UBC Publications

UBC Publications

UBC Publications

The Ubyssey Sep 10, 1991

Item Metadata

Download

Media
ubysseynews-1.0127966.pdf
Metadata
JSON: ubysseynews-1.0127966.json
JSON-LD: ubysseynews-1.0127966-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): ubysseynews-1.0127966-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: ubysseynews-1.0127966-rdf.json
Turtle: ubysseynews-1.0127966-turtle.txt
N-Triples: ubysseynews-1.0127966-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: ubysseynews-1.0127966-source.json
Full Text
ubysseynews-1.0127966-fulltext.txt
Citation
ubysseynews-1.0127966.ris

Full Text

Array theUbyssey
Founded in 1918
Vancouver, B.C., Tuesday, September 10 ,1991
Vol 74, No 3
,*#*
^iWStp
^%^%',
^  I
*■!•»
■"H*^-
•■4?* «*>
3
c
.
3
- Sf^$u^~,.,. Classifieds 822-3977
RATES: AMS Card Holder* - 3 lines, $3.00, additional tinea, 60 cent*, commercial - 3 lines, $5.00, additional
lines 75 cents. (10% discount on 25 issues or more) Classified ads payable in advance. Deadline 4:00p.m., two
days before publication. Room 266, SUB, UBC, Varu, B.c. V6T2A7, 822-3977.
11 - FOR SALE ■ PRIVATE
1983 VOLVO DL 4 dr sedan in need of
tender loving care. Motor in exc. cond. Body
&Boulnisty. 250,000km. $550. Phone22S-
1573.
1981 MAZDA 626. 2 dr, 5 sp. Good cond.,
runs well. Reliable. On campus. 224-8725.
$1800 obo.
1976 MGB. Good cond. Runs well. $2300
obo. Located on campus. 224-8725.
25 ■ INSTRUCTION
PIANO LESSONS, UBC Village Area
A.R.C.T.B.MUS. 984-7340 OR 224-7150. All
ages.
30 ■ JOBS
PART TIME, ON CAMPUS JOBS available contacting alumni. If you possess excellent verbal skills & want to do something
worthwhile for UBC, call the UBC development office between 8:30 - 4:30 pm.
INDIVIDUAL WITH BjV. (Hon) & MA
seeks position as research assistant in biological or social sciences. Qualifications include 2 years exp. as TA, publications, teaching & field exp. Phone Paul at 684-7604.
80 - TUTORING
EXP. MATH TUTOR   needed approx. 3
times/week for Math 130 & Stats. 733-6840.
ENGLISH 100 & the ECT, specialized tutoring available. For more information, call
Jeff at 224-1031 or 734-7975.
Student Health
Outreach Program
Want to promote healthy living at UBC?
jo* rr» sn«*m nn.'upi rant Omwon b n
mtctm uiaMMa ol mm ta» Immm antf
ftMqr.I
IJJO-lJOpm
Bract W ■ Aaom KM.
flamed £■»■ MMt
I Mm* JapfM-OcM
BtJbtrHll
ON THE BOULEVARD
Hair Care Services
Esthetician
Suntanning Special
10 sessions for
$3<>°°
Offer Expires Oct. 15
Hours:
Mon-Sat 9:30-6:00
5784 University Blvd.
224-1922*224-9116
1980MAZDAGLC. Automatic, 91,000 km,
$1750.00 obo. 224-1172.
ONEWAY AIRFARE, Van. toFredericton,
N.B. Female, Sept 23, $300. 224-9439 or
224-9884, rm. 208.
20 - HOUSING
BRIGHT, SMALL 1 bdr basement suite,
newly renovated. Hardwood floors, Pp,
utilities incl. No pets, n/s. 16/Aitmtus area,
$450. 732-0939.
WANTED: FEMALE STUDENT to provide M-F meal preparation in return for
furnished bedroom/private bath/private
entrance close to UBC Gates. Stipend
available for extra housekeeping services,
224-4136.
RESPONSIBLE STUDENT needed to care
for a 10 month old baby, Tue and Th'irs
afternoons. $5/hr, call 261-0045
35-LOST
LOST! GOLD BRACELET with engraving
on front and back. Sentimental value. Reward if found. Call Gordon, 325-8559.
10 - SERVICES
SINGLES - An Intro Service for Singles.
Call 737-8980. 1401 West Broadway.
Vancouver (at Hemlock)
+HALF PRICE BEER+
No kits, no clean-up, no sediment in bottle.
Use our professional equipment to brewyour
own beer on our premises. Richmond Beer
Works. 244-8103.
Between
Deadline for submissions: for
Tiuesday's paper is Friday at
3:30pm. NO LATE SUBMISSIONS WtlL BE ACCEPTED.
Note: "Noon' = 12:30pm.
Tuesday, September 10th
Lunch-hour seminar "Hong Kong:
Lame Duck or Golden Goose?" by
Dr. Lee Ngok, Univ. ofHongKong.
12:30 pm, Asian Centre, Seminar
Boom 604,
World University Service of
Canada. General Meeting. Noon,
SUB212A.
The Ubyssey. New Staff Orientation 4:30. Seminar: "Learning to
write news" at 5:30.
Wednesday, September 11th
Gays & Lesbians of UBC. Discussion Session: Open Forum Topic
TBA. 5 pm - 7 pm. SUB 213,
Gays & Lesbians of UBC 1st
General Meeting, Noon, SUB
212A (thru & beyond SUB 212).
Gays & Lesbians of UBC. Educational Series - Video Screening of
"The Mayor of Castro Street.* Not
to be missed! Series continues
every other Wednesday night at
5:00 pm. SUB 215.
International Socialists Club.
Meeting - Racism & Resistance
Fighting the Socred Agenda. 7:30,
SUB 213.
UBC Film Society - Cinema 16.
Film Series: "Tales of Love and
Jealousy'. 7:00 pm: Rob Nilsson's
Heat and Sunlight, 9:30 pm:
Mireille Dancereau's Death to the
City. SUB Auditorium.
Inter-Varsity Christina Fellowship. Grad Student Discussion.
5:00 pm, SUB 211.
Thursday, September 12th
School ofMusic. Entropy, Guest
Jazz Ensemble. 12:30 pm, Recital
Hall, Music Bldg.
Inter-Varsity Christian Fellowship. Lecture/discussion with Dr.
James Sire Toward a Christian
Approach to Studies." 6:30 pm,
Lutheran Campus Centre.
Arts Undergraduate Society. Inter-Varsity Christian Fellow-
Council Meeting. All Club reps, ship. Dr. James Sire, Author. *Why
AMS Reps, Executive and anyone Believe Anything At All?" 12:30
who's curious. Noon, BUCHA107. noon, Woodward, Room 5.
HI SHUNS
Do you play an orchestra or
band instrument?
Yes you can perform with the
UBC Symphony Orchestra
or
UBC Wind Ensemble
No, you do not have to be a
music major!
No, you do not have to enroll
for credit!
Yes, you can enroll for credit!
228-3113
224-8246
DISCOVER THE
COMPETITION
• low low prices
free services
laser printing
UNIVERSITY VILLAGE
ND FLOOR
2174 WESTERN PARKWAY
VANCOUVER, B.C.
224-6225
FAX 224-4492
OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK
M-TH 8-9 FRI 8-6
SAT-SUN 11-6
ENGLISH TUTOR. Language & literature
instruction by British trained ESL teacher.
Exp. in Europe & Asia. Call Joanne, 261-
7470, mornings 8-12.
■85-TYPING
PROFESSIONAL TYPIST. 30 years exp.,
WD Process/typing, APA/MLA, Thesis. Studentrates. Dorothy, 228-8346.
AMS WORD PROCESS-ZING
Professional service for resumes, letters,
essays, theses and much more! Check out
our competitive rates, fancy typestyles
and snappy paper — with envelopes to
match. Come in and browse... Room 60,
Student Union Building or phone: 822-
5640
FAST ACCURATE typist/secretary. 20years
exp. WordPerfect 5.1, medical/legal terminology, 255-4955.
UBC Film Society - Cinema 16.
Film Series: Tales of Love and
Jealousy* See Wednesday's listing. 7:00 & 9:00 pm, SUB Auditorium.
Dykes Unlimited. Lesbian discussion group. 12:30 pm, Women's
Centre, SUB 130.
Friday, September 13th
Graduate Student Society. Open
House — Featuring tours of the
Grad Centre, a BBQ (4:30-7 pm)
and dance (7 pra -12 am). Graduate Student Centre.
Students of Objectivism.
Organisational meeting. Come
help out or if you just want info.
Noon, SUB 215.
Friday, September 13th
The Ubyssey. News writing seminar at 3:30: New Staff Orientation
at 4:30.
Tuesday, September 24th
A Brown Bag seminar on Indone*
sian Development in Agriculture"
byDr.H.Didung, Director General
of Food Crops in the Dept. of Agriculture, Indonesian Government.
12:30 PM, Asian Centre Seminar
GMAT LSAT
GRE
Weekend Test
Preparation
Next seminars
Sept. 21 & 22
Call: 222-8272
Spectrum
Seminars
PROFESSIONALS IN TEST PREPARATION
l^J
ams
L^
The AMS Coordinator of External Affairs is now
accepting applications for 5 student at Large
positions for The External Affairs Commttiee.
This committee deals with long-term and current student
issues such as Tuition, On and Off-campus Housing. The
provincial and federal student assistance programs and
post-secondary education in B.C. The committee will
meet about once per month and will be chaired by The
Coordinator of External Affairs. Any student can apply.
Applications in the form of resumes are to Kelly
Guggisberg - SUB Rm. 250 by no later than Sept. 20th.
AMS
ARCHIVES
The Alma Mater Society
Ombudsoffice is
currently seeking
Caseworkers for the Winter Session
The function ofthe Ombudsoffice is to represent, the student complaints
within the U.B.C, and the AMS administration.
The Ombudsoffice Caseworker is required to establish regular office
hours to investigate and resolve student complaints.
If you are an enthusiastic individual who is seeking to broaden your
experience, and, as well, are interested in helping your fellow students,
then the Ombudsoffice needs your assistance.
For an application form, or further information, contact the A.M.S.
Ombudsoffice at the Student Union Building 100A - 822-4846, or write
to P.O. Box 60, c/o A.M.S. Business Office, S.U.B. Room 266,
6138 S.U.B. Blvd. Vancouver, B.C. V6T 1Z1
WORK STUDY POSITION
Work study position available as a SUB Inventory Assistant with
the AMS. Duties include taking inventory of the Student Union
Building, using collected data to determine replacement cost of
inventory via standard replacement procedures currently in
place for SUB, and assembling the final product in a SUB
Inventory Manual. Candidates must be eligible for the work
study program.
WAGES: $1025 per hour, approx. 8 hours per week.
Interested candidates should speak with the AMS Archivist
located in SUB 230E. The AMS encourages all who qualify to
apply.
2/THE UBYSSEY
September 10,1991 ■ ^ -*■■
sstf
Carleton students
. get lesbian, gay,
- bisexual centre
by Romeo St. Martin
OTTAWA (CUP) — They're here,
they're queer and now they have a
ptece to hang out.
^Carleton University Students'
Association voted21 toOlastmonth
to provide space on campus for a
gay, lesbian and bisexual centre.
"The time has come, the time
has always been here, for a centre
like this," said Ali Biggs, chair of
the centre's steering committee.
"'Biggs said she had expected the
council to support the motion for a
centre, although a few councillors
andexecutive members warnedher
that there would be some opposition.
"There wasn't any room for objection," said Biggs. "The spirit of
the meeting was not one where it
would have been acceptable to object. That was my intention."
Biggs said she "stacked" the
meeting with a dozen bisexuals,
lesbians and gay men, several of
whom spoke about the need for a
private meeting place.
The centre will educate the
Carleton community on gay, lesbian and bisexual issues, lobby on
their behalf and provide a safe place
for them to meet, said Biggs.
Carleton alumnus Peter Thorne
said the centre's existence would
also help improve the university's
reputation.
Tm not proud ofthe fact that
this university is seen as an environment where homosexuals can
be taunted and hit," he said.
Biggs said the centre will now
concentrate on raising money from
its supporters because the student
council has already passedits 1991-
92 budget.
NEWS
RecFac refund for students available
Those of us who have been at
UBC long enough will remember a
protracted debate about the proposed student recreation facility
(Rec Fac). As the situation is now,
$40 is collected from undergraduate students taking 18 credits or
more by the registrar's office.
This money will be matched by
the government, doubling the
amount available for the facility,
and will be spent when a design is
approved.
The donation by students is tax
deductible and a tax receipt is
available from the Development
Office, at 6253 NW Marine Drive
(822-8900).
Students must apply in writing
with their name and student
number by December 31,1991, to
Leanne Jacobs. An effort shoul d be
made to obtain a tax receipt, as tax
deductions can be carried over into
a year in which there is taxable
income.
Those who do not wish to make
a contribution can apply in person
to the Department of Athletics and
Sports Services, Room 100, War
Memorial Gym (822-2531) before
October 4. A form must be completed and full time students will
receive a $40 credit applied to their
second term fees (no cash refunds).
DAN ANDREWS PHOTO
U of T returns $1.5
million to donor
4y Maylin Scott
TORONTO (CUP) — The University of Toronto has refunded a donor's
$1.15 million after he alleged the university had misused the funds.
The Saul A Silverman Family Foundation had contributed $1.2
million over nine years for research and clinical studies in the
university's department of otolaryngology.
*     Last March, foundation president Peter Silverman requested
.an investigation into the department's spending practices.
U of T ordered three separate audits which concluded $50,000 had
been misspent by the chair of the department, Peter Alberti. The
university refunded that amount to Silverman in March.
But university vice-president Gordon Cressy said Silverman asked
for an additional $900,000 back.
"* "In our view only $50,000 was spent out of the guidelines and we
Jy>ld to that view," Cressy said. "But there were irreconcilable differences between us and the donor and so we felt we should give all the
money back."
Silverman said he was happy with the refund.
"Basically the university has done the honourable thing by returning the money," he said. "[But] I thoroughly disagree with their
investigations."
The university did not spend the donation according to the
"foundation's guidelines, in addition to spending it on flawed research,
he said.
Robert Salter, university professor emeritus, reviewed allegations
last month of research misconduct by Alberti, which included using
foundation money for his personal gain, publishing flawed data, and
conducting unsupervised research. The report cleared Alberti of academic and scientific fraud, and research misconduct.
-**■ However, Silverman said he disagrees with the Salter report. Alberti
was using 350 medical students to provide information for a database,
but the students were unsupervised when examining patients, he said.
"Ofthe three students who were interviewed, all said that they had
been unsupervised. One student said it was the first time he had ever
Jooked down a patient's throat.
"Dr. Salter says 3 out of 350 is not convincing evidence. If there are
*8 out of 3 students, they should be asking the other 347 students. That
is the nature of my disagreement."
Cressy said Silverman had suggested taking the university to court
to get back the money. University lawyers advised U of T administrators that they would likely win the case, but the institution wasn't
prepared to litigate, he said.
%    "Even if we won, and we were convinced we would, it would be bad
jfor the institution," Cressy said.
Silverman said he hopes to maintain good relations with U of T.
"I plan to give again to the university," he said. "Obviously Fm going
to be a lot more careful about what I give, but they've done the honourable
thing."
Tm-d r-*- tBv •---->. v  *   :
Skateboarder, Mike McGill, goes airborne, demonstrating his most unheinous one-
hand stand at Lansdowne Park.
SAM GREEN PHOTO
September 10,199i
THE UBYSSEY/3 Arts & Graphics
All Staedtler Leads
BTS Price* **59<t
0.5, 0.7, 0.9 mm
HB, F, H, 2H, 3H,
4H, 5, B, 2B
REG $1.25
All Staedtler
Lumograph Pencils
BTS Price" • 85<t
REG $1.30
Grippo Retractable
Mechanical Pencils
BTS Price***$1.99
.5mm
MSR $3.98
Pens & Gifts
All Pens over $10.00
BTS Price***20% OFF
Alarm Clocks
BTSPrice***10%OFF
GEAR    ^KgC?" UP FOR
BACK TC^CHOOL
$ A V I  N G $
\i U\/t/l/l\l/l
Stationery & Supplies
Acco Binders (Wilson Jones)
Assorted Round Ring Binders
REG      BTS
PRICE   PRICE
•••
: BOOKSTORE
6200 University Boulevard
Tel»822-2665 (UBC-BOOK)
1"
1V2"
2" •••
Esselte File Pro Asst Colours •••
Esselte Unibox •••
Pilot Fast Track •••
Staedtler Topstar Hi-liter •••
Dainolite 10OVV Flexible Arm
Lamp Assorted Colours •••
$2.49
$3.49
$4.49
$19.95
$4.64
$1.29
$2.65
$169
$2.39
$2.99
$9.98
$2.69
69<t
99t
Electronics
hUvill/lM/l 1 1 1 l//n/\ll
All Calculators*
BTS Price***20% OFF
Including Printing Desktop
♦Excludes HP 95LX, HP 48SX,
& software accessories
Hewlett Packard
Calculators
HP95LXMSR  $845.95
BTS Price***$699.00
HP48SX
BTS Price***$386.00
All Batteries *
BTS Price*•*20% OFF
•Excludes Button Size
Clothing
$34.78 $14.98
All Mens &
Ladies Swimwear
BTS Price***20% OFF
All Backpacks &
All UBC Crested Clothing*
BTSPrice***10%OFF
♦excludes sale priced items
EVER for Excellence"
The Total
PC
Solutions
Company
Everex products
are now available
on campus!
• Step MegaCube File Servers (Novell Certified) • Step 486,386,286 • Tempo 486,386,286 • Tempo 386 Notebook •
• Graphics Adapters   (VGA, Hi-Res., Frame Grabbers) • Network Adapters • Tape Backup • ESIX System V •
• LaserScript Printers (PostScript, HP Auto-switching) • OCR Scanners • Color & Gray-Scale Scanner •
• Modems & Fax/Modems • Monitors • Memory Boards & I/O Cards •
An Everex Representative will be available in the UBC Bookstore on September 24th,
from 10am to 4pm, Stop by to discuss your latest computer requirements and to
find out more about our exciting Everex products!
@&
UBC
Computer
Shop
UBC Computer Shop only serves UBC staff,
students and faculty members.
Rated number 7
in customer
satisfaction and
performance!
Rated number 1
in customer
buying plans!
Most comprehensive
on-site warranty in*
the country
One-Stop Shopping
Largest selection of
computer products
and peripherals
Special University
prices!
m
BOOKSTORE
6200 University Boulevard
Call .UBC-BOOK(822-2665)
4/THE UBYSSEY
September 10,139H TAs at York may hit the
bricks over wages
„ TORONTO (CUP)—York University teaching assistants may strike
v*his fall if the university fails to
meet their wage demands, say
union representatives.
The 2,000 TAs and part-time
professors, members ofthe Canadian Union of Educational Workers,   are  angry  because  the
yiiniversity's offer is lower than the
settlement York reached with full-
time faculty and librarians. Traditionally, the deal offered to
CUEW is on par with the faculty
association's.
^       The   faculty   association
peached a deal early this summer
with the university which included
a nine per cent increase in salaries
and benefits. The administration
has offered CUEW a 5.8 per cent
pay hike.
»       CUEW negotiator Margaret
Watson said union members could
^strike if the university doesn't
improve its offer.
"We expected to do just as
well," she said.
Administration negotiator
•Paula CVRiley said the university
is not bound to meet the deal.
"Obviously they are entitled
to their view," she said. "It is difficult for us to meet all the demands. The university is in serious
financial constraints."
York TAs and part-time professors are among the highest paid
in Canada, while full-time professors earn below the Ontario average, CRiley added.
But Watson said TAs and part-
time faculty perform the same work
as faculty association members and
they should be paid equally.
Other contentious issues include class sizes and the conversion
program CUEW won last year. The
program converts a number of part-
time faculty members to full-time
status each year. The administration wants to suspend the program
temporarily, but CUEW members
fear it is an attempt to kill the
program, Watson said.
"Things are not going well,"
she said. "If s starting to look clear
that on major issues we are far
apart and will continue to be far
apart."
K*«U
WE
:|H|l|s|^$?.^|jilit|r i|
(BQ Botanical Garden
Ii,. 68&^W1vtarineDrive., ;;:§;>;:;
YOUR RUNNING* WALKING'LIFESTYLE STORE
3504 West 4th Ave., Vancouver, B.C. 732-4535
Recycle your old shoes at our
4th Annual
STINKY SNEAKER SALE!
(Aug 19-Sept. 15,'91)
SAVE UP TO $50
on a new pair of shoes, (with trade-in)
All trade-ins are recycled
and donated to the
St. James Social Service Society.
AMPUS
[P OMPUTERS
 1
ALLM
• 12" m
• Hercu
mona
• 101-k
• 1024K
• 1.2 M
• 45 ME
• Comb
• Serial
• Users
• 1 yoai
IODELS FEATURE:
onochrome monitor
les compatible
graphics card
ey enchanced keyboard
(RAM/O wait state
3 floppy drive
i Fujitsu H.D. (25 ms)
nned hard/floppy controller
/parallel ports
technical manuals
parts & labour warranty
286 12MHz
45MB SYSTEM
with monitor
• 1MB RAM
• 12MHz clock speed
• Slim line case
286 20MHz 45MB system
$638
s788
386SX 16MHz
45MB SYSTEM
with monitor
• 1MB RAM
• 16MHz clock speed
• Expandable to 4MB
• Slim line case
386SX 20MHz 45MB
system $1048
$988
386 25MHz
45MB SYSTEM
with monitor
• 1 MB RAM
• 25MHz cIock speed
• Expandable to 8MB
• Mini-Tower case
M128
386C 33MHz
45MB SYSTEM
with monitor
• 1MB RAM/64K Cache
• 33MHz clock speed
• Expandable to 8MB
• Small footprint case
M288
486-33
45MB SYSTEM
with monitor
. 4MB RAM/64K Cache
• 33MHz clock speed
• Expandable to 16MB
• Mim-Tower case
$2388
ask about
FUJITSU
hard drive
3 year
warranty
ACCESSORIES
• BTC CUTIE Scanner with OCR software	
• Dexxa Mouse 3-button "NEW*	
• 2400 Modem (Hayes Compatible w/software)
■ 2400 Modem/4800 Sendfax	
• 2400 Modem/9600 Send/Recieve Fax	
• Math Co-Processors 287/387sx/387 dx	
.$138.00
...$20.88
...$59.00
...$79.00
.$168.00
Best Price in Townl
UPGRADE FOR
ABOVE SYSTEMS
VGA Package A:
• 1024'768 resolutions
• OAK(512K, 16 bit)
• Samtron SC 428 VS VGA
colour monitor
■ 14" monitor w.tilt & swivel
• 28mm dot pitch
NEW DOS 5.0
$78
PRINTERS —
Panasonic 1180 $186
Fujitsu DL8O0 $288
173
COME SEE US AT U.B.C. OR
OUR NEW SURREY LOCATION
AMPUS
OMPUTERS
2162 Western Parkway
Vancouver, B.C. V6T1V6
FAX: 228-8338    Ph: 228-8080
10746 King George Hwy
Surrey, B.C. V3T 2X7
FAX: 584-8383    Ph: 584-8080
Hours: 9:30 AM-530 PM
Monday - Friday
10:00 AM-4:00 PM Saturday
The Ubyssey:
More fun than a root canal. SUB 24 IK
September 10,1991
THE UBYSSEY/5 CLOSEST BICYCLE SHOP TO UBC
BICYCLE STORES
STARVING STUDENTS
BIANCHI
MAINSTREET
- HYBRID
$309
"GIMME A BREAK SALE
Cap's Price
$ 389.95
PEUGEOT
URBANO
- HYBRID
$339
Cap's Price
$ 449.95
PEUGEOT
NAHANNI MTB
$379
Cap's Price
$ 469.95
Cap's
Price
BIANCHI
TEAM GRIZZLY
IBEX
NYALA
FORZA
BRAVA
OCELOT
PEUGEOT
X COUNTRY
MAC KENZIE
KINGS CANYON
DIAMOND SPRINGS
LOOK
M170
M180
M190
MTB21sd
MTB 21 sd
MTB 21 sd
Road 14 sd
Road 14sd
MTB 21 sd
Hybrid
MTB 21 sd
MTB 21 sd
MTB 21 sd
MTB 21 sd
MTB 21 sd
MTB 21 sd
$1349.95
549.95
439.95
529.95
699.95
369.95
$ 579.95
569.95
879.95
1129.95
$ 849.95
1069.95
1379.95
$1099.95
429.95
349.95
419.95
499.95
299.95
$ 449.95
449.95
679.95
899.95
$ 699.95
899.95
1099.95
25% OFF
REG. PRICES
NORCO BAGS, RACKS
LIGHTS, LOCKS
HUGE
CLOTHING CLEARANCE
SHORTS, T-SHIRTS
TIGHTS, JACKETS
LOTS MORE!!!
AVENIR HARD
SHELL - Approved
LG/XL
Only
Reg. $ 59.95
FEATURING
VISTA - LIGHT STROBE
VISA
ON THE SPOT
FENDER INSTALLATION
NO LABOUR CHARGE
TUES. - FRI.
SALE RUNS FROM SEPT. 3 TO SEPT. 28, 6-.00 PM
6255 WEST BOULEVARD 4387 WEST 10TH AVE,
263-3240 12 STORES TO SERVE YOU.
&/TH6 UBYSSEY
September, IQ,)£91 NEWS |
International students
face fee hike
MONTREAL (CUP) — International students at Concordia University have been hit with a 20 per
cent jump in fees.
According to government officials, fees were boosted because
international tuition feeshave been
frozen since 1984, while Canadian
students feeshave almost doubled
in three years.
International students in Quebec pay the highest tuition fees in
Canada, and those at Concordia
must now pay $234 per credit, up
from $195 last year.
Canadian students in the faculty of arts pay $158.19 for a three-
credit course while international
students pay almost five times as
much for the same course.
The 20 per cent increase was
approved late in the school year,
giving students little time to fight
it, much less pay it.
But according to Claudette
Portier of the international
student's office, Concordia was one
ofthe few universities to extend the
payment deadline until fall. Other
universities gave students about
one month's notice to pay.
For Cecile Sow, a 21-year-old
student from Senegal, the product
is not worth the price.
"What am I paying for?" she
said. "What can I learn here that I
can't learn somewhere else?"
Sow, in her final year of communication studies, said she is
particularly frustrated by the fact
that she cannot get into the
courses she wants.
Tm paying astronomical fees
and Fm not even getting into the
few courses that I do like," she
said.
There is a university bursary
fund to assist returning students,
but it only covers part of the difference in Canadian and international fees.
Admissions director Tom Swift
said it was too early to determine
whether enrolment has been affected by the change in fees, although 210 new students have
registered compared to the usual
225.
NYMA
2930 West 4th Ave.
/^         ^^
KtStAURAiMf
Vancouver 731-7899
■b^sibm Entertainmentmwmmmmmmmm
/      Lookjipon Cife      \
ttHifJV.U   Cl'ISIHt
Recardo
with Ritmo Caliete Band
Fri. & Sat. Sept. 13 & 14 9:30pm-1:30am
zuitH nezi> eyes
=iSL
Buying Geronimo
\             Join The llByssty             1
\               SUB241X            /
\^\mim 1
Afro-Cuban Rhythm
x.                      y
Vancouver's' 1ST
ETHIOPIAN RESTAURANT
Ml Ritmo Band
Sat Sept 21 9:30pm-1:30am
^^~^_         ^^*^
Irish studies begin at
Concordia University
MONTREAL (CUP) — History
student Kevin Gillan has won a
four-year battle to get James Joyce,
William Butler Yeats and Daniel
CConnell across the Atlantic.
Concordia University is offer-
ingfour courses in Irish history and
two in Irish literature this fall.
"This was one of my biggest
ambitions in life," Gillan said. "The
shamrock is on Montreal's municipal flag. Now we have courses
to teach young people what it
symbolizes."
Gillan's crusade began four
years ago when he founded
Concordia's Friends of Ireland society, a group promoting Montreal's
Irish community. He also peppered
the history, English and political
science departments with letters
requesting changes to the curriculum.
Gillan, bom in Canada but
raised in Northern Ireland, said the
100,000 Montrealers of Irish descent need to learn about their past.
"Until now there were no
courses available to teach these
people about their culture and
heritage," he said. "I am stubborn,
I just kept pushing and pushing."
Dance Dance
Dance
gepfcmikr15 • 7pm'toAAidnighk
w     f ,
Stoats   ,|*j
:„t<t
JO"*1
^tf
**
H&W
•$•
X.
.#*
<*■
Dhe   ^
Co^s
Location:
Graduate Student Centre
%v
**?r.
Buy a Commodore MS-DOS or Amiga computer system!
Computer
Purchase
Plan
■S?*rW."<™
low plan prices
wide selection of systems
FREE software included with each system
All students, faculty and staff of
Canadian schools, colleges and
universities are eligible.
Plan runs Aug. 15 - Oct. 31, 1991
For complete details and ordering information contact-
Powercom Oodles Technology
444 Robson Street 770A - 4400 Hazelbridge Way
Vancouver Fairchild Sq., Richmond
687-0339        279-OG38
Conti Computer Systems Wizard Computer Systems
1216 West Broadway, Vancouver    6049,Fraser Street, Vancouver
734-0606        321-7144
C- Commodore
Commodore SL386SX-20
Slim-line desktop 386SXI20MHz. 1MB RAM, 51 MB
HDD, 3.5" FDD. VGA colour monitor, MS-DOS VI.01,
Microsoft Works software
$1,799.00
Commodore C386SXLT Notebook
386SX/16MHz, 1MB RAM, 40 MB HDD, 3.5" FDD,
backlit VGA display, removableJrecliargeable battery, AC
adaptor, soft carrying case. MS-DOS V4.Q1, Microsoft
Works software
$2,569.00
Commodore Amiga 3000
Motorola 68030/25MHZ. 2MB RAM, 52MB HDD, 3.5"
FDD, multisi/nc colour monitor, AmigaDOS V2.0I1.3,
AmigaVision and Amiga Professional software
$3,729.00
Many other systems available at similar savings
Certain restrictions apply -■ see your Dealer tor complete
details.
Community Sports
For the
best deal in
skate
sharpening
%OFF
with skate sharpening
card - 10 sharpenings
for $20.00
%OFF
the regular prices of all
hockey sticks
%OFF
regular prices of all other
items in the store with
AMS card
There's no GST on
sweat, fiustration
and torment
Join The Ubyssey. SUB 241K.
3355 W. Broadway 733-1612
§*pt*nb«r 10,2991
THEUBYSSEY/7 TkMviwf^
WAT?!
PSYCHO CHEMO PLA/VAR
CALCULUS GOO?
AlVD you Ke&uiKE" AV
EVE OF AJEWrl
OF A/EWT?!
AND You SWULD HAve
BROUGHT -THE COLD
BLACK WEART
CF A ,
NEWS
£&
•MiS^
BACK TO SCHOOL
WITH PLUM
MOCKNECKS
22.95
100% COTTON
2 FOR 30.00
/5 COLOURS
3 FOR 36.00
BOYFRIEND JACKETS        96.95
100% WOOL
T0110.95
CORDUROY PANTS
36.95
5 COLOURS
RAYON SHIRTS
24.95
ASSORTED PRINTS
;./«•*• VAJ
BLACK STRETCH 24.95
TWILL LEGGINGS and STIRRUPS
(ONE WEEK ONLY)
PLUM
CLOTHING COMPANY
Students avoid
advisers
by Frances Foran
Some ofthe problems students
encounter this week may have been
avoided by an earlier visit to the
faculty adviser.
Jean Elder, assistant senior
arts adviser, said, "The number
one problem students bring to the
advisers during the first week of
classes is finding that Telereg allowed them to register for courses
for which they are ineligible.
"A conference with an adviser
last spring would have been a
worthwhile prevention."
When students find themselves barred from a class during
the first hectic week, their problems are compounded; they may
find that other courses are full,
and everything, from trying to
contact Telereg to seeing the adviser, involves a long wait.
Some students evidently think
the first or second year visit to the
faculty adviser is the most expendable of all the hassles of the first
couple of weeks of school.
Of about ten upper-level students waiting to see an adviser
from the English department on
Wednesday, three had never
sought course approval from the
Faculty of Arts.
"I don't see advisers unless I
have to," said Dawn Diede, a third-
year English student.
Students often defer from getting course approval until third or
fourth year when they see a coun
sellor from the department of their
major.
Reasons for avoiding advisers
varied from "they just give you the
runaround" to *1 read the calendar."
However, not reading the calendar thoroughly is the second
largest cause of problems that students bring to theoffice, Elder said.
While the faculty adviser's
concern is that the student's requirements are met for the faculty, the department adviser's responsibilities are a "grey area,"
Elder said.
"[The department advisers']
primary concern is that the student meet the requirements ofthe
department.
Many students claim to have
been misinformed about graduate
requirements by friends, relatives
and even department advisers, she
said.
"Department advisers may
presume that the students have
gained course approval from the
faculty, as they are urged, in first
or second year.
"Occasionally it happens that
fourth year students have their
applications for graduation rejected due to unmet requirements,"
she said.
She hopes having the advisers' table outside of the arts
adviser's office (in Buchanan A)
will encourage all students to get
course approval and avoid problems in the future.
THE PIT PUB
Sunday
NFL Afternoon
Movie Night
Monday
Monday Night Football
Alternative Night
Tuesday
Hot Wings Night
Funk Night
IWSmhSTJEvI
Pit Night
Thursday
Pit Night II
Friday
Rock 'n Roll Night
Saturday
Rock 'n Roll Night
1082 ROBSON ST. 687-3392 • 3651W. 4th 733-0603 • 2845 GRANVILLE 737-0246 • 128 LONSDALE 988-1754
HOURS OF OPERATIONS
Monday - Saturday
11am- 1am
Sunday
11 am-12pm
Look For Special Activities
& Promotional Events
Throughout Each & Every Month!
8/THE UBYSSEY
September 10,1991 -You'll have nightmares if
you sleep in the house
that Henry built
by Matthew Johnson
No set. No props. White light.
Three men dressed in
white dress shirts and black
^tants. Bare feet. No entrances
or exits.
More theatre than most
people can possibly handle.
THEATRE
•The House that Henry Built
JJot Jazz Club
September 14 and 15.
The House That Henry Built,
a self-named horror spoof
by the Inside Out Theater
Company, was a veritable
quandary of energy, excitement
^and, of course, horror.
m   The original script by troupe
member John Simon
MacDougall wove human
experience and emotion into a
tapestry of blood curdling
suspense.
The ensemble, utilizing only
their own bodies, established
setting, created mood, and even
counterbalanced the peculiarities
of each character.
MacDougall was superb in his
use of his eyes and mouth
to display joviality, sadness,
decay, fatigue and terror. He
projected strength and focus,
providing the thread for
suspense to drip off.
Anthony Bradnum displayed
skill in controlling vocal
quality to instill a constant sense
of uneasiness and discomfort.
Martin Grant, utilizing only
minor changes in physical
stance and hand movement,
broke tension using humour. He
terrified the audience by using
repetition.
The spell was cast when all
three worked as a precision
unit, chanting, stomping, moving
in unison, working with and
off each other to invoke a never-
ceasing pulse of energy and
tension.
The show is definitely geared
for audiences that don't spook
easily; it might not be wise to
bring kids.
Last weekend's show sold out
quickly, so going to the
C.O.W.S. early is advisable.
A simple reminder is to try
not to dream when, after
the show, you go to sleep. Try
really hard.
You're Invited
'Tfie Women Students' Office cordially invites you to
S% Women's Tlace, "Brock #203.
Come in and visit our newly renovated lounge and offices.
Check out our resource centre, or talk to us
about our programs for women students at llBC.
Our services include: counselling, support groups, library, customized workshops,
problem solving, crisis counselling, referrals, infornuiuon and much more.
"Drop-in or
by appointment.
<Thone 822-2415
8:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m
"Brock M #203,
1874 "East jviall
—1—1—
SUB Blvd
SUB
East Mall
fj   j Library     I
^
WOMEN STUDENTS' OFFICE
SAC SECURITY
Yes you know the guys, white shirts, loud mouths and
charming personalities to match.
YOU TOO can be SAC Security!! Just pick up the application form in SUB room 238 before September 20,
PRESTIGE! FAME! FORTUNE, well maybe not.
Apply early! Apply often! We want YOU!
ROLL INTO
-> OUR
WHEELY
BIG SALE!
Mountain Bikes
$50 to $200 off all models'
OurWheelyBig $100,000
Clearance Sale is on from
Aug. 16th to Sept 3rd.
Lots of in-store specials!
While quantities last only!
Come soon!
(Sole ftica do nor afft, to du&fn'i bicyda.)
SAMPLE SAVINGS -$50
BRC BACKROAD Shimano 100GS $269
BRC TREKKER Shimano 200GS $299
BRC SIERRA Shimano 300GS $399
BRIDGESTONE MB3 Shimano DX $899
SAMPLE SAVINGS -$150
BRC LIMELIGHT Shimano DX $599
SBIROCKHOPPER Shimano 400LX $499
MIYATA1000LT Touring Bike $889
ROCKY EQUIPE Shimano DX $1049
-POINT GREY-
224-3536
A
mmWi ——-^•^
SAMPLE SAVINGS -$100
BRC BANZAI Shimano DX/LX $499
BRC GONZO Shimano DX/LX $499
ROCKY FUSION Shimano DX/LX $639
BRC Sierra-ladies only $349
SAMPLE SAVINGS -$200
ROCKY BLIZZARD XT/SYNCROS $1499
ROCKY EXPERIENCE Aluminum $1299
ROCKY CIRRUS Elevated Aluminum ...$1599
ROCKY HAMMER Ritchey Logic $799
KERRISDALE-
263-7587
3771 W. 10th at Alma
6069 W. Boulevard at 45th
OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK!
GREASE
ANY
I  fOOTLONG
SUB OK
| SALAD
*   5738
I   IMIVERStTY BLVD.
_   222-0884
Good-bye greasy kid stuff. Get a real meal at
Subway. Get a big, meaty 6" or footlong Subway
sub made fresh, one at a time with the free fixin's
you choose. Who needs greasy burgers? Try a
fresh Subway sub.
$100 Off
W0
SUBWAY*
Offer Expires: Sept. 24/91
ANY ■
fOOTLONG n
SUB Oft H
SALAD II
I
(WTHEVIiAGE)   |
... J
September 10,1991
TH5u,gxsspy:s/9 "35SS"
"yijjK—yr"
Where the hell is
Fringe F<
• Endange'
Hot For
v>.
Hotting8*01* '
alurrvrd
— , o^ocies con-
EndangetedSpea       triates
• atNTOptey9ab^-mal\to*m
^Sus^aang, a^fiT8t
It fe»tu^9 Sasa yupP«
Jane
W**?^!?Hitschfeld)
ttend,WasAuV».
nd
both
n^Trv ano
^eyport^^0nto,who
Uving ^ dovm^-the notion
SntthusbandbuU{.nt?a
othersen
haP%eboy^B^lstthe
again"
visitor. * <* am ana "**"-;"
worWaitSd disturbed,
distraught an
so are
Sinner
with a
s'twas in the K«, -
88 ev«r in fffi£? ** "^jiuSl !™m «** a neUrosis
Penda8njUchti
*« phone with
°Pens
bang*
i^^SSKss-^.
ier
"'Ml, 12,14
t
99
WHEN one walks on the fringe of
sanity, it is easy to fall off. Fall off into
the brain bending weird world of mad
playwrights.
Witness the corruption, the cruelty, the
fear that envelops characters and leaves
the audience disturbed.
Witness the striving for beauty, for release from ugliness, manifested in the
malignancy and ignorance of the world.
Witness the struggle of free will in the
face
In the
wha
peeg
sions
It'sju
timesj
about
Gose<
*
by Effie Pow
lwl
i some, mime might be a
, white painted face or
someone dressed in a black
leotard and trapped in an
imaginary box, but Antebodies,
an award-winning duo from
Australia, breaks all the conventions.
Obsession
by Antebodies
Arcadian Hall
September 10
(last performance)
Nani McMullin and Wayne
Condo present innovative mime.
Obsession sketches the inventive
games of a woman and a man
that reveal their obsessions or
"persistent ideas of the mind"
with a few oversized props.
The performance of McMullin
and Condo is physical comedy
that combines corporeal mime,
street theatre and "cartoon
imagery." Indeed, the pair often
resemble live animation because
of their exquisite facial expressions and skilled movement.
Antebodies also performed
outdoors at Granville Island
for the Comedy Festival in
August, but taken indoors, their
sophisticated comedy works just
as well. The stylistic exhibition is
a welcome treat and an entertaining addition to the dramatic
performances ofthe Fringe.
10/THE UBYSSEY
September 10,1991 MllafO  MVl I WlH :
SUPPLEMENT
iff.   .\» : i iii^.-jj,
7 7 777'i' '  ,'*'■■ <.f AIDS ACTION SUWHIMSN?
*'.' "'M<
.. f. A. ■ ■ j. ■... e_L
Needle exchange: fighting AIDS on the streets
by Martin Chester
VANCOUVER (CUP)—Inside a
van driving through Vancouver's
downtown Eastside, a nurse who
specializes in sexually transmitted
diseases and a Vancouver Needle
Exchange worker distribute
needles to intravenous drug users.
Six nights a week for the past
two and a half years, the inconspicuous van has patrolled
Vancouver's most prominent drug
distri ct and given away up to 10,000
needles a month.
The needle exchange is an AIDS
prevention programme run by the
Downtown Eastside Youth Activity Society (DEYAS), which was
created 11 years ago to help young
people living on the street.
DEYAS coordinator John
Turvey credits Vancouver's relatively low rate of AIDS among
street people to the needle exchange.
"Among street people in the
world [the rate] is high, but here it
is quite low because of our exchange," Turvey said. "They have
access to clean, sterile needles and
information and are acting responsibly. The programme has
been very successful."
Turvey said 1.5 per cent of IV
drug users tested for AIDS in
Vancouver are HIV positive, compared to as much as 14 per cent in
Montreal and Toronto. New York
has recorded 200,000 IV drug users who are HIV positive, nearly
two thirds of the city's known IV
AIDS and HIV not to be confused
by E. Griffith
The Human Immunodeficiency Virus is associated with an
afflicted immune system, but HIV
and AIDS are not the same thing.
The dominant belief within the
medical community is that HIV
attacks the immune system by
destroying the body's defensive T
cells or by triggering another
mechanism which causes T cells to
disappear. The body is left
undefended against pneumonia,
TB, shingles, Kaposi's sarcomaand
other opportunistic infections,
many of which are not serious to
healthy people.
Without a working immune
system, people with HIV can develop immune deficient-related
diseases which go under the
heading of AIDS. HIV defines
AIDS.
Despite the common association of HIV with deficiency ofthe
immune system, the causal link is
missing. No one has actually shown
that HIV does anything, much less
nun the body's immune system.
According to retrovirologist Peter Deusberg, the viruses consume
a negligible one in 10,000 T cells
daily. By contrast, five per cent of
T cells are regenerated each day.
Nor is HIV necessary for AIDS.
Some patients of diseases that
otherwise fit the criteria for AIDS
do not show signs ofHIV. Deusberg
says theorists are considering
changing the definition of AIDS to
exclude Kaposi's sarcoma, since 20
per cent of KS sufferers do not
carry the virus.
The virus theory is just that: a
theory. Other theories hold that
immune deficiency is more likely
to be caused by multiple factors in
the lifestyles of gaymen.drugusers
and other people in high risk
groups.
Antibiotics, sometimes used as
preventatives for sexually transmitted diseases in a promiscuous
lifestyle, are highly immune-sup-
pressive. Drugs, blood transfusions, malnutrition, radiation and
other shocks to the immune system
are also damaging.
On BBC's programme AIDS
Catch, Deusberg suggested that
scientific principles can be compromised for the sake of scientific
awards, and for profits by pharmaceutical companies manufacturing
anti-virus drugs. Alternative research provides a healthy check on
misinformed trends and company
interest-directed research.
drug users.
The HIV positive rate is higher
in some groups, he said. As many
as half of gay male prostitutes of
aboriginal descent who are IV users may be HIV positive.
A 1989 study in the United
States indicates that IV drug users are the second highest risk
group.
John Blatherwick, the
Vancouver Health Department's
chief medical officer, is apprehensive about the success of the exchange because HIV can take five
to ten years to develop into AIDS.
The programme has only been established for two years.
"The numbers have not gone up
as they have in other cities,"
Blatherwick said. "Certainly [the
needle exchange] is part of the
reason."
Canadian cities with needle
exchanges have not experienced
the same increases as their US
counterparts without similar
programmes.
The exchange also distributes
bleach to IV users to disinfect
needles. *
"We make bleach and watej^
available to people to help them
keep the needles clean," Turvey
said.
Blatherwick explained that the
virus, which is fragile, lives within
a blood cell, and as long as the cell'"'
is intact the virus can survive.   ^
"To exchange the virus it has to
be with fairly fresh blood," he said.
Cleaning the needle with bleach
helps to avoid this possible method
of transmission as well as protecting the user from hepatitis.    »
"When you give out free needles
you have to accept that it will be**
used to take drugs," Blatherwick
said. "But if your child is using
drugs, you don't want to get them
off the drug to find they are HIV
positive." 4
DEYAS set up the programme
in October 1988, five months before^
the City of Vancouver began funding the exchange.
Free and easy to do...
AIDS testing available on campus
AIDS testing currently means
having a blood test for evidence of
the human immunodeficiency virus believed to cause AIDS. Tests
are free, confidential and available on campus.
Student Health Services will
take blood samples and send them
to a central lab. Results take three
weeks and are entirely confidential. Your name will not be on the
sample: it is sent encoded in num
bers and letters. Unless you sign a
release form, no one will know
about the test but you and the
person who draws the blood.
The test detects antibodies that
show the presence of HIV, not the
virus itself. A negative test may be
misleading; it takes the body from
two weeks to six months to produce enough HIV antibodies for
the test to detect them.
A positive test means you have
been exposed to the virus and can
pass it on to others. According to
AIDS Vancouver, half of the people
testing positive for HIV are likel>^
to develop ADDS within 11 years«^
For more information on AIDS
testing, call Student Health at 822-
7011 or AIDS INFO line at 872-
6652. Non-students can make an
appointment at the AIDS Antibody
Testing and Evaluation Clinic aP
660-6161. _
Students - a high risk group.
OMAR DIAZ PHOTO
2/THE UBYSSEY'S AIDS ACTION SUPPLEMENT
September 10,1991 CFS targets students
in AIDS campaign
by Paul Dayson
University and college students are the
target of a new AIDS prevention campaign
by the Canadian Federation of Students.
CFS national executive member Jaimie
McEvoy said, "Canadian students are
amongthe highest riskgroups. Young people
in the age group 20 to 25 are sexually active
and those in post secondary education are
the most sexually active.
"Post secondary students are less likely,
believe it or not, to practice safer sex than
their peers who are not students," he said.
The campaign, with information from
the Ottawa AIDS Society and the Canadian
AIDS Society, consists of posters, bookmarks, pamphlets and local contacts being
distributed to student unions and associations across the country.
The campaign poster says, "Taking risks:
there are no risk groupsonly risk activities"
and lists preventative measures that can
be taken against the spread of AIDS.
The bookmarks, which the CFS hopes
will be easier to pick up than pamphlets,
deal with different risk activities, condom
use, and women and AIDS.
"Women are no exception," bookmark
says. "Just say no to sex unless it is safer."
The success ofthe campaign is now dependent on local CFS unions who McEvoy
hopes will use the materials to augment or
create campaigns of their own.
The Capilano College Students' Society
reacted favourably to the campaign, which
they plan to incorporate into their own.
"They're good quality materials," CCSS
resource person Kerry Hall said, "and they're
here ahead of time."
The CCSS campaign consists of workshops and speakers from community AIDS
organizations such as AIDS Vancouver and
ACT-UP. Comedians and skits are also
planned for pub nights.
Capilano's campaign will have two posters of its own: one targeting heterosexual
couples with the slogan "Safe sex is better
sex" and another aimed at lesbians, gays
and bisexuals.
McEvoy said the decision by CFS to run
the campaign was important.
"It was around the time of the Muse
article (The Gay Man's Guide to Safer Sex)
and efforts to censor the Canadian student
press that the Canadian student movement
took a stand for AIDS education," he said.
Walk to raise funds for PWAs
by Sharon Undores
"Straight or gay, it doesn't matter anyway
What are we going to do about AIDS"
Walk for AIDS "91 has produced a video,
with the help of Vancouver musicians, media and producers. It all came together in
five weeks, and was released on Sunday
night.
The song was produced by Gary
Gilbertson, Julie Brown and Greg Dou
glas for the 10 kilometer pledge walk
around the Stanley Park seawall,
which will take place on Sunday, September 29.
Brown said "I think
Vancouver is the first city
in North America where
the media took a stand on
AIDS and made a song. It sets
an example for all media.
"There are a lot of homophobic
people out there. By being loving and
kind, we can change them and teach them.
"We need to build momentum before
the 29th. We have had an incredible amount
of support and effort by volunteers.
"To me, in this day, the disease has
nothing to do with sexual preferences, it
has to do with raising money and awareness. There are people in BC who are not
getting help and this should be an issue in
the election," Brown said.
"[Homophobia] gets in the way of a
cure. This disease is debilitating to women
and men. It is time to say yes, we are ready
to make a difference," said Brown.
Douglas said "The video is primarily a
promotional tool for the walk. With the
media involved in it, it is more likely to be
addressed. In one way it is bigger than all
that, people came out and had a good time
making the video. Just because there is alot
of work to be done, it doesn't mean that
people can't have fun."
Douglas is expecting a large turn-out
for the walk. Opening ceremonies will include speeches by Mayor Gordon
Campbell, Dr. Peter Jepsen-Young
and Svend Robinson. There will
be entertainment before and
after the walk by the
Vancouver Theatre
Sports League and a variety of entertainers. What
Are We Going To Do? will be
performed again after the walk.
The lyrics were written by Amanda
Hughes and Matthew Campbell did
the music.
Douglas hopes that a lot of university
students will participate in the walk. An
information table will be set up outside of
the UBC Bookstore September 17 and 18,
which will also have registration forms and
pledge booklets.
"If young people don't start realizing
what AIDS is all about, they will become a
high risk group. It could happen to you. It
has gone beyond the gay community; 15000
women in the USA have the disease," said
Douglas.
"I think that university is the time
people really start to think for themselves."
!aW*¥*KW""*53f»S*!
m
O; ^iifzrS- '&i ^w',v ^ u*
■■. >(!■■*
ffe.
S
h
?■ .:■■'
Vi/V
-4   ■       '„ -     -.
h-.,j- ■; -\
IV
V»"
It's time to wake up.
If you are still not aware that AIDS
is. not a gay disease, or a disease of
intravenous drug users, you must have
slept through the last decade. There
are risk activities, not risk groups.
To put it bluntly, AIDS can affect
anyone and that means you. Students
must have been asleep: we are now
considered "high risk."
Students tend to be younger and
fall into the 20 to 25 age group—the
most sexually active. Of this age group,
those attending colleges and universities are the most sexually active.
They are also the least likely to
practice safer sex.
Instead of providing students with
the knowledge to take preventative
action, it seems education has given a
false sense of security and
indestructability.
Last Friday the AMS held a Welcome Back Barbeque. Many of us had
a good time drinking beer, listening to
music and enjoying the company of
friends.
Orientation week has its hazards
as well as thrills; sometimes the thrills
are hazards. Alot of sex happens during orientation week. Some people "got
lucky" at the barbeque.
But alcohol can make you do stupid
things and in the spontaneous heat of
passion, how many of us failed to practice safer sex?
Educate yourself on safer sex, not
just your course materials. If you want
to survive to practice and enjoy what
you have learned at university:
• practice safer sex
• talk about it with your partner, or
partners: ALL of them
• be prepared for safer sex and carry
condoms or dental dams for those
unforseen occasions
• if your partner of choice refuses to
practice safer sex, think about your
choice again
Have fun, enjoy your orgasms, but
do it carefully. Play it safe.
■HI
" iS.
September 10,1991
THE UBYSSEY'S AIDS ACTION SUPPLEMENT/3 AIDS ACTION SUPftBMENT
.............,,.,..„...,,. t ...... .^y.y.^.y,.^.^.....^..,...........
1L
AIDS ACTION SUPPLEMENT
_JiS ,.■:..■:.,
Sex is a fun
mWor*ithr^
CD
O
CD
.c
■*-»
C
<
d
■a
no
as
u>
x
a
(0
ai
X
a.
x
0)
CO
3
CD
o-
c
o
E
.Q
■>
o
CO
S
S
3
■4-"
CD
C
c
3
O
■2
cn
E
o
■D
c
o
o
c
In
o
>-
o
sz
o
e
O
>>
E
0)
sz
o
>
CO
o
CO
E
o
C
o
o
13
CD
i_
O
>
co
o
in
3
his is the story of Bob and Carol
and Ted and Alice and Frank
\ and  Lisa and Stan and Leo
//- ,.<s-
//
/ /■
who arrived at UBC and found condoms in their frosh kits. Bob
usedhis condom with Alice, Ted usedhis with Frank, Susan used
hers with Leo who in turn used his with Stan. Carol and Lisa
weren't sure what to do with their condoms, so they cut them
open and used them as dental dams on each other.
Orientation is a fun time. Sex is a fun thing to do. A
lot of sex happens during orientation week. And that's okay.
But to prevent the risk of getting AIDS or other sexually
transmitted diseases, be sure to always use latex condoms
and dental dams.
AIDS is not a gay disease; it is not something only
happening in San Francisco and New York. People in Vancouver
are living with AIDS. There may well be people at UBC
living with AIDS. You aren't going to catch it if you dance
with them at The Pit, if you borrow their pen in class or if
you eat lunch with them at the Gallery. In fact, you can't
"catch" AIDS at all. AIDS develops in some people who are
HIV positive. The only way you contract the Human
Immunodeficiency Virus is by sharing blood, semen or vaginal
fluid.
Who is at risk for HIV infection? I am. You are. Every
sexually active UBC student who doesn't practice safer sex
is running the risk. Any UBC student who is an IV drug user
and shares needles without cleaning them is at risk.
You can't tell if someone is HIV positive just by
looking at them. People living with HIV don't necessarily
look sick. Some may not even know they are infected. The
fastest growing number of people living with HIV are women.
Straight and bisexual women, and lesbians — we are all at
risk. So are straight, gay and bisexual men.
"Oh BaBy!" I cried as I whipped off my t-shirt. She.
followed suit andruBBedher Bare chest against mine. I was
delighted to suckjon her perky tits as she played with
the hair on the Back.ofmy neck. At this point I wanted to
fuckjherso Badly that I thought I was going to eicplode. I
rotted a thin tateirjjlove onto my hand and dipped my fingers
into the economy-size H&tuBe. I made circles around her
dit again and again white she quietly moaned.
Safer sex. You've heard it all before. HIV is spread
through blood, semen, vaginal fluids. Saliva does not seem
to be an effective carrier. According to some estimates,
you'd need to swallow enough HIV-infected saliva to fill
four milk bags before you really needed to worry. This is
not something you're likely to be able to do and besides,
your partner would drown and you'd dehydrate.
How do we protect ourselves? Always use condoms and
dental dams, clean needles (including those you might use
for drugs, ear piercing or tattoos) and clean sex toys (like
dildos), or always put a condom on them before use. To spice
things up, you can use flavored latex condoms or flavor them
yourself with a little honey. You think condoms feel
unnatural? Interfere with the karmic vibrations? Interrupt
your sex play? Ha!
Stan Began massaging Leo's Backj working down his Body
in slow rhythmic movements. Arriving at his foot he rotted
over and Began massaging it, sucking stowing on each toe. !He
Began moving his way up his teg until he arrived at Leo's
penis. Seeing that he was already hard, Stan rolled a condom
on him, adding some luBe as he did so.
Five other great reasons to use
condoms:
5) They can be fun. You can buy
condoms in lots cf different flavors and
colours. Some glow in the dark. Have
you ever seen a blue penis before?
4) Throw an impromptu party at your
house; you can blow them up and use
them as balloons.
3) Using a condom shows you care
about yourself and about the person
you're with.
2) If you have sex using a condom then
walk around after, you won't have wet,
sticky stuff running down your leg.
1) Anyone can get an STD and anyone
can prevent it.
Condoms and dental dams can be fun to use and don't
need to disrupt your sex play. Condoms should be placed on
the penis before it has any contact with a vagina or an ass.
Even before you ejaculate there is enough pre-cum (semen)
flowing to pose a risk to your partner. "What risks?" you're
wondering. There is enough sperm in pre-cum for your partner
to conceive. Pre-cum is one of the three high-risk fluids
for HIV. Other sexually transmitted diseases such as Pelvic
Inflammatory Disease—which can lead to infertility in
women—can be passed through pre-cum also.
Using latex condoms and dental dams are really easy
ways to avoid such problems. A condom is placed on a hard,
dry penis. If the penis is wet from water, saliva or lube,
the condom will slide off and won't be much good to anyone.
Before unrolling the condom, place a drop of lube on the tip
of it. K-Y Jelly, Mucco, Astroglide or any other water-based
lubes are okay, but oil-based lubes, like Vaseline, will
weaken the condom. So don't use cooking oil! As you roll the
condom on, squeeze out any air that might be in the condom,
otherwise an air bubble may form and cause it to break.
Pulling out before you cum is a good idea, if you want
to be extra careful. That's it. Did that wreck your
foreplay? It doesn't wreck mine. After you've cum, if you
haven't pulled out already don't wait too long. Hold on to
the condom while you're pulling out, otherwise it might slip
off, releasing any fluid into the person you just tried to
protect.
Alice smiled as she ruBBedher Breasts against his
chest, feeling his chest hairs Brushing against her. While
niBBUng at his nipple she paused and reached over to the
Bedside table, grabbing a condom and a container of
luBricant.
Dental dams and non-lubed condoms should be used for
safer oral sex. A dental dam is a square sheet of rubber,
sometimes flavored to taste like vanilla or bubble gum, and
keeps any fluid from the vagina from entering your mouth or
vice versa. You need to do this because you can come into
contact with HIV when having oral sex. Going down on a
menstruating woman without a dam is a big no-no. Menstrual
blood can carry HIV. Vaginal fluid and pre-cum carry HIV and
during unprotected oral sex can get into your blood stream.
You see, every time you brush your teeth, floss, bite your
tongue or even eat something you create small cuts that
allow HIV to get in or out. Most of these cuts heal very
quickly and if you're concerned about your breath, use
mouthwash before playing and leave brushing your teeth to
afterwards.
For safer oral sex, stretch a dental dam or a double
layer of saran wrap across the vaginal or anal opening. Make
sure you always know which side of the dam is against the
vagina or ass and which is against the tongue. If you drop
the dam, get a new one. Rimming (oral sex on an ass) is
fairly low risk in terms of HIV exposure, but high risk for
hepatitis. There is no specific medical treatment available
for hepatitis 8, and in some cases it can be fatal. There is
now a vaccine for hep B to prevent you from getting it. But
the Judds had to quit touring because Mama Judd had
hepatitis. You don't want to end up like that do you? With
yellowing skin, nausea and singing country songs?
Negotiating safer sex can be difficult. Sometimes our
boyfriends are morons. Sometimes our girlfriends are jerks.
Some of us are survivors of sexual assault where we had no
say in the matter. Finally, almost none of us know how to
talk to each other about sex. As difficult as it may be, you
need to try, to protect your life and the life of your
partner.
"Slide on home BaBy," I Begged, "Slide into me. "She
left the room and I thought "Oh Qod, no. She's leaving me."
'But a few minutes later she returned. "I can't do this
without the right equipment, "she smiled as she dangled a
vanilla-flavored dental dam in front of my nose. I spread my
legs apart, making room for her face Between my legs. She
snapped the dam Backhand I shrieked with delight, knowing
that moments later her mouth would Be on me.
. c
co
3°
cm
o>
o
o
3
Q.
O
3
CA
zr
%
w
■■<
o
c
o
CO
0)
o
c
><
o
c
by A!! Biggs and Robin Forbes
(CUP) with Ubyssey staff.
..„ „m snm ai iip qi ohm luaDnis oan A"uv -MSIJ aui 3uiuu.ru si xas jajes aoipaid i.usaop ou./a iuapras oan 9A|pe Alienxas fodfQ 'ate noA -we |
•spm,; ,eu!3BA .ueuie. -poo.q ,*«« pBaJds s, AIH -pwuui aJB fen mou, uaAa pu feu awos to .oo, flueneo*. >.uop AIH ujim Sun. e,doad .MSU j. ., wau, ?U!uBa,o mow* sa.paau saJBL1s pue J9sn Brup Al ue s, ou.m .uapms oan Auy W . .
03
Q.
CD
IT
O
C
T3
CD
o
CD
o
CD
Z3
Q.
Q)
3
cn
o
?
£=
CT
CD
Q.
a
o
ZJ
Q.
o
3
cn
co
IT
CD
cn
CD
Q.
cn
CO
o
I
cn
CD
X
-<
o
c
3
CD
CD
Q.
a
o
r*
ZT
0)
O
0]
c
cn
CD
■g
c
o
Q>
3
o
o
3
CD
O
o
ZT
X
<
3"
CD
3
ZT
i.
3
TO
O
sl
cn
CD
X
<
3
31
O
rz>
o'
3
-O .„,..,y..,..........r....w y-y% ;■'■' ■;    '    '
■ ■   ,,.,, .? ,t?,Gfi.y. ......      g,,,,,   . .?.      ........    ■ ■; P. ,'//">> . ■• ......&.   •   •■  *
AIDS action group makes demands
by Paul Dayson
ACT-UP. Their name expresses
their philosophy, which is also
evident in the slogan they have
made famous: BSilence=Death."
Silent they are not. Confrontation is their style and the basis of
their tactics.
The Vancouver chapter of ACT-
UP has been in existence just over
a year. Its first action, a "die-in" at
Robson Square, brought criticism
that it did not live up to ACT-UP
New York's reputation for confrontation.
A year later this could hardly
be the case following boisterous
demonstrations. At the Queen
Elizabeth Theatre last August, the
U TV station in January, and the
Social Credit convention in July,
ACT-UP has been vocal and confrontational. In all of these demonstrations, arrests took place.
ACT-UP spokesperson Margaret Knight said, "ACT-UP uses
confrontation because non-confrontational tactics don't work.
They focus media and public attention on AIDS issues.
"Back room meetings come in
useful but higher levels of media
and public awareness puts pressure on politicians."
The institution of full funding
of the drug AZT by the BC government is an example of this, according to Knight.
"We feel the main reason that
the government has begun funding
AZT is because of our actions," she
said.
"The media attention that we
generated has caused people to reexamine their views."
ACT-UP plans to continue demonstrating now that AZT is being
fully funded and will direct their
attention at other AIDS-related
health care issues. Some of ACT-
UFs goals are:
• Fundingof drugs other than AZT,
which are used to fight opportunistic diseases occurring when the
immune system grows weak. These
drugs could prevent diseases such
as Pneuo Cisis Pneumonia, and
save many lives.
• A more rigorous legal definition
(by the Centre for Disease Control
and governments) of whether a
patientisconsideredto have AIDS.
Some people, many of whom are
women, are dying ofthe same opportunistic infections that are associated with AIDS but are not
considered AIDS. Often their disease is called Non-descript
Immunio dysfunction and is considered an AIDS-related disease.
Yet because it is not considered
to be AIDS, they cannot receive
AIDS treatments nor the disabled
benefits AIDS patients receive.
• Increases in the number of housing subsidies for PWAs.
• Access to bleach and condoms in
prisons. Although prison authorities may deny it, prisoners have
sex, use intravenous drugs and
tattoo themselves without using
precautions.
In the United States some sur-
veyshave shown ratesof 30 percent
of prison populations testing HIV
positive.
• Repeal of Bill 34, the quarantine
Graffiti as dialogue
in street art project
by Sharon Undores
"New Urban Street Art" has
decorated a Denman Street construction site since mid-June. Ten
Vancouver artists painted hoardings to raise money for the AIDS
Vancouver Emergency Assistance
Fund.
The project was sponsored by
The Vancouver Step in conjunction
with Art Reach auction. Ray
Deerborn, editor of The Step, is
pleased with the project.
"It has brought positive attention to help the AIDS Fund and Art
Reach. Passers-by look at the art
and so the project has given legitimacy to street art.
"It has been an interactive
project," Deerborn said. "For example, Joe Average's hoarding
began with a face, a tree and the
question 'If AIDS was a disease
that killed trees, would anyone find
a cure?' Another individual responded in graffiti, *No, they would
cut all the trees down.' At which
point Average painted over it all,
leaving a tree stump and a tear in
the face."
"It is part of a community issue
and I hope to see a project like that
again," Deerborn said.
■!>*»-■""
' ■>*
i^^g&'&^i&i
law, that was passed by the provincial government in 1988. The
bill targets people who are HIV
positive and makes it possible for
the authorities to place them in
quarantine.
Knight said, "There is a vested
interest in not working for the
disenfranchised, people with
AIDS, sex trade workers, and
people of colour.
"We've won one battle. Now we
are getting into other concerns."
Two ACT-UP members will be
appearing in court on charges of
mischief for damage under $1,000
on November 13th. They allegedly
applied water-soluble red handprints to pillars at the Pan Pacific
Hotel during the Social Credit
Convention.
i   ■*"ri'::£,<- ■ V.l£'-
■:&■:
A,
v v.
Mitchell Wiebe is one ofthe six
graduates from Emily Carr who
was askedto participate. "I thought
it was a greatidea, there shouldbe
more art out in the public.
"There was quite a bit of interaction with the pieces and the
graffiti has been going on as a kind
of conversation.
"I think there is always a possibility to change people's minds.
Everyone has different backgrounds and it is hard to direct
peoples opinions, but options are
there for the viewer," Wiebe said.
"A project like this could lead to
more public awareness about
AIDS, although it wouldn't necessarily inform anybody."
Ron Kearse is organizing Art
Reach. "There is a lot of misinformation about AIDS and there is a
lot of work to be done out there,"
Kearse said.
"I was happy to see people involved. It was great to see people
paintingtheir hearts outfor anoble
cause.
"Unfortunately the Art Reach
auction has been postponed, because politics reared its ugly head.
I still want to do something; it will
probably just take another form."
ACT-UP stages "die-inon Art Gallery steps.
REBECCA BISHOP PHOTO
AIDS news briefs
compiled by Effie Pow
UBC research paper
Research by an associate professor and a PhD student at UBC
shows that boosting the immune
system's response to Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) may
accelerate the virus.
Geoffrey Hoffmann, an associ-
Jkl
•.SzZiwA
Funky art sparks controversy on Denman St.
SHARON LINDORES PHOTO
ate professor with joint appointment in microbiology and physics
and PhD student Tracy Kion,
published a paper based on research started in 1987.
The paper was published in the
journal Science (published by the
American Association for the Advancement of Science) on Friday.
HIV destroys the body's disease-fighting system and leads to
AIDS (acquired immune deficiency syndrome). Most research
is centred around repairing and
boosting the immune system, but
Hoffmann and Kion believe it may
be important to suppress the immune system's response to HIV
rather than boost the system.
UBC psychologist
studies how gay
men with AIDS cope
Assistant professor Rebecca
Collins is interviewing HIV-infected gay men from the Vancouver
area. Collins started her study in
the summer and will continue this
fall.
The study is conducted in conjunction with the Vancouver Persons With AIDS Society and
Collins hopes to interview 100 gay
men.
Data from the interviews and
questionnaires shouldbe compiled
within six months.
AIDS and the Native
community
As reported in the May/June issue
ofthe First Nations' Drum:
According to Deborah Mears, a
spokesperson for the Vancouver
Native Health Society, federal
statistic:* count 24 Native AIDS
cases across Canada. "In the 100-
block East Hastings we know of 36
cases."
She said the number of untested
Native people who have AIDS could
be ten times greater than that
figure.
John Turvey, a spokesperson of
the Downtown Eastside Youth
Association, said, up to 80 per cent
of those tested by the association
to be HrV-positive are young Native women.
€/THE UBYSSEY'S AIDS ACTION SUPPLEMENT
September 10,1991 AIDS ACTION SUPPLEMENT
,5»"
&*&
**'/',"
¥$\
- - s_ jj. . jj&y. v. ..j.
Number of women AIDS cases increasing
by Sharon Lindores
Although AIDS (Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome) was
once inaccurately known as GRID
(Gay-Related Immune Deficiency),
AIDS may affect anyone.
The number of women who are
HIV (Human Immunodeficiency
Virus) positive and who have AIDS
is increasing—awareness is not.
Sandra Chan, a ministry of
health spokesperson, said,"British
Columbia has the highest total
number of AIDS cases per capita
in Canada." She predicted more
women will be infected in the future.
There are 17 reported cases of
women with AIDS, but there are,
by a conservative estimate, 400
women who areHIVpositiveinBC.
According to Chan, statistics are
deceiving because of many unidentified cases. "AIDS cases are
just the tip ofthe iceberg. There is
an incubation period of tenyears for
HIV."
HIV is contracted more frequently through sexual intercourse
than intravenous means in Canada.
According to a Vancouver Health
Department publication, 62 per
cent of women with AIDS acquired
the infection through heterosexual
contact in Canada.
One of the problems of low-
awareness is conveying the information. Lezlie Wagman, of the
Vancouver Health Department,
believes AIDS education is not
completely successful.
"Surveys show that the public is
quite knowledgeable. However,
less than ten per cent ofthe population uses condoms—obviously
something is wrong," she said.
"Homophobia is an obstacle to
obtaining information. Trying to
educate women is difficult because
they've been told for so long that
if s a gay disease. And it's hard to
educate the public because they
don't want to know. Denial is a
problem in the population. Women
are not solely responsible, it's a
shared concern."
According to Rebecca Fox,
Spokesperson for the Women and
HIV/AIDS Support Network, physicians may have little or no experience in dealing with HIV and
AIDS. As well, physicians do not
acknowledge the symptoms because of social stereotypes.
Martin Schecter, an associate
professor in the UBC health care
department, agreed there are
problems in the medical field.
"There is less experience in dealing with women than with men.
Some ofthe manifestations ofthe
disease are different."
For example women are unlikely to develop a purple skin
cancer (Kaposi's sarcoma lesions)
common in HIV-positive gay men.
Some vaginal infections seem to
be related to HIV such as recur-
rentyeast infection, pelvic inflammatory disease, and a virus that
causes genital warts (human
papillomavirus), Schecter said.
HIV-positive women also tend to
have abnormal Pap smears and
irregular periods.
These symptoms, however, are
common in women and are therefore easily overlooked. Nobody
wants to create unnecessary
anxiety. "Some women have never
dealt with HIV," Schechter said.
"They think of a lot of possibilities
before HIV. The virus has all different ways of presenting itself.
Diagnosis may be missed because
sexual histories are not adequate."
Late diagnoses cause problems
because the illness is further developed and can be unknowingly
passed on. Once diagnosed,
women with HIV/AIDS may be
isolated because they do not share
an established community for support.
Two main organizations are
available to women in Vancouver.
The Women and HIV/AIDS Support Network provides support and
information for HIV-positive
women. The Women and AIDS
project focuses on education and
public awareness and is open to all
women.
A Vancouver Health Department publication and Ms. Magazine claim that AIDS has become
one ofthe leading causes of death
for women between the ages of 20
and 40 in major cities of North
America, Western Europe and sub-
Saharan Africa.
This article is reprinted from the
March 8th edition of The Ubyssey
Lesbian complacency, AIDS and safer sex
by Nikola Marin
Lesbians constitute the bulk of
female AIDS activists as well as
filling a prominent role as
caregivers.
However, the view that lesbians
have the lowest risk of contracting
AIDS persists.
The idea not only relies on an
outdated and useless notion ofrisk
groups" but is based on certain
stereotypes and misconceptions
about lesbian sexuality.
Misconceptions include: lesbians have little contact with high
risk groups; lesbians are relatively
monogamous; and lesbian sex in
volves little exchange of body fluids.
In the article Lesbians and the
AIDS Crisis, Zoe Leonard says,
"Lesbians are not a homogeneous
or isolated community: there are
lesbians who shoot drugs and share
needles, who have been married,
who are in prison, who have chil-
I
Ac
fo.
-*   iTi°wri
*!*?th;2e_*iDs
"ot.^ic.
■Hit
1990
^m
do.
(*ID£
nil
"Our
-e.r
Ti'f-
si*th
caUc
LOfl      £ — *4      g
dren, who have sex for money, who
get raped.
"Lesbians are at risk through
[artificial] insemination. Andmany
lesbians have sex with men."
According to a recent Kinsey
study, 46 per cent of women who
identified themselves as lesbians
had had sex with men at least once
since 1980.
Without multiple exposure
categories for women, statistics on
lesbians and AIDS are obscure.
Lena Einhorn, in her article
Time To Re-evaluate "Least Risk'
Groups, says, "Lesbian sexual contact is not regarded as a risk factor, and it seems likely that lesbians with AIDS, especially if they
have reported IV drug use or sexual
contact with a man at risk, to some
extent have been referred to the
general poolofwomenwithAIDS'."
Furthermore, physicians generally assume the female AIDS
patients they interview are
straight and thus often fail to ask
about sex with women.
Dr.Charles Schable, who conducts transmission studies for the
American Center for Disease
Control (CDC), says in an interview with the lesbian magazine
Visibilities, the CDC does not examine risks for gay women because
"lesbians don't have much sex."
The CDC does not include
woman-to-woman transmission in
its breakdown of AIDS cases de
spite such existing cases, as published in journals like The Lancet.
Doctors often overlook medical
manifestations of HIV in women,
so many cases go undiagnosed or
untreated until very late.
The pervasive denial by lesbians of their vulnerability to the
virus is as threatening as the misogyny and homophobia of the
medical establishment.
_ Laurie Hauer, a registered
nurse and coordinator of the Bay
Area Perinatal AIDS Center says,
"Lesbians need a better way of assessing their own risks and the
risks of their partners and dealing
with it."
One thing is clear: lesbians are
not without risk and denial may
place lesbians most at risk.
Jane Livingston of the PWLA
Network of Saskatchewsin says,
"People are prone to lie when it
comes to revealing parts of their
past that they may be ashamed of.
Lesbians are especially reluctant
to reveal that they have slept with
men or used IV drugs."
Whether it's scooping some latex gloves from Student Health for
fisting/digital play, slitting an
unlubricated condom from, stem to
stern, and/or picking up some "thin
gauge" dental dams for oral kicks,
lesbians would do well to acquaint
themselves with the risks and then
take the necessary precautions.
*>e
Co«dL
^^mm^.
1991
:ifflWlW»,«l
PPLErVtENT/7 vu—y	
' ,   '*
,}"-'
AIDSACHON
&
Throwing out the garbage about AIDS and HIV
Myth: AIDS originated in Africa when a green monkey bit someone.
Fact: It is not known where the disease originated, nor is
it constructive to pin the blame on someone or something.
Epidemiologists have theorized about the relationship
between HIV and similar viruses infecting simians in
Africa but nothing has been proved.
Myth: Prostitutes are responsible for much of the
spread of AIDS.
Fact: There is no proven link between prostitutes and an
increase in the incidence of HIV or AIDS. Organizations in
many cities in North America teach street workers to
practice safe sex. And in fact, street workers are among the
most organised in teaching safe sex. It is in prostitutes best
interest to use condoms to protect themselves against
contracting HIV from their customers.
Myth: ADDS is a gay disease.
Fact: AIDS is NOT restricted to gays. Anyone can become
infected with the virus that causes AIDS
through:
• Sexual intercourse: any person infected with HIV can transmit the virus
to another person through sexual activity where semen, vaginal fluids or blood
enter another's body.
• Needle sharing: sharing hypodermic
needles for injecting drugs can pass infected blood from one person to another.
Instruments that puncture the skin such
as razors, tattoo needles, ear piercers and acupuncture
needles can also be contaminated if not properly sterilized.
• Pregnancy: An infected mother can transmit HIV to her
child during pregnancy and delivery. The risk of transmission is at least 50 per cent.
Myth: ADDS can be "caught" through casual contact
such as kissing and hugging or from toilet seats.
Fact: There is no evidence of HIV transmission through
kissing, hugging, crying, sneezing, shaking hands or by
using an infected person's eating utensils, toilet or towel.
Avoid sharing razors. While HIV has been detected in low
concentrations in saliva, urine and tears, it has not been
shown to be transmitted through these body fluids.
Myth: Douching can help wash out HIV.
Fact: Douching is more likely to wash out the enzymes
capable of fighting HIV. There is no substitute for safe sex.
Myth: As long as you don't belong to a high risk
group you are OK.
Fact: AIDS is transmitted by what you do, not who you
THE
ULTIMATE
PUT-ON
are.
It does not restrict itself to certain demographic groups but
affects everyone including women, children and straight
men. Anyone can get AIDS if they take part in risky
activities.
Myth: ADDS is God's punishment for homosexuality
and drug use.
Fact: It would be strange for a god who would choose to
punish gay men and injection drug users but not to punish
those who smoke drugs while also attacking hemophiliacs,
children and those who receive tattoos or ear-rings. Any of
us can get AIDS.
Myth: If you test HIV positive it means you have
ADDS.
Fact: A positive test result means that you have come into
contact with HIV and that your body
has produced antibodies to attempt to
build up an immunity to the virus. It is
thought that people who test HIV positive have up to a 50 per cent chance of
developing one or more of the infections associated with AIDS within an
eight year period after being infected.
Myth: A positive test result on an
HIV antibody test is a death sentence.
Fact: AIDS is now closer to a chronic manageable disease,
than a death sentence. People with HIV and AIDS often
lead productive and enjoyable lives despite their condition.
Myth: A person can become infected by givingblood.
Fact: There is no danger of contracting AIDS by donating
blood. A new needle is used for every donation. The risk of
becoming infected by blood or blood products is extremely
low. Strict testing procedures have been in place for all
blood donations since 1985.
Myth: You can get AIDS from a mosquito bite.
Fact: No.
Myth: There are no known cases of woman-to-woman
transmission.
Fact: At least three documented cases of lesbian transmission exist, but almost no research has been done exclusively on woman-to-woman transmission, and so such
statistics are deceiving.
Shields' condoms may well qualify
as the ultimate. We wouldn't
put you on about that
We use only premium latex. And Shields
are put through 11 tests.
4 tests beyond strict federal
standards. If you want much
more assurance, you'd better
just say no.
Shields quality control lets us
keep them remarkably thin, so
ShicMc: I ShiekfeL f ShiekK"
maximum security won't
minimize enjoyment. In
fact, they're a real
sensation.
Thinking
about what you
use a condom for,
wouldn't you choose
the ultimate?
Shields. Your partners in
protection. There's nothing more
comforting to put on for bed.
Shields
*    PREMIUM
LATEX
CONDOMS
Make no mistake
Trademark £ onno Pharmaceutical (Canada) Ltd i99i
Shieics information line See package inserts 'or our toll-free number A Sponsor of the Blockbuster New Film   Madonna Truth or Dare
St Paul's Hospital
HIV Research Program
Volunteers Required
A study of the oral absorption of 3TC, a new
anti-HTV drug is currently underway.
Volunteers should be HIV positive with a CD4
count between 200-500 and be on no medications
for at least 3 weeks.
The study consists of a 2 night stay on 2 separate
occasions one week apart
Volunteers will be financially compensated.
If interested, please contact:
Patricia Fulton
Clinical Trials Coordinator
Infectious Disease Clinic
St. Paul's Hospital
Vancouver, B.C.
631-5054
A guide to
local AIDS
resources and
organizations
There are several organizations which provide support
and information on AIDS
education.
AIDS Information Line
872-6652
AIDS Vancouver
#509-1033 Davie St.
Vancouver, BC
687-2437
ACT-UP (AIDS Coalition
to Unleash Power)
669-0121
British Columbia Task
Force: AIDS, Women and
Children
c/o Cathleen Smith
Douglas College
ECE-Programme,
PO Box 2503
New Westminster, BC
Information Network about
women, children, and families, which meets every two
months.
Downtown Eastside
Youth Activity Services
and Needle Exchange
221 Main St.
Vancouver, BC
(DEYAS) 685-4488,
(Needle Exchange) 685-6561
Street project for young
people which offers AIDS
educational programmes.
Hey-way*-noqu',
Healing Centre for
Addiction Society
#206-33 E. Broadway
Vancouver, BC
874-1831
A Native healing centre.
Ministry of Health BC
Centre for Disease Control
828 W. 10th Ave.
Vancouver, B.C.
AIDS Information Line: 872-
6652
Resource centres,  street
projects and testing clinics.
National HIV
Trials Network
631-5327.
Clinical
Oxfam Global Health
Project
738-2116.
People with AIDS Coalition
683-3381.
Vancouver Health Dept.,
Community Health Education
736-2033
Women and HIV/AIDS
Support Network
255-9858
Women and AIDS Project
#302-1720 Grant St.
Vancouver, BC
255-9811
Funded by Health and Welfare Canada for education
and public awareness about
women and AIDS, the project
operates a drop-in support
group which meets the first
and third Tuesday of each
month.
8/TrlE UBYSSEY'9 AIDS ACTION SUPPLEMENT
September 10,1991 estiva I
c
*?"*/>,
fawn
I
<*vIh
ng
°AME>
r
of oppressive fate. Laugh at the
absurdity of it all.
e reviews the reader will glimpse
lies on the fringe, a land where
ie-jpersistently pursue their pas-
o their graves, death always having the last laugh.
3t like real life, except that some-
; is easier to clearly see what life's
when one looks from the Fringe,
ashow and find out for yourself!
flay.,,theshow £<**» I
^scri°tCzec}>oshvanof
J13' H J!5
future's n^dother'
honest u. .ts fo
>fs«'pla
?8«ht
5und
Js«cants
crav
es.
d tale of a madman
by Greg Davis
A GAUNT, haggard face, bulging eyes and a
frenzied grin—these are the expressions of
a madman! Provincetown Playhouse is the story   ■
of that insane genius, the crazed play"-™"1-1*
Charles Charles, age 38. brilliantly c.,.. _,
Simon Webb.
Provincetown Playhouse
Mount Pleasant Community Centre
September 11-15
From his cell in the asylum he recounts his
"farewell" performance: 19 years ago at the age
of 19, on July 19, 1919. Roland Brand plays
Charles Charles, age 19, interacting with his 38-
year-old self, a ghost in the mind of a maniac.
Winslow Byron and Alvin Jensen are the 19
year-old supporting actors, sturdily played by
Don Noble and Troy Skog respectively.
Charles Charles pens a play that involves the
sacrificial slaying of beauty, the stabbing of a
child 19 times. Of course the bag was supposed to
contain only wood and a sack of pig's blood, not a
real child—or was it?
Both incarnations of Charles Charles eventually unravel the mystery, their dialogue a
mixture of calm, twisted rationality and deranged ecstatic rants. The pace never relents,
nor does the emphatic enthusiasm ofthe actors.
The barriers between the stage and the
audience, sanity and psychosis, and
beauty and horror melt away, with the
shocking death of a child underlying
the morass.
i,.//,,'/■,'}'■■■' Charles Charles reminds me of
^'i'''/)' '■'•'''       Charles Man son—dangerously
Jjjii* '.•/'*'      psychotic as well as detached from his
ti'illiif '■' ''     feelings and his connection with the
//;■'■'     '      world. He is trapped within his
own fabricated perceptions thai; allow him
to see murder as sacrifice and inflict pain
without remorse.
Then again, world leaders and generals fit the
• same description, for like our aforementioned
psychopaths, they beguile others to do the bloody
deeds and chalk it up as a necessary measure
with chilling reasoning. Like Winslow Byron
yelled at the audience during the trial scene,
"You are all guilty!'
y
Tho»Terb%hZh tb«
%be e"dinf"yenjoy.
4Water u* }bet*ickli      a
****
^
h^ve the J  f end- she dZ
1-^»'sSanCe^hing
sub«ecoDa,*,   ^ePlay's
concern.    ^"contemZary
sags? 2:^
w°man qUesf •„ dm,rers- One
Cross-dreZ^0n8 Wh*thertZ
^,d»aJIybe^esUrf
confrontafaonajn««on-
■■ s m* ^ ■■ _ , i
September 10,1991
THE UBYSSEY /U The Ubyssey has
office orientation
and two news seminars scheduled this
week for interested
students:
Victor Chew Wong,
who worked as a copy
editor at The Globe
and Mail this summer,
will give a news seminar on Tuesday, September 10th at
5:30pm.
Note: orientation will
be at 4:30pm.
Mark Nielsen, who
worked at various BC
community papers
this summer, will give
a news seminar on
Friday at 3:30pm.
Note: orientation will
be at 2:30pm.
Come to The Ubyssey
office (SUB 241K) for
other orientation times
and look out for future
seminars.
ATTITUDE
CLOTHING
FOR   MEN
(B
SAFEWAY
We bring it all together ♦
For all your grocery needs and
more, Safeway is ready to help
you with convenient shopping
hours, superior selection,
competitive prices and service
that's second to none! Our friendly staff are here to help you any
way that we can.
555 W. 12th AVE
CITY SQUARE MALLL
— OPEN —
8 a.m. to 10 p.m.
7 Days a Week
990 W. 25th AVE
KING EDWARD MALL
— OPEN —
8 a.m. to Midnight
7 Days a Week
8555 Granville St
at 70th AVE.
— OPEN —
8 a.m. to Midnight
7 Days a Week
4575 W. 10th AVE
at SASMAT
— OPEN —
8 a.m. to Midnight
7 Days a Week
27333 W. BROADWAY
at MACDONALD
— OPEN —
8 a.m. to Midnight
7 Days a Week
2315 W. 4th AVE
at VINE
— OPEN —
8 a.m. to Midnight
7 Days a Week
FAST, FRIENDLY SERVICE...
THAT CLOTHES
MAKE THE MAN
THEN SOME MEN
ARE MADE OF STEEL
WITH THIS COUPON
Coquitlam • Pacific Centre • Richmond Centre
Guildford Town Centre • Lansdowne Park
Park Royal • Brentwood Mall • Eaton Centre Burnaby
Metro Town Centre • Lougheed Mall • Tillicum Mall
DISCOVER   THE   LOOK
ON ANY MINIMUM
PURCHASE OFS75
LID UNTIL SEPT   28.  I'.
ONLY ONE COUPON
HSlti'WHV*
. >.
,,*S;■■■■■
B^ittt*             **"
*                "              IF IT'S TRUE
Hot Flash!
The Anti-Discrimination Committee will
have its first meeting
of the academic year
on Wednesday, September 11th at
12:30pm. Meet outside SUB 130
(Women's Centre).
Everyone welcome.
Hot Flash!
A meeting to brainstorm for solutions to
campus parking problems has been organized by Jason Brett
and Martin Ertl. Open
to UBC students.
On Wednesday, September 11th at 5pm in
council chambers.
SILKSCREENING
(1 WEEK DEUVEET ON STOCK ITEUS)
T-SHIRTS
SWEATSHIRTS ..S5r.°...  $15.20 ea.
Other styles, colours & fabric contents available
' Based on 2S-* units '
TERMS AND CONDITIONS: Price includes 1 colour
print, choice of ink colour, screen set-up &
artwork. No hidden charges. Options: flashcure-
add ,38t/print (for solid coloured fabric) & puff
mk-add,75e/print S-M-L-XL sizes only. XXL
by quotation only. Additional colours by
Quotation only. PST & GST added where
applicable
Call the:
KENNY OYE SPORTSWEAR HOTLINE:
270-6348
Superb Food &
Friendly Staff
Recommended by
James Barber's
"Best Eating"
Take out
Wedding parties
Anniversaries
Birthdays
Try Our
Daily Specials
Sun-Thurs
1 lam-midnight
Fri. & Sat. 1 lam-lam
2272 West 4th Ave.
736-2118/736-9442
WRITING THE
OCTOBER
GMAT?
Kaplan's
GMAT
test prep course
starts Sept. 12
on U.B.C. campus
Stanley H. Kaplan
Educational Center Ltd.
944-7717
12/THB UBYSSEY
S«rt€Witerl&A9$* NEWS
Loan applications in
Ontario skyrocket
by Clive Thompson
TORONTO (CUP) — The number
of students applying for financial
aid in Ontario this year has shot
through the roof.
As of August 16, more than
69,000 students applied for aid
under the Ontario Student Assistance Plan—an increase of 44 per
cent over last year's figure of
47,900.
Students and university officials say the increase reflects the
sagging economy, which has killed
thousands of jobs for both students
and their families.
This summer has to be the
worst summer I can ever remember for student employment, and
that hasn't been helped by the cuts
to government job programs," said
Laurie Kingston, chair of the
Ontario Federation of Students.
According to Statistics Canada,
Ontario student unemployment
reached 15.4 per cent this summer,
with 87,000 jobless.
Tight financial times have also
reduced parental contributions,
forcing more students to turn to
government assistance, said
Debbie Mair, a financial aid counsellor at the University of Guelph.
"The economy has a lot to do
with it, what with families out of
work. And a lot more people are
staying in school."
Richard Jackson, an official
with Ontario's ministry of colleges
and universities, doesn't buy this
argument. He said the main reason for the surge in applications is
that the government simplified the
loan form this year, making it
easier and quicker to fill out and
process.
The total number of applications, which can be filed up until
January, will not increase by more
than eight per cent over last year's
130,000, he predicted. Ontario has
boosted its OSAP funding by 7.8
per cent this year, bringing the
level to $220 million.
"We haven't found that people
are a lot poorer than before,"
Jackson said. "At this time in the
year, we attribute the numbers to
a sped-up process, not a drastic
increase in need."
But while Kingston and university student award officers
agree the new form may have sped
things up, they feel economic factors are also at work.
Kingston, who herself is $13,000
in debt from student aid, said the
number of student applications
would be up even if the forms had
remained the same.
"Fm a (loan) recipient myself,
and I know that even if the form is
a royal pain, you're still going to
fill it out if you need the money."
Karel Swift, director of student
awards at U of T, said she expects
an increase in the number of applications duetotighterfamily and
student budgets.
foa youcv tovtio^   fees.
^ t"
\
*i.
R E F U NILPOL1CY
<t$<t$<t$<t$<t$$$<t$<t$<t
/
*
\\
NO
RECEIPT?
We will be
pleased to offer
you an exchange
for other
merchandise.
(Please note
textbooks are
accepted for
refund or
exchange during
the current term
only).
ALL
MERCHANDISE
All merchandise* is
returnable for
refund within 14
DAYS of purchase,
accompanied by
your sales receipt
and in resaleable
condition.
'Exceptions:
special orders,
computer
hardware &
software, postal
services, sale
Items, and items
which cannot be
returned due to
health regulations
(medical
instruments,
dissecting kits,
safety goggles
andswim wear).
: BOOKSTORE
6200 University Boulevard
Tel-822-2665 (UBC-BOOK)
COURSE
BOOKS
For your
convenience, at
the beginning of
each new
session the
refund period for
textbooks Is
extended to end
of the add/drop
period.
Fall: Sept 27,
1991
Winter: Jan 24,
1992
Spring: May 15,
1992
Summer: July 10,
1992
The University of British Columbia
FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE
presents
5th of July
by Lanfoid Wilson
A comedy in the Chekhovian mode
Directed by John Wright
September 18-28
Special Wednesday Review - September 18
2 for the price of 1 regular admission
Curtain: 8pm
1991-92 Season of Four Plays
5th of My Romeo and Met Sarcophagus SanperFkfcfc
September 18-28       November 6-16 Jartury 15-25 March 4-14
by Lanford Wilson  by William Shakespeare   by Vladimir Gubaryev       by Ian Weir
Season Prices • Adult $33 • Student $22
Box Office • Frederic Wood Theatre • Room 207
Support Your Campus Theatre
a TOC Christian
We invite you to join us by
starting the year in
mm
f
Date: This Sunday Sept 15,8:30 - 9:30 pm
Place: V.S.T. Vancouver School of Theology, Chapel of the Epiphany
Organized by the Student Residents of Carey Mall
Worship for Students, By Students
MsSgSgSgSgScSgSgSgS^ScS^S*
FEEL   THE   GRD1CN !
September 10,1991
THE UBYSSEY/13 Seriously.
Buy a Serious machine.
THE     PS/2     55SX
Save some Serious cash.
P^pJpjyfiEf^i^yJi^P^^i^B^EV^i^i^^f^Hpjp^l
Have some Serious fun.
WITH     THE     MONEY     YOU     SAVE
Buy an I UNI Personal System/2 Model .").">S\ .it thi>
special student price now. and you'll be ready lor anything
lake term papers, assignments. r\am>. and «|irin<; hreak!
The l'S/2 ,">S\ >r\\f- >ou lull 386S\ power to create
impressiyc papers, jrraphics. and spreadsheets. It come-
wilh 2 Ml? lUM.a'.-tO MBharddriye. 85U \C\ colour
display. IBM Mouse, and IBM DOS .",.(!.
Nou II also lie elifdhle to win a year's
tuition in the I KM Back to School Contest*
l-'or a hands-on demo, drop h\
and see us lodav.
It's time to "el serious!
W:.
°6,
 ' "™ * "'"I I <•■-!•■' <■•> -—.il.l-t.- .l-iuil-. t II'- "II- i-1'" I M .| il -IU.I....I.. l-.-„li.
.!.,H»l»,„„l.r.„i HIM l-S/J M...I. I H.-..,-. Ill I  rl„l.,„. IM,,|„.r ||    |>|,||   | |„|,.r. ,„. .„|,,,.,, ,„
I..I..I.U  IIIM ,....> »Ml„l,.,„ ,1,, ,„.,„„.,„.„ .„„,„„, .1,1, „„„,. ,„ ,..  ||l\l, |.,.r..„,.,| s,.l,.„,/-
l'-/J ..... „.£,.!,.„., I ir,i,l.-,„.,rk. .,1 li,l. r,,.,,; | |l„.i„,.. \|.„ l„„.. I ,„,,.,„„;„„   |H\| ( ,,„.„|J |„|    ,,
Offer available
until October 31st.
UBC Computer
Shop serves
faculty, staff, and
students.
Authorized
Educational
Institution
Dealer
BISBOOKSTORF
6200 University Boulevard
Call 822-2665»UBC-BOOK
UBC
Computer
Shop
_    IF YOU WANT TO
.GRADUATE M SEPTEMBER,
WEIL HELP WITH THE TUITION.
UBC
Computer
Shop
Save over $1200 when you buy a
NeXT computer and select software.
BOOKSTORE
6200 University Boulevard
Call 822-2665«UBC-BOOK
Cl'Nl \cX'I Computer. Int.  All rights rescr^d VX'l   the \c\ I |(1Rii irut V\ I7uti..n die
.eXT< nmpmct  Int   ( MX hj regi«.
.cdrridcnurknrWiillrjmkcs
:uiJem1irk> mentioned he long m
14/TNE UBYSSEY
September 10,1991 ^>
Carleton University
puts daycare on hold
by Katie Swoger
OTTAWA(CUP)—AnewCarleton
University childcare facility,
originally scheduled to open this
month, is on hold because the
Ontario government has not come
through with funding.
Although the Liberal government promised to fund the project
last year, Carleton is waiting for
word from the NDP, said Heather
Tierney, a university childcare
supervisor.
"We were told the fall of '91,
which is now and nothing has been
done," she said.
Carleton's existing centre,
Colonel By Daycare, is a non-profit
childcare collective with space for
52 children, but with an average
wait of two years for a space. The
new facility would create a total of
73 spacesfor acommunityof 23,000
students, faculty and staff.
And despite a growing demand
for evening and drop-in care, the
centre only offers full-time
childcare during the day.
The projected cost ofthe new
building is about $1.5 million, with
the university donating land valued at $140,000. Gayle Preston,
regional director of child services,
said the province is supposed to
fund 80 per cent ofthe project, while
the region and the municipality
will split the remaining costs.
Carleton is not the only university desperately short of
childcare space.
"Only half of the 68 universities in Canada have daycare, and
only eight or nine of those provide
care for infants," said Sylvia Sioufi,
a researcher for the Canadian
Federation of Students.
Although the centre will accommodate an additional 21 children,
the cost of childcare still limits its
accessibility.
Care for toddlers and preschoolers costs $752 per month,
while the charge for infants is
$1,121. For some parents, child
care costs are subsidized in whole
or in part by the Ottawa-Carleton
regional government.
EXPLORE
I I'll1     M1'11111   ■! Ill
A World of Student ISravel!
• Student Charters Across Canada •
• World wide Student Airfares •
• Ski and Sun Holidays ♦
♦ European Youth Tours ♦
* Adventure Holidays •
«Student Work Abroad Programme •
• Many other Student Travel Opportunities •
Visit the StudenlTravelExperts on Campus
Student Union ButlMng, Lower Level - UBC
The Travel Company of the Canadian Federation of Students
■SEiHS   VARSITY COMPUTERS
vnccuver. b c     SERVING VANCOUVER SINCE '87
TRISON 386SX
• teMIU 386SX CPU
• IMogRAM
• 1.2 or 1.44 Mig floppy drivi
■ 1 serf*. 1 pinM. 1 gam port
■ 101 Myl mla ad kfybowd
• 40MeotMiddrm
. MonomonitorwtthHerajles
cofflptftta crd
TMSON 386DX-25
• 25M(n3»ro<CPU
• lUigHAM
• 1.2 of 1.44 Mig floppy tfiin
• 1 sopM. 1 puiflet. 1 gome port
• 101 kiyf mfNncad deybowd
• <0Utghuditt*i
• Mono monitor with Horcutn
compittbta cird
TRISON 3860X43
• 33Mhz 386DX CPU ,
• 1 Meg RAM
• 12 or 1.44 Meg floppy drive
• 1 sert.1,1 ptnllel. t game port
• 101 keys enhanced keyboard
• 40 Meg herd drive
• Mono moritorwith Hercules
compaJbln card
$850"
*10W»
*1200°°
(604) 222-2326    Fax: (604) 222-2372
Meet Manufacturer
Representatives from
PACKARD BELL at the
UBC Bookstore!
On Thursday, September 12th,
10 am - 4 pm, representatives from
Packard Bell will be in the UBC
Computer Shop to give exciting
product demonstrations and to
answer any questions you may have
on Packard Bell's products. Let these
knowlegeable representatives help you
match your needs with the
appropriate and most affordable
Packard Bell computer system.
Come into the UBC Bookstore
on September 12th and experience
the great North American
tradition of technology through
Packard Bell.
PACKARD BELL
/,/-» it r r».'H»»/»3f*)l"rT»eg=r=   \
UBC
Computer
BOOKSTORE
S.. «, « 6200 University Boulevard
HOP Tel. 822-2665 (UBC BOOK)
i «s<-
S«trterflbta.iCQt*991
THEUBySSIEY/15 Expand the Horizons
Canadian faculty perspectives on the significance of
Christian thought and faith in the modern university
The modern university is dominated
by the life of the intellect but the
human spirit - that part of being
that desires communion and
revelation from above and beyond
itself - is largely ignored.
Christianity is relevant to university
experience in its prophetic witness
that human "wholeness" is not
possible without feeding the spirit.
Brian Stimpson
Professor and Head,
Dept. of Geological Engineering,
University of Manitoba.
After 35 years in universities I am
more than ever convinced of the
privileges of being a Christian. In
the pursuit of knowledge, Christ has
taught me that truth is to be
enjoyed, honoured and served, not
just exploited. Toward the fashions
of current ideology he has taught me
the critical spirit which knows the
difference between wisdom and
mere technical knowledge. In
relation to the universal realities of
life he has taught me that God's love
is the best perspective from which
to see the real worth of a human
being.
Walter R. Thorson
Professor of Chemistry,
University of Alberta.
It is impossible to understand
psychology adequately without first
examining its basic assumptions
about reality and human nature.
These oft-ignored presuppositions
pervasively influence our research
hypotheses, methodology,
theoretical interpretations, and
applications to human behaviour
and social issues. A Christian
world-view promotes a critical
examination of such assumptions
underlying psychological science.
Christianity encourages respect for
human dignity, and advocates
justice and love among people.
Lawrence J. Walker
Professor of Psychology,
University of British Columbia.
Every theory, every analysis,
invention, or creative work, is based
on assumptions. Research and
scholarly activity of every kind
emerges from the set of
presuppositions that researchers and
scholars take as their starting points.
Scholars know what their beginning
points are. It makes sense to me to
begin with knowing the One who is
at the beginning pomt of
everything.
Naomi Hersom
Faculty of Education,
University of Ottawa.
Essential Christianity fundamentally
challenges the self-centered
therapeutic consumerism which
appears to be at the heart of
contemporary Canadian life.
Essential Christianity also challenges
so much of what we regard as
"Christian."
George A. Rawlyk
Department of History,
Queen's University.
A Christian is a servant of Christ. If
we are serving Christ, we have a
reason for resisting peer pressure
and risking unpopularity. If we
serve Christ whole-heartedly, we
will not be satisfied with second-rate
work. Our intention will be to
please the Lord who has put us in a
university, not just to get a degree or
a promotion, but to learn, to use
our minds.
Eleanor Irwin
Vice-Principal/Associate Dean,
Scarborough College.
I understand people's suspicion
regarding Christians who pretend to
have all the answers, and I respect
scepticism that leads a person to
question and discover. But I pause
when somebody's scepticism about
Christianity is really just
unacknowledged prejudice against
religion. Is not openness the
appropriate intellectual posture of a
university?
Dennis Danielson
Associate Professor of English,
University of British Columbia.
Because Christianity has impacted
Western civilization more than any
other movement, a truly educated
person must know its basic beliefs
and the breadth of its past and
present influence. The radical
Christian message explains how
God revealed himself to humankind
and how Christian faith provides
focus and purpose for human
existence. In a university, which by
definition excludes no source of
knowledge, a thorough and
open-minded examination of Jesus
Christ's claims should have a central
place, all the more so because the
establishment of medieval
universities was itself the result of
the Christian pursuit of knowledge.
John H. Redekop
Professor of Political Science,
Wilfrid Laurier University.
The university exists to investigate
truth claims. Since Christianity
claims to know something crucial
about ultimate reality, about proper
ethical direction, ana about what
alone can give human life real
meaning, its message is vitally
relevant to university life. There are
lots of reasons why Canada is in the
mess it is now in but a big reason is
usually forgotten about - there is a
spiritual vacuum at the heart of the
Canadian identity.
Clark H. Pinnock
Professor of Theology,
McMaster University.
As a biologist I see major problems
confronting society - pollution, the
population explosion, the
applications of recombinant DNA
and other technologies to name a
few with a biological basis. As a
Christian I see major challenges to
the application of my faith - such as
the responsible stewardship of
resources with which we have been
entrusted. There are no easy
answers, but my concern is to
present a Christian perspective.
Forrest C. Bent
Professor of Biology,
Acadia University.
The university is a place where new
and old coexist in an uneasy tension,
where often there is an unspoken
condemnation of anything that
wasn't "invented" in the late
twentieth century. I find it
intriguing that we often accept as
"gospel" the materials in our 5th or
6th edition of a text, without really
asking why the 1st edition was
abandoned. I respect the fact that
Christians are still using the 1st
edition of the Bible. It nas not been
superceded by "new truth." I need
that kind of stability to have
confidence in what I plan to use as
the foundation for my entire life.
Bruce Fournier
Dept. of Business,
Wilfrid Laurier University.
Whether they realize it or not, all
university people have some sort of
a view according to which they
select, organize and interpret
knowledge. Similarly, their
behaviour is governed by a moral
code of their choosing. Such views
and codes differ widely in their
validity and content as well as in the
qualities of behaviours that they
engender. Such differences in
qualities of personal and collective
lives are observable in families, on
campus, in communities, and across
national and international
boundaries. It matters a great deal
what we believe and how we
behave. The world-view and code
of behaviours embodied in
Christianity command the highest
respect and deserve the closest
examination. To ignore Christianity
is to wink at the foundation, fabric
and glory of Western civilization
and the strong evidence for "... an
eternal reality that lies beyond the
flux of temporal and natural things,
which is at once the ground of being
and the basis of rationality."
Daniel H. Osmond
Professor and Graduate
Coordinator of Physiology
Faculty of Medicine,
University of Toronto.
■«.»
Walter Thorson
Naomi Herson
Brian Stimpson
Living on the Edge
Central to our university experience is the examination and
development of our own world-view or "philosophy of life." Modern life
has left many people disenchanted with a cold, mechanistic view of the
world (i.e. Naturalism or Atheism). They are looking elsewhere for a
richer, more personal perspective, a perspective that includes the
supernatural.
But how can we know which world-view to choose? On
September 23-27, the UBC Association of Christian Clubs presents an
attractive series of lectures, discussions and musical entertainment which
will explore a Christian response to this vital question. Join them in
discovering what "Living on the Edge" really means.
The featured speaker is Sunder Krishnan, a scientist turned pastor,
from Toronto. He will engage UBC students and faculty each noon hour
(12:30) in the SUB Theatre Auditorium and respond to your questions.
Bring an open mind.
Topics
Sunder Krishnan
Sept 23 Christianity and Other
Religions: A Question of
Narrowmindedness
Sept 24 Evolution and the
Possibility of a God-Shaped
Universe
Sept 25 Dare We Trust the
Christian Bible?
Sept 26 Evil and Suffering: A Key
Dilemma
Sept 27 The Heart of Jesus'
Message
Evening Benefit Concert:
The Total Experience Choir
LIVING
ON THE EDGE
Over 8000 titles
including books on:
Philosophy
Asian Studies
Literature
History-
Addiction & Recovery
Love & Marriage
Bibles
2130 Wesbrook Mall
Vancouver B.C.
C 228-1820
16/THE UBYSSEY
September 10,1991 Fit in or get out?
Believe it or not, the fact that
you happen to be Asian does not
make every problem you experience in life an Asian problem. If
you get marks deducted on an essay for spelling it probably is because you spelled some words
wrong, not because you're being
discriminated against. Spelling is
very important, and everybody
loses marks when they make a
mistake.
I'm sure you're right that Asians
have a different way of expressing
themselves. If I were studying at a
university in China or Japan I
would expect that I would have to
learn how to write in the Asian
style before I would expect to get
good marks on essays. Since you
are studyingin North America, you
should expect that you will be
graded based on North American
standards. This does not mean that
"- .M.^mnyvimj v»
 j
there is no room for you to express
your culture here, but rather that
if you do you at least need to make
sure the marker understands what
you're doing first, and that it is
appropriate for the particular essay you are writing.
As to your September 6
Freestyle: in the last year Fve been
called Tom, John, and Mike by
mistake. Having somebody forget
your name or confuse you with
someone else is not an Asian
problem, but a human one.
Just relax. Fight against racism
when you find it, but stop looking
for it in every little problem that
comes your way.
One other thing: I wonder if
your use of the term "Asian" to
refer to people of your particular
cultural background is offensive to
people from the eastern Soviet
Union, who are also "Asians" If s
something to think about.
Steven Leffler
Down with Goofism
In defence of Chung Wong I
must take offence to Anotnia
Rozario's remarks about Chung
Wong hieing persecuted for being
"goofy."
Persecution in any form is an
outrage against any civilized
person/perdaughter. It is thanks
to "goofists" (those with a prejudice against goofs) and your close
siblings "idiotists" that this world
is such ahellhole to live in. I think
the Ubyssey should adopt a policy
of not printing any goofist or
idiotist letters.
I would also like to commend
the Ubyssey for furthering the
fight against goofism and idiot-
ism by hiring predominantly goofs
and idiots.
Adam La Rusic
Prefer female
I just moved here from the
States desperately looking for a
place to rest my weary head. Not
knowing anybody here in town I
depended almost exclusively on
the listings hanging outside of
the housing department for a
place to live* When I first saw
the "prefer female* listings, it
didn't bother me very much. I
thought there's plenty of others so it's no big deal. As I
started calling I soon realized
that finding housing was not
going to be an easy task. Themore
I tried the more I thought back on
the "prefer female" listings. Although they were a relatively
small percentage they represented an automatic "Don't
bother trying here" in a market
which was already very tight.
Now, Iunderstand the difference
between a preference and an
absolutely must have. But the
affect was the same. Pew if any,
males bothered even calling these
listings. I started to wonder why
someone would say "prefer female."
Religious, cultural differences,
even medical seemed like viable
reasons for wanting a female
roommate. Wanting to test my
PERSPECTIVE
theory I called a couple of listings.
Wellit wasnt any oftheabove. The
reason was exactly as was stated
on the listing, they "preferred" a
female. Now this sort of discrimination has bothered me enough to
write this commentary bat what
bothers me even more is that it is
somehow acceptable. Imagine the
outcry, or at least what I hope
would be an outcry, if there were a
listing that said "prefer white* or
"prefer Canadian".
These sorts of discrimination
set off alarms in our heads. Im.
ages of bigots in white sheets discriminating agai nst a suppressed
minority. Well you know something. I find this male-female discrimination even worse since
it affects such a great number
of people across all cultures. I
mean we're talking about half
the population of the planet!
Besides whats wrong with a
male roommate? We live with
the opposite sex for the greatest
portion of our lives. As children
with brothers and sisters to marriage. Anyway I'm still looking
for a place to live, so if you're a
woman please dont forget: males
can also make excellent roommates.
Martin McNabb
MEXg AWARDS
Have You Picked Up Your
Canada Student Loan?
Students who applied for aid through the B.C. Student Assistance Program
before June 28 should now have received their Notification of Award/
Statement of Personal Responsibility from the Ministry of Advanced
Education, Training and Technology. This form confirms the amount and
disbursement dates of your BCSAP award. If you have received this form,
your Canada Student Loan Schedule I should be available for pick up from
the temporary Awards Office desk, located in the lobby on the main floor of
the General Services Administration Building. Document s may be claimed
on weekdays between 8:30 a.m. and 4:00 p.m.. You will be required to
present picture I.D. Loan recipients are urged to pick up and negotiate their
Schedules I as soon as possible. Loan recipients should note that they have
signed a declaration saying that the FIRST use of their loan funds will be
to pay fees owing to the educational institution.
BCSAP applicants are also reminded to complete their Statements of
Personal Responsibility promptly and return them to the UBC Awards
Office for subsequent forwarding to Victoria. Failure to do so could disqualify applicants for Loan Remission after graduation.
Whatever the
subject, we keep
you informed.
Subscribe to The Globe and Mail
now at the special student rate
of 50% off.
♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦
As a student subscriber, you'll save
when you register for the
GREEN LINE - GLOBE AND MAIL
INVESTMENT CHALLENGE
• Canada's most challenging and dynamic
simulated investment game
• Play and learn the stock market like a pro
• Thousands of dollars in prizes to be won
• For complete information call 1-800-668-8438
♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦
MAIL TO: The Globe and Mail, Circulation Dept, 444 Front St. W..
Toronto, Ontario, Canada M5V 2S9
Yes!
I want to become a Gobe and Mail subscriber.
Begin my special-rate subscription for
D 13-week term: $29.58 + $2.07 GST = $31.65
'•        □ 26-week term: $59.15 + $4.14 GST = $63.29
Same
Iniversin
Campus
Residence
Kc
<>m#
student II)
Address
Citv
Province
Postal Code
Phone
This address is
Q on campus
Doffc
ampus
□ Cheque, money
order
enclosed
Q Visa
D MasterCard
□ American 1
xpress
Charge Card #
Expiry Date
Signature
t required to validate offer) STWA1 -47
NOTE: Offer only valid where home delivery is available. Offer expires November 30,1991
CANADA'S   NATIONAL   NEWSPAPER
THE GLOBE AND MAIL
i_.
.j
September 10; 1991
THE UBYSSEY /17 Time to demand
a refund
More than a year ago, students
voted down a proposal to construct a
recreation facility (RecFac) on campus. Now, students are paying for it
and must try to track down their
money if they do not want to pay for
a building that they did not originally support.
Students should make an effort to
get their $40 refund fromthe administration. The money is being collected in spite of a "no" vote by students. The former coordinator of external affairs felt the student vote
was not a good enough indicator of
students' opinion. He claimed to know
what the students wanted, even
though his opinion went opposite to
the concrete result of the vote. The
former coordinator is now your AMS
president; perhaps he will eliminate
referendums entirely, and govern by
telepathy.
The original proposal for a recreation facility was voted in by students. However, the design of the
building was significantly altered
after the vote and much of what was
to be included in the building was
eliminated. The move was undemocratic and the second referendum
was called, resulting in the no vote.
The fee levy, because it is illegal,
was designated as a "voluntary contribution." Instead of withholding the
$40, students must pay it and then
apply to get their money back and
lose the interest they would otherwise
earn.
theUbyssey
September 10th, 1991
The Ubyssey is published Tuesdays and Fridays by the
Alma Mater Society ofthe University of British Columbia.
Editorial opinions are those ofthe staff and not necessarily those of the university administration, or of the
sponsor. The Ubyssey is published with the proud
support ofthe Alumni Association. The editorial office is
Rm. 241k of the Student Union Building. Editorial
Department, phone 822-2301; advertising, 822-3977;
FAX* 822-6093
It's 2 am in Effie Pow*s kitchen which is dark and smelling of exotic
spices. Paul Dayson, dressed in a white apron and white chefs hat wi th
a fat grin on, stirs the boiling cauldron on the fire. Greg Davis can be
heard in the pantry, ripping labels off all the cans of creamed com and
snickering. Ela3ine Griffith draws dirty pictures while Martin Chester
scratches her thigh. Matthew Tigger" Johnson is sucking loudly on
garlic and Karlyn Koh is watching with fascination. Sam Green and
Helen Willoughby-Price are licking the bowl of leftover cake batter
from Chung Wong's Devil's Food Cake. Rod Brown sucks on a lemon
'til it's dry to the bone that Sharon Lindores is knawing on. Slurp!
Slurp! Nadene Rehnby moans at the delicious taste of her spaghetti
sauce while Raul Peschiera lets noodles rush into his mouth at high
speeds. Tanya Paz feels her lips; they are numb from being in her ice
cream cone too long. John Paul Morrison clutches ripe avocadoes but
Sage Davies prefers testing firmer grapefruits for ripeness. Carla
Maftechuk and Frances Foran frolic in a whipped cream bath as Victor
Chew Wong delightfully drops marachino cherries into the tub. Nikola
Marin squirts liquid honey all over Paul Gordon from the little teddy-
bear-shaped bottle while Dianne Rudolf slowly licks it off. Hao Li lies
on his side—posing with grapes of course—for Malek Charles to paint
the portrait with the paintbrush held between his buttocks. And
Johanna Wickie ate gummy bears all the way home. Dear Harald
Gravelsins simply ate salty taffy until he got lockjaw. How do you
practice safe sex?
Editors
Paul Dayson • Sharon Undorao • Carla MafUchuk
Raul PMchlara • Efflo Pow
MULTIPLE CHOICE EXAMINATION
I
PHIL. 5oo
1 Identify:
\\znp
CP)A//S£»-FVESlt>eHT.
Msf
Letters
The Ubyssey welcomes letters on any Issue. Letters must be typed and are not to exceed 300 words in length. Content
which Is judged to be libelous, homophobic, sexist, racist or factually Incorrect will not be published. Please be concise.
Letters may be edited for brevity, but It Is standard Ubyssey policy not to edit letters for spelling or grammatical mistakes.
Please bring them, with Identification, to SUB 241k. Letters must Include name, faculty, and signature.
Tips for dips
So, if s the start of yet
another school year and it's
time for students to get down
to business. Namely, drinking, smoking, and trying to
have sex as often as possible
while their wallets are still
fat and their course demands
meager. Since the Pit and
Gallery are the most frequently patronized areas of
drunkenness and debauchery I thought it prudent, as
a Pit waiter, to offer some
hints to make a night of
partying more pleasurable
for both you and the friendly
staff.
1. Never hassle a
bouncer. This may sound
like common sense, since
most of these men have arms
the size of an average man's
thigh. However, it is not uncommon for someone with a
fewbeersinthemtogetlippy
or throw a punch in anger,
even if they have the phy
sique of a guy like Prince.
Naturally the bouncers abhor violence of any kind, but
if you're too stupid to either
stay mellow or take your
differences outside, they are
more than willing to "educate" you on bar etiquette.
2. If you're drinking,
make sure you have enough
money before you order a
drink. Have it on hand before the drink arrives
whether you are ordering
from the bar or from a waiter
or waitress. Nothing slows
down service more than
someone rummaging
through their pockets or
wallets for five minutes for
the cash they swore was
there aminute ago. If you are
ordering from the floor, stay
where you were when you
ordered the drink. No one
likes playing hide and seek
with a customer so you can
wait for the next dance to be
with your significant other.
Be patient. Sometimes we
are bringing out a $60 order
of drinks, which can take
some time to fill.
3. Please, Please tip your
server, which includes the
bartenders. It will only mean
better service for you. Believe
me, I remember the people
who do and do not tip. If you
tip at any other bar but not
on campus, what is your excuse? That you are a student? Bull shit! If that's your
excuse, get a six pack and
stay at home. You can't afford to go to a bar. We have
to tip out a percentage of our
gross sales. If you don't tip,
it effectively means that it is
costing us money to provide
a service for you.
4. Finally, when the music stops and the lights go
on, get the Hell out. Not to
seem ungrateful for your
patronage, but as we are all
students, some of us need to
clean up, get out of there, and
get some sleep for our morn-
inglectures. Socialize all you
want outside.
Hopefully these simple
TIPS have provided some
enlightenment. If not, I'm
looking forward to spilling a
drink on you some time.
Jeffrey Maurice
Reader wants
his refund
UBC students, both new
and returning, should be
aware that fee payment includes a FULLY REFUNDABLE $40.00 "contribution"
to the construction of a recreation facility. Twice rejected in referendum questions, the "Recfac" project
does not have the support of
the UBC student population.
To receive your refund,
apply in person to the Department of Athletics and
Sport Services in the War
Memorial Gymnasium before the end ofthe fifth week
of classes.
Stefan Ellis
Arts 4
Are you literate? Could you
fool people?
Join the hordes
of revolutionary
news maggots.
We meet regularly at noon on
Wednesday in
SUB 241K, also
known as hell.
JOIN THE UBYSSEY'S
PHOTO DEPARTMENT.
SUB 24 IK
.AND SMILE
18/THE UBYSSEY
September 10,1991 Feeling sexually
inadequate
There is a curious dichotomy in
the Hitch-hiker's Guide to ABC
booklet.
On the one hand there is a
lengthy discussion of contraceptive
techniques and AIDS prevention.
While spreading such knowledge
is applaudable, the tone of the
articles, especially on page 13, assumes that the reader eiy'oys a
frequency of sexual contact, the
presence of a forgiving and cooperative partner, and confidence in
one's desirability. Most of us spend
lonely nights wishing we had even
one of the above traits, and all
three is almost beyond belief. Fd
say many people read that section
with vague feelings of inadequacy.
On the other hand, later there
are seven pieces on sexual harassment, which collectively give
the impression that women at UBC
require panic whistles and martial arts training for survival.
Furthermore, according to one
article, "Staring at someone,"
"Hanging around a person," or
"Standing close or brushing up
against a person" can be interpreted as sexual harassment. This
means that a person merely trying
to get another person's attention,
or a person not doing anything at
all, can be pronounced guilty
ofsexual harassment. Many ofthe
signs of harassments can also be
genuine expressions of affection
and/or sexual interest. Many
people would, after reading that
list, feel intimidated from making
any overtures to a prospective
partner.
This may be some kind of subtle
joke on incoming frosh. A new arrival would first be told that sex is
the easiest, most natural thing in
the world, and made to feel inad
equate if he or she isn't active.
Then, suddenly, ABC becomes an
armed camp between the genders,
and one is discouraged from obtaining the crucial ingredient to a
sex life: another person, on fear of
ostracism and self-loathing.
Peter Tupper
Arts 2
A lesson to be
learned
re: T.L. Danlock's letter printed
September 3rd
After reading your comments
about Chung Wong's freestyles, I
found your statements to be incongruous if not unfair. You refer
to modern China's treatment towards central Asia's non-Chinese
people to back up your allegation
that Chinese people are racists.
Of all people, you should know
that the policy towards Tibet is
not made by the Chinese people,
but rather China's government.
And it is this government that not
only treats non-Han Chinese cruelly (the Han form a majority in
China) but also all Chinese. This
can be seen in the past 40 years
and in the Tiananmen Square
massacre.
You should not mix up China's
government with its people especially since most people in China
do not have a right to make a
decision.
Also, if you have read ancient
and modern Chinese history, you
will find that Tibet and Mongolia
have been a part of China for centuries. Their leaders (political and
spiritual) were appointed and approved by the central government.
They never claimed independence
until they suffered under the
communist regime.
Hao Li
graduate studies
STUDENT/TEACHER
APPRECIATION DAYS
Welcome to the 1991/92 school year. Radio Shack wants
to help make this your best year ever. We've assembled
a selection of products designed to help students and
teachers, and we're offering them at very special prices.
Just bring along ID showing you're a student or teacher
when you present this brochure at your nearest Radio
Shack store or participating Dealer. These values will
only be available until October 31,1991.
A Pair Of Portable Computers
WP-2 Personal Notebook Computer
• Weighs only 3.1 lbs. QAX/P ,
• Built-in dictionary £-m»
and thesaurus 26-3930 »70
NEW! Tandy 2810 HD Laptop
• Built-in 60MB hard drive        CAWC
• Weighs only 6.9 lbs. ?
• 80x25 VGA screen 25-3552  *400
Smith Corona Typewriter
• XL 2700 with built-in dictionary and
line memory correction. 261-8001
• French version. 261-8210M.S.L 229.95
SAVE $30. DMP 134 dot-matrix printer. IBM' Proprinter II emulation, up lo 192
cps 26-2848 Reg  299.00 sale 269.00
399.00
■■JVV2999.II0
SPECIAL PURCHASE
I I %/ Each
HALF PRICE! Computer Accessory Kits
720K kit. 3V2" disk 10-pack, disk storage box and cleaning kit
26-418/1381/8051. Reg. sep. items 38.42 sale 19.21
1.44MB kit. 3'/2" high-density disk 10-pack. disk box and clean-
mg kit. 26-8046/1381/8051. Reg. sep. ilems 50.42    sale 25.21
A Trio Of Terrific Computer Systems
The Tandy TL/3 for easy computing!
• Powerful 80286 microprocessor
• VGA video • 640K memory
• Mono monitor 25-1603/4040
NEW! Tandy 1000 RLX
• 3V2", 1.44MB floppy disk drive
• 1MB RAM, VGA video support
• Mono monitor 25-1452/4040
NEW! Tandy 1000 RLX-HD
• 40MB hard drive with DeskMate
• 101-key enhanced keyboard
• 1MB RAM, VGA video support
• Mono monitor 25-1453/4040
INTERIMim/ Radio /hack
BUSINESS PRODUCTS
DIVISION © INTERTiirM CANADA LTD
IBM is a registered trademark ol International Business Machines Corp
I .■! I'd1
It
UWTING FOR. THE- STUDENT LOAN
OF UNCLAIMED
LOST & FOUND ARTICLES
Wednesday
September 11
5:00pm-6:30pm
BROCK HAIL       Room 106 (1874 East Mall)
September 10,1991
THE UBYSSEY /19
i ■: -. i .-.<    ■•■!■/ Mac to School.
Homework
has a nasty way of piling
up. Our advice: Get in front
of a Macintosh™ computer.
Until September 30,1991, take
advantage of these Apple
superbuy computer/
printer packages.
Any
Combination.
It's up to you!
1,899.
2,999.
2,499.
You can get a complete,
Or, a sleek,
For students who
You can take
a     ready-to-run,
jm±  modular, Macintosh
demand an affordable
jmi   advantage of the
1     Macintosh™
'    1 LC with 2MB of
laser printer that
/   Macintosh Classic
1     Classic™
/   RAM, a 40MB
produces sharp,
|  coupled with the
JL   computer system
trnmW internal hard disk,
professional text and
V/   Apple Personal
with 2MB of RAM,
a 12" Macintosh
high- definition
LaserWriter LS
40 MB internal
printer, and RGB
graphics, the
Printer and
hard disk, keyboard,
colour monitor
Apple Personal
save over $449.00.
mouse and an
and the same
LaserWriter™ LS is
Apple™ StyleWriter™
StyleWriter
ink jet, and
save over $468.00.
the answer for you.
save over $419.00.
fi BOOKSTORE
6200 University Boulevard
UBC Computer Shop only serves UBC staff, students and
Call •UBC-BOOK(822-2665)
faculty members. Offer available until September 30,1991.
1
3,599.
Wr, you can
4  take advantage of
the Macintosh LC
coupled with the
Apple Personal
LaserWriter LS
Printer and
save over $498.00.
US
UBC
Computer
Shop
Don't go back without a Mac.«
Apple, the Apple logo, and LaserWriter are registered trademarks, StyleWriter, Macintosh, and Mac are trademarks of Apple Computer, Inc. Classic is a registered trademark licensed to Apple Computer, Inc.
20/THE UBYSSEY
September 10,1991

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
http://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.ubysseynews.1-0127966/manifest

Comment

Related Items