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The Ubyssey Mar 4, 1966

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Array IK UBYSSEY
for
old men?
Vol. XLVIII, No. 56
VANCOUVER,  B.C., FRIDAY,  MARCH  4,   1966
CA 4-3916
Architect
thinks over
SUB hall
A four-man committee formed to ensure adequate theatre
facilities in the proposed Student Union Building will get
a hearing Monday.
Existence of The University
Theatre for SUB (TUTS) committee was announced Wednesday by organizer Basil Hobbs,
technical director for special
events.
Hobbs said the committee
compiled a brief about two
weeks ago outlining the minimum technical requirements of
TUTS, and then submitted it
to SUB chairman Roger McAfee.
In a meeting Monday with
McAfee and AMS co-ordinator
Graeme Vance, TUTS was told
McAfee would submit their
minimum requirements to an
architect March 7.
The committee's brief was
approved by several prominent
members of theatre and the
UBC   faculty;
Committee members are
UBC musical society president
Steve Chitty, film society president Brian Rodgers, and special events chairman Dave Lui.
Hobbs said he organized the
committee Feb. 14 to campaign
for an adequate theatre in
SUB in case the auditorium
which houses present facilities,
is torn down.
Hobbs said the three groups
composing TUTS had been concerned for some time about the
facilities in the auditorium,
their major production centre,
but thought a new 1,500-seat
theatre, part of a "SUB stage
two," would be built within
three years.
"But now we don't know
when this larger theatre will
be built," he said.
"Because of a lack of funds,
it may have to wait another
five to ten years."
— kurt hilflT photos
FRANK LOVERS didn't mind smooching in full view of
passersby Thursday in front of library. But they weren't
pleased when an alert Ubyssey photographer spotted
them and recorded their moment of bliss. Lovemaking
continues at various points on campus today.
DISCRIMINATION
IRKS  CRUISE
'Let's march on police
AMS first vice-president
Bob Cruise says students
should stage a march on
Vancouver police headquarters.
Cruise told The Ubyssey
Thursday the police department's decision to force undergraduate societies to get
faculty sponsorship for off-
campus events is out of tune
with the times.
"Discrimination against racial and class groups is receiving more and more attention," he said.
"Yet now the police have
decided to instigate class
discrimination against university students."
He said the ruling — recently re-affirmed by deput-
ty chie| John Fisk — is
"hasty   and   arbitrary   and
__4_____
€___________&,,.
BOB CRUISE
time for a parade
must be changed.
"A march on police headquarters by a large number
qf students might be effective," said Cruise.
Cruise said letters of protest sent to the police by
AMS president Byron Hender are not strong enough
action.
Hender said Thursday the
police decision will have the
effect of driving student affairs into the Vancouver
suburbs.
"At least 30 dances are
held by student groups during the year — the agriculture undergrad's formal
dance has already been cancelled,"  Hender said.
Hender would not specify
what his next move concerning the ruling would be.
Three grads
nominated
for senate
By  ROSEMARY  HYMAN
Three post-graduate students have been nominated for
the UBC senate.
Hugh Swayze, law III, Mike
Hunter, law II, and an unidentified science post-graduate
were among the 27 nominees
for the 15 elective senate seats.
J. E. A. Parnall, registrar,
refused to release names of the
nominees until they confirm
that they will stand. They have
until Monday to do so.
AMS president Byron Hender said Hunter's nomination
was the result of a "put-stu-
dents-on-the-senate" movement
initiated by the AMS
DIDN'T KNOW
Hunter said he did not know
his name had been put forward.
"I will have to look into
this a bit before I decide
whether to stand for election.
I don't even know who nominated me."
He said he thinks having
students on the senate is a good
idea.
Also nominated through the
student movement were AMS
lawyer Ben Trevino, a past
AMS president, and Dick
Hayes, a past law president and
unsuccessful Liberal candidate
in the November federal election.
1 DID IT*
"I don't want to take the
full responsibility for it (the
nominations), but I did it,"
Hender said.
Swayze was nominated by a
group of law students, acting
independently of Hender.
"The senate is involved with
the type of decision that affects the students down to the
last degree,"   Swayze said.
"I want to stress that my
campaign is quite serious. I
haven't decided how much of
a campaign is required, but I
feel the franchise has been
badly wasted in the past. If
those who did have it exercised it they would have a
very powerful voice."
GRADS VOTE
Ballots, to be sent to all
graduates of UBC, must be returned by May 26.
Travino was not aware he
had been nominated until
yesterday. '"I will certainly allow my name  to stand;  I am
gratified by the nomination,"
he said.
'However, I hope this is not
being used for any political
purpose on campus that I am
not aware of."
Trevino graduated from UBC
in 1959.
Only 15 of the more than 80
senate members are elected.
The rest are appointed or automatically members because of
their faculty position.
Elections are held every
three years.
Enomoto
plans 'full
campaign
By CAROL WILSON
Graduate student Randy
Enomoto will set another first
in the dhancellor elections by
waging a full campaign.
Enomoto broke with tradition Wednesday when he became the first student nominated for chancellor.
If the two nominees accept
the nomination, there will be
an election — the second one
in the history of the university.
The first election was in 1962
when Mrs. Phyllis Ross and
Mrs. Ann Angus ran for the
position.
Neither waged a  campaign.
"I will carry out a full campaign" Enomoto said Thursday.
"I'm going to start on it right
away.
"I am doing it to try to bring
democracy to the election for
chancellor. The whole process
is undemocratic as it stands,"
he said.
John M. Buchanan, the
other candidate, was not available for comment.
He was last heard from in
Mexico, where he went for a
vacation in January.
"I would like to start off the
campaign with an open debate
with Mr. Buchanan in the
Brock lounge,"  Enomoto said.
"■But if Mr. Buchanan can't
be found, I guess this won't be
possible.
"I hope Buchanan doesn't
withdraw from the race.
"I don't want to win by acclamation. That would ibe very
ironic, since one of the main
reasons I'm running is to have
the chancellor elected in a
democratic   election."
Enomoto said he would focus
his campaign on the campus.
"I will put up banners and
posters and go into the residences,'' he said.
Job registration
ends  this  week
The last chance to register
for summer employment is
Friday.
Registration is open to
students in all years and
faculties.
They should apply in
room 100 of the old arts
building, noon Thursday and
Friday. Pag»2
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, March  4,   1966
— kurt hilger photo
WE KNOW how this gentleman broke his drum, but we
Shantelle. Students frugged and what-have-you at noon
hour dance to advertize Radsoc-sponsored dance March
12, which, oddly enough, will feature Kentish Steele and
the Shantelles.
Sciencemen fly—
if they find cash
By ANN BALF
Two UBC sciencemen will fly to New Zealand for a
world-wide science student conference this May — if they
can raise the money.
Return plane tickets to the
conference at Auckland, New
Zealand, are over $1000 each.
Although registration and
living expenses are supplied
by the conference, minimum
cost for two delegates would
be $2100.
Anonymous donors 'have
come up with $1500 and the
3US will ask the AMS for the
remaining $600.
If AMS doesn't come
through, the SUS will have to
resort to traditional fund-raising tactics.
"Maybe we'll have another
smoker," said SUS president
Dave  Williams, Thursday.
Delegates will be chosen on,
March 8. Each delegate must
present a paper to the conference on either a scientific problem or student government.
Selection committee includes
the assistant science dean, faculty members, and SUS executive members.
"Yes, I'm applying," said
Williams. "But I don't expect
to go. We have several very
well qualified people applying."
Delegates will come from
universities all over Australia
and New Zealand, from Japan,
Hawaii and Berkeley.
HELD OVER
BIG MILLER
SHAKEY'S PIZZA PARLOR
Shows at 9:30, 11:30, 1:30 "Hoot" Sunday
1026 Granville
Res. 681-2822
Getting Dlari-ied?
Yours for the asking . . . Our free "Take
Home" invitation album. Phone or call in
to our store today.
Careful advice expertly given  to "Awoy
From Home" Brides.
™e CARD SHOP
Comer Robaon and Burrard MU 4-4011
Maharishi's yogi session
may relieve your troubles
By ANN BISHOP
Looking for a way to make
more money or improve your
marks?
For a fee of $15, the simple
method of meditation taught
by Maharishi Mahesh, yogi
enables one to tap the generally unused vast resources
of the mind.
The president of Vancouver's International Meditation
Society, Hugh Hunt, spoke
Thursday on the simplicity of
attaining the state of pure
being or transcendental consciousness.
"This method of meditation
is simple and effortless and
starts to be effective from
the beginning;" said Hunt, a
consulting engineer.
No complicated Yogi exercises are necessary nor is one
required to give up the world.
A half-hour meditation in
the morning and another session at night is all that is
needed.
"Nothing more than the
daily practice of this meditation is necessary to bring
man to that level of himself
where his every power and
faculty becomes developed
and effective."
One who has attained this
higher state of being lives
energetically, peacefully and
creatively in harmony with
the world around him, Hunt
said.
"This is not a religion,"
said Hunt, "and is compatible
with all forms of faith. In
fact, since I began meditating
three years ago, my attendance at church has become
much more regular."
The society holds regular
meetings, but these are in no
way obligatory.
Initiation is necessary in
order to find the proper method, for meditation. Any one
of   the   five   senses   may  be
FttKRimOM
EYEGLASSES
60^16*
All Doctor's EyecUss Prescriptions filled. Only tint
quality materials used. All
work performed by qualified
Opticians.
GRANVME  OPTICAl
Ml Granville MU t-MCt
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Slacks Narrowed
Suits Altered
and Repaired
Tuxedos  Remodelled
Expert Tailoring
UNITED TAILORSI
549 Granville St.
used for meditation, but Hunt
said his group uses sound.
The initiate is given a group
of syllables which suit his
own need.
There are three people in
Canada qualified to give this
initiation.
The initiation fee is necessary because of the cost of stationery, bringing in the initiators, and building a center
for the society.
Anyone considering the
initiation may contact Hunt at
261-8575.
IH program helps
foreign students
By KIT MILNE
Underway at UBC's International House is a reception
program aimed at helping 300 new foreign students settle
quickly into UBC campus life next September.
Two students, one Canadian,
the other a compatriot already
studying at UBC, are assigned
to a potential overseas student.
They write to him some
months before his arrival giving information about the university and answering questions.
The overseas student is met
at the airport or train by the
two students who have made
necessary advance arrangements and who help the newcomer to settle into the campus
and city.
John Thomas, director of International House, stresses the
importance of the "personal"
program in helping International House look after the
foreign population at UBC
"Such a system helps us insure the well-being of the
foreign student. We expect the
Canadian friend and fellow
countryman to keep in close
touch and advise us if any difficulties arise," said Thomas.
INDOOR
FOREIGN STOCK CAR
AUTO RACES
Saturday. March 5
I A cross between a demolition derby and a stock
car race —
FINAL race of the season.
I See a race car built in 15
minuies and then raced.
AGR0D0ME
I Time trials 7:30 Races 8:30
Adult $2.00 Student $1.25
Child under  12  FREE with Adult
ARMSTRONG & REA
OPTOMETRISTS
EYES EXAMINED
CONTACT LENSES
2 Convenient Offices .    .
■BROADWAY at GRANVILLE
■ KERRISDALE   41st at YEW
GSA NEWS
SKI TRIP
To Whistler Mountain
SATURDAY, MARCH 5, 1966# 7 a.m.
FROM THE GRAD STUDENT CENTRE.
$3.00 EACH, G.S.C. OFFICE.
Friday, March 4th-TO NIGHT!
HEAR THE NEW SOUND
SONG FEST  66
QE THEATRE, 8 p.m.
TICKETS AMS & QE Friday, March  4,   1966
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 3
.     .Jf.-A
*rry*f»
_.*__■£' f_f». t...
#*W* p _ft *■*
•    ._i. y. §.*   i-u.. ..*"»?,
— powell hargrave photo
IS IT A BIRD? The Red Baron?
No. It's Super-Kite, engineers' new mascot. Ubyssey
photographer spotted it
cruising high over the library looking for sciencemen.
FOR PAPER
No autonomy
at McMaster
HAMILTON (UNS) — An attempt at autonomy for the
Board of Publications at McMaster University here was shot
down   at a   joint   meeting   of   the   Student   Representative
Assembly and the Student Executive Council Wednesday.
The introduction of  amend
ments to the BOP constitution
was made by Bruce McKay,
regular organizations commissioner, and all were seconded
by Dave Lush, arts delegate,
chairman of the BOP.
The amendments took the
form of a five-point brief presented to the Constitution
Committee of the 28th National Canadian University
Press Conference at Calgary
during the Christmas recess.
AMENDMENTS
The amendments posted
were:
1. That the CUP Charter of
the BOP Constitution be
amended to substitute the following for article 1, paragraph
2.
"That one of the major roles
of the student press is to act as
an instrument of social change;
that it should continually strive
to emphasize the rights and responsibilities of the student as
a citizen and that it use its
freedom from commercial control to examine issues that the
professional  press avoids."
2. and that paragraph 5,
reading as follows, be added to
the charter:
VITAL FUNCTION
"That the Canadian Student
Press should incorporate as its
primary purpose an educative
function which is vital to the
development of student criticism."
There two motions were passed by a large majority of
those present.
Straw votes to give the BOP
powers to fire or discipline editors, to leave financial control
in government hands, and to
continue policing The Silhouette as to ensure proper content
and standards were defeated.
Cambridge
opens doors
The university city — Cambridge, England—is offering an
international summer school
for students and teachers in
August.
The school will consist of 200
teachers and students from the
United States, Europe, Britain
and the Commonwealth.
The $210 fee includes accommodation, meals, lectures and
excursions.
Limited places are allocated
each country.
For applications write to
Christopher Thompson, International Summer School, Croft
Gardens, Barton Road, Cam-
toridjge.
Poems read
Five evenings of poetry readings, offered by the UBC extension department, started
Tuesday in Room 102, Las-
aree Building.
Poets who will be reading
are John Newlove, Pierre Cou-
pey, Jamie Reid, Myra Fia-
mengo, Seymour Mayne, Bill
Bissett, Wayne Nyberg and
Gardens, Barton Road, Cambridge.
UBC award
will honor
top grad'
UBC now has a little Rhodes
scholarship of its own.
The $l,500-a-year scholarship
honoring the late Chief Justice
Sherwood Lett will be awarded  for  the  same  qualities
the Rhodes scholarship.
The scholarship will be
drawn from a $30,000 endowment fund.
Winners will be selected on
the basis of academic achievement, • character and personal
qualities, participation and
achievement in student affairs,
and leadership and service to
the university and community.
Candidates can be men or
women, graduate or undergraduate, and must have been
at UBC for two full years.
The selection committee will
include Dean Walter Gage,
President John B. Macdonald,
and members of the UBC alumni asociation, AMS and graduate students' association.
Chief Justice Lett has been
described by the UBC senate
as "UBC's most distinguished
graduate."
Lett was AMS president in
1915 and Rhodes scholar in
1919.
He has been a member of the
Senate and the Board of governors, and was Chancellor of
UBC from 1951 to 1957.
He died in July, 1964 at the
age of 68.
—  norm   betts  photo
BUDDYING UP to first buds of spring is lovely Mary
Saxton, arts IV. She was one of hundreds of students
who put this week's fine weather to good use by avoiding
classes.
Shivering protesters
knock Viet Nam policy
OTTAWA (UNS) — Two
student   demonstrators   held
Tuesday.
First to arrive were a group
of about 15 members of the
Student Union for Peace Action
who carried placards protesting Canada's support of the
United States' stand in Viet
Nam.
The vigil was part of Canada-Viet Nam Week sponsored
by various student groups.
The placards read, "Canada
must have an indepedent foreign   policy   in   Viet   Nam,"
separate groups of shivering
a  vigil   on   Parliament   Hill
"Canada tell the U.S.: build
villages — don't burn them"
and "End Viet Nam conflict".
The second group, six Canadian Indians, protested Canada's treatment of Indian citizens.
Members carried placards
which read: "Autonomy for
Indians" and "Stop colonialism on the reserves".
— norm   betts photo
UPHOLDING UBYSSEY policy, assistant news editor Dan Mullen refuses to be swayed
by go-go girls Roz Bufton, left, and Edie Sutter. Law student Ted Ewachniuk, right, and
troupe failed in attempt to gain publicity for opening of Ewachniuk's Surf Club at 821
River Road  Richmond, Friday at 9  p.m. mrnsstt
Published Tuesday, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the university
year by the Alma Mater Society, University of B.C. Editorial opinions
expressed are those of the editor and not necessarily those of the AMS
or the University. Editorial office, CA 4-3916. Advertising office, CA 4-3242,
Loc. 26. Member Canadian University Pres*. Founding member. Pacific
Student Press. Authorized as second-class mail by Post Office Department,
Ottawa,  and  for payment of postage In cash.
Winner Canadian University Press trophies for general
excellence and editorial writing.
FRIDAY, MARCH 4,  1966
"The responsibility of the press
is to report the Truth."
—Batman, Feb. 3,   1966
SUB-cleaning
We read that the student union building chairman
tells a different story about the negotiations between
himself, the Bank of Montreal, and the administration
than the university bursar does.
We read that suddenly AMS president Byron Hender
wants study space and a squash court inserted into the
proposed new building.
We read that $800 worth of SUB postcards and
calendars, ordered by the SUB committee, sit on the
College Shop shelves.
We read that a group of interested students take
a good look at the SUB theatre, and in two weeks come
up with a proposal backed by university heads that
make the SUB plans look completely out of line.
Now the proposed union building is not a spanking
new project. The present head of the SUB committee
has been working on it off and on for at least two years,
and a predecessor worked on it for a couple of years
before that.
A snappy $100-a-day SUB expert from the U.S. was
hired to "do the job right", in 1963. A "vast and comprehensive" survey was supposed to have been taken,
and all the right things for this university's students
for the next 50 years are supposed to be included in
present SUB plans.
Why then, is the question we keep asking ourselves,
does there now seem to be something wrong with this
fabulous building every time some impartial body takes
a good look at it?
It's true that most of the elements of the Great
Mistake have been passed by the councils of this and
other years.
Councils bored, councils tired, councils without the
energy or the time or the patience to sift through the
screen of facts and figures to take a good hard look at
the project?
Now, when group after group does take that time
to study aspects of the building, they find all these things
which aren't quite Tight. Aren't quite right by a lot
of money. Aren't quite right by a lot of student money.
All of which makes us nervous about what a careful
examination of the rest of the project would come up
with.
And then there's the union building chairman. He
grins. He smirks. He won't remember this or that. An
explanation he gives doesn't gibe with that given by
administration officials.
He interviews himself in half-page ads brought at
student expense, interviews himself on how he thinks
aspects of his building are good.
More and more we are beginning to conclude thai
the whole Great Mistake needs a thorough examination
from the top down. A SUB cleaning, so to speak.
Even the basic idea seems ill-timed.
As we have so often stressed, the priority surer*
ought to be on having students of all faculties adequately
housed and fed before an arts-law-fratetnity play centre
is erected.
At a time when the money on hand in lihe SUB
building fund equals the 10 per cent of a $4 million co-op
residence project necessary to begin construction, and
when great glaring inconsistencies in the SUB project
seem to be cropping up daily, at least one logical step
seems possible.
Student government should swallow its pride and
take a good look at the monster they are planning.
Perhaps a year-long look.
And while this hiatus in the project is going on,
funds could be channelled to provide the residences so
desperately needed and so easily seen as a first priority
.of any ptudept-cpnsciqus student government.
LETTERS  TO  THE   EDITOR
Repeat tautologies  bug  him
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
A recent news item of the
Ubyssey said that officials of
the Toronto sub-way system
were made choleric with rage
by the antics of U. of T.
students.
Readers who don't like
tautology will be saddened
with sorrow, but if they are
familiar with undergraduate
English they will hardly be
amazed with  surprise.
If they could.1 only be sure
that such blunders were
peculiar to Toronto, no doubt
they would be alleviated with
relief.
G. B. RIDDLEHOUGH
Classics
• •      •
'PETTY DISPUTE'
Editor. The Ubyssey, Sir:
It is very gratifying to note
how many intelligent, educated and well-informed students we have on this campus.
The endless letters as to
the identity of the aeroplane
that the Red Baron was supposed to have flown are extremely enlightening and exciting.
What a pity that all these
writers' energies could not be
harnessed to relevant matters,
such as the university or the
future of our country; rather
than such a petty disgpte over
a stamp-sized pix of an aeroplane.
GUIDO BOTTO
Arts 1
• *     •
YOUR CUE, JOHN'
Editor. The Ubyssey, Sir:
Frosh are once again being
discriminated against: {Your
cue,  Mr. Wheaton).
Would someone please give
me an INTELLIGENT reason
(no one at the ballot boxes
had a clue) why frosh were
not allowed to vote in the
Arts U.S. elections?
If it is because, "TJh, well,
maybe it's (because, er, you
mightn't be back next year or
something" why is the vote
not taken away from students
who will gradluate this April?
Thank you — if you can dig
up an answer.
ERIC SAVORY
•      •      •
MANY BIPLANES'
Editor, The Ubyssey, Six:
Concerning your observation that the Gloucester Gladiator 'was the only biplane
used in last war'.
I presume you are referring
to the Second World War. If
fo, those who flew against the
Bismark from the Ark Royal
in Swordfish will be quite
alarmed.
It seems also that the Fairey
Eattle was a biplane and was
used, as were the Tiger Moth
and Purr Moth.
Against the Japanese, U.S.
forces used several dozens of
EDITOR: Tom Wayman
Newt  Ron Riter
Associate     .. _ George Reamsbottom
City Al Donald
Photo Norm Belts
Sports —     Ed Clark
Ass't News Dan Mullen
Richard Blair, Robbi West
Ass't City           Danny Steffman
Page Friday John Kelsey
Managing      Ian Cameron
Features       Mike Bolton
CUP Don Hull
the Grumman biplanes with
retractable body gear, F2F.
The Boeing F4B4, a fixed
body gear biplane, saw action
in the Philippines.
And the U.S. Navy had a
single fixed pontoon two seat-
er biplane that did much
photo - reconaissance work
from catapult kunchy cruisers
along with the monoplane
OS2U (Vought) Kingfisher
through most of the war.
And there were several
Curtis Helldiver biplanes used
before the Douglas Dauntless
and the later Helldivers arrived.
The Dutch used a number of
Breuster biplanes in their
brief action in the Pacific because their newly-arrived Buf-
falos were not combat ready.
The Italians had a Fiat biplane fighter and, as I recall ,
the Germans and the Japanese both used biplanes for
observation and reconnaissance.
The Canadians had the
American Car and Foundry
biplane but I doubt that it saw
combat.
CHARLES J. BRAEUR
Ann Bishop grabbed a yogi. Hal-
verson burned glue. Carol Wilson
phoned Mexico. Writers were
these: Bill Graf, Dick Taylor,
Gu/ido Bonno, Bert Hill, Anne
Balf, Joan Pogarty, Izor P^rtz,
Lashy Foom, Hrooshowai, and Val
Zuker. Photo takers were Hilger
who was chief, and Don Kydd.
Rick Blair brought 38 copy pencils.
Rosemary Hyman was here. Carol
Stevenson came. Benton ate $17
of Chinese food and burped. Al
Donald  dried  off.  pf
Friday
March 4 1966
editor:  JOHN  KELSEY
current affairs:  STEVE BROWN
science,  the  arts:  AL  FRANCIS
associate:  CLAUDIA GWINN
assistant:   CAROL   STEPHENSON
ON THE COVER: a few views of
That Man.
A horde of eight Simon
Fraser profs, with typewriters and mad abandon
have started a new literary quarterly, having
once again perceived the
local vacuum.
Welcome to the void
filling group, group —
you'll need the luck.
They're not the first to
discern the chasm between artist and consumer.
Little mags proliferate
like raindrops and blacktop here.
But the consumer
yawns at all literary altruism, turns on the TV
and goes back to sleep.
Contributors, editors
and their mutual friends
buy out the first  issue.
Those succeeding line
up on office bookshelves,
threatening to overflow
and engulf the corridors.
If the magazine survives, they'll pay off —
after five profitless years.
As Prism founder Earle
Birney discovered last
year, at the end of his
bookshelf. He gathered
the first year's press run
and sold it to his students
— only a dime each for
these priceless collector's
items.
Shortly thereafter,
nearly defunct Prism
went international, pirating Murray Morton's plot
to unload his monthly
Limbo — the first local
international.
Like the Pushmi-Pull-
yu, we predict Limbos
will become ten-cent collectors items in cities all
over the world, just three
years from now. Hf storage space holds out.
And eight Simon Fraser profs, unless your
venture croaks belly-up
the way literally hundreds of other little mags
have, you'll be able to
sell yours in five years
too.
If your offices are big
enough to hold them until
then.
But considering Simon
Fraser's luck, they probably are — and we'll
buy some to help out.
pf 2wo
WHO
CARES?
SUB smog screens irrelevance
By BOB CRUISE
There are few more touchy
subjects in the AMS Bureaucracy than the proposed
SUB. Councillors talk to
each other after the Ubyssey
prints some criticism of this
4.6 million dollar extravaganza and say "of course
everyone wants a SUB, they
voted 80 per cent for it a
couple of years ago!"
Well, the following is a
replay of a conversation with
a fellow law student who
has been eight years on-and-
off at UBC. He said, ''I'm
sort-of in favor of SUB myself but . . . five years ago
when there was no Brock
Extension and the campus
was somewhat centralized it
seemed like a good idea.
"Students, however, never
really got a chance to form
an opinion or vote meaningfully on it. It was really
crammed down their throats.
Publicity for SUB was
everywhere and any vote
"NO" signs were removed
around  referendum  day.
"Times are changing now.
The campus is growing and
spreading out and there is
little evidence to suggest a
three-storey building in the
middle will be able to counteract the forces Of decentralization.
"Students should have a
chance to re-evaluate SUB in
the light of changing circumstances — a general meeting
or a referendum would tell
us  whether  students  really
need or want this project."
I tried to tell my lawyer
friend the AMS needs SUB.
It provides necessary summer jobs for student bureaucrats; it provides invaluable
"contacts" and "experience"
in administrative work, and
it gives student leaders the
necessary smokescreen o f
activity from which to point
out why they did not have
time during their year in office to get busy on the issues
which really affect students.
Such as desperately needed married student housing,
now in committee, better
and more student residences,
and education reform.
SUB will tie up student
funds and time for the next
20 years so that there will
be no opportunity to attack
problems like athletics
(which is financially desperate and has been for two
years).
My friend went on to say:
"I can't see what we are
doing building a huge building which will do little more
than expand or duplicate
existing services when wartime shacks are still sitting
on the campus and hundreds
of students still live in inadequate housing and hundreds, more can't find a convenient place to stay."
Lately, there has been
much thought on priorities
and alternatives and many
of AMS types who argue
strongly for SUB admit there
is  a   far   greater   need   for
decent  on-campus  housing.
One proposal which has
strong support as a SUB alternative is high-rise co-op
(student designed and financed) residences containing
the facilities from SUB (e.g.
squash courts, bowling alleys, ballroom, ping pong,
lounges) right in the resi-
lence where there is a guaranteed indiginous population
of 800-1,200 to use them.
I feel the once sacred cow
is looking a little tarnished.
There is nothing in SUB
which ranks above the demand for good living facilities for students who are
not in a position to drive
home every day.
SUB itself is useless to
Engineers, who aren't prepared to walk that far and
would rather see some of the
$4 million put into realistic
common rooms and diversi-
fed recreational facilities;
Lawyers, who only use
Brock for coffee and would
not walk to the proposed
SUB; Grad Students, who
have their own problems getting to the Grad Centre;
medicine, who have no free
time and spend most of their
day off campus. So it goes.
Perhaps it's time we looked at SUB ffor1 what it is.
An unfortunate mistake,
born of good intentions,
mothered in a period of
change, and now, like an old
man who is needed no
longer by society, it is being
vigorously defended by apol-
GARBAGE
ogists for the investment of
past effort, and by bureaucrats who have a vested interest in the project.
No one I have met suggests we should not have a
'student activities complex'
but they do ask:
• why so big,
• why so much money?
• how long are we going to wait for this
thing?
• isn't co-op and married
student housing a more
important financial
priority?
• couldn't we get the
government to supply
the money—as McGill
did?
We conclude all is not
well.
Students should have a
chance to express before it
is too late what priorities
they place on SUB, housing,
and athletics. We need a
referendum, in the balanced
atmosphere of alternatives
and not the propaganda take
it or leave it situation of two
years ago.
Most of the campus will
probably feel, however, as I
do. Who cares, I graduate
next year and it won't be
my problem. But for those
who do care and do have a
strong opinion one way or
another it should be remembered:
"There  is a   tide   in   the
affairs of men
Which taken at the
flood  .   .  .   .  "
AND JEWELS
Big swing to Prism International
By EDITH WALSH
Since Prism's metamorphosis two years ago from
an occasionally published
little-mag, grabbing scraps of
literary verbage from very
minor Vancouver writers into the new Prism International, the names of the writers have changed.
But the quality of the
work hasn't.
Not much anyway.
It's as though the magazine gained respectability
under the protection of the
UBC Creative Writing Department, published a wider
selection of work, and then
decided to settle back in the
complacency of security.
The winter-spring 1966 issue contains the work of 28,
count 'em, 28 poets, 13 of
them Canadian and the remainder from the United
States, Britain, Hungary, Poland, Ceylon, and India.
The quality of the issue,
which is understandably
high, is not due entirely to
the contributions of the international poets, but, except for a few ugly exceptions in the poetry, is generally good in the Canadian
writers.
Peter Stevens, a Saskatchewan poet, with a talent
for    typographical    jiggery,
Page 6
carefully and efficiently
avoids sentimentality In A
Few Myths and comes up
with an English school boy's
memory of the second World
War.
"Our schools was bombed
— smashing! One week's
holiday.
And some of our schoolmates were killed .... and
the funeral got us out of
German homework."
Stevens isn't a genius, but
he is good.
The point is that none of
the foreign poets are geniuses either. The issue, which
is twice the usual size, would
lose nothing but volume with
the omission of their work.
Perhaps the best Contribution is The City of Nannies by Maria Kuncewicz.
Mrs. Kuncewicz, who
holds the chair of Polish literature at the University of
Chicago, takes up the topic
of nannies, who are the foster mothers of the Franco
regime, in Seville, and
reaches back for a Don Quixote image.
"I came to dislike the
nannies and the soldiers, and
fell in love with Don Quixote."
One thing I have missed
in recent issues are the illustrations, which have recently
been replaced with pages of
THE      UBYSSEY
poems in strange, oriental
languages. This issue has a
poem, (fortunately with a
translation) in Sinala, by Siri
Gunasinghe.
Despite the garbage, there
are some jewels in Prism —
if you look for them.
#,JS3.,,&£#& \v
.■^^iw$ffi J,K0W*^*"y^.■■■-
LOOKING FOR JEWELS  .  .  .
Friday, March  4,   1966 MAO
"According to anthropological findings, Sinanthropus
Pekinensis was a fierce hunter of the North China plains
over 360,000 years ago. Today Peking man is personified by Mao Tse-tung, leader of
the aggressive Chinese Communist regime. His aims pose
a threat to all of Asia, as
well as to his erstwhile
ally, the Soviet Union. An
understanding of Mao and
China is important to the
American people, particularly lo the youngsters who will
live in a world where ONE
BILLION Chinese will be a
basic fact of life."
The preceding is not an
uncharacteristically vicious
quote from some extreme
right-wing hate-sheet — it is
part of an advertisement
from TV Guide, urging the
reader to purchase without
delay his copy of "China",
published b y Time - Life
Books. The ad is a very clear
expression of the attitude of
the American establishment
toward' China, and is thus
worthy of further examination.
•       •      •
"Even if you could enter
China today, it is unlikely
that you would learn as
much about the country
as you will from this informative and exciting book , . .
You'll see the graphic record
of the Communists' destructive sweep to victory in 1949.
You'll stand beside those
backyard smelting pots
whose production was supposed, one day, lo top U.S.
Steel's . . . You'll learn with
horror the details of the execution of the whole landed
gentry class — by the millions — in 1950 and 1952 ., . .
"... You'll visit Nationalist China on Formosa. Under
Chiang, it's the most productive farming area in Southeast Asia. And under free
enterprise, it it enjoys one of
the highest living standards
in Asia.
"Only   Time-Life    techni-
WMmmmmMMmiiiMS
ques could produce this panoramic portrait of China."
True, it is frightening to
hear about the anti-American
hate campaign being waged
in China, but it is even
more frightening to see hate-
mongering practised in our
country, under the guise of
informative and responsible
journalism. The advertisement, and no doubt the book,
is the most blatant type of
propaganda, full of lies, distortions, and openly racist
prejudices.
The leader of the largest
nation on earth is presented
as an atavism to prehistoric
caveman days. His regime —
not government, but regime
is branded aggressive, and
his truculence is seen as a
threat to the security of the
entire world.
Hysterical visions of savage yellow hordes are conjured, as we face the prospect
of one billion Chinese inhabiting the earth. We are
told that the Communists'
path to victory was a destructive one, coupled with
the massacre of millions of
innocents.
In contrast, Chiang Kai-
Shek is the benevolent ruler
of a peaceful, happy country,
it seems, despite the fact that
he has to be one of the most
blood-thirsty and greedy of
all the dictators the 20th century has produced.
The final blow is the phrase
"Even if you COULD enter
China . . . "It conveniently
»s
remains unmentioned that it
is the American government
which forbids travel to China.
But in one respect we
agree with the advertisement. Only Time-Life techniques could have produced
this book.
:.*«f
APOLITICAL
WOMAN
Time to rally 'round the campfire, girls
By MARGARET CATLEY
"Man is by nature a political  animal" — Aristotle.
Woman is a temple built
upon a sewer" — Boethnius.
"From   birth,   the  species
has taken possession of woman and tends to tighten its
grasp." — de Beauvoir.
•      •      •
Little futility could be derived from disputing whether
in fact woman is apolitical.
The question of why woman is apolitical has more
merit.
If political is defined as
that which pertains to public
The writer, Margaret Cat-
ley, graduates this year and
has been hired by the Canadian government's foreign
Service. She's the first woman so hired in more than
three years.
Margaret notes she is not
an ardent feminist. She likes
men. She even wants to
marry one.
power and the exercise of
governmental machinery in
a state, the absence of women in politics can be noted
by mentioning the attention
given to the ifact that a woman holds a publicly important position.
From the family to the
state, women generally play
subordinate roles in power
relationships.
The key to this dominance
relationship may be traced
to the specialization of function and division of labor
between the sexes — in their
sexual roles and their adaptations to these roles.
This duality is an inheritance from our annimal ancestry when primary behavior laws were applicable
to human society and human
groups.
First, in societies and
groups of marginal survival
potential, females must be
constantly lactating or pregnant to compensate for the
high death rate.
The cumulative effect of
constant pregnancy and regular dependance is one of the
strongest bases of the dependant or inferior position of
the female in the family.
The dependence of females
upon males and the relationship thereby established cannot be forgotten.
Second, as mothers, women had to be more gentle
and tender with their offspring and thus were forced
to develop some most unwar-
tlike attributes.
(But love and affections
which serve to justify the
individual group defense and
protection may be one of the
most important adaptions for
survival.)
Third, the male of the
species, in answer to his role
as   a   fighter,   became   the
LADY BIRD JOHNSTON
. . . she's secondary
Friday, March  4,   1966
stronger and ultimately the
weapon-bearing sex.
Surely this allocation of
forceful methods to men has
had more than a little effect
on which sex ultimately became the ruling group.
Fourth, because males had
to cooperate in order to
wage successful defense, they
eventually developed a greater propensity than women
for cooperation among themselves.
Why do women not get
along with each other?
One explanation may be
that if women are sexual aggressors and specialists, then
the winning and holding of
a mate becomes their most
important function.
Whereas males have many
life-long foes, women have
primordially and primarily
one — other women, competitors for the available men.
When social pressure as
well as biological urges decree women must mate and
marry, and when most women think of marriage as the
necessary if not sole life
goal, the competition becomes vital.
Woman's essentially
stronger narcissistic tendencies also provide a good explanation for her lesser abilities towards cooperation.
Fifth, the difference between the sexual development of women and their
role in the sexual act, and
that of men, supports male
dominance.
Compared to man's rela-
t i v e 1 y uncomplicated sexual anatomical development,
woman's is mysterious, even
to herself.
Furthermore, during intercourse, although woman may
be   the   aggressor   and  insti-
~* '.' * * '
THE      UBYSSEY
gator, it is man who is the
conqueror and who decides
ultimately whether he will
participate; a female cannot
take a male by force.
Sixth, men have traditionally been in contact with the
world outside the home or
close community and thus
are and always have been
in a better position to make
decisions.
INDIRA GANDHI
. . . but she's not
The myth of woman has
also contributed to her apolitical position.
Posed somewhere between
a fertility symbol and an
Eve-Pandora disrupter and
temptress, woman is surrounded by a supernatural
aura derived from the mystery of her body functions
behind which she is seen a
creature of intuition, instability and emotionality.
In summary, then, the answer to the question of why
woman have remained the
sub-dominant sex is found in
her  biological-psychological
nature and the division of
labor which placed her in
the cave, in the harem, in
the city, and finally in the
white pickeVfence prison.
Here she is found raising
and caring for her children
while her husband fights the
species' enemies and the economic battle for survival.
The social roles have been
integrated into an increasingly complex social organization which woman — by her
acquiescence if not active approval — has done as much
to perpetuate as man.
•       •       •
But one important consideration should be mentioned.
It is only in the last fifty
to one hundred years that
women have ventured to become political animals at all
on a world-wide, culture-
wide basis.
For the first time, woman
has demanded access to, if
not leadership in, almost all
fields of human endeavor.
This is but an inch on the
miles of chart of human history.
Perhaps, though, it is the
signal for profound  change.
However, the species must
survive and unless there is a
very profound change indeed
(not entirely impossible!)
women will continue to reproduce the species .... and
the story  begins  again.
Also, as Simone de Beauvoir bitterly notes, "the present enshrines the past —
and the past is history which
has been made by men".
'iPii»«e;
Page 7 10% Discount Given to
All U.B.C. Students on
Corsages
Vogue Flower Shop
2197  W.   Broadway 736-7344
Is the Key Club
Camp?
Sure, just ask anyone in
Acadia.
El Circulo presents
Ires Sombreros de Copa"
a modern comedy from the theatre of the  absurd,
in the
FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE
MARCH 4th    -    8:00 p.m.
MARCH 5th    -    2:00 and 8:00 p.m.
Tickets A.M.S. Office or at the Door
Students $1.00   —   General Admission $1.25
E
U
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THE   HIGH  BRIGHT  SUN
Dick Cogarde - Susan Strasberg
Plus
CAT BALLOU
Lee   Marvin   -  Jane   Fonda
STUDENTS 75c
DELTA
Plus
Plus
THE CURSE OF
FRANKENSTEIN
Hazel Court
DR. CRIPPEN
BLACK  TORMENT
* A,
Scoot over to
the whole teen-age world.
Sure you love scooters.
Records. Folk rock.
Dancing. Straight hair.
Short skirts. You're
natural, you're normal.
But perhaps you haven't
yet got the message
that more and more high
school students are using
Tampax tampons. Ten
years ago, it may not have
been so. But today,
definitely yes.
That's because Tampax
tampons are ideal for the
lively, spirited girls of
today. These girls aren't
dragging their feet and
waiting till they're in their
twenties to know the
freedom Tampax tampons
bring.
You're in the
new generation.
Take advantage
of it.
Page 8
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LIMITED. BARRIE. ONT.
THE      UBYSSEY
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has
OLUMNS
INDUBITABLY — in addition to signing the nomination papers for chancellor-candidate John "Tuck"
Buchanan, the students'
friend Byron Hender distinguished himself in unflagging support of the
alumni machine a second
time this week.
Seems there was this
meeting to discuss the
alum-student high school
liason project. Seems alum-
body Tim Hollick-Kenyon
wanted profs to speak for
20 minutes, students for 10
at each high school, with
a "come to UBC" slant.
Student position was for
a student-to-student contact, with the emphasis on
higher education, rather
than just our Alma Mater.
So who was arguing bitterly for the alumni?
You guessed it, the same
long-legged fellow who enjoyed a similar joint alumni-student junket around
the province last May just
before settling down to his
unconstitutional summer
job as president.
INDEPTH — Mystery of
the week is whereabouts
of the other chancellor-
candidate, Buchanan. Frantic Ubyssey staffers trying
to determine whether he
would indeed fight the
doughty Randy Enomoto
contacted everybody before finding out the most
authenticated rumor was
that the big bold B was
asea off Acapulco on H. R.
MacMillan's yacht, the
Mari-Jean.
Said the San Diego radiotelephone operator: "Send
a telegram." Said Acapulco: "Better you send ay
tele-graam."
INDOMINABLE — Nothing daunted, Ubyssey news
editor Ron Riter tried for
former good buddy Ubyssey staffer Bill Willson,
now on the Los Angeles
Times, to see what he could
come up with.
The conversation ran
like a bad movie script:
"Hi, Bill, this is Ron. Ron
Riter. R-i-t-e-r. Yeah. Anyway, there's this guy running for chancellor who is
supposed to be in a yacht
off the coast . . . chancellor
. . . UBC . . . oh." Wrong
Willson.
IN THE MAIL — Grad
students and friendly Dean
Ian McT. Cowan apparently have this hankering for
all faculties and departments to provide letter
boxes for all grad students.
Students got pushy for
the boxes at a facilities
committee meeting, chaired by Malcolm "No comment" McGregor, current
residence czar and classics
department head. It seems
MacGregor's policy for
grad students' mail is to
leave it on the edge of his
dask, to have it picked up
whenever He is in.
It seems the letter box
idea is meeting some opposition.
• •       •
IN THE TILL — AMS
financial wheels, hard pressed to meet blossoming
budgets each year, have
been desperately working
to avoid fee raise on our
side.
Expect some noise about
athletics, which consume
about $5 of that $29 each
year, the $5 being cash
which the society's coffers
could use.
• • •
INVERTED — Co-op residence question seems to
be coming to a kind of solution as well. AMS types,
seeking to quiet SUBsti-
tute demanders, have been
rustling up financial support for the high-rise student owned and run
scheme.
Aim, as well as the humanitarian angle, is to prevent the up-coming sink
.SUB petition from taking
the form of a residence or
SUB  priority question.
IN TOO — Also interested in the high-rise
scheme are, surprisingly
enough, faculty. Seems
same as married students,
the young faculty members
are looking for cheap, on-
campus housing.
INCENSED — During
student council's debate on
Totem, the losing yearbook,
editor John Tyrell made
one boo-boo which lost him
the foresters', support and
almost lost him his teeth.
Discussing the faculty
yearbooks currently published, he said the foresters' "feometim.es didn't
seem to know where it was
going". "Take that back!"
growled gigantic Dave Parker, quick-tempered monster woodsman. As council
laughed and applauded his
ire increased until it looked like fistcuffs were about
to begin.
"In this corner, at 250
pounds ..." began one
Brock bureacrat, amid the
cheers. "We'd hate to have
to throw you out, Dave,"
commented Hender.
Friday, March   4,   1966 V.
CASTRATED
NON-CALF
Letter to the golden calves
By KARL H. BURATJ
Being an incurable optimist, I was persuaded last
year to submit a dozen or so
articles to an editor who was
supposed to be unusually enlightened and courageous.
When I at last gave in, I
wrote to tell him that he was
evidently unable to publish
any opinion that was not accepted by the majority, and
I see no merit in writing
something that most people
already agree with.
A few days ago, (half a
year later), I got his answer.
He tells me I am wrong to
accuse him of not daring to
publish something non-conformist. But, he writes, articles must Ibe not only essential, well-written, well-documented, and,1 the projper length, but the author must also
at present (and presumably
in Canada) be an all-round,
recognized authority in the
field of his topic; otherwise
he can not be presented to
the public!
Now I admit that a calf,
i.e. a professor or some other
worshipped authority, would
get published for he says
something sensible.
But what matters is that
he has been made a calf by
some other calf, for most calves of our establishment cannot distinguish between good
and bad, but only between
calf-produced (and therefore
good) or not calf-produced
(and therefore bad).
When the Hebrews lost
their faith and good sense
(and their will to live up to
ideals) they made an idol, a
golden calf to be worshipped
without troublesome moral
obligations.
This exactly is our situation. It does not matter at all
that the UBC president
boasts that the budget for the
Humanities has gone up 85
per cent in three years, because it is all for the calves.
There is no improvement in
extending a closed shop intellectual incest propaganda
Karl Burau is a UBC student. He says his German degrees are equivalent to our
Ph.D.
He invites any group to
ask him to speak, and promises a thorough damnation
of Canadian society. Call
325-8898.
machine for outdated prejudices and childisSh nonsense. And if an outsider cannot prove that he is reliably
incompetent, or if his servility does not penetrate all his
buttonholes, he will never be
accepted in the United
Brotherhood of Calves.
I once had a friend.  He
worked as a bricklayer until
'*.. ,t>'
THE HOGARTH PUPPETS perform free Thursday noon in.
Education   100.   Directors Jan   Bussell and   his wife Ann
Hogarth are recognized as Britain's leading exponents of
this ancient and fascinating art.
Friday,  March  4,   1966
■because of an old brain injury he became half-blind
and his hands trembled badly. So he took up painting.
He sent some paintings (abstract, of course) to an annual national exhibtion. A
letter arrived inquiring
about his artistic background. He admitted' he was
a non-British immigrant, and
was rejected. The next year
he sent them the same paintings under an English sounding name "nom de plume"
and when same letter arrived, he wrote them a nice
story of how he was a Canadian who had studied under
Sir Henry Moore. He was accepted.
Now a few years later he
has become an international
authority of art education
with his own paintings hanging in all the leading galleries of North America. And1
he deserves this recognition,
for his abstract paintings are
no worse than any others,
and he can even paint real
pictures. He certainly is intelligent and smart, and his
greatest problem is to hide
his trembling hands and poor
sight.
When I spoke to him last I
suggested some books for his
boy. He was terrified and explained that his son shall be
kept as ignorant as possible,
and shall go to Simon Fraser
Academy because there he
can pass three semesters in
one year. He shall study only
English for nothing else
counts. He shall study, read,
memorize, apd believe only
what his professor tells him.
He said, "If we do not confuse him with real knowledge, he will become a professor before he is twenty-
five. Then I'll tell him all
about our silly society of
primitive snobs. And he will
become a great reformer of
this outdated country."
I said.that if a father succeeds in castrating his son
up to the age of twenty-five,
he will become and remain
(professor or not) a nightpot
bearer of the establishment.
Since then my friend does
not know me any more.
Calfism is very contagious
and my former friend likes
to cover it up for himself.
My article "The Knowledge Bar at Canadian Universities" was published in
The Ubyssey in a castrated
form under "Dangerous Man
Lashes Canada", October 15,
1965.
I am still waiting in vain
for an invitation from any
student group to speak on
how to improve our universities and our society.
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BETTER  BUY  BOOKS
1393 W. 10th Ave. - 224-4144
NEW YORK
COSTUME SALON
WHITE   DINNER   JACKETS
TAILS, TUXEDOS
MASQUERADE      COSTUMES
Special Student
Rates
4397 W.   10th AVE.
CA   4-0034
When will the mysterious
KEY CLUB
be de-mystified?
on  Tuesday everyone will
know.
Part Time Job Opportunities
For 1966-67 School Year
Boys' Clubs of Vancouver have a Student Work Plan for
Undergraduates, Men and Women.    If you are interested
in a part-time job for next term apply to the University's
Placement Office for further  information.
INTERVIEW: 9-5 THURSDAY, MARCH  10th
'(I// 0Hl\
i!w tin:'i
k" '■■■ k
TRADS
designed for women
to walk beside
Sabre-slim TRADS are tailored with lithe,
clean lines. The finest worsteds and long
wearing blends are featured in fashionable
shades with the modern international flair
for eye-appeal. DON PARKER TRADS popularly priced at your favorite men's shop; look
for the authentic "TRADS" hang tag - your
assurance of top value.
THE
UBYSSEY
Page 9 Summer Employment
Opportunities
A limited number of general office summer employment
opportunities will be available for second or third year
male students for the period from the end of the term to
mid-September. The positions will be in the pulp and
paper, woods, converting and building materials divisions
of Crown Zellerbach Canada Limited in British Columbia.
On-campus interviews will be scheduled for March 8th.
Students in Commerce or Arts — majoring in Economics,
Maths or Geography — who are interested should leave
tlheir names at the Student Services Office.
CROWN ZELLERBACH CANADA LIMITED
LUMBER/PLYWOOD/NEWSPR INT/PAPER/PULP/PACKAGING
c
4.00 P.M.  TODAY
SPECIAL STUDENT MATINEES
WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE'S
Romeo   &
Juliet
PLAYHOUSE THEATRE COMPANY
at the Queen Elizabeth Playhouse
Only $1.00 with AMS Cord
TREASURES FROM THE ART GALLERY OF TORONTO
through March  27
31 important paintings by Rembrandt,
Van Dyck, Hals, Reynolds, Canaletto,
Monet, Renoir, Degas, Picasso and
others
at
THE VANCOUVER ART GALLERY
Open: Tuesday - Saturday 10 a.m. - 5 p.m.
Friday 7 p.m. -10 p.m.
Sunday 2 p.m. - 5 p.m.
, ,, * <>» v.tnk" W ?x ,
AT  LAST
A  PLUG
Good, sexy warming winter
By STEPHEN SCOBIE.
Winter Kept Us Warm is a
full-length Canadian student
movie. If that description
puts you off, don't let it, because Winter is something
even rarer than a full-length
Canadian student movie. It's
a good full-length Canadian
student movie.
The story of the film (the
title comes from T. S. Eliot's
poem The Wasteland) covers
one year at University of
Toronto. It examines a
campus friendship between
two young men of widely
differing backgrounds.
Doug (John Labow), a glib
Commerce senior, befriends
Peter (Henry Tarvainen), an
awkward fresfaman from a
Northern- Ontario mining
town. Doug's buddies and
his breezy girlfriend Bev
(Joy Tepperman) are confused by the unlikely attachment, but the friendship
flourishes until Peter joins
the drama club and meets
an aggressive co-ed, Sandra
(Janet Amos).
The director describes his
theme as "the loss of innocence, presented on two
levels, set aside against the
ivy-clad traditions and jet-age
pressures of a multiversity."
The theme of homosexuality
is implicit in the story, but
never openly stated.
Winter is produced and directed by David Secter, a
final year Arts student at
Toronto, who made the whimsical cartoon Love With The
Proper Guppy. shown on
CBC last January. The film
was shot on a solid financial
foundation of debt, and was
finished in a frantic rush to
be available for its premiere
at the Commonwealth Film
Festival in Cardiff, Wales.
When it went on the screen
pf 6ix
LOVE WITH THE IMPROPER STRANGER is great for staving
off that cold Toronto winter, say U of T students Henry
Travainen and Janet Amos in Winter Kept Us Warm.
there, Secter himself had not
yet seen the final print.
Critics in both Britain and
Canada have given the film
a favorable reception. They
have said that it possesses a
"rare naturalness" and have
especially praised its visual
qualities.
The major American trade
paper Variety acknowledged
it to be a "better than average campus film" and singled
out its outdoor photography
as being particularly commendable.
Arthur Zeldin described
the photography as being "as
competent as that of many a
professional" and went on to
say: "What gives the film its
structure and progression is
director Secter's sophisticated use of montage.
Right from the opening sequence, parallel scenes, tight
ly related to the plot, are
counter-pointed in such a way
as to reveal as much about
the story, or even more, as
the dialogue itself."
It would be foolish to pretend that Winter Kept Us
Warm is a great movie, or
that it does not bear the
marks of its director's inexperience, but it would be
equally foolish to dismiss it
as a professional campus
failure.
There is no need to patronize David Secter and his film.
It is a film well worth seeing
and enjoying for its own
merits.
Winter Kept Us Warm will
be shown in the Auditorium
next week, Wednesday
through Friday at 12:30,
3:30, 6:00 and 8:30, and Saturday at 6:00 and 8:30.
UBC ^t*&-    65
ON YOUR
CAMPUS
RADIO DIAL
PRESENTS
THE SHANTELLES
and
the Shantelle Go-Go Girls
Saturday, March 12  -  Brock  -  9:00-1:00
Page  10
THE        UBYSSEY
Friday, March  4,   1966 CHRISTIAN  CORNER
BY  LYNN
Christ went to the heart
"Picture a world: half-slave, blighted with
drunkenness, torn wth racial strife, immersed
in political corruption, troubled with wars
and rumors of wars. Imagine then a religious
leader rising in the midst of that world and
never delivering a single sermon against any
of these things! That's how it was with
Christ. A person searches in vain for one
message from him on slavery, the liquor
traffic, racial discrimination, war, or bad
politics." Lon Woodrum, Journalist: The
Rebellious Planet.
Christ delivered no sermon on slavery or
the current ills. He went, instead, to the
heart of the matter. And out of that marched
all the evils of the world. He stood opposed
to evil in any form, but outward change
could not effect inward change.
First, change the inner man.
Great popularity could have been his.
His mighty miracles could have been performed in disposing of the Roman rule, the
starvation that threated the shaky economic
situation. He could have taken advantage of
the situation of the day in order to gain a
following — but Christ insisted on personal
inward change. No miracle for the masses
. . . personal conversion first . . . then light
and decency and progress would' follow.
Christ cannot be had socially, politically,
economically, religiously, unless he is had
personally. He cannot move in our midst
unless he lives in our hearts.
Christ never boasted that he would get the
whole world saved, but he did promise to
reconcile to God all those who personally
came to him. Only that part of our world'
will be redeemed that desires redemption.
And, to date, the unredeemed outnumber the
rdeemed outrageously. But what society can
function with a minority saved and a majority lost?
The religion you have may be a bore. The
church you go to may foe a morgue. But to
know Christ PERSONALLY — for he can
be known on other way — is to step into
meadows of dazzling sunshine of a million
delights. Doubts vanish, boredoms disappear
. . . and the 'mystery of you' dissolves.
High life of the flat dweller
By BRIAN  WITHAM
Considering the quantity
of not wholly unjustified
criticisms of campus residences which have appeared
in this paper, I thought it
only fair to give a not only
biased but enlightened view
of conditions off campus.
Two years of campus living in the newer residences
was   enough  to  turn me
against   their   sterile  orderliness.
Yes, Acadian and Fort
Camp-types, I said "newer
residences". Living quarters
above a store in a district
livened by sculptors, painters
and potters was ideal and
what I wanted — and1 what
I got. At last, bare walls,
high ceilings, just waiting to
have things glued, nailed or
tacked on them; gaping corners ready for  an  easel or
NO ADMITTANCE TO
PERSONS UNDER It
SturfMItt $1.23
SlIOWHllMt
7:30 - 9:30
—* lAfl. Wdf&m<j(A£__,
^^wi4
224-3730
437. W. 10th
massive chunk of driftwood;
switches that would have to
to be turned just a certain
way to light the wobbly, Vic
torian lamps; a giant radio,
Which when tapped on the
sjde or on the middle of the
dial would lose its recurring
squeal.
The bathroom door never
has, can't now, and never
will close more than half
way.
Every two weeks sees me
coated in soot, trying to vacuum the stove. Each day I
have to cook my own meals
but can throw together whatever fancies my palate —
and there are fringe benfits
in such an area as girls actually offer to cook meals for
you, so variety does occur.
I do have neighbors occupying the adjoining suites
above the stores and so
therefore can't have a hundred guest-type party lasting
until four in the morning but
I know of a real swinging
place nearby just two blocks
away ...
in a rush of pleated skirt, a bold-as-brass buttoned
trimmed blazer . . .all neatly knit in all wool. Be
well suited at a sorority tea, a fraternity hop, that
nervous first day on the job! White skirt with
black, red or green jacket; navy skirt with green,
red or navy jacket. Sizes 10 to 16. Each 55.00
EATON'S Sportswear—Downtown and Park Royal
Only.
MAKE YOUR
WEEKEND
RESERVATION
EARLY
Type of Car
24 Hour Day
Weekends
Acadian
Chevy II
$5.00 & 5c
$12.00 &  5c
Valiant
Comet
$6.00 & 5c
$14.00 & 5c
Parisienne
Galaxy
Impala
Mustang
$8.00 & 5c
$18.00 & 5c
Save up to 40% on Special overnight rate. Any car in
our fleet — $5 & 5c per mile.
You Pay Only For The Gas You Use
BUDGET RENT-A-CAR
New Location 1058 Alberni
Phone 685-0536
SPECIAL  EVENTS
presents
The Paul Winter Jazz Sextet
This Saturday - 8:00 p.m. in the Auditorium
VANCOUVER TICKET CENTRE OR AT THE DOOR. Prices for students $1.50
to $1.75. Adults $2.50 to $2.75. Credits winners of Intercollegiate Jazz Festival
1961, First Jazz Group to play the Whitehouse, State Department Tour, six albums
on  Columbia.
BE THERE!
Friday, March   4,   1966
THE
UBYSSEY
Page  11 OOPS
Nothing's like
a good pyre
By ROBIN JEFFREY
Old winos in new cans or
passions enflamed or a woman is only a woman but a
monk is a smoke or there's
nothing like a good pyre.
"Your majesty! Your majesty! Where is thy husband
King Alfred? The Danes are
coming! The Danes are coming! He's got to build the
Royal Navy by tomorrow
morning!"
"Oh, Alfie? Why the last
time I saw him he was pouring the royal wine cellar over
him and rubbing two sticks
together."
•       •       •
"Sir Francis! Sir Francis!
The Spaniards are gathering
a huge invasion fleet at Cadiz
and the Queen hath sent thee
forty, pitch-filled fire-ships!"
"Oh, gee, that's great. Tell
her to just give me a minute
while I call 39 friends."
"Mr. Lincoln! Mr. Lincoln!
The South has seceded! The
slaves are being persecuted!
The union is tottering and
. . . say, where are you going
with that case of gunpowder
and those matches?"
"Oh, well, I thought I'd
just . . . well . . . you know,
sort of draw attention to the
problem . . . maybe in Jeff
Davis' frontyard . . . perhaps?"
"Students! Students! Where
are you going with those logs
and tins of gasoline? You're
not! No! No! Not you! Not
the youth of our nation! Not
the hope of the world! Not
"Relax man, like we're
just holdin' a protest wienie
roast in Victory Square."
The Love
Goddesses
NO ADMITTANCE TO
PERSONS UNDER 1*
'"The Love Goddesses" is the story of sex in the movies. It is
also the story of how the Love Goddesses have been the reflection of the customs, manners, and morals of their times.
Added Short Subjects: "Jazz Dance" and "The Golden Fish"
2 shows nightly including Sunday
at 7:30 and 9:30.
Adults   1.25.   Students   with   cards
1.00.
Cbt.wmi.ii
9-1   in the Armouries
RETURN...
with the BANDITS from SEATTLE
Friday, March 11
Sphiwq. u distM . . .
at
THE COLLEGE SHOP
• SWEATSHIRTS  $3.25 - $3.95
-Long sleeve
-Surf
-Olympic
-Short sleeve
-Metallic
-All sizes
-Quarter zipper
-Classic
-Assorted colours
• LIGHTWEIGHT JACKETS  $7.50 and $8.50
-Poplin -All sizes
-Gabardine -U.B.C. crested
Navy, Powder Blue, Gold, Red, White with trim
* Sweatsuits
-U.B.C. Crested
-Navy blue
-All sizes
-7.95
* Tennis Shoes        * Running Shoes
-Low cut
-Made by Spalding
-Two sizes
-6.95
-Even sizes
-White
-4.50
D E A/I E l\/l D CD       Tnis   ,s   Your  College  Shop—Come   in  and   Browse
KCIVICIVIDCK    Hours:8.30 a.m.-1.30 p.m. Shop Closes for Year April 1
Page 12
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, March  4,   1966 Friday, March  4,   1966
THE      UBYSSEY
Page   13
FOREGROUND
BIRTH CONTROL
GOOD    IiY?
HEAVENS!
HIS-MOTHER! Secret,     •
'IN 1880THERE UERE 20,000 GIPSIES IN ENGLAND"-AL HUGHES
Illegal seminars
tackle problem
noRA-dAN IS INHIS_/i7,
AVERAGE DISGUISE
LAM5 AND PAV THE CAB,1
_WILI YOj? I   HAVEN'T
" TH£ CHAMO£:
  OH! M/kMA,T*
JOESY, WHO'SXA^O/S LUST!
YouR girl FK/£.\D?)^0^< meet
LONDON (CUP) — Western
students who want birth control information may have to
take a lesson from their buddies! a* University of Toronto.
Seminars to dispense birth
control information to students in direct contravention
of the Criminal Code began
at U of T last week.
Western officials say students here have made no requests for such seminars.
"The question has not come
up," said Dr. Leola Neal, Western's dean of women. If there
is a demand it will have to be
considered by the appropriate
people, she said.
Dr. R. J. Bowen, head of
University of Western Ontario
Health Service refused to
comment on the feasibility of
birth control seminars or
whether students request
birth control information at
the Health Service Centre.
Sponsored by the Literary
and Athletic Society of Toronto's University College, the
birth control seminars segregate men and women to pre-
Will Moralman be a
member of the
KEY CLUB?
Certainly.
DRIVING IN UK
OR EUROPE7
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FREE   BOOKLET
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h
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4538 West 10th, Van.
Everything
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PHONE:
224-5858     -    224-9112
FOR SALE SHEET
vent embarrassment. Leading
the seminars are four Toronto
doctors.
UC Lit President Danny
Cooper told the Gazette
there has been no complaint
from university administration. Police have taken no
action "as yet" he said.
Lawyer Stewart Fisher of
Toronto said the Society could
be prosecuted under the Criminal Code if anybne makes a
complaint.
The Criminal Code prohibits
instruction in birth control
and contraceptive devices.
At Queen's University, officials said if birth control information is requested by students it will be given in the
form of seminars. Officials
said they would examine carefully the choice of the person
to  give  out  the  information.
At U of T Cooper said
there are "quite a number of
abortions".
-&W\<\
M
,oh-,doVoU5:v_-_. play1
THA T GAME : WEL_.,v'olm)
HAVE TO 5ToP X'OUJ: EH."
______£§ii
 WHAT 15 MAPf A uPTO?COMTiMUED^
KEEP WATCHING THIS SPACE—TORALMAN U LL BE BACK |kl TEN Minutes. $>
This is the first time a student council has initiated
discussion of the problem, he
said. The Society plans to hold
as many seminars as the students demand.
In conjunction with the
seminars, the Society is sponsoring    a    series    of    public
panels, involving the legal,
moral and psychological aspects.
At a students' meeting in
Toronto, Cooper said there is
a plot in parliament to
strangle legislation which
would legalize such instruction.
The technique involves killing the bill by an extended
debate' which leaves no time
for  a  vote,  said Cooper.
He advised students wishing to change the law to write
and inform their member of
parliament they are aware of
the   technique.
P.E.U.S. To Vote Friday
B.P.E. students are actually having an election to determine next year's council. For the first time since  1958
council members will not go in by acclamation.
Candidates for office:
President: Ed Youngberij. P.E. Ill; Byron Thorne,
Rec. III.
Vice-President: Brenl McComb, P.E. IH, Ernie Yacuib,
P.E. III.
Secretary-Treasurer: Meryl Oliver, P.E. II, Melanie
Kamm, Rec. III.
Students are invited to hear these people speak .  . .
Thursday, 12:30 in Room 213, War Memorial Gym
Vote Friday, March 4, at War Memorial Gym.
SOCIAL
WORKERS
Interviewer from the British Columbia
DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE
will be pleased to interview persons with a Bachelor of
Arts Degree or graduates of the School of Social Work
for permanent positions in the  Department.
Interviews Will Be Held In Student Services Building
Thursday, March 10,
and Friday, March 11
9 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Appointments can be made by calling in person or
phoning 228-3811
SALARY SCHEDULE EFFECTIVE APRIL 1,  1966:
M.S.W.                  _  $490.00 to $590.00
B.S.W.         470.00 to    550.00
B.A.   __.          389.00 to    450.00
All usual Civil Service benefits
Further information from
Training Division
DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE
800 Cassiar Street
Vancouver 6, B.C.
Telephone:    CYpress 9-9131
Alma Mater Society
OFFICIAL NOTICES
Finance Committee:
Applications are now being accepted for positions in
the Finance Committee.
1. Three Assistant Treasurers
2. One Member At Large
Those possessing a wide knowledge of student activities and capable of assuming an interesting and
responsible office are especially urged to apply. Please
submit applications in writing to Box 53 by March 7,
1966.
Chairmen Needed:
Applications are now being received for chairmanship of the following committees:
ACADEMIC ACTIVITIES COMMITTEE.
FROSH ORIENTATION COMMITTEE.
INTRAMURALS COMMITTEE.
LEADERSHIP CONFERENCE COMMITTEE.
COLLEGE SHOP MANAGER.
All applications shall be in writing and shall be addressed to the secretary (Box 54).
Eligibility forms must be submitted with applications.
Eligibility forms are available at the Secretary's office
(upstairs south Brock).
Applications must be submitted toy 4:00 p.m. Today.
W.A.A. Elections:
Nominations are now open for the positions of President, Vice-president, Treasurer and Secretary of the
Women's Athletic Association. Nominations will close
at 4:00 p.m. on March 7th, and; elections will be held
on March 10th, in Bu. 100, at a general meeting
to which all women on campus are invited. Nominations may be submitted at the Women's Athletic
Directorate office in the Women's Gymnasium.
Students Court: Constitutional Hearing
The court will hold a hearing on Tuesday, March 8th,
12:30 p.m. in the Student's Council Charrnbers, Brock
Hall, to enquire into the validity of the Law Students
Association, election held Feb. 25, 1966.
All those interested in making representation to the
court must notify the Clerk of the Court of their intention to do so by 4:00 p.m. Monday, March 7. The
hearing is open and all students are invited to attend.
Apply Box 126, Brock Hall.
Canadian Union of Students:
Applications open for S.I.S.A. Deadline is Wednesday,
March 9. Apply to C.U.S., Box 153. Page  14
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, March  4,   1966
FLEET FULLBACK Jim Berry
will lead soccer Thunderbirds in Pacific Coast League
game against St. Andrews
Saturday at 2 p.m.. Varsity
Stadium.
Volleyballers
champs twice
UBC's volleyball Thunderbirds won two championships
Saturday.
The squad captured the
Canadian • American Intercollegiate tournament and th<
B.C. Open Championships at
the War Memorial Gym.
Thunderbirds romped to victories over University of Washington Huskies and the University of Victoria in the Can-Am
tournament, winning straight
sets in the best-of-five series.
The Thunderbirds swept the
B.C. Open title undefeated in
the four-team competition.
OUR  BOYS
OVERCONFIDENT'
Russian soccer' tactics beat Canada
By JOHN MILLER.
Miller is a former sports editor
of the University of Western Ontario Gazette, who attended the
World University Hockey games in
Italy.
TORINO, Italy (CUP)—As
expected, a Canadian hockey
team came to the 1966 World
University Winter Games to
trade souvenirs and lose to
the  Russians.
Unexpectedly, Canada also
lost to Finland, 8-5, and Rumania 5-0.
Had it not been for a spirited 5-3 conquest of favored
Czechoslovakia, the University*"
of Manitoba Bisons, 1965 Canadian Intercollegiate champions, would have lowered the
Maple Leaf abruptly to half
mast in international hockey
circles.
•      •      •
Father David Bauer's idea
of a university-based national
team never looked so impossible.
There are reasons, of
course.
Compared to the Russian
team's Spartan-like schedule
of daily workouts, Canada
did not practise once. The
team was busy taking tours of
Torino's sprawling Fiat Factory or visiting night clubs or
signing autographs.
"They've had it too easy,"
admitted Manitoba's Athletic
Director Bud Fisher, "They
weren't thinking about hockey."
The team was alarmingly
overconfident before the Finland game. Canada beat the
Finns 7-2 on the first day of
the tournament, but the game
was played the same day the
Finland team arrived by train.
But the real reason for
Canada's poor showing was
something our players couldn't bring with them.
The game of hockey has
changed since they first batted
rubber in the 1800's on the
frozen St. Lawrence. The
darting, durable, machine-like
Russians have changed it.
•     •     •
Russia has bought soccer
tactics to hockey. You can't
forecheck them because they
break quickly and trap one or
two forwards. Skating with
them is like chasing gazelles.
The answer is superb conditioning and ability to play
the puck and not the man.
In this tournament, the
rock-hard Russian bears defeated confused Canadian
beavers 6 to 2.
Afterwards many Canadian
players admitted the Russians
were a better team. They
had come up against the Iron
Curtain    version    of   college
hockey—professionalism in a
mortarboard.   ,
Two Rumanians were policemen back home posted to a
precinct. But neither had ever
been there. They just played
hockey and their pay cheques
were sent to the rink.
The Canadian team came
from one university. The Russians, Czechs, Finns and Italians all sent all-star teams;
the Rumanians sent their national team. Russia's included
two players from the national
"B" team.
• • •
Every team had a tough
schedule, which probably detracted from the play towards
the end of the tournament.
The fact remains that Canada
came to Torino never having
played under international
rules. And the team was not
conditioned well enough to
play full out past the fifth
game of the tournament when
they beat Czechoslovakia.
*      •      •
The Bisons did not finish
among the first three teams
in Torino, but maybe they
taught Canada a lesson.
Maybe some blustery winter morning when 1,500 miles
of Canada's prairies are
frozen and mercury collapses
in thermometers—just maybe,
a bunch of kids in Flin Flon
or Saskatoon or Moose Jaw
will be out on the lake.
Playing  soccer.
UBC OPEN
SQUASH
TOURNAMENT
March 7-21
Entry Forms $1.00 at AMS
- ADULT DISCOTHEQUE
9 to 3 a.m.    Featuring:
THE EXECUTIVES  &
THE A-GO-GO  GIRLS
821   River Rd., Richmond
"on the way to the airport,
above the Richmond marina".
Admission $2.00 Reservations 278*2624
SATURDAY. MARCH 5th
9-1 in the Armouries
DANCE
Don & the Goodtlmes
Kentish Steele & the Shcmtelle's
with A-Go-Go Girls
$1.50 Person Friday, March  4,   1966
THE      UBYSSEY
Page  15
CLOSING  WEEKS
— powell hargrave photo
PUTTING SOME shoulder into their work are these two hopefuls at Thunderbird spring
football camp. Workouts of last two weeks culminate in full-dress intra-squad game
today at 4:30 at Wolfson Field.
Alaska success gives
cagers winning year
By KEN  ATKINSON
The Thunderbird basketball
team closed the season winning
three of four games on their
Alaskan tour.
'Birds split with the University of Alaska in Fairbanks,
taking the first game last Friday 74-73 then losing the second the following evening 69-
60.
Officiating during the series
was unbelievable. The second
game was a little more than a
brawl masquerading as basketball.
UBC coach, Peter Mullins,
whose firm policy is never to
criticize the officials, received
the (first technical foul of his
coaching career.
Things were different in
anchorage Monday and Tuesday.
'Birds bombed the hosting
Alaska Methodist University
111-68 and then beat the Elden-
dorf Air Force Base 82-77.
The victories gave UBC a
winning 15-14 record, including 10 wins in 13 home games.
Scoring ace Bob Barazzuol
finished his three-year basketball career at UBC by bagging
PETER MULLINS
.  technically incorrect
586   points   this   season   for  a
20.2 game average.
John Olsen and Ian Dixon
followed with 12.1 and 10
point-per-game averages respectively.
Barazzuol led the season in
rebounding with 248 for an 8.6
average. He was followed by
Olsen's 8.5 and Steve Spencer's
7.9 averages.
Meanwhile, in Victoria,
UBC's Jayvees have reached
the Junior Men's Canadian
Basketball Championship finals
undefeated.
UBC scored victories over
Fredericton Elms, Mount Royai
Junior College from Calgary
and Victoria Chinooks.
They will play the championship game Saturday against
either Montreal, Calgary or
Victoria.
Intramurals boom
tho  exams loom
Intramurals   swings   into   its  last   th_ree   weeks   with
activity in six sports.
Co-ed tennis doubles will
commence March 10th and
curling the following day. Entries for both events are due
Monday. Curling fees are $6.
Entries to be submitted in room
309 of War Memorial Gym.
Track and field preliminaries commence March 10th in
the Stadium. A list of events
is posted on the Intramural bulletin board in Memorial Gym.
Wrestling weigh-ins are set
for March 14th in Memorial
Gym with bouts beginning the
following day.
Lacrosse begins today on the
playing field behind Memorial
Gym with ATO playing against
the Engineers.
Play continues every noon
hour with finals March 24th.
Seven-aside rugby is being
added to the Intramural schedule for the first time.
All managers and captains of
groups planning to enter are
asked to attend a meeting at
noon March 15th in room 211,
Memorial Gym.
Brian   Wightman,   coach   of
rugby Thunderbirds, will be
there to explain rules, techniques, and answer any questions
pertaining to the game. Play
begins March 21st.
WE'VE DIDDLED IT AGAINI
Another Air Shipment of
WIDE WALE CORDS
in new summer colours . . . 9.95
ALSO    ARRIVING   BY   LOW   FLYING
DOGHOUSE
. . . "Snoppy Airways" (Ha Ha, Red
Baron,   Another   Successful   Mission)
Bad   Boy  Mini
BLUNDERBUSSES
in  the  Latest  "Flak"  Colours at the
Same Ridiculous Price . . . $9.95
BAD BOYS
RAGGE SHOPPE
315   SEYMOUR
Spring  Formal Specials
Complete Outfit
Tuxedos Colored Tails
$6.50 Jackets $8.50
$7.50
E. A. LEE Formal Wear Rentals
623 Howe (Downstairs)      MU 3-2457
Can girls join the
KEY CLUB?
Yea, yea, yea.
CHINA?
Well, of course you can go! Not everywhere, maybe, but to the main centres.
And after, you can take the train up
jfjjffs^jji*0 the Trans Siberian Railway and go on
J$wH§y»to Moscow. Come in and see us for full
details.of travel to all the Orient.
MEMBER
Open 9-5 p.m., incl. Saturday
Hagen's Travel Service Ltd.
HAGEN'S
736-5651
2996 W.  Broadway
C^./^^^ ^^^^ /      LIMITED
OPTICAL DEPT.
Bring your optical prescription
to us and save!
Glasses   Single vision from ,_.   9.95
Bifocals from 12.95
Contact Lenses    49.50
ONE LOCATION ONLY
677 Granville, opp. the Bay, 681-6174
1 Hour Free Parking at Rite Park
"The home of friendly people and happy teachers."
SCHOOL DISTRICT
No.  35  (LANGLEY)
Within  easy  commuting   distance  of   U.B.C,   S.F.U.   and
U. of W.W.
Elementary and Secondary Vacancies Effective
September, 1966
For salary schedule and detailed information phone'
594-4515 (Toll free Vancouver Area)
Harold  D. Stafford:  District Superintendent of Schools
PONDEROSA!
THE RAWHIDE LOOK!
Suedine Pullover Shirts $10.95
Corduroy Pullover Shirts $11.95
All laced at the neck with rawhide
PEA JACKETS!
THE DOUBLE BREASTED NAVY LOOK IN
JACKETS.
HEAVY WOOL MELTON. ONLY $19.95
¥ DISTINCTIVE
DISTINCTIVE  MEN'S  STORES
4445 W. 10th Ave.   290fr West Broadway
near  Sasamat at Mackenzie Page  16
THE      UBYS5EY
Friday, March   4,   1966
'TWEEN CLASSES
Winter brings showmen
SPECIAL EVENTS
Last minute tickets for Paul
Winter will be available tomorrow night in the Aud. 8:30
p.m. At the door $1.00 with
AMS card.
EL  CIRCULO
El Circulo presents Tres
Sombreros de Copa, a comedy
from the theatre of the absurd
in the Freddy Wood Theatre tonight at 8 p.m. and tomorrow
at 2 and 8 p.m. Tickets AMS
office or at door.
GERMAN  CLUB
Two  color films about Germany, Bu. 202 at nOon.
RADSOC
Prof. Wm. Willmott will answer students' questions about
Vie1iirm on UBC radio's Student Forum Monday 8:30-1 C.1.0
p.m
COMMUNITY  PLANNING
Free   illustrated   lecture   —-
The National Plan For Ghana
Prof. Geo. Nez Lass. 102 Monday noon.
VIETNAM COMMITTEE
General   membership   meeting.
PRE-SOCIAL WORK
Speaker on Alcoholism Monday noon in Bu. 202.
UN CLUB
Crisis in Ghana — A seminar
with Dr. Kubicek Monday noon
in IH Upper Lounge.
FROSH   U.S.
Any Frosh wishing to participate in intramural rugby,
track and field and /or wrestling, please meet in Bu. 1213
at noon.
DEBATING  UNION
UBC is a Cultural Wasteland
— Alpha Phi vs. Aises. Noon
in Bu. 217.
SPECIAL EVENTS
Special Events and Frosh
present Tomasi, Fijian folk
singer, noon in Brock. Part of
Frosh week celebrations. 25
cents.
CHORAL SOC
A Festival of Song 8 p.m. in
Aud. Popular, classical, folk,
barbershop, and spiritual numbers featured. Good entertainment. Adults $1, Students 75
cents.
RADSOC
Hear Poet Gripper Forster
interviewed on Student's
Forum Monday 9:30 p.m. Students' questions and opinions
can be aired by phoning 224-
3245.
ALLIANCE FRANCAISE
French day today at IH. Discussion and coffee at noon.
SEAFORTH   HIGHLANDERS
Special lecture Monday noon
in Armouries on S.M.G. prior
to going on ranges on Tuesday.
UBC  SOCREDS
Howard Johnson, M.P. Ok-
anagan-Revelfetoke, speaks
noon in Bu. 104.
University Hill
United Church
on University Boulevard
Invites You to Worship
This Sunday
March 6th at 11:00 a.m.
"IN CONFLICT WITH
TEMPTATION"
Rev. Harold L. MacKay
7:00 p.m. University Young
People's
THE CHURCH ON THE
CAMPUS WELCOMES YOU
PRE-MED
Tickets are still available
for the Slipped Discotheque on
Saturday. Vote yes Thursday,
March 10.
GERMAN  DEPT.
Prof. Hans Bekker-Nielson
will give a noon-hour lecture
Monday on Icelandic Literature
anjd Western Civilization in
Bu.   100.
NEWMAN  CLUB
Newman campus mission
takes place in the St. Mark's
Lounge at noon all this week.
ED. U.S.
Dr. Fiedler speaks noon in
Ed. 1006.
PRE-LIBRARIANSHIP
Mr.   Watson   will   speak   on
the use of Computers, in Libraries. Meet in Rm. 863 Lib.
South. Everyone welcome.
ALPHA  OMEGA SOC
General meeting Monday
noon in Bu.  223.
ACADEMIC   ACTIVITIES
Gordon Martin, UBC alumnus and a wel-known Marxist-
Leninist wil speak on The Role
Of The Intellectual in Modern
Society noon in Bu.  100.
IH
Exhibit of Chinese paintings
by Mr. I-Hsiung Monday-Friday
8:00 a.m. to 10:00 p.m.
CHEERLEADING
CHEERLEAD! Tryouts for
'66-'67 teams Bu. 218 Monday
noon.
CLASSIFIED
Rates: 3 lines, 1 day, $.75—3 days, $2.00. Larger Ads on request
Non-Commercial Classified Ads are payable in Advance
Please bring or send lo Publications Office, Brock Hall.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Lost J. Found
11
FOUND ADS inserted free. Publication* office, Brock Hall. Local 26,
224-3242.
LOST — LONDON FOG RAINCOAT
at Totem Park Dance. Reward offered.   Phone   224-9774,   Room   302.
LOST ON UNIVERSITY BLVD.. —
Nowrath watch, silver. Reward.
Contact Perrin Bruce, Ph. 738-7675
LOST—ONE WATCH, GOLD WITH
silver band, Monday, in men's
washroom,, Buch. Ex., third floor.
Reward offered. Call Alroy at
224-9953..	
POUND SMALL PEARL EARING,
clip back.    The Ubyssey office.
WALLET FOUND IN BU. 104 BE-
forc 10.30 Mar. 3. Claim in Ubyssey
Publications   office.
Greetings
12
DEAREST YVONNE, HAPPY 2lBt
birthday on March 5. Only the best
of everything always. All my love
Bob.	
G1NA: HAPPY 21st! The Wayward
one.
LANCELOT: CONGRATULATIONS!
Twenty-one already!! Your loving
Grandmother.
Special Notices
13
STUDY FOR FINALS ! BUT HAVE
a ball first, the Pre-med Ball.
This Saturday at the Coach
House.   Only  ?3.50   cpl.   at  A.M.S.
WHY PAY HIGH AUTO INSUR-
ance rates? If you are over 20 and
have a good driving history you
qualify for our good driving rates.
Motorbike & Scooter Insurance,
also from $17.00 up. Ted Elliott,
224-6707.
STUDENT MEDICALLY UNABLE
to attend classes needs notes for
month of March in English 100,
History 202, Psychology 100, So-
ciology  200.   Phone  228-8593.
DON AND THE GOODTIMES WILL
be in the Armouries with Kentish
Steele and the Shantelles Saturday, March 5. Don't miss the
biggest dance yet. Just $1.50 per
person.    9  to  1.
SEE AND DANCE to the SEATTLE
"Bandits", of "Little Sally Walker" fame, and the "Chessmen"
on Friday, March 11, in the Armouries, 9-1. Make it a completely
great  weekend.
DON'T MISS THE "BANDITS"
tonight in the Armouries, 9-1; also
the Chessmen; only $1.50, and
please arrive early to get in.
Great!!!
MEET A LOVER TONIGHT!
Totem Park Ballroom 'Nocturnals'
there to serenade you, 9 p.m. to 1
a.m.     AMS   Cards,   please.
52 8-CYL. FORD, ONE OWNER.
Onl 52,000 miles, excellent condition. Cheap. Ph. AL 5-7843. Be-
tween 6 p.m. and 9 p.m.	
BLOOD RED 1952 MARK VII
Jaguar Twin S.U. Carbs, 3.5 litre,
overhead cams, walnut' leather
interior.     RE   3-8765,   Robert.
Scandals
39-A
TOTEM TRIUMPH GYMKHANA.
Middlegate Shopping Centre, 7155
Kingsway, Bby. March 6. Registration 9:00 a.m.
BUSINESS SERVICES
Typing
49
PROFESSIONAL TYPING, ARDALE
Griffiths Limited, 70th and Granville,  263-4530.
FAST, ACCURATE TYPING
thesis, essays, etc., on new IBM
Executive typewriter, phone 263-
4023.
EXPERIENCED TYPIST, WEST
End, would like typing to do" at
home. Phone MUtual 3-5071 morn-
ing  or  evening.  "^
TYPING 25c page or »1.95 hour West
End. 685-5539 eves. Campus pick-
up and delivery, $1.00. '
EXPERT TYPIST, SPECIALIZING
in thesis term papers and. reports.
AM 1-4655.
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted
51
A   GO-GO   GIRLS
For the "SURF". Opening this week
end Located in Richmond, on the
way to the airport. Above the
Richmond Marina.  Phone 278-2624.
HEAD LIFE GUARD to supervise,
direct and train a staff of five life
guards and assist with the summer aquatic program. Qualifications expected.. Instructor's award
in swimming & life saving. Salary $400 month, plus car allowance
and extra instructional income
opportunity. Send applications to
Director of Recreations, Municipal
Hall, 610 Duncan St., Powell River
B.C.
Wanted
15
WANTED ADDITIONAL CREW —
For 28-ft. cruising-racing sloop
for 1966 sailing season and swift-
sure. Must be dependable, keen,
experienced. Phone Vern Ruskin,
day, 5682-3808 Loc. 57: evenings
and weekends,  WA  2-0406.
Travel Opportunities
16
3 WEEK CHARTER FLIGHT TO
London Aug. 24th to Sept. 14th,
$340. Faculty and students (and/
or parents, spouses, children, eligible). Phone WA 2-7931 or RE 8-
6996. Deadline for applications
Mar.    10th.
POST EXAM TOUR TO MEXICO,
$295 via CPA. For inform, phone
Steve Hunter, AM, 1-8656 after 6
p.m. Reservations. Deadline March
11th. \
Automobiles For Sale
21
1955  PLYMOUTH   HARDTOP.   ORI-
ginal  owner.  266-6206.
SUMMER TRAINEE DIRECTOR OF
Recreations — Applicant must be
in the Faculty of Physical Education & Recreation. To organize
and direct the summer recreation
program of swimming, playgrounds
and activity centre, commencing
May 1, 1966. Starting salary $'400
month plus car alee.
Send applications to Director of
Recreations, Municipal Hall, 610
Duncan   St.,   Powell  River,   B.C.
Work Wanted
52
EXPERIENCED R. & B. BAND
wants dance jobs. Phone Brian.
AM    6-4260.
Room & Board
82
ROOM AND BOARD — D.U. FRA-
ternity House. Excellent food. Call
Al Dahlo  CA  4-5852  or CA  4-9841.
MOVE ON CAMPUS FOR EXAMS!
Room and board available in Fraternity House. Phone 224-9986 between   5:00   p.m.-6:30   p.m.
Houses and Apts.—Other
Cities
87
ROSEDALE .ONTARIO — FAMILY
of 4 with furnished coach house
(3 air cond. BR's, 2% baths, LR,
DR, garage), wishes to trade for
similar accommodation July-Aug.
with responsible individual in Van.
For further information call Van.
682-6331.
University of B.C. Choral Society
Presents . . .
* Popular
* Folk
* Spiritual
•k Classical
A Festival
of Song
Fri., March 4, 8 p.m. - Auditorium
Adults, $1.00 Students,  75c
SPECIAL     EVENTS
and FROSH US
Presents
TOMASI
Fijian Folk Singer
B
R
O
C
K
25c
T
O
D
A
Y
N
O
O
N
Tomasi has appeared at Shakey's, The Bunkhouse and
the Shanghai Junk. He formerly was a performer at
the Polynesian Cultural Center in Hawaii.
■■^'■SJ? A'-
THE LUSTROUS LOOK IS IN
FOR SPRING!
Glenayr   ,       .^
IN \
NEW SILKY    ;
ANTRON    '.
It's so feminine—the      *'
exciting new look for
Spring—the shimmering      ,'
new pastel look—captured
here by Kitten in this new
perfectly matching cardigan
and skirt—the cardigan with
raglan shoulders (shapely)
and % sleeves. 34-42,
$13.98. The fully-lined
straight skirt to perfectly
match, 8-20, $15.98.
Both in the fabulous new
fibre—silky Antron.
\ Look for Kitten's
lustrous new look at
good shops everywhere!
Without this label
m>Lf&
it is not a genuine KITTEN.

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