, MALE STUDENT,
private entrance, kitchen privileges, near bus. Phone after 5
p.m.   733-5255.	
LARGE FURNISHED ROOM FOR 1
student. $34 month rent. Share
kitchen, T.V., etc. Immed. occu-
pancy.   733-7358  eves.     *
ON CAMPTTS ACCOMMODATION
for 2 students. Light housekeep-
Ing, available Feb. 1st. 224-6397.
Room & Board
82
SIGMA CHI HOUSE — LARGEST
rooms on campus; two lounges
and dining hall. Free room cleaning service, laundry, color TV,
good food. Come out and see us.
5725  Agronomy,   224-9620,   224-6374.
ROOM A-ND BOARD PLUS Remuneration offered in exchange for
baby sitting, cooking and light
housekeeping. For six months. Urgent. Office: 228-2225. Home: 266-
9544.	
ROOM, BOARD $75. FEMALE STU-
dent. Neat Mcdonald bus. 261-0804.
ON CAMPUS BOARD & ROOM.
Available immediately at Union
College. Free parking. Home
cooking.   Apply   matron,   224-3266.
TIRED OF COMMUTING; TRY
being a boarder at Phi Gamma
Delta. Good food and rooms; ten
minutes from any . building on
campus. $90 a month. 224-9769 ask
for Dave  or Bob.	
MALE - STUDENT. CLOSE TO
U.B.C. Tennis - table, 3 meals
daily.  Good  food.  Tel.  738-2305.
SPACE FOR ONE MALE STUD-
•ent in St. Anderw's Hall. Apply
to   Dean—phone   224-7720.      	
FREE ROOM AND BOARD Exchange for light housekeeping &
supervising 2 boys after school, 5
blocks University grates* Call Lynn
days   736-7391,    everui.=.,   224-5738.
Furn. Houses & Apts.
83
GIRL STUDENT TO SHARE FUR-
nished modern apt. in West End.
Call MU 1-7707.	
WANTED — GIRL 30 TO 40 TO
share 2 bedroom furnished penthouse apartment with same. Kitsilano District $85.00 per month
plus telephone and hydro. Tele-
phone 731-3639.	
1 BDRM. FURN. APT. TO SUBLET
Kerrisdale area, couple pref. Ph.
263-9057.	
BSMT. STE. TO SHARE WITH
girl, 19th & Dunbar, $45/mo.,
washer, dryer. Phone 738-0219
after   6:00. Tuesday, January 20, 1970
UBYSSEY
.Page  15
Xgrf
—dick button photo
UBC GOALTENDER RICK BARDAL came out on the right side of a lucky break on this shot by
Manitoba Bisons forward  Dan Topolinski  as the puck slid  under his pad but wide of the goal.
Unfortunately, for Bardal, nine others found the mark as Manitoba trounced the Birds. Things went a
little better. Saturday night as Bardal held Winnipeg to three goals and the Birds picked up a 7-3 win.
Birds beat prophets
lose to prairie boys
By DICK BUTTON
Contrary to popular predictions, the UBC
Thunderbirds did not trounce the opposition from
the Universities of Manitoba and Winnipeg this
weekend.
In fact, the Birds came out on the short end
of a rather bad trouncing themselves as Herb
Pinder, formerly of the Canadian National team,
and a few other players comprising the University
of Manitoba Bisons scored a rather convincing 9-1
victory Friday night.
Pinder himself tallied five of the goals, plus
added a couple of assists. Of course, he also made
some good defensive plays to maintain a balanced
game.
Saturday night the Birds looked a little better
as they defeated the University of Winnipeg
Wesmen 7-3 in a rather lackadaisical game.
Play was good in some spots, but overall was
not up the standard the Birds have shown before.
The Birds started slowly Friday night, picked
up a penalty at 1:32 for too many men on the ice,
then less than a minute later found out that
Manitoba has a fairly potent power play.
The Birds had difficulty staying out of the
penalty box, and Manitoba scored again in the first
10 minutes.
Halfway through the period, the Birds settled
. down and took control of the game.
Barry Wilcox and Wayne Schaab missed a few
good chances as the puck bounced the wrong way
for them, then UBC picked up their only counter
of the evening on a close in shot.
A record crowd of nearly a thousand watched
UBC come out flying in the second period, then
die.
Two minutes into the period, they took a
major penalty for butt-ending and Pinder and
company went to work.
Three goals and five minutes later, the Birds
were back at full strength and behind 5-1. They
never recovered and gave up three more goals
before the second period finished.
The defense was notably absent on a number
of the goals.
Saturday, the Birds approached the game with
a healthier attitude and slightly better play.
Again it was a night of frustration for many of
the Birds, especially Roy Sakaki who picked up
two goals and was robbed of a hat trick by
Winnipeg goaltender Grant Clay who played
strongly for two periods before he left the game.
Doug Buchanan had two good breakaways,
but Clay made better plays and Buchanan went
scoreless.
Larry Watts picked up a nice goal on a UBC
power play with a hard shot from 10 feet out after
two similar shots had been stopped.
Mike Darnborough slapped in a hard drive
from 30 feet out, and Barry Wilcox and Tom
Williamson slipped shots past the unsuspecting
Clay to round out the UBC scoring.
Birds were without the services of Laurie
Vanzella who was sidelined with an elbow injury
and a bad bruise on his leg. Hopefully, he will be
ready for next weekend when UBC tackles the
University of Alberta Golden Bears and University
of Calgary Dinosaurs here.
T Birds advance
towards ball title
The continuing march of the UBC basketball Thunderbirds to the
WCIAA championship took its seventh and eighth steps on the weekend
as the club topped both of its Manitoba opponents on the weekend ...
Friday evening the victims were second place University of
Manitoba Bisons as they fell 72-65 to the Birds.
The battle was won on the boards as the rebounds were 46-28 in
favor of the winners, 16 of them by 6'7" centre Terry MacKay.
UBC got off to an excellent start as they were able to use their full
court press effectively and this, combined with their rebound edge,
decisively limited the number of Bison shots.
"We didn't get enough shots to win," said Manitoba coach Jack
Lewis after the loss. With rebounders like that MacKay and Sankey it's
difficult to get possession to take the shots."
Unfortunately for the Bisons the loss could conceivably prove
more costly than simply the league title.
The Bird victory means that Manitoba or any other club
competing against UBC in the playoffs will have to play all the games at
War Memorial Gym; the place Peter Mullins had in mind.
Saturday night UBC unexpectedly had their hands full. The
University of Winnipeg Wesmen put up a spirited struggle in the first
half and led 34-30 at the break.
Early in the second half the Birds stormed ahead by 10 points and
with the help of rookie guards Rod Matheson and Joe Kainer held off a
final Wesmen surge in the last two minutes.
The result came in the form of 78-71 victory, caused mainly by
the fine play of Bob Molinski who had 20 points, Derek Sankey who
added 17 and Ron Thorsen who finished with 15.
Apart from the obvious success in that the team picked up two
victories, there was other good news for Mullins. The lack of depth
which was evident on the American road trip seems to have cured itself.
Friday night Jack Hoy was able to come off the bench to relieve
Sankey and hit two outside shots to maintain the UBC momentum. On
Saturday Matheson and Kainer did the job.
Hence it might be reasonably assumed that the Birds have more
than five players; an excellent asset especially when plagued by chronic
foul trouble.
The Thunderbirds continue their prairie jaunts as they play the
Universities of Calgary, Alberta and Lethbridge next weekend.'
Intramurals
INTRAMURALS
SCHEDULE
HOCKEY—Jan. 20, Rink I, «:20: PE vs.
Deke; 7:35: Eng U vs. Beta; 8:50: Sigma
Chi vs. Phi Delta. Jan. 21, Rink II, 4:40:
For vs. St. Andrews; 7:55: Union vs.
Grad *B'; »:10 Ed vs. Comm "A*. Jan. 22,
Rink I, 6:20: Eng I vs. Psi U; 7:35: Grad
'A' vs. Figi; 6:50: DU vs. Kappa Sigma.
BASKETBALL — Jan. 21, 7:00: St.
Marks vs. Law; PE III vs. Aggies; 8:00:
VCF vs. Union m; Eng HI vs. Ed IU;
9:00: Phi Delta vs. For HI; Carey Hall
vs. Eng VI; PV V vs. Union IV; 10:00:
PV IV vs. Eng VII; Dekes vs. SAM 'D*;
Figi vs. SAM *C; 12:30: Beta vs. Sigma
Chi. Jan. 23, 12:30: Pharm II vs. Eng II;
Med II vs. Grad St; Eng V vs. Swim
Team.
RESULTS
BASKETBALI Jan.  14:  Eng VI (27),
PV VI (26); PV IV (29), PV V (26); PE II
(33), Union IU (30); Carey Hall (46), Phi
Felta II (25); Ed HI (46), VCF (26); PV
III (44), Law II (29); St. Marks (43), Aggies (24); Totem II (41), Eng III (20);
PV I (37), Figi I (20). Jan. 16: For H
(23), Arts English (28); Swim Team and
Eng V win by default.
21 =
HOCKEY — Jan. 15: Arch (2),
Sigma (2); DU (6),  Ed (2); Figi
U  (5).
POINT   STANDINC   —  JAN.
1. Engineers 1379 + 127
2. Beta Theta Pi    1192 +    52
3. Union College      934 -f-    85
4. Forestry 727 +
5. Kappa Sigma 740
6. Phi Gamma Delta 520
7. Agriculture 470 -f      1
8. Arts 416 +      1
8. Physical   Ed. 203 -f 214
9. Sigma Alpha Mu 314 +      1
10. Delta Kappa Ep.    268 +    21
11. Commerce
12. Delta Upsilon
13. Phi Delta Theta
14. Dentistry
15. Law
16. Sigma Chi
17. Education
18. St.  Marks
19. Grad Studies
20. Alpha Tau Omega
21. Pharmacy
22. Alpha Delta Phi
23. Zeta Beta Tau
24. Carey Hall
26. PI.   Vanier  Res.
26. Medicine
3 =
+    54 =
Kappa
(8), Psi
1970
=*= 1506
= 1244
1019
748
740
520
4/70
417
417
315
289
281
253
250
200
191
180
176
165
145
128
120
93
90
65
54
33
UBC FILM SOCIETY which in 1967 brought you the uncut "HIGH7'now presents
LARRY
KENT'S
FACADE
HO ADMITTANCE TO NKSONS UNDrt )|
Warning:    VERY    FRANK    TREATMENT   OF   SEX
R,   W.   McDonald,   B.C.   Censor
SUB AUDITORIUM
FRIDAY:        23, 30
SATURDAYS: 24, 31
SUNDAYS:      25,    1
7:00
&
9:00
7:00
' JI Special admission price tor this presentation only        ^ J Page   16
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, January 20, 1970
Security guards'
eyes on Loyola
MONTREAL (CUP) - After a one-week ban on all campus
activity, the doors of Loyola College opened again Monday with an
unauthorized faculty-student rally, and the announcement of new,
restrictive hours of business for the campus.
Approximately 900 students and faculty filled the Loyola
auditorium during the early afternoon, and agreed to ask students
who have not paid their second-term tuition fees to withhold the
money in protest against the Loyola administration's firing of 27
professors.
Immediately following the rally, approximately 75 students
filed over to the Loyola bursar's office, to demand a $25 refund on
their fees — their approximation of the portion of tuition lost during
the administration's one-week ban on classes.
The students arrived at the office to discover the door was
barred and guarded by a security guard.
The one-week ban was announced to "facilitate a freer and
more profitable exchange of views of all concerned" with the current
Loyola crisis. Jan. 12, 150 riot police entered the campus to evict
students and faculty sitting-in at the Loyola administration building.
In a press release Monday administration president Patrick
Malone declared that current security regulations on the campus were
inadequate, and announced new, early closing times for all campus
buildings "in the best interests of the college  community."
Henceforth, the college will close at 10:30 p.m. weekdays, 1
p.m. Saturdays, and all day Sunday.
Security guards have been stationed in   most  campus  buildings.
Classroom strategy
planned at McGill
MONTREAL (CUP) - McGill sociology students Friday decided
to shift their emphasis on reform from the committee to the
classroom, while negotiating a new form of government in their
department.
Approximately 150 students attended a mass meeting which
made that decision, while agreeing to return student representatives to
a joint student-faculty caucus which previously ruled the department
by consensus.
Students withdrew from the caucus last Monday, after faculty
unilaterally dissolved the body and then attempted to reconstitute it
without consulting the students.
Neither side is in favor of the current consensus procedure, but
many faculty would like to see the caucus, originally formed on a
parity basis, replaced by a formal structure in which students would
have only one-third representation.
In the meantime, David Abbey, chairman of the sociology
student union, said the student group would sponsor a series of
meetings, seminars, and teach-ins to discuss a "radical approach" to
sociology.
Eventually, students will be trained to debate professors in the
classroom on the political significance of course material, he said.
Campus day care centre
still looking for home
The UBC Parents' Nursery Co-op, conceived three months ago,
is still looking for accomodation on campus.
"We've applied for everything that became vacant in the last few
months but there's always an excuse why we can't have it," said
Sibylle Klein, an organizer of the day-care centre.
Those involved in the plans for the centre see the parents co-op
as a nursery where parents will take turns supervising the children
under the direction of a full-time kindergarten teacher. Programs and
instruction will be organized for the children while they are at the
centre.
A spokesman for the community care facilities at the
department of social welfare has given her full support to plans for the
co-op.
Yet according to UBC administration there is no space available
on campus to set up a centre such as this.
There will be an important meeting Wednesday noon in SUB
224 for parents and parties interested in plans for the parents' nursery
co-op.
„     1
Bagdad - by - the Bay
San Francisco
home Could send you there
^"" For a FREE Weekend!
(There are Six)
For details see January 23 Ubyssey
CAMPUS LAUDR0MAT
1968
Coin-Op    Wash    &    Dry   Cleaning
Cozy   Lounge
Inviting   Atmosphere
Attendant  Service
"Clean As A'New Pin"
4354   W.   10th 224-9809
•EAT IN »TAKE0UT« DELIVERY-
3261 W.Broadway   736-7788
Weekdays to 1 a.m.
Fri. & Sat. 3 a.m.
"Susan said
that Jane said
that you said
that I should try Tampax tampons.
"Why should I?
"Yes, I know they're worn
internally, but I'd never thought
of the 'no show' idea. Why,
that means l could wear
anything 1 own without worrying.
Even a bathing suit.
"You say I can actually go
swimming, too? And that story
about not washing your hair
is just an old wives'tale, huh?
"A doctor developed them? Well,
he ought to know. Getting rid
of those bulky pads sure sounds
good to me. I'm going to
try Tampax tampon's next time.
"Thanks a lot, Ann, for telling
it like it is."
The Village printwrights
2109  ALLISON  RD. AT  UNIVERSITY  BLVD., VANCOUVER 8, B.C.
Phone 224-1015
COMPLETE   PRINTING,   BINDING   AND   MAILING   SERVICE
A   DIVISION   OF   BENWELL-ATKINS,   Vancouver   Printers   For   Over   40   Years
\\
n
PHYSICS SOC. PRESENTS
TWO FOR THE
ROAD
THURS., JAN. 22 - HEBB TH.
12:30
Admission:  50c
Staring .  .  .
ALBERT FINNEY
AUDREY HEPBURN
Color and Cinemascope
Contemporary Theatre in the Round
GALLIMAUFRY
THEATRE
Pinter's  Dwarfs &
Becket's Krapp's Last Tape
SUB Ballroom- 12:30 - 1:30
Wed. - Fri., Jan. 28 - 30
ADMISSION 50c
Special Events Contemporary Arts
DEVELOPED   BY   A   DOCTOR
NOW   USED   BY   MILLIONS   OF  WOMEN
TAMPAX  TAMPONS  ARE   MADE ONLY   BY
CANADIAN TAMPAX CORPORATION LTD..
BARRIE.   ONTARIO
GRAD PORTRAITS
Candid Portrait Studios are honoured to have been chosen
to continue this year's Grad portraits. Your portraits will
now be taken & proofed in color. B&W can be ordered.
Re-takes at no extra cost including those wanting re-takes
from the Extension Department.
One 5 x 7 in a folder, choice of 5-6 proofs inclusive. Sitting is paid for
through your gradfee. Extra copies in folders are: 4x5 size in B & W
$1.50, in Color $2.95, 5 x 7 B & W $2.00. Color $3.95, 8 x 10 B & W $4.00.
Color $4.95. But best of all will be our package rates on which we're
still working.
Since there is no immediate deadline, we will be taking as much care
and time as possible and take your Grad Portraits at our studios starting
Feb. 2/70. We're located at 3343 West Broadway and have lots of free,
easy and unrestricted parking. Bus stop is practically outside our door.
Leave  bus  at Waterloo  going  East or  Blenheim  going  West.
We'll be taking sittings Evenings and Sundays too. Come well
groomed. Gown and Tie, etc. covers all your other clothing.
For appointments phone 731-4845, our special UBC Gradline.
Candid Photography & Portrait Studios
731-4845
3343 W. BROADWAY
"Our Own Ektacolor Lab Makes the Difference, it's the Best!"
(You'll find us in "Birdcalls" & B.C. Tel's Yellow Pages)

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