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The Ubyssey Oct 11, 1968

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Array 'All the news
THE UBYSSEY
that's print
to fit'
'Vol. L, No. 15
VANCOUVER, B.C., FRIDAY, OCTOBER 11, 1968
228-2305
— ian lindsay photo
ARTISTIC TWIG wows friends with ballet interpretation of Swan Lake, complete with swan dive
at Forester's frolic Thursday.
Burly foresters  birl,
broomstick to  bubbly
Forestry and home economics chalked up victories in forestry
week contests Thursday noon.
A home ec relay team defeated the nurses in a broomstick
race, in which each team member ran down a log, tapped a
forester at the end and returned.
The foresters appeared to have enjoyed the event.
Each team received a "case of bubblies," presumably ginger
ale.
In the final of the log-birling contest, forestry contestant
Gary Rosval defeated Ray Verbrugge, eng. 2.
Forestry undergraduate society president Frank Gregory
claimed he couldn't compete because of an injury sustained in
Wednesday's forestry contests.
Other technical faculties, arts, aggies, and science also fielded contestants.
|*r
Forestry week continues today with a boat race at noon and
Undercut sleep-in tonight in SUB.
We get
a reprieve
Yes Virginia, Monday
is a holiday.
And that means no
classes. And that means
we can all spend Monday
recovering from the weekend.
And that means no paper
on Tuesday. See you Thursday (snicker).
AH staff, future, present
and past are cordially invited to a work-in Wednesday. Come to the northeast corner of SUB and
find out what you can do
to help.
Besides, being Canada's
best journalists, we're also
good, and patient, teachers.
Quebec grads
declare War
MONTREAL (CUP) — Quebec post-secondary students are
declaring war against the provincial government.
By Thursday night they held four junior colleges, were
moving in on another five and threatening a province-wide student strike for Tuesday, Oct. 15.
More than 1,100 students at Lionel Groulx College in Ste.
Therese, 15 miles north of Montreal, occupied their school Tuesday in what proved to be only an opening salvo in a rapidly
escalating battle. The entire CEGEP (Colleges d'Enseignement
General et Professional) system now appears to be in desperate
trouble.
CEGEP's in St. Foy, Chicoutimi, and St. Jerome fell to students Wednesday evening as occupation at Lionel Groulx ended
its second day.
Five others, St. Laurent, Ahuntsic, Maisonneuve, Vieux
Montreal and Edouard Montpetit, all in Montreal, have been
threatened with occupation by the weekend.
The Lionel Groulx student grievances are fairly specific but
the pressing issue throughout the province is the need for a
second French-language university in Montreal. Students say
lack of space will prevent over sixty per cent of CEGEP graduates from attending university this fall.
TWO-MONTH STAY
At Lionel Groulx, shifts of 250 maintain control over the
school and leaders say they are prepared for a two-month stay.
The protest is quiet and orderly — students patrol the entrances,
handing out admission passes to special visitors and the press,
and co-ordinate activities by walkie-talkie.
Union General des Etudiants de Quebec (UGEQ) and the
leaders of all 25 provincial CEGEP's will meet at l'Universite
de Montreal to discuss further action. UGEQ, the province-wide
association of post-secondary students, is fully supporting the
strike.
Gilles Duceppe, a UGEQ vice-president, announced Wednesday night that UGEQ will recommend a day of study sessions
through the province Friday and occupation of the remaining
CEGEP's next Tuesday.
Indications are that UGEQ will also call a province-wide
one-day student strike as well on Tuesday.
They complain as well of the inadequacy of CEGEP education in training students for employment and a lack of government planning in opening up employment for the growing number of graduates of the CEGEP system.
GOVERNMENT CUTBACK
A government cutback on bursary funds (from a proposed
$60 million to $44 million) and a two per cent increase in the
student loan interest rate are further items in student grievances.
Students all over the province have been growing more
militant as organizational difficulties at CEGEP's and government inattention to student demands pile up.
CEGEP and UGEQ leaders say the whole CEGEP system
will be shut down indefinitely unless the government takes
drastic action to alleviate student problems.
Individual student unions around the province have endorsed the strikes, notably McGill University and l'Universite
de Montreal.
Lionel Groulx protestors have also demanded reorganization
of courses and lecture timetable, easier access to laboratories
and a complete change of the school administration.
Student leaders say the disorganization at CEGEP's has
become intolerable and schools all over the province are in
similar chaotic states.
Cool-Aid drives,
dances for dollars
Cool-aid needs a little help.
The society, which was well supported by student council,
is now asking for aid from the student body.
To celebrate the occasion of their first birthday, Cool-aid
is spending a week at UBC starting Tuesday, Oct. 15.
They will be occupying a booth in SUB to give information
and accept donations of all sorts (old clothes, money, etc.).
The founders of the society, Ray Chouinard, Elmore Smalley,
and Gordon Mullin, will come during the week to talk about what
they are doing.
They will be speaking at noon in the ballroom in SUB on
Tuesday, and in Hebb theatre Thursday.
Cool-aid is also sponsoring a dance to be held Saturday,
Oct. 19. Page 2
THE     UBYSSEY
Friday, October 11, 1968
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Mao's thoughts
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AUCKLAND, N.Z. (CUP-
Special) — Copies of Mao Tse-
Tung's thoughts bought in New
Zealand have been found to
have pieces of bible covers as
stiffeners in their covers, says
the inter-denominational Christian weekly, Challenge. It said
this could be termed the ultimate in blasphemy
Mao, on discovering the
Christian backing said: "tin
lah (good Christ).
CBC gives
students
free message
Once again GBC International Service is providing
overseas students with the opportunity of sending broadcast
Christmas messagies to their
homeland.
This year, messages will be
sent to Hong Kong, Formosa,
Malaysia, Indonesia, and the
West Indies. The messages
will be sent in the native
tongue of the sender.
Interested students may
contact Mrs. Penny Essex at
684-0246 for an appointment.
The deadline is Oct. 31.
Grape group
plans picket
Supporters of the California
grape boycott will begin picketing large food stores this
weekend, says UBC committee head Larry Licht.
There is a meeting at 4 p.m.
this afternoon to organize
picketing.
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THE     UBYSSEY
Page 3
— fohn frizeU photo
TERRIBLE TURNOUT to hear tenant union organizer Bruce Yorke indicate affluent students have
no problem meeting increasing rent hikes.
Rules needed to protect
rights of tenant dwellers'
By MURIEL MOSCOVICH
A   small   group   in   Hebb
theatre   Thursday   heard  revolutionary new ideas  on how
tenant   dwellers   can   protect
their rights.
Economist Bruce Yorke of
Vancouver Tenants Organization spoke to students of a
spreading movement in the
city.
*.   "The  movement's   object  is
Attendance
reflects
to organize, on a block basis,
associations of tenants that
will be able to sit down and
negotiate conditions with
apartment owners," said Yorke.
He added there should be
rules   to  protect   what   is   the
majority of the population in
Vancouver from situations
such as "unjustifiable" rent
increases and discrimination
toy owners.
"As future tenants, students
will soon be facing this situation," he said.
apathy
Student apathy has struck
again.
The group discussions on
university reform sponsored by
the Student Christian Movement have been poorly attended.
Five discussion groups, led
by five prominent campus professors were scheduled to meet
meet during four noon hours
throughout the week.
A SCM spokesman said they
had hoped for a combined attendance of approximately 100
-but only about 15 students
showed up.
They will try again when the
groups will be combined into
one.
The meeting will be held at
noon in room B of SUB, in the
-south-east corner of the main
floor.
Blow your mind in SUB
with a lighted cigarette
SUB will be closed after the Undercut dance Saturday
morning.
SUB will not be accessible to students until 7:30 a.m. Tues
day.
The building will be closed so the lacquer finishing operations on the bowling alleys can be carried out. The work was
originally scheduled for Sept. 21 and 22 but was subsequently
cancelled because of water damage to the lanes.
Nobody except the contractor's workmen will be permitted
to enter the building from 2 a.m. Saturday, Oct. 12 to midnight
Sunday.
The lacquering will generate large amounts of explosive
fumes, creating a serious fire hazard in the building.
"A single match will blow up the whole building," said
building manager Dave Cooper.
"The last time they had an accident in Saskatchewan and
it blew one whole side of the building down."
Patrols will be posted around the building for 48 hours.
Students are warned to stay on East Mall.
The bowling alleys should be ready in another week's time.
Games area supervisor Dermont Boyd is confident the alleys will
be used.
SUB has been opened for 15 days since Sept. 26.
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THE     UBYSSEY
Friday, October 11, 1968
*H '
TH( UBYSSEY
Election Reflections
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the university years
by the Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C. Editorial opinions aro
those of the editor and not of the AMS or the university. Member,
Canadian University Press. The Ubyssey subscribes to the press services
of Pacific Student Press, of which it is founding member, and Underground
Press Syndicate. Authorized second class mail by Post. Office Department,
Ottawa, and for payment of postage in cash. The Ubyssey publishes Page
Friday, a weekly commentary and review. City editor, 228-2305. Other
calls, 228-2301 editor; Page Friday 228-2309; sports 228-2308; advertising
228-3977. Telex 04-5843.
OCTOBER 11, 1968
»>wx>   -. >>'.     , " ",n ;,.,,:
Unionize!
In the past few years, the UBC student government
has expanded its realm of concern to include not only the
so-called "extra-curricular" activities b(ut also those
areas of the university relating more directly to formal
education.
When concerned wholely and solely with extracurricular activities the authorities of the AMS was, more
or less, final. Active student body support for their
policies was unnecessary; tacit acceptance, indifference
or grudging consent — in short, non-opposition — was
sufficient. This elitist approach, tolerable perhaps in
sandbox government, is totally inappropraite. Any pressure group must, if it is to be in any way effective, have
the active support of its membership. Elitism and mass
support are incompatible.
Despite the few structural changes which have taken
place over the past two years the relation of the student
to the university has not changed. The student still is,
to use Gerry Farber's term, a nigger. He is not part of
the university, rather, he is at the university. He has no
power in relation to the university. The fact of having
students on a few general advisory committees, the
senate, and now on a few departmental advisory committees does little or nothing to change the situation.
Students have no more than a voice, and that voice is
rather weak.
"Student participation", as presently conceived, (at
least by the AMS) cannot, in and of itself, be counted
upon to produce major advances in terms of real university reform.
If "student participation" has failed, direct student
council action has been almost equally unproductive.
Their approach to reform has followed a definite elitist
pattern. A brief is drawn up outlining a series of proposals, by an ad hoc committee of executive and council
members. The council ratifies the brief, the brief is presented to the appropriate administrative authorities,
meetings are arranged between the "authorities" and a
small group of councillors (usually members of the
executive) to discuss the brief.
This process was followed by council in preparing
that famous (or infamous) brief Fair weather or Foul.
In it they made certain stated deadlines. Those demands
were not met and the reaction of the student body was,
so what. Charges" of student apathy do not hold water.
Students were never involved in the decision-making
processes used to formulate the brief. In short it was and
is irrelevant to them.
It is becoming blatantly obvious to all that the AMS
is irrelevant to the students and to the reforms needed
to make the university a humanly useful place. They
cannot throw off their tradition of elitism and their sandbox politics approach to the university. Therefore the
students must look elsewhere for the organizations which
will provide the incentive for reform and restructuring.
One obvious place to look is to the departmental unions
presently being formed. These unions, if they do not
degenerate to the level of associations tea and crumpet
sessions meeting weekly to discuss seminar papers, can
be real vehicles for real reform. Departmental unions
have the potential power base needed to back up the
demands they make. They have the potential to be democratic, to involve all those students concerned in the
decision before those decisions are made in their name.
They have the potential to involve students because
they are concerned with the issues which affect those
students immediately. Departmental unions, by definition,
deal with curriculum, hiring and firing, standards for
faculty and students, allocation of material resources and
all other matters involved in the running of a department.
The potential for organizing is there. The need for
organizing is there. The only thing missing at present
are bodies. People make the demands, people form the
alternative structures. Don't wait for the AMS to make
the start. Organize yourself.
— Daphne Kelgard
By CAREY LINDE
Once again seventy-five per cent of the
student body boycotted the electoral process of
the AMS. This in itself isn't anything new.
What strikes me as intriquing is: how many
this time boycotted on purpose ? Obviously, we
will never know, and can only surmise. Clearly
the most important factor in the entire election
was the number of spoiled ballots. In the past
the usual number of spoiled ballots in each
election is about twenty, most of which are by
some accident.
In Wednesday's election, 524 students wilfully told ALL the candidates to go to hell!
If that great a number take the trouble to
actually obtain a ballot, get their card punched,
and then spoil it, it seems to me that a far
greater number, perhaps thousands, expressed
the same feeling but didn't have the energy to
go through the actual ballot spoiling routine.
The election of Stuart Rush was a mistake.
A great number of people who voted for him
just didn't know what he represented, or what_
he was proposing. He stood as a direct attack
on the Senate and students who wanted to run
for it. And yet a glance over the ballots showed
that masses of people voted for both Rush and
Ferguson. Two people couldn't be more distant^
in their political philosophies (if indeed each
has a philosophy.) To cast a vote for the status
quo AND Stuart Rush at the same time means
that   the   posters   influenced   more   than   the
words,   that  the  slick   paint and  nice  photo- "
graphs, the seeing of a name enough times,
made one vote without respect to policies.
So I don't see Stuart Rush's election as a
strong indication that students are ready for*
change, but rather, that while he did get a lot of
real support, he like all the other candidates
was screwed by the typical AMS type of
apathetic misinformed, low turn out election.
LETTERS  TO  THE   EDITOR
Letters to the editor must be
signed. We reserve the right to
edit letters for brevity and grammar.
Education
Editor. The Ubyssey. Sir:
The Political Education Committee of the External Affairs
Commission is deeply concerned with the problem of the
great increases in the student
population of UBC especially
when the facilities and finances of the university warrant only two thirds of the students are are presently here.
In this regard we would like
to draw the attention of your
readers to the story in last
Friday's Ubyssey in which Jack
Parnell, the registrar, stated
that in five years the student
population of this university
would be 34,000.
Obviously, UBC cannot function at proper academic standards, nor is there a proper
possibility for student participation in the functioning of
the university, if UBC would
grow to such an even greater
impersonal size. This is a problem that must be dealt with
immediately, for each year the
crisis worsens noticeably. Thus
the committee passed in principle the fact that there must
be a ceiling on enrolment at
UBC.
Premier Bennett must create
other post-secondary educational institutions, for UBC
can no longer carry the load
created by the errors and
shortcoming in the provincial
government's education policy,
if it is to continue to serve its
purpose. We believe that there
must be a rapid development
of the regional college program, which Bennett has succeeded in sweeping under the
rug.
Further more the committee
will demand a statement of the
views, and ultimately the poli-
EDITOR: Al Birnie
City  Paul Knox
News   John Twigg
Photo   Powell Hargrave
Wire   Peter Ladner
Page Friday   Andrew Horvat
Sports   Jim Maddin
It was a backword day all 'round.
Around a dozen of the faithful came
back to write words, others just wandered awron, like Dixon. Cawsey, who
fred yesterday^ returned and blew
minds. "Erlka, you've got it," said Bryn-
jolfsson. Lau allowed that indeed he
was  quite  hanson.   "Smart  alex,"  mut-
cies, of the administration on
the enrolment problem, and
we are considering appealing
for the students to support a
freeze on enrolment at this
university, until such time as
the facilities and finances allow the university to grow
further to the ceiling we envisage of 25,000 students.
Students are urged to express their opinions on this
crucial question with the undersigned or any member of
the committee. We are in room
232 in SUB. We hope to speak
to as many students as possible
so that in the next few weeks
a formal policy may be formed that will encompass all student opinion and have the unanimous support of the student
body.
LES HORSWILL
GEORGE SHINDLER
political education committee
Intent
Editor, The Ubyssey. Sir:
Re the content and intent of
my amendment to Shaun Sullivan's motion at the special
general meeting  Tuesday.
The way my amendment
was reported it seems as
though I was against the use
of liquor on campus. The thing
that I am against is the complete hypocrisy of Sullivan's
motion, denouncing the pub-
ins yet completely ignoring
the flagrant abuse of alcohol
in all the fraternities, at several well-known general meetings, and the Teacup game.
The hypocrisy of the meeting
defeating my amendment and
yet passing the main motion.
The hyocrisy in this instance
is quite trivial, but perhaps indicative of the unthinking attitude taken by a large part of
this campus on issues of considerable import.
STEPHEN  GARROD
acting president ArlsUS
tered missing Volkoff and Flynn, frankly. Moscovitch painted verbal murlels,
and Knox, as usual, was appauling. "Al
is lost," beamed Birnie brightly. "Nobody's karen about us," lamented Loder.
Mirhady split with his lady. "1 don't
nader, alligator," quoth he. Tarzwell
stepped out elaine, and was told to
shape up.
In the converted John, Frizell fotod
ian company with Lindsay. Maddins
***r**e tne jim scene with the basket-
bailers. He claims to be OH mythical,
rejected  by  the  blood  drive.
Staff meeting today at noon. Guest
speaker Rev. Ralph God will deliver a
sermon, "Whither The Ubyssey". Everybody come!
Cameron
Editor, The Ubyssey. Sir:
I was certainly sorry to hear
that Miss censured Cameron
considers her job to have been
usurped by the vile efficiency-
minded persons of Brock-cum-^
SUB.
This is indeed an unforunate
predicament for such an ideal,
efficient co-ordinator as Jill. I
fail to see how someone who
has been doing a good job
could manage to lose all these
duties. Perhaps she has not
been doing such a good job
after  all.
One of the major tasks of
the coordinator is to ensure
that she is the only person
making bookings for each
building on campus. Even at
the end of last year Miss Cameron did not seem to realize1
that this was part of her job. „
Over the summer she was supposed to revise booking procedures to increase efficiency.
This she did not do.
It is the coordinator's duty
to aid student organizations to
obtain bookings for campus,
rooms. When SUB was not to-
open for registration week,
Miss Cameron merely sent
cancellation notices to all organizations that had booked
SUB. In her official capacity
she should have tried to obtain
the use of alternative buildings for the functions.
Frosh Orientation (although
seriously hampered by a chairwoman who was out-to-lunch)
was seriously hurt by Miss
Cameron's lack of help in obtaining facilities. The individual students had to persuade
the administration that they
were responsible enough to
take care of the buildings — a
hard job when the elected coordinator is not responsible
enough to help. The engineers'
were able to obtain the gym,
so was VOC. Since Miss Cameron was not on top of her job,
Commerce was unable to hold
their dance.
D. F. SHERATON
engineering 4
Ed. note — This is the last
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V   n/>rr   rntniu    i-m r ■-    *ri->Tr>»«« By IAN D. SLATER
On June 2, 1966, university students occupied
a rich iron mine in the Mexican state of Durango.
They did not leave until early August when the
governor Enrique Dupre Ceniceros was dismissed
from office, following charges of "a lack of interest, irresponsibility, and ineptitude". The students were also promised that a smelter would be
built near the iron ore* mines so that the state,
one of the poorest, would receive the benefit of
its own mineral wealth.
Now in 1968 the hierarchy of church and state
in Mexico are once again sadly grieved and angered by the recent bloody outbursts of student
revolt. At a time when the eyes of the world's
news media are focussing on Mexico City for the
Olympics, the streets have been patrolled by
armoured cars.
This does not enhance the drive for increased
tourism and besides, who wants to talk politics
at the start of the 100 meters ? Of course the other
unmentionable in the company of guests is "religion". If you are involved in the games — the
Olympic ones — then the riots must indeed be
disheartening, for reasons both of church and
state. The disappointment of administrators is compounded by the expenditure of millions of dollars
outlaid to make the '68 Games the best ever.
It seemed, for a while at least, that student
dissent would not interfere with the administration of the other game, that of maintaining the
peasant in his place, that is, at the "bottom".
While tactically speaking it may have been
good strategy for the students' rebellion to coincide with maximum news coverage, in another
sense the timing was miscalculated to gain world
sympathy.
People are a little frightened and fed up with
student revolt. After tbe examples of the Sorbonne, U.C.L.A., Berlin, and other hotbeds of
student dissent in affluent western countries,
people are too tired to discern differing objectives.
To most people student revolt by now merely
signifies revolt against university administration,
with all its inherent bureaucratic bogs and" production line education. It also seems to be a
reasonable assumption that many students, particularly the younger ones, are radical simply because it's "in" to "sit in", and, if the police move
in, to fight.
"What are you revolting for, man ?"
"Hell, I don't know — just do your thing.
Revolt!"
Student revolt in America, at its best, is the
unification  of individual  aspirations  and values
against an overwhelmingly complex and therefore often frightening system. It is, in short, a
rude face against the established order.
The Mexican student revolt is something else.
If you have been through Mexico then you do
not need to ask, "Why riot ? Why dissent ?" You
know why —- if you have eyes in your head.
The reason is very simple. The "rich" and the
"church", encased in a reciprocal alliance, are on
top and intend staying there. The poor, that is, the
remainder, are on the bottom and cannot do much
about it.
It is not courage that the "popular" or common
class (comprising over half of the 47.5 million
population) lacks, as previous defiance shows, but
a powerful vanguard. The students have risen to
provide the intellectual leadership but this by
itself is insufficient.
Despite the boasts of a six per cent rise in the
G.N.P. and an accompanying industrial expansion
under President Diaz Ordaz, Mexico is still devoid of a large and powerful middle class. There
is a middle class in between the rich and poor but
it is akin to the petty bourgeois of Spain, where
government favour is the special endowment paid
to selected citizenry for their silence. This condition for security is of couse not unique to Mexico,
but the degree of good behaviour by public servants and the like is governed by the country's
poverty and in Mexico that is considerable.
It is true that the Mexican student revolt involves grievances against bureaucratic administration, but it is possessed by a much more deeply
rooted anger.  It is not a more complex  dissent
written "understanding" with the government
keeps the peasant a victim of economic exploitation.
Furthermore, to a priest without benefit of
higher education, an educated parish is not a
desirable flock. Education has a habit of reducing
awe for hitherto "unquestionable precepts". It is
against the forces of church and state (which are
often unaware of their collective alliance) that
the students have pitted themselves.
The revolt is largely motivated by a desire to
demonstrate to the "popular" mass the weakness
of their government under attack. One student
leader defined the revolt by saying, "We are testing the structure of the country. We want the people to-see what happens when the government is
criticized. We want to awaken the need for
change."
If Mexico could industrialize more heavily, as
northern Italy has done, then a more affluent and
union powered middle class would make the
change. However without such a class the only
vanguard are students who grossly overextend
themselves with armed violence.
Whenever you discuss the gap between rich
and poor together with the multi-social connotations that stem from it there are always "good"
reasons for the gap. Economists will launch into
their post Keynesian tirade with liberal usage
of economic jargon explaining how it's all very
well to look at things simply in terms of rich and
poor, but in such a complex society you just cannot, at this stage, cut the cake more evenly without
dire results to the world's economy. Furthermore
Mexican marathon
because of its apparent obscurity, but the depth
of that obscurity is a measure of its age. The dissent is old; it is the gap between rich and poor, and
it is a gap — not a marsh.
There is no gradual curve to represent the
distribution of wealth in Mexico. The curve is
composed of a plain, then a cliff. The very slight
curve where the ascension begins represents the
ineffectual middle class. At the top is a large cross
which you adorn with pesos as insurance against
falling. On the bottom is the plain with its cross. It
is supposedly the same cross but of much poorer
parentage. They still practise flagellation on the
plain. It is easier than acquiring pesos for penance.
Officially the church was silenced and denied
political influence by the "Lerdo Law" of 1856;
however it still exerts a potent power over the
poorer classes — a power born of an environment
where the only knowledge was that dispensed by,
and for, the church. Paradoxically this religion
(96 per cent are Roman Catholic) which keeps
them down by means of its unspoken alliance with
the rich, is the same creed which abrogates the
poverty of the "popular" people and negates any
call to revolt with its doctrine of passivity and
obedience to established authority. The holy Mass
offers the peasant consolation and even hope. His
contentment is a sunburnt acceptance of forces
seemingly beyond his control; and one of these
forces is the church, which by means of its un-
there are graphs and statistics to support them,
despite the fact that eminent economists still often
disagree on the most basic interpretations of
economic forces. This economic repartee is all
very high level stuff delivered with the same arrogance of befuddled cabinet ministers who attempt
to justify the dumping of grain into the sea. Thus,
armed with voluminous texts, the gap between
rich and poor is easily explained away.
There are no statistics available on the number
of hungry or poorly fed Mexicans who attend Mass
on Sundays, but there are statistics on the Vatican's stock market holdings. Perhaps the church
owns Acapulco ? — after all it does own Yankee
Stadium.
Though camouflaged and at times ignited by.
other issues, the thing under attack in Mexico is
the alliance of church and state, not visible as
such but made manifest by the haunting spectre
of poverty surrounding the "popular" people.
The only real hope of the impoverished mass
is that the Vatican's most recent edict of Papal
servitude regarding birth control will swell that
mass to such numbers that it soon becomes a sea
that will at first separate, then encircle and finally
swamp the affluent islands.
The question, in Mexico as elsewhere, is not
the morality of affluence but rather the immorality of greed.
THE     UBYSSEY
Friday, October 11, 1968 p& Shree
WOYZECK
By ROY STARRS
How do you get a horse to urinate on
cue? How do you get a man to urinate at
all, under the nose of the censor? And
those scene changes — how can you manage them at the rate of twenty-nine per
hour? And then again, will the stage of the
Dorothy Somerset Studio accommodate an
army barracks, a tavern, a fair ground, a
village street, a pawn shop, several apartments, open fields, a woods, a pond and a
mob? These questions and others of like
profundity will be resolved next Wednesday by John Rapsey's production of Woyzeck, a play by Georg Buchner.
Woyzeck is a beautiful and a phenomenal play. Anyone who would understand
modern theatre should be on the most
intimate terms with it. To an astounding
degree, considering that it was written in
1837 by a man of twenty-three, it anticipates the central drifts of contemporary
theatre, both in theme and form. Within its
.brief hour, there are intimations not only
of naturalism and social realism, of Ibsen
and Brecht, but even of expressionism and
poetic tragedy, of Strindberg and Lorca.
Certainly, the mysterious happenings by
the pond suggest the Dream Play, and the
intense action of the murder scene, with
the moon presiding like a bloody knife, is
strongly reminiscent of Blood Wedding.
Regarded as a whole, Woyzeck's story
has the engaging simplicity of an old folk
song: a young soldier murders his mistress
for sleeping with the Drum Major of his
regiment. But the telling of the story is not
in the manner of the traditional romance,
sad but charming, evoking the sort of
vague nostalgia which is good for the
digestion. It is a story told with savage
veracity, as detailed in its social analysis
as an anatomy lesson. Eric Bentley has said
that Buchner is "the first dramatist of the
'little' man in his marvelous realistic tragedy Woyzeck". The young soldier, Woyzeck,
is not a romantic figure. He is indeed a
"little" man, an object in the hands of the
local bourgeoisie, the Captain's plaything,
the Doctor's guinea pig and the goad of the
Drum Major. It is even a possibility that
he is driven to murder entirely by the
machinations of the townspeople.
If bourgeois hypocrisy is Buchner's primary target, as Marxist interpretators are
likely to contend, there is nevertheless no
trace of the heavy-handed Marxist style
of sermonizing in the play. Buchner prefers to deliver his shafts with delicacy, in
small, pointed scenes, humorous or poignant, which usually involve some form of
ironic contrast. In the first scene, for instance, it becomes evident that the captain
considers himself to be a man of extreme
intelligence and sensitivity, whereas he
considers Woyzeck to be a rogue and an
idiot. In the ensuing dialogue, however, his
philosophic pronouncements appear false
and pretentious opposite Woyzeck's honest
and anxious questionings.
But Buchner is not exclusively a political
or a sociological playwright. In Woyzeck,
man's inhumanity to man does not always
take the form  of class warfare.  Buchner's
vision is universal, as are the conditions he
describes. In scene nine, the problem of one
man's abstraction from the suffering of another is as apparent in the interchange between the doctor and the captain as it is in
that between the captain and Woyzeck. The
captain's terror of apoplexy is, in a way, as
pathetic as Woyzeck's terror of the infidelity
of his mistress. There is an ironic tension
established here which is reminiscent of that
in Pirandello between the character and his
role, or between the character who suffers
and the chorus which is "objective".
If we regard the play as a musical score
— and certainly the balance and intricacy
of its structure invite this analogy — we
may observe that there are three leitmotivs,
each of which corresponds to a progressive
stage of awareness. The first of these to be
sounded is the one already mentioned, the
theme of social injustice or, more generally,
the bestiality of man. This, of course, accounts for the extraordinary realism of the
play. But the greatest and most brutal works
of realism invariably are founded on the
ruins of an erstwhile passionate idealism.
It is precisely because of this that the nineteenth century was the golden age of such
works, because it was also the golden age of
idealism. One thinks immediately of Dos-
toevsky, a scurrilous realist and a genius of
a Christian. (We realize now, of course, that
realism is only one form of reality.)
Sure enough, we can feel behind Woyzeck
a tremendous force of disillusion, a disillusion of tragic proportions. For Buchner, it is
clear, is a disillusioned Christian. In order
to accept the importance of this fact, we
must remember that in Buchner's age religion was a more popular obsession. Consequently, the spectacle of Maria's ironic
mea culpa or of the mock-sermon of the apprentice: "Let us piss on the cross", would
be more jolting to an audience of that day.
Buchner's religious cynicism would not be
received with any nonchalance.
The final motif, which brings the others
to a climax, is a profound sense of fear and
ambiguity. From the beginning, the play has
been permeated by a fear of death. It finds
expression again and again in Woyzeck,
Maria and the captain. But now, after the
terrifying events of the play, it is a larger
fear which is felt, a fear of life itself, of the
madness and strangeness of the world. The
doctor, perhaps, is the one character who is
impervious to this fear, who has duped himself into believing that the world is explicable. One is reminded of some lines from
Shakespeare:
"They say miracles are past; and we have
our philosophical persons, to mak6 modern
and familiar, things supernatural and causeless. Hence it is that we make trifles of
terrors, ensconcing ourselves £ito seeming
knowledge, when we should submit ourselves unto unknown fear."
It is very much on this note that Woyzeck
draws to a close. Woyzeck himself is overwhelmed with moral and philosophic perplexity. When he thinks of Maria, he is at
a loss to explain how one who appears so
innocent could be so capable of sin. "People,"
he says, "are like cliffs; Vou look down them,
you feel giddy." And in this condition of
moral vertigo he perfo*|ms the murder. Deprived of all faith, he is as directionless as a
character out of CamusiThis is not a melodrama. He does not slay Maria with any
sense of moral indignation or self-righteousness. He commits murder with as much uncertainty and "indifference" as Meursault,
who shot the Arab because "the sun was in
his eyes". In a similar sense, Woyzeck knifes
Maria because of "the voices in his ears".
Because Buchner never quite completed
his play Woyzeck (he died .at twenty-three),
and because of the order of some scenes is
uncertain, the success of any production depends largely on the imaginative resources
of the director. But anyone who saw the delightful Gallimaufry production of Comings
and Goings this summer, which was directed
by John Rapsey, will be looking forward
with great optimism to his Woyzeck, which
runs October 16th to the 19th, 8:30 p.m., at
the Dorothy Somerset Studio Theatre (behind Freddy Wood).
A PREVIEW
Friday, October 11,1968
Mother
Tuckers
Yellow
Duck
Sot., Oct. 12 *— Wc
ir Memorial Gym
9 - 1       Maids 75c
Makers $1.00
Underground   Films
TONIGHT   -  SUN.  -   8 & 10 p.m.
9 Films by Stan Brakhage
East-West by Alan Clark
(Stroboscopic Interpretation  of Butterfield)
575  Beatty
Intermedia
<
*,
A Selection of
Quality and Distinction
Importers from Spain, Germany,
France and  Italy
frWDpBXUL ShlDSL SioML
979 Granville
Phone 683-2819
GEORG BUCHNER'S
WOYZECK
(M.A. Thesis Production)
October 16-19 - 8:30 p.m.
DOROTHY SOMERSET STUDIO
Phone 228-2678 tor Reservations
DUTHIE
BOOKS
is back on  Robson Street
At 919 ROBSON - 684-4496
OUR   U.B.C.
4560 W.  10th  Ave
and
BRANCH
.   -   224-7012
670 Seymour St.
- 685-3627
DUTHIE
BOOKS
BUY YOUR TICKETS early
1968
HOICK DICE
with 2 Big Bands
SOUL UNLIMITED with  CARL GRAVES
ERIC SANDQUIST'S BIG BAND
Dance:
Saturday, Oct. 26, 1968
SUB Cafeteria — $4 per couple
Ticket Sales Begin
Tuesday, Oct. 15, 1968
AMS Ticket Office
THE     UBYSSEY pf 4our
Well trained Czechs
By PHIL SURGUY
Closely Watched Trains, an excellent and very funny film
from Czechoslovakia, opened at the Varsity last night. It tells
the ageless story of a young man's initiation into the adult worlds
of sex and life-and-death politics. It is set in the last days of the
German occupation.
Milos is the young man, an apprentice railway dispatcher,
whose world is a tiny station and the people who work or pass
through there. Among them are his girlfriend, Masa, a young
conductress; the stationmaster and his assistant, a cynical rake
named Lubicka; a female telegrapher; and a German official who
drops by now and then to tell them that the strategic withdrawals
from Normandy and Russia are carefully prepared traps for the
enemies of the Reich. The war and occupation are seemingly of
only secondary importance to Milos and his friends.
Milos main concern is to get laid, and the pain caused by
what he thinks will be his perpetual virginity is made even
keener by Lubicka's outspoken assumption that he is already
sleeping with Masa. "I know Masa's a nice girl, but how is she in
bed ?" But nervousness and uncertainty prevent him from making
love to Masa, though she is more than willing — almost formidably so, given a boy as shy as Milos is. And added to his pain and
confusion is the utter bafflement with which he regards the older,
experienced men who know what it is all about and casually
accept the pleasures that Milos feels will always be denied him.
In one poignant scene he stares at a carload of nurses but is too
The big picture
shy to approach them. He leaves, but then stops to watch a squad
of soldiers who make it with the nurses after doing no more than
walking across the tracks and going into the railway car.
The film is the first feature directed by Jiri Menzel. He has
done everything well. His camera perfectly sets the dominant
tone of understatement; no movement is wasted and the characters have a solid base upon which they can and do attain a delightful reality that quickly overrides the basic knowledge that
we are watching a lot of images being reflected off a screen.
Menzel chose each actor with unusual care and all give better
than average performances. Of particular note is the actor who
plays Lubicka and who, in appearance, resembles John Lennon.
In one of his several fine scenes, he frolics with the telegrapher,
and part of their play involves the wonderfully lubricious use
of official railway stamps. The scene should become as famous
as the eating scene in Tom Jones. Yet in spite of the excellence
of the ancillary characters, it remains Milos' film. He does become
the man he desires to be. But to tell exactly how he does so, and
to reveal his involvement in the underground, would detract from
the discovery of these things in the film itself. See it. Closely
Watched Trains is the best film shown in Vancouver since the
start of the school year.
•        •        •
Finally: Jack Palance as Fidel and Omar Sharif as Che in the
Warner Bros.-Seven Arts production Che. W-7 have already started beating the drums and have circulated a picture of the beard
that Omar is growing for the role. Doris Day is considering the
part as Mrs. Batista.
POST
GRADUATE
STUDIES
The little picture
By STEPHEN SCOBIE
Movies come and movies go, but The Graduate abideth for ever.
Syd Freedman, manager of the Studio theatre, at which The Graduate is
now entering its thirty-first week, told me, "If it continues as at present, it could
last until Christmas."
In the thirty weeks it has played the Studio so far, it has taken in something like $270,000—more than the Studio would normally expect to gather in
a complete year. (These figures do not take into account the total of twenty-one
weeks The Graduate also played at Park Royal and Richmond.)
Freedman said that the greatest number of attendances he personally
knew of was a man and his wife who had seen it eight times. This, however,
comes nowhere near the Studio's record of the little old lady who saw every
single matinee performance of Gigi throughout its sixteen-week run.
The overall picture in America shows that, while still on its first run, in
a limited number of theatres, The Graduate has already taken in a total of
$80 million.
This places it, already, third in the all-time box-office record list. Only
Gone With The Wind and The Sound of Mucous are ahead of it, and producer
Joe E. Levine is confident that they will eventually be overtaken, leaving The
Graduate as the most successful film in motion picture history.
Gulp.
The obvious question is, Why? The Graduate is certainly an attractive
movie: it has nice music, pretty photography, showy direction, and it is undeniably
funny (though no funnier than a fair proportion of other films.) The only
explanation seems to be that people are, incredibly, taking seriously its vague,
confused, inane pretensions to say something "significant" about the generation
gap, the decay of American middle-class society, the betrayed idealism of youth,
and all that garbage.
(Surely the very popularity of the film should be a warning to its idolators
that something is wrong here. No film that really and truly exposed the truth
about society, youth, sex and so on could end up grossing $80 million. Either
The Graduate's satiric teeth aren't quite as sharp as has been supposed, or else
the cause of American Masochism has taken a great leap forward.)
In fact, as soon as you begin to examine The Graduate seriously, it falls
apart at every available seam.
Let me just take a few random swipes:—
The mass youth following of the movie (Freedman reports that the
foundation of his audience is the high school/university student crowd) presumably derives from an identification with the hero, Ben. This is easy to understand,
since Ben isn't really a character at all, in any cohesive dramatic sense, but
rather an anthology of adolescent wish-fulfilment fantasies.
Ben as he is described in the opening of the film bears no relation at
all to Ben as Dustin Hoffman plays him. Take just one minor, but indicative
point: Ben is supposed to have been editor of the college newspaper. I think
of Ubyssey editors I have known; I try to imagine Danny Stoffman or John
Kelsey as inarticulate idiots mumbling through a seduction; my mind boggles.
Ben is supposed to be the most "aware" of the characters. (I mean, man,
like, you know, he sees, get it, he sees right through them straights, I mean, he's
on the ball, like, everyone else isn't where it's at, man, it's a real bad scene, but
Ben digs it all, that's his bag, that's his thing, you see, he sees.) In fact, it is
impossible for Ben to be self-aware, for the simple reason that he has no self
to be aware of.
The only vaguely human character in this mish-mash, and the only one
with any clear view of her self, is Mrs. Robinson. The classic bedroom scene
in which Ben demands to talk to her is presumably intended to show how great
Ben is and how shallow Mrs. Robinson is. In fact, it shows the opposite. It
shows Ben as an utterly insensitive boor without an iota of understanding about
himself or anybody else; and it shows Mrs. Robinson as a mature, fully-rounded
character, who views life with a bitterly clear eye which leaves no room for
the kind of self-deception Ben is so good at.
Given this conception of Mrs. Robinson, the film's greatest aesthetic sin
is its cynical betrayal of her character at the half-way mark, where she is
suddenly transformed into a one-dimensionally jealous mom. The character is
ditched without compunction, and The Graduate's sole claim to artistic integrity
collapses. (It is worth comparing the film's treatment of Mrs. Robinson with that
of Simon and Garfunkel, in the song, which, significantly, never appears in
full within the film. "Mrs. Robinson", and indeed the whole Bookends LP,
proves decisively that Paul Simon is a greater artist than Mike Nichols can ever
hope to be.)
One last point. For a film which supposedly advances the younger
generation's enlightened view of the world and personal relations, The Graduate
has a remarkably Puritan attitude to sex. Sex, for this film, is essentially dirty.
It belongs to the wicked Mrs. Robinsons of this world. It belongs to the men's
shower rooms, the back seats of cars. It is a nasty horrible weapon which Ben
can use against Elaine by demeaning her in a strip club.
Ben and Elaine themselves pursue an entirely sexless relationship. They
scarcely ever kiss, even when she (shocking!) visits his room at night. The whole
relationship is summed up in the scene in which they retire behind the rolled-up
windows of the car to carry on their clinically pure conversations. (In fact,
Nichols uses this device to avoid—not solve,—the problem of what on earth these
two utterly insipid drips could conceivably think of to say to each other.)
And so on. Probe at any point, and you'll find a soft spot. The movie
looks like a series of Mike Nichols/Elaine May review sketches hastily strung
on end in the vague hope of finding some connections. But in the midst of this
morass of non-characters, pretentious symbolism, facile satire, and irrelevant
camera trickery, there are no connections.
The Graduate is a perfect illustration of Peter de Vries' immortal dictum:
"It's only profound on the surface; deep down, it's shallow."
Ragas and
THE     UBYSSEY
Friday, October 11, 1968 pS 5ive
Bistro
Rock, folk, and blues,
poetry reading, classical
guitar and Kelly James.
That (in 25 words or less)
is what's happening at the
Village Bistro, one of the
few night spots in town that
caters to the entertainment
needs and wishes of young
people.
It is a place where you
can unwind without being
accosted by greasers or
alienated by alcoholic middle-aged lechers out with the
office harlot.
You can meet friends
there or you can just sit
and take in the action on
stage.
It's up to you, and that's
the nicest thing about it.
Many illustrious (and not
so illustrious) musicians have
played at the Bistro since
it first opened.
The Tom Northcott Trio,
Mother Tucker's Yellow
Duck, Papa. Bear's Medicine
Show, and the Cleanliness
and Godliness Skiffle Group
from Berkley are some of
the rock groups who've performed at the Bistro.
More recently, Tomorrow's
Eyes, a group of three fantastically competent musicians, has arrived on the
scene.
Not only do they play
hell out of their instruments.
They play them well.
The Poppy Family, whose
single Beyond the Clouds
has zoomed up the charts
since its release three weeks
ago, played the Bistro last
week.
Led by beautiful blonde
singer Susan Jacks, they
provide a soft yet swinging sound that is justly
popular.
This week it is My Indole Ring who belt out some
pretty rank rock.
Their stuff boasts a solid
beat and an intensity' that
their audiences groove on.
Folksingers Casey Anderson, Eric Travers and Bruce
Rathie have also done their
thing (right there on the
stage, Martha). And, oh
yeah,. . . Uh . .. Kelly something or other.
Tish-poet Greydon Moore
has waxed egregious on the
very stage, as has UBC
Creative Writing student
Jeffrey Justin.
Rounding out the picture
is Bostonian John Jervis,
who plays classical guitar,
and who blandly admits
that while he may not be
as articulate as Segovia he
is much faster.
Well Virgina, that mixed
bag of goodies happens to
be a major force in keeping the so-called pop entertainment revolution going
in Vancouver.
The Bistro is where it's
at for a lot of people in this
town.
Do yourself a favor and
dig it some time.
FREDERICK
T. R. CAWSEY
A big, burly, beautiful beast.
A guitar, a harmonica, a voice, and an
abundance of perception and skill for
parody, mime, impressions — anything —
you name it and "if you haven't tried it,
don't knock it".
He provides a great deal of the Bistro's
local colour, or off-colour maybe, depending where you're at. As one woman commented on a recent open-line radio show:
"He was really gross but boy, was he
funny."
Kelly draws his material from areas
which most people choose to ignore. He
recognizes no taboos — "everything in life
has its humorous side".
He was born in Glasgow, Scotland, and
in his 23 years he's "been on both sides of
the fence". He served in the Canadian
Army and was discharged for "selling rifles
in Algonquin Park".
He came to Vancouver to pick strawberries — "if you want to be a success as a
folk-singer you have to pick strawberries"
— and ended up teaching himself to play
guitar and sing.
On stage he's liable to do anything from
impersonations (the Queen: it gives me
great pleashaw to be here on this postage
stamp) to fingershadows — he does what
he feels and people respond.
"People identify with me," Kelly says.
"They laugh for and at themselves and each
other."
Does he consider himself outrageous?
"Sure, for this day and age, in a Bible belt."
Kelly on life: "I don't follow the East
Indian noise. Your mind is like a bucket of
shit — when the bubbles rise, it's done."
On revolution: "I dig student power.
Any kind of revolution's cool . . . it's good
for the country, like a laxative."
On pyjamas: "I don't wear 'em. I
like onions in my eggs."
On politics: "I respect authority, not
power. I hate laws, politics, and Tom Campbell. I'd like to see him make a decent
speech to support his campaign without
talking about hippies. It's all he's got to
go on. But I respect his trip . . . "
On popular groups: "The Beatles are
cool but they're spoiled by intelligence. Intelligence is not necessary for success —
look at Tiny Tim. He's too good for the
Madison Avenue Musical Racket."
On the future: "I'd like to have a lot of
kids — seven, it's my lucky number. Kids
are cool. I don't know about marriage.
Common law's a gas. Virgins are a gas.
Teeny-boppers are a gas because they're
versatile — fantasy-seekers, like me."
You may peruse him in the SUB auditorium on the 30th.
VALLEY
Kelly James says Mark
Derrick looks like a partially circumcized penis.
Derrick calls himself a
one-time miner, truck driver,
yacht skipper, seaman, fisherman, roofer, jackhammer
operator, and waiter.
He's the man who founded, owned and still manages
the Village Bistro at 2081
West Fourth.
"My main aim has always
been to provide good musical entertainment in a relaxing atmosphere," the
bearded and bald-headed
32-year-old Derrick says.
"Over the years the type
of good music has changed,
but the purpose of the whole
thing has remained the
same."
"I noticed that Vancouver
lacked the type of social
gathering place we have in
England — the pub and the
coffee house.
"So, after borrowing some
bread from a friend, I opened a small, folk song coffee
house at Hornby and Beach
and called it the Bistro."
That was in February of
1967. The Bistro "opened
with four record LP's for
music and a seating capacity of 25.
Three months later the
Bistro died.
"We had brought in amateur folk singers for entertainment," says Derrick.
"We started packing in 100
people at a time and finally
the fire chief came and told
me he wanted the same fire
exits in the Bistro that
they have in a beer parlor.
'^So, we moved up to
Fourth Avenue and carried
on."
Fourth Avenue accomodation for the Bistro was
formerly the home of the
Spanish Canadian Society
and now resembles a bright
orange, poster - plastered
cracker-box.
"For six months we continued with pure folk," says
entrepreneur Derrick. "That
is type of music I groove on.
"But by December, folk
had died. So, we moved
into rock because that's
where it was at."
The groups that play at
the Bistro take a percentage
of the take at the door,
standard door charge being
$1.50 a head for the 140
people who pack the club
most nights.
Rock is the thing at the
Bistro, but folk hasn't died.
Derrick pleases himself —
and his customers—by having local folk singers on
stage between rock group
sets and playing into the
wee hours.
Relaxation-selling is good
business these days. Derrick, having admitted making      considerable      cash
from his enterprise, has now
sold the Bistro to two young
European men, though he
will manage it till Christmas.
So how about the Bistro
crowd?
Derrick likes to say the
Bistro's reputation as a hippie hangout is exaggerated
and out of date. The long-
hairs are visiting musicians,
he says.
Lot of musicians in Kitsilano. Though many university and straight working
people like to visit the
place, the Bistro remains a
favorite haunt of many of
the Kits super-cool.
And Derrick's future?
"I would kind of like to
get out of the business for
a while. Maybe take a three
year business course at
SFU.
"But if given the chance,
I would really dig to open
a coffee house on the UBC
campus. That's one thing
that's really lacking out
there — somewhere for the
kids to get together and
relax.
And that's Mark Derrick,
a man who waffles between
encouraging Kelly James
and calling the narks on his
customers, sitting with the
flower children and packing
a .38 against motorcycle
gangs, advertising his abhorrence of dope pushers
and hiding his peddling customers in darkened corners.
But he remains a pioneer
in the Vancouver pop music
and entertainment bag, and
for that he deserves recognition.
MICHAEL   FINLAY
Friday, October 11, 1968
THE     UBYSSEY FILM SOCIETY PRESENTS
BLOW - UP
TODAY
in Old Auditorium
•
Showtimes: 12:30 - 3:30 - 6:00 - 8:30
Admission 50c
IN PERSON!
THE FABULOUS
GORDON  LIGHTFOOT
Queen Elizabeth Theatre
October 19 and 20 - 8:30 p.m.
Tickets: $3 - $4 - $5 - On Sale Now
Vancouver Ticket Centre - 683-3255
All Eatons stores and Townhouse Electronics, Kerrisdale
Jka/in. to Speak,
GERMAN, ENGLISH
SPANISH, FRENCH
The Easy Conversational Way
Matt Wall-tit
*  Active participation sessions with native instructors
*  Day or evening *  Private or small group
Special Rates to U.B.C. Students
•  PHONE 736-5481
WALLEN SCHOOL OF LANGUAGES
A102 - 1093 W. Broadway (at Spruce)
ON CAMPUS
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pfi 6ix
By PETER LINCOLN
Today's youth are seeking a new philosophy and I
hope within the confines of this short article to outline
just such a philosophy, capitalism.
Over the past several hundred years the socialist warmongering imperialists in their many idealogical disguises
(communism, fascism, conservatism, liberalism, Christianity) have propagandized so strongly against capitalism
.that now youth rant and rage against it and not the real
cause of misery in this world.
Capitalism is a complete and totalistic philosophy
much akin to the religious and philosophical beliefs of
the East e.g. Zen Buddhism, Hinduism, yoga, as well as
being steeped in the best of western traditions e.g. Darwinism, and the Phlogistan theory. It is the philosophy
of freedom. Man is freed from all his fetters in a capitalist
world. Race prejudice, nationalism, religious persecution,
colonialism and other Marxist-humanitarian values that
have brought so much grief to this world are non-existent.
There is one and only one motive — self-profit. Crass
materialism instead of the left-wing's reactionary dialectical materialism!
Men are born capitalists. Little babies grab for everything they see. They demand constant attention and service. Id satisfaction is the fore-runner of the profit motive and its various forms.
Capitalism has no bourgeois Leninist values. Capitalism is natural man, man with no inhibitions, no programmed restrictions in his mind. Capitalism is a belief
that rests upon a firm conviction that man has a soul and
that that soul is greedy and therefore beautiful.
This then is true capitalism. A mystical natural down
to earth ecstatic experience open to all who are open to
it. The narrow conception of economics must be changed,
if capitalism is to be understood. Economics is everything.
The principles of economics can be applied to love, war,
art, politics, death and anything else you can name. Capitalism is natural economics. The laws of supply and demand, marginal utility, diminishing returns etc. are the
principle of life. Capitalism is the only one that embraces
these non-moral non-Bolshevik truths in an uncompromising manner.
It is this concentration of power in a few people's
hands, monopoly, that is the key to the anti-capitalist
forces. Strong government, strong business, and strong
unions, are the antithesis of strong individuals and liberty. The synthesis of these two is mediocrity and
therefore Hegelian notions can not be applied here. The
individual must crush the organization or he will be
crushed. Capitalism must destroy monopoly and collectivism. De-centralization must be carried out to its natural
conclusion -— each individual a self-contained unit.
Each individual must control his own destiny and
accept responsibility for his shortcomings. Cripples
must accept responsibility for their disablement, illiterates
for their illiteracy. Why do you have to have medical
training to practise surgery? Why don't witchdoctors from
Haiiti have positions in our hospitals? Race prejudice?
Cultural snobbery? Professional jealousy? No such thing
in a capitalist society. Give the highways back to private
enterprise! Get the government out of our mailboxes!
Annihilate censorship! Give pornographic smut peddlers
a chance on the open market like any other capitalist
would get! Repeal the Food and Drug laws! Release the
inventors of thalidomide and pay them damages! Kick
down the doors! Bust the windows! Freedom! Profit the
only ideal, a completely open and competitive market!
Return politics to private enterprise! Contract out elections! Put wars up for bids! End subsidized marriage!
(Married men pay less taxes, are the first hired, the last
fired and the last to go to war.) Cut social security, portable pensions, insurance! Put a little danger back into
life! Karma capitalism!
Contradictions are the proof of great ideas! Paradox
capitalism! Theatre of the absurd capitalism! Hold the
dollar signs high! Disband the Securities Commissions!
Dismantle stock exchange laws! Down with Albert
Schweitzer! Jesus Christ! Mahatma Ghandi! Up with
Simon Legree! Henry Miller! Horatio Alger! Om! Capitalist aristocracy! Everybody's eligible! Step right up! No
equality, no fraternity and therefore naturally liberty!
(If you believe in fraternity or equality, marry someone who is in your opinion ugly and has a bad personality,
hundreds of hangups. Someone you hate. Danny the Red
and Shirley Temple.)
We are all beautiful! (But i more than anybody else.)
Workers of the world, disunite! You have nothing to lose
but their chains! Capitalism! Anarchy! Involution! It is
better to shiv than to receive! Government is terror and
coercion! Break the circle! End the game! Dangle fantastic
Jefferson!
SHflW l*****^? *^*""***t ****£■
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THE     UBYSSEY
Friday, October 11, 1968 Books
Poets emanate from
strange places. When Walter Bauer was born in Germany in 1904, into a working-class family of six, he
was a latecomer and there
was no room for him at the
family table. So he ate his
meals under the table—and
spent a good part of his
childhood observing the
world from there.
The result so far has been
some 8 volumes of poetry,
5 novels, 9 short stories and
novellas, 6 biographies,
countless     essays,     radio
By
ANDREAS P. SCHROEDER
The   Price   of   Morning  by
Walter   Bauer,   translated
by Henry Beissel
Pfrism   International   Press,
$4.95
plays, journals and children's books, 3 plays for
children, 4 stage plays—and
Walter Bauer, now 64, is
still writing steadily in Toronto.
He writes in German —
which may explain why he
isn't as well known in Canada as he might be—though
some of his work has been
translated. But The Price
of Morning is his first bilingual book of poetry.
This book is important in
more ways than one. The
poetry itself aside for a moment, The Price of Morning
represents a long overdue
addition to the North American publishing scene—the
regular printing of translated or bilingual texts.
Though Americans haven't
done too badly on that
score, let's face it, Canadians have been deplorable.
A book such as this now
pS 7even ""b^""^^^
fills the gaps left by publishers who prefer to
imagine that English
language literature is quite
sufficient and that the rest
of the world's literature can
happily be ignored.
But to the poetry. One of
the first characteristics that
strikes one is the quiet calm,
the brooding deliberation
which sets the atmosphere
for Bauer's book. There is
little flashiness, little noise.
There is control, the self-
assurance of a man who has
important things to say and
who knows it.
Through it comes the voice
of a man seasoned by war,
persecution, imprisonment
and censorship, writing in a
country which by and large
doesn't know about wars:
On this continent people
unfortunately
don't know the sound of
falling bombs;
I do.
You're dead before you die.
Bauer has little patience
with the contemporary fascination with absurdity and
the inability to communicate. Understanding is possible, he maintains in his
ruietly desperate way; only
listen, only forget for a moment the noise and materialistic hypnotism around
you.
The sum total of all wisdom:
Silence.
Nothing   but   silence.   The
end of time.
There is very little intel-
lectualism about Bauer,
nothing "literary". He is a
man writing for all men,
passing on the message of
friendship, the warning of
past mistakes and present
confusion, the admonition
of a necessary peace for
those who can or wish to
h***ar. He's a humanist all
the way.
NOTICE TO '69 GRADS
Your FREE Grad Photos
Now Being Taken
Mobile Studio Location
OCT. 7 to 22
Behind Brock (South)
Arts Students Anytime
Hours — 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Don't Delay — No Appointment Needed — No Cost
(This Service is  Covered by Your GRAD  FEE)
CAMPBELL STUDIO
10th & Burrard
736-0261
YOUR PRESCRIPTION . . .
. For Glasses
for that smart look in glasses ...
look fo
PlescliptioH Optical
Student Discount  Given
WE HAVE AN OFFICE NEAR YOU
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year. Maximum tensions! Almond's style is akin to the mood and insight of a
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TRIUMPHANT! STARTLING! EXQUISITE! This is
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Friday, October 11,1968
THE     UBYSSEY p£ Sight
d&   CoPt of tfiinqf:
Cs0jn»!& yp
Art
David Mayrs canvasses
are on display at the Douglas Art Gallery and this
latest exhibition seems to
exude more confidence
than his' others.
The attention of the
viewer is arrested by the
technique of zeroing in and
enlarging the most interpretive parts of his sub-
je c t. WASPish overtones
dominate as a very white
flesh is pitted against a
grey steel cold background.
In Penny Shine, in which
a huge black shoe is being
polished with an "In God
We Trust" penny brush,
the message comes through
loud and clear. Also Battle
Creek, with a 1984ish
background leaves one
cold and anxious. Another,
called Esoterica shows an
articulate woman with
two children detecting two
blemishes on her skin. The
character of the hand is
sufficient to construct the
image of the whole woman
and this, I feel, is David
Mayrs' strength.
You have until the 19th
to take in this latest exhibition.
BRUCE M. WATSON
Plug
If your life's run amuck
or you're running low on
luck or you're plumb tuckered out or you're stuck
for a chuckle, hustle to
the Gymnasium Saturday
night.
It's the Commerce Undergraduate Society dance
with Mother Tucker's Yellow Duck, a group of five
peace - loving missionaries
who are becoming increasingly well-known on the
Vancouver  scene.
Visually they are funky
hip musicians, lyrically
they are ambassadors of
social change.  To a Large
Pf
Found under wilting geranium petals, this message: A
Richly Negated Old Life
Died Sadly And Blew Away.
These worked, more or
less: Horvat, Andras; Scobie,
Stephen; Hilger, Kurt; and
Maureen the Mountain Girl.
On the cover, Gordon Fid-
ler at Bay.
Pfoto credits: pf 2, Chris
Blake; pf 3, Pat Yeomans;
pf 5, Fred Cawsey.
extent they perform original
material, like "I", released as
a record single not long ago.
Recently they played at the
Vancouver Art Gallery as part
of the regular lunch-with-
music series. They were well
received by an audience predominately older than they
are used to, and accordingly
put on an excellent concert.
See them in the Gym, 9-1,
Saturday.
VALLEY
Etcetera
Several grad students who
are frustrated with not teaching English  100 this year re
quire numerous dissatisfied
English 100 students for the
purpose of free, non-credit tutorials, rap sessions, etc. for
mutual inspiration.
Meetings    Tuesday    nights.
Everyone welcome. Phone
739-8432 for information.
The UBC Fine Arts Gallery
will be exhibiting the works
of local sculptors from October 15 to November 2. Iain
Baxter, Bodo Pfeifer, Michael
Morris, Takao Tanabe and
others will show their stuff
daily except for holidays Sundays, and Mondays, from 10:30
to 5:00 p.m.
A.H.
-M^   a r-y
didrvt
case,   y'oo    601    i°M here   12:   a
-ja
I*-
ftCAP'« 5'
S06
OBC
J_
-^ 1
■_c^esr
*•*•*«•■■■
fodJ   ,
r
So    cum   Jo^   so., -Tor      a
00>~ -Aa****.*- ^~    U S **A
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, October 11, 1968 Friday, October 11, 1968
THE     UBYSSEY
Page  13
OFFICIAL NOTICES
Alma  Mater Society
SUB Closed This Weekend
SUB will be closed Saturday, October 12th, Sunday,
October 13th and Monday, October 14th, 1968 for lacquering Bowling Alleys.
Student Assembly on University Reform
This Study Group has been organized to analyze and report on certain problematic areas in student-university relations. Through public discussion the Commission hopes to
promote greater student participation in and knowledgeable
comment on the politics of education.
The areas under most intensive study on which separate
reports will be written are:
1) academic curriculum;
2) student participation in governing bodies at the
university;
3) student and faculty attitudes (surveys);
4) financing of education (for the student and for
the university);
5) teaching, research and promotion;
6) student housing and university physical planning;
7) dropping-out.
Anyone interested contact:
Fred Grauer, Chairman, 266-2133
or AMS Office, 224-3242
Student Library Committee
Applications are now open for four positions on the
Library Committee. This committee is advisory to the
head of the service and may make suggestions or
recommendations concerning developments or changes
in the library which may affect students. Anyone interested please contact Jennifer Johnston, Acting Secretary,
AMS box 55.
SUB Management Committee
Applications are now being received for 5 positions on
the SUB Management Committee. Students interested
please apply to the Secretary of A.M.S. Room 248 SUB
in writing.
SAVE  50%
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keep abreast of the mining industry and what
it means to Canada. Read all the news of
all the mines — all the metals.
A special $5.00 per year subscription rate
(regular price $10.00 per year) is offered to
University students.
Take advantage of this special student offer.
Complete the coupon below and mail it today
or write for a specimen copy.
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Canada's National Mining Newspaper
77 RIVER STREET      —      TORONTO 2, ONTARIO
Please send me one year's subscription to The
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Faculty  Year of Graduation	
Revisions
pass, 91%
By FRANK FLYNN
The mathematics department
recommended Thursday that
the proposed new math curriculum be implemented next fall.
At a noon meeting of the
mathematics faculty, a resolution to recommend implementation of the new first year program for Sept. 1969 was passed
when 41 of the 45 faculty present voted for it.
A later resolution to recommend approval of the complete
new program received the same
support from the meeting.
The resolution to implement
the first year program came
from a meeting of the joint
student-faculty committee on
curriculum which had met
earlier in the day.
At the committee meeting
partial results from questionnaires distributed to mathematics students last week were
available.
Returns from 1245 of the
more than 5500 questionnaires
indicated that the students
were generally in favor of the
new program.
A spokesman for the committee said because proposed
curriculum changes for 1969
must be submitted by Oct. 15,
••*■. was necessary to act now
and thus the committee was not
able to wait for the complete
results of the questionnaire.
"The questionnaires already
evaluated represent a fair cross
section of the people taking
mathematics courses," he said.
"On the basis of these early
results the committee voted
unanimously to recommend to
the mathematics department it
approve the proposed first year
program and forward it to the
faculty of science curriculum
committee."
"Furthermore, as it is easier
to stop these sort of things than
to initiate them, we felt we
should get going now and we
can make changes later if they
appear necessary."
Replies to the questionnaire
indicated most students
approve of the greater flexibility of the new program.
Furthermore, students feel
one and two unit courses are
desirable if they can offer this
flexibility.
PANGO PANGO (UNS)—Editorial blorgs of the Busybody
student newspaper Thursday announced plans for a gigantic
blorg-in for all Busybody staff today noon in the Fort's northeast corner. All and sundry, including staff of three weeks ago,
are cordially invited. That means those budding journalists
who've finked out, come back, damnit.
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278-5171 Page  14
THE     UBYSSEY
Friday, October 11, 1968
Is the food   Claude's   kids   underfoot
that bad?
It has been proposed that
Fort Camp residents volunteer
to starve for a day.
They want to send the money
food services would have spent
on this food to starving Bia-
frans.
Information officer Jim Banham said he had heard no word
of the plan.
"There would be many difficulties," he said. The food
services would still have to
pay its employees on the starvation day, and the money
paid by students for meal
passes goes directly into university revenues where it is
used by the food services."
Banham said that in spite
of these difficulties, he was
sure the university would discuss the proposal if it were
put   forward  officially.
OVERSEAS
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TORONTO (CUP) — At a recent meeting at the university of
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before the meeting was called to order and refused to move when
asked.
They spent the meeting crouching quietly at administration
president Claude Bissell's feet. They later told reporters they
were illustrating the "real situation at the university — administrators on top and students on the bottom."
Slacks Narrowed
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Upper Tenth £a?be?
MEN'S HAIR STYLISTS
Appointments - 224-6622
4574 WEST 10th AVE.
>m-tm .•«■■ ^sgdW^*^""^^'^fBi"f^ytx
Wi   YOUNG ALUMNI CLUB
l-Aiiii!
Due to space limitations, please note the following
changes:
(1) Commencing October 11, the Young Alumni Club
will open at 4:00 p.m. and not 3:00 p.m. as in the
past.
(2) Sale of additional "on campus" memberships has
been temporarily suspended.
(3) Members may bring one guest. We have had to
establish a ceiling on the number of members in
the Club at a given time if space permits.
Village Motor co. ltd.
proudly present
the 1969 Renault
in their new showroom
with better
service & parts
facilities
Come in and
test drive
the new 1969
Renault, and win
a trip for two
to San Francisco,
California.
CPA&r
CANADIAN BUG/PIC AiRUNMB
Last year "ROAD TEST" chose the Renault 10
as number one import under $2,000
Each year Road Test Magazine rates imported cars in the $2,000 PRICE
RANGE. Eight of the top selling imports were compared this year. They
were judged in 5 categories: engineering, roadability. performance,
comfort and economy. When the points were added up, the RENAULT
10 came out on top again. Take the RENAULT 10 on a test drive and
you'll probably end up picking the same winner.
Village Motor are proud of their appointment
by Renault of Canada
Our ability to offer the finest possible service after the sale, enhances
our reputation of excellence. Our mechanics are factory trained by
Renault and are prepared to offer top quality service. In addition, we
have extended our parts department where we can be of service until
10 p.m. Drop in and see us, we are convinced that Renault represents
the best dollar value, and we are sure we can convince you.
MMtna
nuii
RfflAUEW
uraffi
We also have a
fine line of sports
and imported
quality used cars.
Inquire about
our French magic
purchase plan.
Village Motor Co.Ltd.Z880ArbutusBl2h 736-9781 Friday, October 11, 1968
THE     UBYSSEY
Page  15
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Birds aiming high,
shooting for first
The soccer Birds are out to improve their goal average this
Saturday at 2 p.m. in Callister park.
Their opponents will be Eintracht, a fast-improving team
in the Pacific Coast league. But the Birds should win easily
according to coach Joe Johnson.
The squad was hit by injuries though, and Johnson must
use substitutes and even bring up JV's to replace non-starter Jim
Quinn and Len Lenvoy who are limping on a sore ankle and a
sore knee respectively.
Robin Hart and Oscar Faoro will be the JV's standing by
in case of any more injuries.
Where have all the
tough guys gone?'
Head football coach Frank Gnup is asking himself questions
as he prepares for Saturday's game against the University of
Puget Sound in Tacoma.
Specifically, "where have all the tough guys gone?"
Some were injured in last week's Honolulu game, but the
main lack of players is due to the scarcity of Vancouver high
school grads.
Gnup will likely try juggling the lineup as well in an attempt
to find a winning combo. But don't look for too much. UPS is
a strong team and the Birds have yet to win in three games.
Although the JV's will be missing a few players, they too
play this weekend.
JV game time Sunday is 2 p.m. at the new stadium.
Kats vs. Birds
in grudge match
Head rugby coach Donn Spence is looking forward to the
Birds' game against the Kats on Saturday.
"They are the team to beat and have been for the last eight
years," said Spence, "but this year we are young and strong and
keen and we want to win (verbatum)."
Only Gordie Mackenzie with a strained foot ligament and
Tony Hodge with a cold will be missing the game.
The Birds must contain the Kats' dynamic duo of Hunt and
Macdonald to win.
Last year the Birds lost a very close game and since then
have only lost two veterans, so game prospects are good.
The three senior UBC teams take on the three senior Kats
teams so all the way down the rugby line action should be fast,
furious and exciting.
The Birds' game starts at 2:30 p.m. in Thunderbird stadium
on Saturday. Admission's free with an AMS card.
BETTER BUY BOOKS
UNIVERSITY TEXT BOOKS
NON-FICTION PAPERBACKS
Specializing in Review Notes
and Study Guides
4393  W.   10th  Ave.
224-4144
Mother Tuckers
Yellow Duck
Sat., Oct. 12 — War Memorial Gym
9 - 7       Maids 75c       Makers $1.00
TUXEDO
RENTAL & SALES
GARMENTS TO CHOOSE FROM
• Full Dress (Tails)
• Morning Coats
• Directors' Coats
• White & Blue Coats
• Shirts & Accessories
• Mail  Orders  Invited
(Downstairs)
E. A. Lee Formal Wear
623 Howe MU 3-2457
FALL  and  WINTER  SPORTS
1968 SKI SWEATERS
PEDIGREE SLACKS AND SKI PARKAS
SPECIAL SALE ON C.C.M.  SKATES
25% Oft Regular Prices ot 79.95 - 23.95 - 29.95
North Western Sporting Goods Ltd.
10th AVE. AT ALMA ROAD
224-5040
cBirdGalls
19681969
YOUR NEW
STUDENT
TELEPHONE
DIRECTORY
Now Available
ONLY
75c
(on campus)
PUBLICATIONS OFFICE - ROOM 241   S.U.B.
BOOKSTORE
AMS BUSINESS OFFICE - BROCK HALL
Redeem   Pre-Sale  Tickets  At  Publications   Office  Only
INTERCOLLEGIATE   FOOTBALL
2ND ANNUAL SHRUM BOWL GAME
UBC "THUNDERBIRDS''
vs
S.F.U. "CLANSMEN"
MONDAY-OCTOBER 21st AT EMPIRE STADIUM
at 8:00 p.m.
SPECIAL STUDENT PRICE
$1.00 for a $2.50 or $2.00 Reserved Seat
(Advance Sale Only) on presentation of A.M.S, Card
Organized student groups may purchase blocks of tickets
from Athletic Office
STUDENT TICKETS AVAILABLE ONLY AT MEMORIAL
GYMNASIUM AND STUDENT UNION BUILDING
UP TO AND INCLUDING NOON FRIDAY, OCTOBER 18th Page  16
THE     UBYSSEY
Friday, October 11, 1968
'TWEEN CLASSES
Foolery at Union
RESIDENCE   ASS'N
Informal   meeting,    7    p.m.
Tuesday   at   Union   College.
Speaker will be Joachim Foikis. Refreshments.
HISTORY UNION
What can we do about his-
story  100?  History students
come to Bu. 104, noon today.
DEBATING  UNION
Topic: The University is Incapable of Being an Instrument for Social Reform, SUB
205, today noon.
ENGLISH UNION
'General    meeting    to    elect
members   to   English   dept.,
student-faculty      committee,
k, today noon, Bu.   106.
ALLIANCE   FRANCAISE
Meeting  today   noon   in   IH
lounge.    Membership    cards
ready.   Everyone   welcome.
PRE-LAW
Barrister   Irwin   Davis    on
"The   NatiUre   and   Law   of
Contracts," today noon, Ang
415.
MOTORCYCLE   CLUB
Organizational meeting for
formation of club, today
noon in SUB 213.
COMPUTER   CLUB
ACM chapter meeting today,
Ang.   314.   All   last   year's
members and those interested   in  joining  should   come.
VOC
Today   noon    is    your    last
chance to buy tickets to long
hike. $9 from outdoor club's
office in SUB.
MARDI GRAS SOC
Meeting   for   all   committee
members, noon today in SUB
room A.
UCC
General    meeting    Tuesday
* noon, SUB meeting room F.
Elections for president and
PRO.
VCF
Panel discussion on the relevance of Christ at UBC,
today noon in SUB party
room.
ECONOMICS
Ernest Mandel, world famous Marxist economist, today noon, Ang. 104.
VARSITY   DEMOLAY
Regular   meeting,    constitutional  revision   today  noon,
Ang. 313.
LUTHERAN STUDENT
MOVEMENT
Who   needs   a   family?    Dr.
Gray,    dept.    of    sociology,
and   Pastor   Schwabe,   noon
today, Ang. 110.
FILM SOC
Last chance to blow your
minds. Blow-up today in old
auditorium, noon, 3:30, 6:30,
8:30 p.m. Admission 50
cents.
VIETNAM       MOBILIZATION
COMMITTEE
Demonstration in support of
Berkeley GI  march,   1  p.m.
Saturday at the courthouse. '
HELLENIC CLUB
Folk dancing will meet Monday,  7:30  p.m.,  IH.
SUB GALLERY  COMMITTEE
Students interested in forming committee meet in SUB
gallery, Tusday noon.
SCIENCE  US
Nominations for president,
vice-president, publications
officer, PRO and AMS rep
close Tuesday noon. Apply
math annex 1119.
CANOE CLUB
Meeting Tuesday non, Ang.
110. Talk and slides on running rapids.
•toN_E ]jHL custom GfiJGi* sfcrto.
#
ess***.*
— .        Vhirus.
3*(>tf)UWAmay-—758-OC33
NEW YORK
COSTUME SALON
RENTALS
WHITE DINNER JACKETS
TUEXDOS,   DARK   SUITS,   TAILS
COLORED JACKETS
SPECIAL   STUDENT   RATES
224-0034 __ 4397 W. 10th
NO GUESSWORK IN OUR OUTFIT!
We pride ourselves  in  having the  latest equipment
(electronic and otherwise) to make sure we can GUARANTEE your car is fixed properly. That's why we can
have confidence in our slogan.
"Highest quality workmanship at the lowest possible prices?
only at
AUTO HENNEKEN
SPECIALIZED  SERVICE
8914  Oak  St.   (at  Marine  Dr.
263-9181
CLASSIFIED
Rates: Students. Faculty & Clubs—3 lines, 1 day 75*. 3 days $2.00.
Commercial—3 lines, 1 day $1.00, 3 days $2.50.
Rates for larger ads on request.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone and
are payable in advance.
Closing Deadline is 11:30 a.m. the day before publication.
Publications Office: STUDENT UNION BLDG., UNIVERSITY OF B.C., Vancouver 8, B.C.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Dances
11
DANCE SATURDAY — MOTHER
Tucker's Yellow Duck October 12,
9-1 War Memorial Gym. Female
75c,   male   $1.00.
Greetings
12
Lost & Found
13
FOUND PAIR OF PRESC. GLASSES
in Brock Hall about 2 weeks ago.
Come  to Publications Office,  S.U.B.
DOST NAVY MEN'S SWEATER
between Gym and C-lot. Phone
Chuck, 733-3432, and leave message.
Reward.
FOUND PAIR OF GLASSES, COL.
prescrpit., black frame and black
case in Staff parking lot in fr. of
Educ. Bldg. Call 291-2101 aft. 4 p.m.
4 p.m.	
LOST: GLASSES IN RED PLASTIC
case, lost Friday, Oct. 4 on way to
C lot. Phone Lynne 738-3559.	
LOST: SILVER CHARM BRACLET
on Oct. 9. Reward, call Kathy: 278-
0243.
FOUND LADIES W,ATCH NEAR
Bank of Commerce. Phone 224-1084
.and   identify.	
Rides 8c Car Pools
14
WANTED ONE DRIVER FOR CEN-
tral West Van. carpool. Phone Sally
926-1590.
RIDE WANTED TO UBC FROM
23rd and Inglewood; West Van.
922-4081. v
WANTED DRIVERS FOR CARPOOL
in Oakridge vicinity. Phone Mick or
Frank   327-7824.
RIDE WANTED TO THE OKAN-
agan on Saturday. Share exp. 224-
4611  or  224-1962.  Ingeborg.
Special Notices
15
THE GRIN BIN HAS POSTERS,
Jokes, Cards, Gifts and a Post
Office. You'll find it across from
the Liquor Store at 3209 West
Broadway.	
REDUCE THE  COST  OF  YOUR IN
surance   by   as   much   as   20%.   All
risks  insured  and  no  cancellations
Motor bikes also. Phone Ted Elliott
299-9422.
THE NEW YORK LIFE AGENT ON
your campus is a good man to know.
SMILE YOU '69 GRADS! YOUR
Grad pictures are being taken be
hind (South) Brock in the Mobile
Unit until October 22nd. You've al
ready paid for this service in your
Grad fee so hurry before it's too
late! This is the only time pictures
will   be   taken   this   year.
PLAYHOUSE' THEATRE HAS A
few student tickets for Tuesday
nights available. Special price, 7
plays   $10.   560   Cambie,   684-5361.
LIFE INSURANCE
Students, age 23 — $20,000 (commuted amount). Reducing Term.
Includes 3 options. Premium $42.50.
Also New Fidelity Inflation Fighter
policy; first in Canada. Call George
Kaiway, Fidelity Life Assurance
Co.  —  681-7496.
CONTRACT PROBLEM HAS FORCED cancellation of Jose Feliciano
Concert, scheduled for Oct. 24
1968,   in   S.U.B. 	
U.B.C. RADIO SOUND CAR NOW
available at noon in SUB. Rooms
233/235. 	
HOMECOMING DANCE: SAT., OCT
26, 1968. Ticket sales start Tuesday,
AMS. The biggest dance of the
year. 2 bands. Soul Unlimited with
Carl Graves and Eric Sandquists
Big Band. $4.00 per couple.
Travel Opportunities
16
Wanted Information
17
Wanted—Miscellaneous
18
AUTOMOTIVE
Automobiles For Sale
21
'57 VOI/KS. A-l CONDITION. $500
cash. 261-3633 between 6-8, ask for
Denny.
1960 ZEPHYR, FAIR CONDITION,
priced for quick sale, $275. 263-8021
after 6 p.m., at  3271 W.  35th.
SACRIFICE OFFER MUST SELL
1963 Chev. 4-door 6-cyl. auto. $950
or best offer. Don 733-1760 Eve.
USED IMPORTS — PRICED FROM
$200 to $2,000 — ten to choose from:
Grand Prix Motors — 1162 Seymour.
682-7185.  Open  'till 8 p.m.
G.T. AND SPITFIRES IN STOCK AT
Grand Prix Motors — 1162 Seymour
682-7185.   Open   'till   8  p.m.	
'64 FALCON, BEAUTIFUL CONDI-
tion. Excellent body, and motor.
Family's 2nd car. Must sell quickly.
228-8341.
1960 PONTIAC, GOOD CONDITION,
new tires, battery, generator. Must
sell.   $445.00  or  best  offer,   926-4009.
Auto. For Sale (Cont.)
21
'56 MORRIS GOOD CONDITION, '66
motor, good rubber, new brakes.
Phone  266-4369 after 5 p.m.  $225.00.
SPECIAL SACRIFICE! OFFERS —
1959 Consul convt. Excellent condition. See at 2270 Wesbrook. Chris
Curtis,  266-4931.
Automobile—Parts
23
TR3, 4, 4A, MOUNTED SNOW TIRES.
Also TR4A Tonneau cover. Offers.
Alan,   RE 8-9032.
Automobile—Repairs
24
Motorcycles
26
'67 KAW1ASAKI — 4,000 miles — Excellent condition. Grand Prix Motors
—1162 Seymour — 682-7185. Open
'till   8   p.m.
BUSINESS SERVICES
Dance Bands
31
Miscellaneous
33
NOW WITH APPOINTMENT SER-
vice, Upper Tenth Barber Hair
Stylists, 4574 West 10th Avenue,
224-6622.
Misc. For Sale (Cont.)
1963, 1964 and 1965
TOTEMS
(The UBC Yearbook)
25c - To Clear - 25c
Publications, Room 241 SUB
RENTALS & REAL ESTATE
Rooms
81
Repairing—All Kinds
35
Scandals
37
THOSE ARE WATER BUMPERS
not seven gallon hookahs. Call University CabCo^224-5025.
AQUA SOC—BOAT DIVE SAT., OCT.
12. See notice board in club lounge
for   details.
Typing
40
TYPING SERVICE
Mrs.  Gail  Symons —  224-6435
 3885 W. 12th Ave.	
GOOD EXPERIENCED TYPIST
available for home typing. Please
call 277-5640.	
EXPERT IBM SELECTRIC TYPIST—
Experienced essay and thesis typist.
Reasonable rates. TR 4-9253.
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted—Female
51
Help Wanted—Male
52
Male or Female
53
SKI INSTRUCTORS WANTED. NO
teaching experience necessary.
Training course begins at Whistler
Mt. on Oct. 13 at 9 a.m. and continues for six consecutive Sundays.
Fee $20. Apply to Mr. Jim McConkey, Garibaldi Ski School, Alta
Lake,   B.C.   932-5422.
Work Wanted
54
INSTRUCTION
Tutoring
64
ENGLISH, FRENCH, HISTORY,
Russian lessons given privately by
B.A., M.A., B.L.S. (McGill). Phone
736-6923.	
FIRST YEAR MATHEMATICS, PHYSICS, Chemistry lessons given by
excellent  tutors. Phone 736-6923.
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
BUSY "B" BOOKS — USED UNI-
versity texts bought and sold. 146
W. Hastings, opposite Woodwards.
681-4931.
FOR SALE: 2 SNOW TIRES, TUBE-
less, 6.50x14 and 1 wheel for same
$35. Phone 922-5198.
1   PAIR  METAL   SKIS   $30.   926-4789.
Fisher 20S's Wedel Kings.	
FENDER   JAZZMASTER  GUITAR   &
amp. Phone 224-9054. Ken, room 401.
MUST SELL FULL LENGTH RED
ladies suede coat, size 12. Leaving
for tropics,   733-1831 after 6:00 p.m.
FREE DESK—COME AND TAKE IT
away — or maybe trade something?
738-6134 to arrange pickup.
DROPPING OUT! COMPLETE SET
oi First Year Engineering texts,
like new condition, Jim, after 5 p.m.
278-9341.
BIRD CALLS
NOW AVAILABLE
at Bookshop & Publications
Office in SUB
On Campus, only 75c
ROOMS ON CAMPUS $40.00 (M.) 2250
Wesbrook, kitchen priv., TV lounge,
on campus parking.  224-9662.	
LARGE FURNISHED ROOMS IN
student's house, 12th & Highbury,
kitchen facilities, washer, separate
entrance, $45 mth. Call*. day,291-3141;
evening  228-9597.	
LARGE BASEMENT ROOM FOR 15th
October.  224-0531.	
FURNISHED ROOM FOR MALE
students near 16th and Arbutus.
Phone   after   6   p.m.   733-5255.	
SLEEPING ROOMS, AVAILABLE
Nov. 1, male. Well furnished, priv.
bath, entrance, 4546 W. 8th. $45
Ph. 224-9340.
PRIV. ENTR. QUIET AND WARM.
Man only, 48th & Fraser. Call 325-
0055.
NICE HOUSE-KEEPING ROOM FOR
male student. Prefer non-smoker.
Phone  325-9503.
82
Room & Board
LIVE  ON  CAMPUS  AT  THE  DELTA
Upsilon Fraternity House, good food,
short walk to classes, quiet hours
enforced for study. Phone 228-9389
or 224-9841.	
DELUXE ACCOMMODATION NEAR
UBC for female student in exchange
for light housekeeping duties. Should
have limited class time. Call 682-1249.
Furn. Houses  & Apts.
83
GIRL PREF. OVER 21 TO SHARE
apt. near Broadway and Burrard
with German girl. $60.00 incl. phone
Gretel,   732-6756.	
STUDENTS, 2, TO SHARE HOUSE
with same, vicinity Cambie & 20th.
Available now. Glen Dave Normand
or Dennis,  3655 Ash.
3-ROOM SUITE, UPSTAIRS, FUR-
nished, 1 or 2 quiet senior students.
$70 per month. 1942 W. 3rd. Phone
733-6726.
INTELLIGENT MAN, STUDENT, 32,
has furnished English Bay apartment to share, $60 including TV,
linen.  Phone evenings 733-6954.	
STUDENTS, 2, TO SHARE HOUSE
with 2 others. 7th and Highbury.
Private rooms. Immediate occup-
ancy.   224-3035.	
FTTRNI. BSMT APT., SUIT 2 MALE
students. W. 17th nr. Dunbar. Avail.
Oct.   15.   224-0989.
WANTED MALE GRAD STUDENT
to share two bedroom Kits, suite.
732-5932  or Hut  B-6,  33.	
FURNISHED BASEMENT SUITE. 1
male student. Private entrance Kitsilano  area.   Phone  731-1629.
MATURE MALE STUDENT WANT-
ed to share house with two businessmen, Kerrisdale area. Ph. 261-
9491   eves.
BUY — SELL — RENT
USE
UBYSSEY CLASSIFIED
UBYSSEY ADVERTISING
OFFICE
Now Located In
ROOM 241 — S.U.B.

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