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The Ubyssey Feb 27, 1968

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Array vote again
THE UBYSSEY
damn it
Vol. XLIX, No. 50
VANCOUVER, B.C., TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 27,  1968
224-3916
— kurt hilger photo
BRAINS NOT BRAWN swept UBC to victory over Simon Fraser University Monday in the
tug-of-war which decided whose Queen would reign over the North American Gymnastics
Championships this weekend. The UBC team employed Spraggs rhythm method of pulling
while   using  sulphuric  acid-treated   running  shoe treads.
Profs protest Soviet jailings
By STEPHEN JACKSON
Jailing of Russian intellectuals who dissented with their government's policies has brought
jrganized protest from UBC professors.
A statement of concern over government
nterference in what the professors call indispensable rights, has been signed by 233 UBC faculty
Tiembers.
It was initiated by four professors: Dr. Wer-
ler Cohn, associate professor of sociology; F. K.
3owers, professor of electrical engineering; Dr.
itobert Rowan, associate professor of philosophy;
ind W. E. Willmott, associate professor of an-
;hropology.
"We, members of the faculty of the Uni verity of British Columbia, speaking as individual
icholars, scientists, writers and artists, feel
noved to express our concern over the situation
)f our fellows in the Soviet Union,'' the state-
nent said.
Six Russian writers, a scientist and a student
were arrested ever the last two years for alleged
mti-Soviet agitation.
Four of those arrested were convicted. Two
eceived jail terms of up to five years. The other
wo, writers Yuli Daniel and Andrei Siniavski,
vere sentenced! to five and seven years' hard
abor respectively.
They  were  charged  with  having published
abroad under pseudonym works of an antiTSoviet
nature.
"The defendants in these trials have raised
many issues within the framework of Soviet
legality which we cannot consider here," said
the  statement.
UBC faculty members said there were certain rights of which the Russians should not be
deprived.
They should have the right to disagree fundamentally with one's own government, to express such views freely, and to be able to communicate them freely, at home and abroad, and
to associate freely with others, in and out of
Russia, in order to express and advocate such
views.
"In asking the Soviet authorities to remove
all obstacles to the free exercise of these rights,
we see the need to reiterate our firm opposition
to similar obstacles wherever they may exist, in
particular in our own country and in the Western world."
In a letter enclosed with the statement sent
to faculty members, the organizers said that they
were bearing all costs and would welcome any
contribution up to one dollar.
They plan to send the statement to the Civil
Liberties Association, Soviet universities, and the
Soviet embassy in Ottawa.
Mystery over:
Persky wins
voided ballot
UBC students chose Stan Persky as Alma Mater Society
president in elections Feb. 7.
Former arts president Persky toppled law student Brian
Abraham by 3,854 votes to 2,541 in the voided election.
Ballots in the election were counted last week after council
reversed an earlier decision not to count them.
The election was declared null and void by council on a
student court recommendation after the court found Persky constitutionally ineligible to run for president.
A referendum to change a constitutional clause requiring
candidates to have had two full winter sessions will be held
today.
The amended article in the constitution would limit candidates to students who have been at UBC for one, rather than two
years.
Observers says the section means any student who has taken
Grade 13 at a B.C. high school can not run for president unless
he is going into grad studies.
Also, they say, the clause prevents graduates of two-year
junior colleges and transfer students from other universities from
running.
Council's decision to count the ballots came after two petitions, containing 1,300 names, were brought to council meeting
calling for a ballot count.
Results in the Feb. 7 vote gained Persky 59 per cent of the
turnout, compared to Abraham's 41 per cent.
The results were closer than in last year's presidential
elections when current president Shaun Sullivan beat out law
student Bob Cruise by a margin of almost two to one. But Persky
had a wider margin of victory than did 1966-67 president Peter
Braund, who edged opponent Gabor Mate by only 700 votes.
Munton   helped
Alma Mater Society first vice-president Don Munton
wrote losing presidential candidate Brian Abraham's cam-
>   paign publicity.
f This was revealed last Monday by Abraham's campaign
manager, George Davis, law 1.
~ Speaking after the votes in  the  voided election were
counted, Davis said there was no AMS conspiracy to put
Abraham up as arts president Stan Persky's only opposition.
"The only one who helped us was Don Munton. He
wrote all of Abraham's campaign statements. They were
the same as Sullivan's last year—everyone knew that,"
Davis said.
Davis recounted how Abraham and presidential candidates Russ Grierson (now commerce president-elect), and
Harry Clare, former Social Credit Club president, decided
Abraham alone would run in order to unify the right-wing
vote.
"Grierson had asked if we were serious about the
election. We said we were but during the weekend we
considered dropping out.
"Then I found out that Grierson had dropped out of
his own accord. When Clare came back from a rally in
the education building he was very disheartened. Persky
is a very polished speaker—there aren't two people on
campus who can match him on an  election platform.
"We offered to drop out and Clare agreed. Then I
told Grierson's people and they said they couldn't support
Clare.
"I told Clare about this and he agreed to drop out,"
"   Davis said.
According to the campaign manager, Abraham first
decided to run the day nominations closed for the election.   -
"About 14 of us from law 2 were sitting around Thurs-
'   day morning when Persky was the only candidate. We felt   f
.   someone should run again him—but it was a question of   j
who was willing to devote the time. Abraham was picked
by default."
Davis said only Abraham was willing to devote time to   ' *
being AMS president.
"But Brian lost support every time he appeared in
public," Davis said.
•%S Page 2
THE       UBYSSEY
Tuesday,  February 27,  1968
Priest  resigns
Parish   didn't   like  views on sex,  politics and  religion
By NORMAN GIDNEY
Controversial Anglican priest Jim McKib-
bon, pastor of St. Anselm church, resigned Monday.
McKibbon, said increasing hostility from the
older member of his parish forced his resignation from the University Blvd. church.
"Basically the parish has lost confidence in
me, particularly because of my views on hippies
and Vietnam," he said. "There has been growing discontent over my expression on sex policies and religion".
He said that the church committee of the
parish which controls policy decisions wanted
him out.
WON'T RETURN TO CHURCH
McKibbon said he has no immediate plans
for other work but has said before he wouldn't
return to the Anglican church or work at
another church.
In an interview before his resignation, McKibbon identified the church as a complete captive of  middle class suburbia.
The 36-year old minister of St. Anselm's
said he's finding himself a misfit in the church.
He defined the chuch as organized Christianity.
McKibbon's been involved with runaways
and hippies, helped the diggers establish a communication centre and participated in the
famous Freedom March at Selma, Alabama, in
1965. Last year he was plunged into controversy
when he staged a church service with go-go
music and flashing lights.
"The church reflects middle class values and
can't relate either to intellectuals or dissenters,"
he said.
CHURCH  IS MIDDLE  CLASS
McKibbon said his parishoners would rather
have a pastor who wasn't controversial and
didn't speak out on the issues of the day.
He gave these typical parishioners' comments:
"If McKibbon has anything good to say
about hippies he can't speak to me."
"When we come to church we don't want to
hear about Negroes and Vietnam."
He said the church has remained  "achingly
silent"   about   issues   like   Vietnam   and   Civil
Rights.
"That is the height of immorality. Immorality isn't just wrong action, it's also remaining
silent. When the church loses its ability to criticize society it loses one of its functions."
NOT SEPARATE FROM STATE
McKibbon said that the church has become
so much a part of society — contrary to the
popular idea that church and state are separate
— that it cannot stand back and criticize.
McKibbon believes that the Freedom March
was the turning point of the civil rights movement. "It may have exhausted the peaceful, nonviolent  means for change."
He said the black counter-violence is no
better or worse than the kind whites have
used for years on the Negro.
"I can understand the Negro being violent.
It may be the only word the Anglo-Saxon un-
dertsands but the Negro may end up with the
same  hang-up  on  violence  that  we have."
Another contemporary problem — or the
exaggeration of it by authorities — is the use
of marijuana.
MARIJUANA HYSTERIA ON
"Now they're sending kids to jail who never
before broke even a traffic law. It's providing
fertile soil for the underground.
"The hysteria against marijuana isn't about
it being really harmful but that people who use
it may become social dropouts." He suggested
authorities either clamp down hard on offenders
or suspend prosecution while a royal commission investigates the drug.
He talked about social revolution and rebellion  by the  young.
"In church you see women, older men, the
middle class but fewer and fewer intellectuals
and young people. When I look around and for
those most sensitive to the world, free, concerned, creative — they're not in the church."
More than 60,000 persons have left the
Anglican church alone in Canada out of a total
of  just  over  a  million,  he said.
"I can see something bloody close to civil
war — unless the Vietnam war is settled, unless the economy is strengthened, unless the
poverty situation is reversed — unless this happens it's going to colapse into anarchy."
Fine arts head quits
to do creative work
By PAUL KNOX
The head of UBC's fine arts department has resigned
so that he can be more creative.
Prof. B. C. Binning, fine arts head since 1949, said in
an interview Monday he wants to devote the remainder of
his career to teaching and painting.
"I want to do some creative work, and leave a little
painting behind me before I go under,"
he said.
Binning, one of Canada's best known
painters, was teaching at the Vancouver
School of Art when he was asked to
start a fine arts department  at UBC.
"At that time, the university was a
damn arid, sterile place," he said.
"I thought this was a terrific opportunity to improve the cultural outlook of
both  the  university  and  the   community
BINNING of Vancouver.
"We started with about 30 students in only one or two
classes," Binning said. "Now we have about 30 courses
and more than 1,500 students.
Binning said his most important achievements have
been the establishment of the Norman MacKenzie Centre
for the Fine Arts and the acceptance of the arts by students
at UBC.
"Students know we're here. There's never the problem
there used to be getting audiences for the contemporary
arts festival.
"The interest in fine arts has increased greatly. But
this has caused a hell of a problem, because there's not
enough space even with the new fine arts building.
"There's a big change needed in our department, and
I'm too old to fight new battles now." he said.
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The Deepening
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Peter Camejo was just recently elected to the Berkeley Student Council
with the highest vote in Berkeley history. He is presently The Socialist
Workers   Party   candidate  for   Senator   in   California.
WED., NOON, BU. 104
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AT YOUR
UNIVERSITY
BOOK STORE Tuesday,  February  27,   1968
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 3
NOT PERSONALLY
JUST ETHICALLY
Sullivan  anti-Persky
— lawrence woodd photo
AMS PRESIDENT Shaun Sullivan emerges from the office
safe, carrying ballot box containing votes from presidential
election. Stan Persky won, 3854 to  2541.
Jack-hammers wreck E
UBC engineers are minus one large E.
AMS treasurer-elect and engineer Donn Aven said Monday
the concrete letter E laid by engineers in front of the math
building Jan. 31  has been destroyed.
"Physical plant people went at it with jack-hammers," he
said.
Aven said the E was completely broken up and removed. A
bed of earth has been laid in the spot where it had been placed.
A spokesman for the department of physical plant said
Monday only part of the E was removed.
"We were: ordered to take it out," he said. "I don't know
why. The orders came from higher up."
Wilson   winners   named
They should be your children's profs.
So says the USA's Woodrow Wilson Foundation, which
recently named seven UBC students as top prospects for college
teaching on the North American continent.
The seven are John Young, Ellen Hunter, Anthony Crowle,
Edward Cragg, Carl Diehl, all arts 4; Sheila Ricardo, agriculture
5; and Rick French, science 4.
Foundation president Sir Hugh Taylor said the seven have
been recommended by the foundation to receive public or
private scholarships.
By MIKE FINLAY
Ubyssey Council Reporter
Alma Mater Society president Shaun Sullivan said Monday he has always been an opponent   of presidential  candidate  Stan  Persky.
Sullivan, however, told more than 800 persons in front of the library at a noon debate
against Persky that he never contrived to keep
Persky  from  running for AMS president.
"Some say it was an exercise contrived by
myself and certain members of the executive
against Stan," he said. "This is not true."
Persky said he has never accused the executive of consciously trying to stop him from
winning the election.
"I'm not saying student council was involved
in any conspiritorial malevolence to keep the
students from exercising their democratic
right," he said.
"And I don't think there is any point in
questioning at this time the facts that people
involved in referring the eligibility question to
students' court also sat on the eligibility committee and held meetings to choose candidates
to oppose me."
Persky, who said he will run if Tuesday's
referendum passes, centered his discussion
around concepts of university government and
avoided particular issues.
"I don't want to get hung up on details that
don't make any difference now that the election
is three weeks past," he said.
Sullivan outlined the election fiasco from
the time Persky filed his nomination papers,
concentrating on specific events and issues.
He said the question was sent to court because several individual students raised doubts
about Persky's eligibility to run for office.
"Council  did  not set  out  to get  Persky on
j Ed  building
] passes needed
Education Dean Neville Scarfe has im-
|; posed an identification requirement on
||   students   using  the   education  building.
Students not familiar to education
|i building manager Thomas Fiander are be-
Ill ing asked to produce their Alma Mater
Society card. Those who do not have a
1; card or who refuse to produce it, says
||| Fiander, will be asked to leave, taken to
||| dean Scarfe's office or turned over to
II   university patrolmen.
Scarfe, who became indignant when
|| he was questioned by a Ubyssey reporter,
§ said mandatory identification was started
1 to stem a tide of two purse thefts from
|||   the staff office block in the past week.
"This is no business of yours," Scarfe
told the reporter. "This is a matter for
||| the university administration; if students
||| wish to complain about being asked to
1 produce their cards, they should come to
|: me." Two students stoppe'd by Fiander
||| Monday reported the incident to the
||   Ubyssey.
The  identification   requirement, Scarfe
I claimed,   was   enforced   only   in   the   staff
II block. But the two students said they were
II   stoppsd in a classroom area.
Scarfe   said   most   students   enter   the
I staff   block   only   to   attend   appointments
II with  professors.   "They   don't   just   prowl
f    through the hallways," he saic'.
a technicality," he said. "We set up a referendum to allow him to run in the election March
13."
Sullivan also said the counting of the ballots to total only was a very narrow interpretation of the meaning of count, but was the
only alternative open  to  the executive.
"I think it was the right decision when all
the factors are considered," he said. "We had
to meet council decisions calling for the counting of the ballots on the day of the election,
the meeting of student court within a week,
and the request from court that the results of
the election not be released before the court
met."
Sullivan said he understood that if the results were released, the meeting of students'
court would have been adjourned one week,
which would have been clearly against the motion of council that it meet on the following
Monday.
"■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■•■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■J
SPCA wants you
The  SPCA is  after  UBC  students.
Not for cruelty to animals but for ignorance
of campus issues, says Dave Howe, comm. 3,
spokesman for the society for the preservation
of council activities.
The society is a non-partisan, apolitical group
of about 20 students formed after the Alma
Mater Society presidential election Feb. 7.
"Our primary concern is to publicize the
presidential election and the issues surrounding
it," said Howe.
He said that the students didn't know what
was happening and didn't know how to vote.
To help clear up the confusion surrounding
the first presidential elections, the SPCA arranged the discussion between arts president
Stan Persky and AMS president Shaun Sullivan
held in front of the  library Monday.
Officers elected
The education undergraduate society has a
new slate of officers.
Gerry Olund, ed. 4, won the presidential
race with 576 votes to 358, for Barrie Mowatt,
ed. 3, while George Hollo, ed. 4, trailed with
126 votes.
The AMS representative will be Susan
Shaw, ed. 2, who won over Judith Sigurdson,
also ed. 3.
Secretary is Barb Landel, ed. 3, while Richard Chang, ed. 4, is treasurer.
In by acclamation are vice-president, Judy
Wolfe, ed. 3, and public relations officer Judy
Larsen,  ed.  1.
Separate fee wanted
The Men's Athletic Association wants a
separate athletic fee instead of one included in
the Alma Mater Society fee as at present.
The association last week passed a motion
to circulate a petition amongst sports managers
to gather support for the proposal.
Starting in September, the $5.00 presently
collected by the AMS for mens' and womens'
athletics would be collected by the university
administration as a  "university athletic fee."
The money would go directly to the committees on mens'  and womens'  athletics.
Any increase in the fee would be by student
referendum. TMUBYSStY
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the university year
by the Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C. Editorial opinions are
those of the editor and not of the AMS or the university. Member,
Canadian University Press. Proprietor, Ubyssey News Services (UNS). The
Ubyssey subscribes to the press services of Pacific Student Press, of which
it is founding member, and Underground Press Syndicate. Authorized second
class mail by Post Office Department, Ottawa, and for payment of postage
in cash. The Ubyssey publishes Page Friday, a weekly commentary and
review. City editor, 224-3916. Other calls, 224-3242: editor, local 25; photo.
Page  Friday,  loc.  24;  sports,  loc.  23;  advertising,  loc.  26.  Telex  04-5224.
FEBRUARY  27,   1968
Only  chance
Students arguing that the Alma Mater Society constitution should not be changed to make allowances for
one person have missed the whole point of today's
referendum.
The motion to hold a referendum was not passed by
student council to help make Stan Persky president.
Anyone familiar with 1967-68 AMS history can't believe
this council would provide a referendum — at considerable student expense—to assist Persky.
The arts president usually found himself a minority
of one in council debate. The arts undergraduate society
budget of $0 was chiefly a result of student council disapproval of Persky and his executive. The climax of all
this has been the partisan council maneuvering on the
eligibility question.
Clearly, then, this referendum is not being put to
students for one presidential candidate's benefit. Rather,
students are being asked to change a clause in the AMS
constitution which bars hundreds of potentially qualified
candidates. In a year in which proposed constitutional revisions have been repeatedly squashed, this could be our
only chance to democratize future presidential elections.
Nasty Neville
Who is to blame for the B.C. high schools which
have been turned into perfect models of fascist police
states?
Certainly, you say, not good old enlightened UBC
dean of education Neville Scarfe. You could be wrong.
For Scarfe is apparently the genius behind a current
attempt in the education building to import high school
terrorism into the university.
Scarfe's new edict provides that students not familiar to the education building manager will be ordered
by this worthy to produce Alma Mater Society cards.
Students who have left their cards at home can be
tossed out, handed over to the patrol or taken to Scarfe's
office — presumably for a spanking.
Scarfe j^ the man responsible for producing the
"educators" responsible for producing an ugly, authoritarian atmosphere in B.C. high schools. Students traversing the halls of these institutions while classes are in
session are required to carry little yellow slips, signed
by a staff member. And unfortunate students heeding
calls of nature are in many schools required to /carry
wooden tags — proof of permission to pee.
Both of these items are inspired by the identity
cards common in police states. Negroes in South Africa
must carry government-issued passes. In Germany, Jews
once had to wear yellow badges.
The obsession with permits is only one part of the
wierd notion held by B.C. "educators" that the way to
train people to become citizens of a democracy is to
nurture them in model tyrannies.
Scarfe, it is clear, is using AMS cards in a totally
illegitimate fashion. This misuse of student cards is a.
matter which must be dealt with immediately by the
AMS executive.
In addition, Scarfe should be informed by education
student leaders that his action is unacceptable. These
leaders should strongly urge education and other stu- '
dents in the building not to produce cards on the building manager's demand.
This is what the education students should do. More
likely, however, they will act with accustomed meekness.
They were so well trained in the school system they're
going back for more.
EDITOR:   Danny   Stoffman of  yingalp   dares,   ihwch   Ualp   Onkx
clf^                                            ,h   rt  frm* koncked   rove.   Niere   Isilawewsk   (?)
^             sruarr  <*ray dan    Adye    MonaIs   esud    ru0f.telter
News          Susan  Gransby sword   ni   a    barcbles   mage,   chiwh
Managing                     Murray   McMillan Udjy    Goyun    worfned    upon    Evets
pn0fQ                                         Kurt  Hilqer Sackion layped vole sgons on a ozoka
rof  Nan Raky,  and   dernowed   erewh
Senior                                 pat Hrushowy Am RrUmay dah noge.
Sports                        Mike   Jessen Goind reit ingth erew gotofs Rence-
Wlre                                 Norman Gidney law  Ddoow.   Greoge   Loloh,  dna   Libl
„,-,..                                  .   j    „• Oilelles.
Page  Friday                               Judy  Bing Yarg Soptioag  del  0bb  Nat,0n  and
Ass't. City      Boni  Lee Nirab   Tartray   no   eerth   slap   droun
het cojk posh.
"Tel's eus gramanas,"  driec Vingir Torialedi  glorb teeming to seeal a
Shitef. Tub Ikme Yinfal saw pickaltes, nnuby   sub   dayot,   noon,
referpring   to   yalp   odminoes.   Nnelg Won hatt oyu'vetangulde shit karab-
Lardub Hubt a  armandin  pemtle   otu mleer ciepe fo dureinoit, gofferbug.
'We  regret to inform  you  that your  14-year-old-son is a  hardened  criminal,  a  debauched
sinner,  and   a   distinct  menace  to  our  society."
Iiiilis to the emmR
Victim'
Editor, The Ubyssey:
It is unfortunate that Stan
Persky became a victim of student organization last Monday.
The loss to Mr. Persky personally is perhaps neglible compared to to the loss to the
university. I was disappointed
as I sat through the trial to
hear calls such as "kangaroo
court" and "the leagle-beagle
bureauacracy". The student
court sat on the constitutional
reference as one would sit on
a charge of dynamite. Their
duty, as explained by the chief
justice, was only to deal with
the legal aspects. They were
not called upon to heave up a
"gut-reaction" at the end of the
hearing. Fault does however lie
within the student ranks, perhaps manifestly in the eligibility committee.
I personally was not gratified
by the court's decision, in that
it disqualified Mr. Persky, but
I realize that the court did
carry out its duty in a fair and
just manner. I hope Mr. Persky
will not be daunted and will
run again when he does have
the necessary qualifications.
MIKE EDWARDS
law 2
Stan   &  Shaun
Editor, The Ubyssey:
At Monday's discussion between Shaun Sullivan and
Stan Persky we saw a difference of approach to the question of government. This difference, I suggest, is fundamental. Sullivan asked Persky for
an explanation of what the
now well-known phrase "human government" actually
means. If Shaun had kept his
ears open, he would now know.
It means that a government
acts out of the belief that people are competent, free and res
-ponsible. This is the basis on
which trust between the student body and its government
can thrive. Having this sense of
The Ubyssey retracts any
implication in its column.
Zap, page 4, Feb. 20, 1968,
of any association between
the Georgia Straight newspaper, Mr. Fred Latrimo,
and the Mafia.
trust is the first step toward
build|ing an efficient and
meaningful representation of
the student body. Shaun's opinion that "students are hopelessly apathetic" can only lead to
a student council which indeed
will represent students no
more than an IBM computer
can.
The debate made it very
clear what are the spaces and
issues that separate these two
students. Shaun admitted more
than once to his pride in bureaucracy, while Persky said we
must take the past for what it
was, and aim our sights a little
higher for the future.
MICHAEL LANGE.
arts 2
Peter chirped
Editor, The Ubyssey:
An open letter to Dr. Peter
Mullins:
I read in todays' Ubyssey
that you 'chirped' after the T-
Birds'    recent    victories    over
the ex-top-team in the west.
'Chirped', Peter? For five
years I have intently watched
the Birds' every game. I have
yet to see Frank Rotering flutter down the floor, Ian Dixon
twitter over a missed foul shot,
or Neil Murray roost under the
basket for a rebound. I have
seen (and heard!!!) you roar,
goad, sneer, plead, threaten,
growl, fume, snarl, exhort, incite, grumgle, ridicule, shout,
rejoice, cheer, prod, urge, encourage, deride, and taunt.
Yea, even have you smiled.
But 'chirp'? Oh, Peter, tell
me it isn't so!
DIANE McNAY
education 5
A YES vote needed
to democratize AMS
By CAREY LINDE
AMS vice-president-elect
When student court voided
the Feb. 7 presidential election it also strongly recommended that a motion be put
to the student body to alter
the wording of By-Law 4 (3)
(a), thus making the residence
requirement more democratic.
Your student council has taken
this recommendation and today you are being asked to
vote on the matter.
As a member of your student
government-elect I ask you to
consider the following points:
VOTE YES
By voting YES today you
will be democratizing the constitution by bringing into eligibility all those students who
don't spend their first year at
UBC. This group includes
Grade 13 students, junior college students and transfer students from other institutions.
The office of vice president has
the same discriminating by-law
and passage today of this referendum will give notice to
council that the same restriction  governing the  vice-presi
dent should be removed from
the by-law.
These -will be the long term
effects if you vote yes today.
The immediate effects will be
that Stan Persky will be eligible to run in a fair election.
Your executive and council-
elect plus members of the present council ask you to give
serious thought to the reasons
why Persky should be a candidate in the upcoming election.
STRONG   PREZ
1) His candidacy would
put the onus directly upon
those who disagree with him to
field their strongest possible
candidate. Then, whoever wins,
you will get a strong president
for an already active and concerned executive.
2) Persky must be allowed
to run in a fair election and the
students given an honest
chance to choose or reject him.
The question must be settled
with clear finality once and for
all.
Remember, that for this referendum to pass, each of us
must vote to ensure the needed
two thirds YES vote. Your individual vote is important. Tuesday,  February  27,   1968
THE     U BYSSEY
Page 5
LETTER TO  THE EDITOR
U.S.  policy justified'
Editor, The Ubyssey:
If a visiting professor from another country
(the United States) is not violating hospitality,
I would like, to comment on both the Tonkin Gulf
article by Mr. Hunter Golay and on the article
of Miss Hilda Thomas in The Ubyssey of Feb. 1
and Feb.8.
In his article Mr. Golay concludes that the
attack by North Vietnamese torpedo boats on
United States destroyers in the Gulf of Tonkin
never took place. The article also assumes that
the attacks were the sole reason for the congressional resolution which "has since been construed
to express support for the escalating military
measures employed both in South Vietnam and
against North Vietnam".
Both of these conclusions need examination.
For his belief that the alleged attacks never
occurred Mr. Goly relies chiefly on the denials
of the North Vietnamese government and on the
testimony of a naval Lieutenant White. The
lieutenant was not present at the time of the
alleged or real attacks but stated that the chief
sonarman of one of the destroyers denied any
torpedos had been fired. Note that the lieutenant's statement is second-hand.
Although in writing history and in life we
are at times forced to rely on second-hand evidence, it is notoriously tricky. In this instance
Lt. White may have distorted the statement of
the sonarman or may have misunderstood it.
There is also the possibility that the sonarman
may have been mistaken. Against this evidence
the United States government claims to have
positive evidence including the statements of a
number of officers of the two destroyers. Some
people immediately decide that the United States
is lying. Regretfully the United States government has, like other governments, lied on occasion. So the issue depends on a question of
veracity between North Vietnam and the United
States.
Much more important is the second point.
Mr. Golay did not refer to those portions of the
Tonkin Gulf resolution which place the action
of the United States on a much deeper and
broader basis than the attack on the destroyers.
The first "whereas" did cite the attack. The
second "whereas" said "these attacks are part
of a deliberate and systematic campaign of
aggression that the Communist regime in North
Vietnam has been waging against its neighbors
and the nations joined with them in the collective
defense   of  their  freedom".
Then follows the action part of the resolution.
It contains these words: "The United States
regards as vital to its national interest and to
world peace the maintenance of international
peace and security in Southeast Asia. . . . the
United States is therefore prepared, as the president determines, to take all necessary steps
including the use of armed force to assist any
member or protocol state of the Southeast Asia
Collective Defense Treaty requesting assistance
in defense of its freedom."
President Johnson, the secretary of state and
other spokesmen of the government base their
defense and explanation of American policy on
this fundamental case and not on the attacks on
the American destroyers. In fact they rarely
mention those attacks. Obviously if the attacks
alone were involved the actions of the United
States would be highly and improperly out of
proportion.
The United States is not (repeat not) alone
on its view of events in Vietnam. The prime
minister of Canada has agreed on the essentials
and has pointed out the need to check communist
"wars of liberation". George Brown, Britain's
foreign secretary under the Labor government
said that while Britain is not sending men and
arms to South Vietnam it was not because England is neutral and he referred to "the ruthless
attempt to take over the country" by North
Vietnam.
Harold Wilson, the British prime minister,
emphatically repeated his support of the American policy in a television interview less than two
weeks ago. The heads of the governments in
Australia and New Zealand have said the same.
So too have the leaders of most of the governments in Southeast Asia.
These are not isolated statements but have
been repeated in various forms by the heads of
these goverments many times. Similar views
came from other governments. Those of South
Korea, Thailand and Taiwan have not been cited
as they can be considered client states of the
United States. But Canada, Great Britain, Australia, New Zealand, Malaysia, Indonesia and the
Philippines are not controlled by the United
States nor are they at present receiving economic
aid from the United States. In any case they
must know that aid does not depend on approval
of American policy. India has been a severe
critic yet every year receives millions of dollars
of aid.
One way of stating the fundamental issue is:
Will the world return to isolationism, that isolationism which has cost the world so dear?
When Hitler marched into the Rhineland, the
American secretary of state said it was "a European development in which we are not involved".
For that isolationism the American people paid
heavily a few j^ears later when all of them, were
involved, 12,000,000 in uniform. When Hitler
began his attacks on Czechoslovakia, Chamberlain is reported to have said "it is a far off
country of which we know  little".
That isolationism was to cost many British
lives. When Poland was under the gun some
Frenchmen said "Why should I die for Danzig".
That isolationism cost thousands of French lives
and France's freedom until it was restored by
the British Commonwealth, by Soviet Russia
and by the United States.
There is presently a revival of isolationism in
the United States and elsewhere. Should it prevail the result would ultimately be World War
III. Fortunately there are those willing to pay
the price of the opposite doctrine so well expressed ir. the speech from the throne in Ottawa on Jan. 21, 1942 in these words, ". . .
the myth of isolation has vanished from the
earth. It is now recognized that the freedom of
each nation is bound up in the freedom of all",
Miss Thomas in her article omits from her
quotation of the Tonkin Gulf resolution six important words. They are "including the use of
armed force." The resolution reads as it is quoted
by me above. These words, unless words have
lost their meanings, give the approval of congress to President Johnson's use of force.
Miss Thomas asserts, as do many people in
the United States, that the action of the United
States in Vietnam violates the United States
constitution because that document gives congress alone the right to "make war" and congress
has not done so in the case of Vietnam. The
constitution does indeed give congress the power
to "declare war." In the 180 years since the
constitution was adopted congress has declared
war only 4 or 5 times. On some fifty or more
occasions, not counting Indians wars, the United
States has used armed force including large scale
operations without any declaration of war by
congress: under President John Adams against
France in 1799, under Jackson against Argentina, under Lincoln against Japan, under Mc-
Kinley against China, about thirty times under
various Presidents against Caribbean countries,
under Franklin Roosevelt against Germany
when he ordered American naval ships to fire
on German submarines, under Truman in Korea.
These examples do not prove the use of force
was wise or justifiable in all these instances.
But they do prove that President Johnson has
abundant precedent for his policy and action
even without the Tonkin Gulf resolution and
that he is not violating the constitution.
W. S. HOLT
visiting professor
of history.
Ed. note: The late Bernard Fall and Marcus
Raskin said this about foreign support for the
war in The Vietnam Reader (New York: Vintage, 1967): "It would be inaccurate to say that
the United States does not have any foreign
support for its action in Vietnam. It does —
in about the same measure that the Soviet
Union had support for its action in Hungary:
the client stales and a few supercautious
neutrals."
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All events to be held in the Queen Elizabeth
Theatre.    Tickets   available   in   the   Bay   Box
Office, Main Floor at the Boy—Daily 10 a.m.
to 5 p.m. Phone 681-3351.
VOTE TODAY!
- AMS Constitutional Referendum
Are you in favour of amending By-Law 4(3)(a) of the A.AA.S.
Constitution  to  read  as follows:—
"(a) The President, who shall have successfully
completed his second year or its equivalent, and
who has attended the University of British Columbia for at least ONE year, and who has not previously held the position of President of the
Society."
YES    a
NO   a
To ratify this change at least
15% of the student body must vote!
EYE-CATCHING EYE WEAR
Better vision can mean better marks! Start the new
year right with a visit to
you eye physician. Even if
your prescription is unchanged, a fashionable
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for the  disposition.
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THE     UBYSSEY
Tuesday,  February 27,  1968
U of A council
runs tight ship
EDMONTON (UNS) — University of Alberta student
president Al Anderson runs a tight ship. Very tight. Commerce rep Hal Eppel will testify to that.
Students' council suspended Eppel for missing three
consecutive meetings.
After arriving an hour and a half late for one meeting, he was unable to explain to council's satisfaction
his slovenly attendance record.
He admitted two of his absences were for skiing trips,
and before the other he looked at the agenda and it didn't
seem so promising so he didn't bother.
He agreed that, of the meetings he had attended, he
had only stayed for about an hour each time because he
also had fraternity meetings on Mondays.
Lawyer disputes prof firings
TORONTO (CUP) — Ontario College of Art
principal Sydney Watson is at odds with a
lawyer over his actions in firing two instructors
last week.
Vince Kelly, Q.C., called in by the Ontario
Union of Students to study the case of two
drawing and painting instructors who were
fired from OCA last week, claims Watson does
not have the power to fire them unilaterally.
Kelly claims according to their contracts
with OCA notice must be given education minister  William   Davis  before  they  can  be  fired.
But Watson disagreed. He said the interpretation is not correct.
Davis' executive assistant Clare Wescott said
the minister has been in Chicago for the past
five days, and claims there is not connection
between OCA and Davis.
Watson remains steadfast in refusing to hire
the two professors, Ab Bayefsky and Eric Frei-
field, who were both fired after supporting student protests against alleged changes to be
made in the fine arts curriculum.
Watson charged last week Bayefsky called
him a liar. Bayefsky contradicted him, claiming
Watson told several of his collegues changes
were being planned but none was to speak
about them.  Watson  denies the conversation.
Students have planned a boycott of classes
this week, and are considering a march to the
legislature.
Opinion  sought
MONTREAL (CUP) — Quebec students will hold a province - wide plebiscite on La
Question Nationale next fall.
The Union Generate des Etu-
diants du Quebec congress is
expected to approve a proposal
by the executive for a plebiscite
among all of its members.
The plebiscite ballot — to be
voted upon at all institutions
simultaneously — will ask a
battery of questions on Quebec's future status with English Canada.
Louis Gendreau, newly elected vice-president for national
affairs of UGEQ and chairman
of the national affairs commission of the congress, told Canadian University Press Friday
the plebiscite will be held in
October or November.
McMASTER
UNIVERSITY
Department   of   Sociology
and   Anthropology
M.A. and Ph.D. programmes
in  Sociology
Comparative and
Theoretical  Emphasis
Applications invited from First-class
students without a degree in sociology.
PAPERBACKS  NEW ARRIVALS
LIST NO. 90 - FEBRUARY 20, 1968
These titles will be found in subject area
Absolute   Measurements   in   Electricity   &   Magnetism.   Gray.   Dover
(Physics)      4.75
Adventures   of   a   Columnist.   Berton.   Canadian   Best   Seller   Library.
(Can.     Fiction)              .95
African    Boy.    Sargent.    Collier.    (Poetry)      1.25
American  Art   Since   1900.  Rose.   Praeger.  (Art)    4.75
American   President.   Warren.   Spectrum.   (Political   Science)     2.25
Ancient Israel. Vol.  I  and Vol 2. de Vaux.  McGraw Hill  (Religion)  ea. 3.75
Art  of  Southeast Asia.  Rawson.  Praeger. '(Art)     4.75
Atlas  of  European  Affairs.   Kingsbury  &  Pounds.   Praeger.
(Political   Science)       2.10
Atlas of  Russian  & East European  History.  Adams.  Matley  &
McCagg.    Praeger.    (History)           2.75
Authors  Take   Sides on  Vietnam.  Woolf  &  Bagguley.
Simon   &   Schuster.   (Vietnam   Table)     2.50
Autobiography of William  Butler Yeats.  Yeats.   Collier.  (Literature)       - 2.10
Beyond.   Wilding.   Wilding   Foundation.   (Special   Interest   Table)      1.95
Beyond  the Welfare State.  Myrdal.  Bantam  (Economics)        .95
Biology   of   Work.   Edholm.   McGraw   Hill.    (Biology)      3.10
Book  of Canadian  Stories.  Pacy.  Ryerson.  (Canadian  Fiction)    2.95
British  Theatre  1956-1966.  Tynan.  Tulane  Drama.   (Film  &  Drama)  _...  1.95
Capable   of   Honor.   Drury.   Dell.   (Fiction)      1.05
Capitalism:   The  Unknown   Ideal.   Rand.   Signet.   (Fiction) .95
Case   for   Israel.   Gervasi.  Viking.   (Political   Science)      2.50
Challenge   of   Confidence:   Kierans   on   Canada.   Kierans.
McClelland   &   Stewart.   (Canadian  History)    2.50
Children's   Books   Too   Good   to   Miss.   Arbuthnot.
Weslyan   Univ.   Press.   (Education)       2.15
Concepts; of Development.   Harris.  Univ.  of  Minnesota.   (Psychology) 2.75
Conspirators. Goodspeed. Laurentian  Lib.  Series. (Canadian Fiction)    1.95
Crossroads  of  Liberalism.  Forcey.  Oxford  Univ.  Press.
(Political    Science)      2.50
Demian.   Hesse.   Bantam.   (Translations)      1.10
Desert of Love.  Mauriac.  Bantam.  (Translations)       .75
Disinherited.   Van   Every.   Avon.   (American   History)        .95
Drugs.    Laurie.    Penguin.   ■(Psychology)          .95
Economics of  Everyday  Life.  Williams.  Pelican.  (Economics)    95
El Greco. Puppi. Dolphin  Art  Books.  (Art)   —-  1.85
11,000 Seven Year Olds. Pringle, Butler, & Davie. Longmans.
(Sociology)         2.50
English  Courts  of  Law.  Hanbury.  Oxford.   (Law)     1.50
English  Magistracy.  Milton.  Oxford.   (Law)       1.50
Ernest  Hemingway.  Rovit. Twayne  U.S.  Authors  Series.  (Literature)    0.50
Ernest   Hemingway—A   Reconsideration.  Young.   Harbinger.   (Literature) 2.70
Eugene  O'Neill,  Carpenter.  Twayne  U.S.  Author  Series.  (Literature)    2.50
Evolution   of   Physics.   Einstein   &   Infeld.   Clarion.   (Physics)    2.25
Execution.  McDougall.  Laurentian  Lib.  Series.   (Canadian   Fiction)     1.95
F. Scott Fitzgerald.  Eble. Twayne U.S. Author  Series.  (Literature) 2.50
Fauvism.  Muller.  Praeger World  of  Art.  (Art)     4.75
Fox.   Lawrence.   Bantam.   (Fiction)      . .  60
French Canadians  1760-1967. 2 Volumes. Wade. MacMillan of
Canada.   (Canadian   History)     each 4.95
From  Jane Austen  to  Joseph  Conrad.  Rathburn   &  Steinmann.
Univ.    of   Minnesota.    (Literature)      2.45
Goya.   Abruzzese.   Dolphin  Art   Books.   (Art)    1.85
Great  American   Essays.  Cousins.   Dell.   (Literature)                .95
Hemingway:  The   Writer  as  Artist.   Baker.   Princeton   Univ.   Press.
(Literature)        2.95
Henry James.  McElderry. Twayne  U.S.  Author Series.  (Literature)     2.50
Henry James Reader. Edel. Scribner. (Fiction)   3.70
Henry  Miller.  Widmer.  Twayne   U.S.  Authors   Series    (Literature)    2.50
History of Economic  Change  in  England  1880-1939.  Sayers.
Oxford.    (Economics)      1.50
Impossible  in   Mathematics.   Adler.  John   Day  Co.  (Mathematics)     1.25
Impressionism. Pool.  Prager World  of Art paperback. (Art)   4.75
Inadmissible   Evidence.    Osborne.   Faber.   (Drama)      1.45
Insects Their Ways and  Means of Living.   Snodgrass.  Dover.  (Zoology) 2.35
Interaction   Ritual.   Goffman.   Anchor.   (Sociology)     1.65
Introduction  to  Crystal  Chemistry.  Evans.  Cambridge  Univ.  Press.
(Chemistry)        3.50
Introduction to Electronics. Bureau of Naval Personnel.
Dover.   (Dover   Section)      1.15
Jane Austen—A  Study of Her  Artistic Development.
Litz.    Galaxy   (Literature)      1.65
Journey   to  the   East.   Hesse.   Noonday.   (Translations)       1.75
Karl   Marx:   Evolution   of   His  Thought.   Garaudy.   International
Publishers   (Philosophy)     Q.10
LSD  The  Problem   Solving   Psychedelic.  Stafford  &  Golightly.
Award.     (Psychology)         .75
LSD Story. Cashman.  Fawcett Gold Medal.  (Psychology)      .50
Language of Fiction. Lodge. Columbia Univ.  Press  (Literature)   2.95
Late   Renaissance  &   Mannerism.  Murray.   Praeger.  (Art)    4.75
Left Wing Intellectuals Between the Wars 1919-1939. Laqueur & Mosse.
Harper    Torch.    (History)      2.00
Life and Music of Bela  Bartok.  Stevens. Oxford.  (Music)   2.50
Life  of  Plants.  Corner.  Mentor.   (Botany)    	
Literature & Politics in the Twentieth Century. Laqueur & Mosse. Harper
Torch   (History)     	
Long   Valley.   Steinbeck.   Bantam.   (Fiction) 	
McGraw   Hill  Handbook  of   English.   Shaffer,  Shaw  et al.  McGraw  Hill.
(Language)             	
McLuhan   Hot   and   Cool.   Steorn.   Dial  Press   hardcover.  (Canadiana)	
Madeleine.   Gide.   Bantam.    (Translations) 	
Making  of  Foreign  Policy.  Frankel.  Oxford.  (Political  Science)
Manitoba.  Morton.  University  of Toronto.   (Canadian   History)	
Man's   Hope.   Malraux.   Bantam.   (Translations)   	
Master  Art  Forger.  Godley.   Book   Society.   (Art)  	
Morley Callaghan's Stories.  Callaghan. Laurentian  Library  Series.  (Can.
Fiction)       	
My  Mark Twain:   Reminiscences  &   Criticisms.   Howells.   Louisiana   State
Univ.    (Literature) 	
Natives  of  Hemso  &  the  Scapgoat.   Strindberg.   Bantam.  (Translations)
New   American   Review.   Sexton.   New   American   Lib.   of   Can.   (Short
Stories)             	
New  History.  Laqueur   &  Mosse.   Harper Torch.  (History)   	
New Media & Education.  Rossi &  Biddle.  Anchor.  (Education)
New   Poetic—Yeats  to  Eliot.   Stead.   Pelican.   (Poetry)       	
New   Sociology.   Horowitz.   Oxford.   (Sociology)   .	
1914:   The  Coming   of the   First   World   War.   Laqueur   &   Mosse.   Harper
Torch    (History)       —        	
Ordeal   By   Fire.   Wahle.   Dell.   (History-war)   	
Outnumbered.   Steinbeck   &   Malamud   et  al.   Dell.   (Short  Stories)  	
Paul   Martin   Speaks   for  Canada.   McClelland   &   Stewart.   (Canadian
History)          	
Playwrights for Tomorrow—vol. 1  and vol. 2.  Schevill et all.  Univ. of
Minnesota  Press  (Film and  Drama)          each
Red   China   Today.   Portisch.   Crest.   (Political   Science)
Republic  of  Childhood.  Egoff.  Oxford.  (Education   &   UBC  Authors)
Riches of Life.  Simkin.  Mitchell  Press.  (Poetry)  	
Rivers of Blood Years  of  Darkness.   Conot.  Bantam.   (Fiction) 	
Russian  Writers & Society   1825-1904.  Hingley.   McGraw  Hill  (Literature)
Science & English  Poetry: A  Historical  Sketch  1590-1950.  Bush.  Oxford.
(Poetry)                	
Selected   Military   Writings   of   Mao   Tse  Tung.   Mao  Tse  Tung.  Foreign
Languages  Press.  (Special  Interest Table)  	
Selected  Works  of  Mao  Tse  Tung.  Mao  Tse  Tung.   Foreign   Languages
Press. 4  Volumes.  (Special   Interest  Table)      each
Seven   Japanese  Tales.  Tanizaki.   Berkley.   (Translations)   	
Short Stories  of Ernest Hemingway.  Hemingway.  Scribner. '(Fiction)
Smug   Minority.   Berton.   McClelland   &   Stewart.
(Special   Interest   Table) paper   2.50.   hard
Student's   Guide  to  50  European   Novels.   Lass   &   Wright.
Washington    Square.   (Lit.)
Snow  Country.   Kawabata.   Berkley.   (Translations) 	
Sound   of   Waves.   Mishima.   Berkley.   (Translations)        	
Stonehenge  Decoded.   Hawkins.   Delta   Dell.   (Phvsics)   	
Studies   on   Hysteria.   Freud   &   Breuer.   Avon.   (Psychology)
T.  S.  Eliot's  Dramatic  Theory  &  Practice.  Smith.
Princeton   Univ.   Press    (Literature)    	
T.   S.   Eliot's   Moments   &   Patterns.   Unger.
University   of   Minnesota.   (Literature) 	
Teaching   of  Anthropology.   Mandelbaum.
Univ.   of   California.    (Anthropology)  	
Teen-Age   Tyranny.   Hechinger.    Crest.    (Sociology)        	
Time  of the  Assassins.   Blunden.   Bantam.   (Fiction)   	
Territorial   Imperative.   Ardrey.   Delta.
(Anthropology    &    Interest    Table)    —   	
To  Criticize the  Critic.  Eliot.   Noonday.  '(Literature)  	
Travels   &   Traditions   of   Waterfowl.   Hochbaum.
Univ.   of  Minnesota   Press.   (Zoology)       	
Trees   &   Shrubs  for  Pacific  Northwest  Gardens.   Grant.
Univ.   of   Washington.   (Botany)   	
Twentieth   Century   French   Literature.   Moore.   Delta.   (Literature)   	
Two Solitudes. MacLennan. Laurentian Lib. Series. (Canadian Fiction) —
United  States &  China  in  World  Affairs.  Blum.  McGraw Hill.
(Political    Science)     	
University  Game.   Grant.  &  Seeley.   House  of  Anansi.
(Special   Interest   Table)   	
Varieties  of  Psychedelic   Experience.   Masters   &   Houston.   Delta.
'(Psychology)     	
Vietnam.   McCarthy.   Harcourt  Brace  &  World.   (History)	
Vietnam!  Vietnam!   Green.   Penguin.  (Vietnam  Table)   	
Visitors.   McMinnies.   Penguin.   (Fiction)     	
Who  Rules  America.  Domhoff.  Spectrum.  (Sociology)   	
Who's  Your  Fat   Friend?  Minifie.  McClelland   &   Stewart.
(Canadian     History)      	
Words   &   Waves.   Beck.  McGraw  Hill.   (Physics)   	
World  is   not  Enough.   Oldenbourg.  Ballantine. '(Fiction)   	
World   We  Live  In.   Barnett.   Golden  Press.  (Zoology)  	
Young  Girl's  Diary.  Freud.  Unwin. (Psychology)	
1.50
2.25
.75
2.75
8.75
.75
1.95
3.95
1.Q5
1.75
1.95
2.75
1.25
.95
2.25
1.95
1.25
2.75
2.25
.50
.50
8.75
1.95
.75
2.95
2.00
.95
3.25
1.25
2.00
2.00
.75
3.70
5.95
.75
.60
.60
2.25
1.125
2.95
1.95
3.20
.50
.95
2.95
2.10
2.95
4.25
(2.95
1.95
3.75
2.50
2.35
2.50
2.95
1.85
2.95
2.50
3.25
1.25
3.25
1.35
UBC BOOKSTORE Tuesday,   February  27,   1968
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 7
NOT  ONLY  FOR  DRAFT  DODGERS
New group aids war objectors
A new organization called the Canadian Assistance to War Objectors has been formed in
the Lower Mainland.
"The  aim of the organization,  which endea-
Fee strike ends
MONCTON (CUP) — The Universite de
Moncton student strike is officially over.
In a plebiscite held Feb. 21, students voted
overwhelmingly to suspend the 10-day old strike,
which had almost completely halted classes on
the campus of 1,100 students.
They also voted to wire Premier Louis Robi-
chaud demanding an immediate answer on the
freezing of fees, and to hold a teach-in on the
situation.
Students had vowed to stay out of classes
until the government had agreed to freeze the
fees at their present level. A referendum on the
matter drew 90 percent of the students to the
polls, 85 percent of which voted in favor of
the strike.
The crisis had been precipitated by the announcement of a fee hike by their university
administration.
Last week, university president Adelard Sa-
voie, delivered an ultimatum — students missing
lectures on Wednesday or after would have to
make them up in their spare time or they
wouldn't be allowed to write final exams.
The ultimatum was ignored by the students,
who were not in classes Thursday.
Over 75 percent of the student body voted in
Wednesday's plebiscite. Of these 70 percent
favored suspension of the strike.
vors to remain humanitarian and non-political,
is to assist dissenting young U.S. citizens who
are seeking sanctuary in Canada," said CAWO
secretary Bob Gregory, program analyst for the
UBC  Health  Services  Centre.
"We also wish to introduce Americans to the
values of Canadian society and to encourage
their participation in the life of their new country," he said.
"CAWO is essentially different from similar
organizations in Vancouver in that it caters to
all war objectors and does not limit itself to
assisting draft dodgers alone."
Many U.S. citizens who are in no way affected by the draft, ars considering the move to
Canada as a statement concerning current
American policy, he said.
"In a letter to CAWO one such objector said,
We are not so much deserting a sinking ship
as leaving a carrier engaged in illicit trade."
CAWO has been established with the backing  of  Unitarians  and  the  Society  of Friends.
So far the group has arranged for a housing
and job placement program which is already
assisting several persons. The program provides
the services of two professional job counsellors
on a part time basis.
"The group is very appreciative of all
voluntary help,"  Gregory said.
Persons who can contribute money, knowledge of job openings, or who can offer temporary housing (three days to one week), may
do so by writing Canadian Assistance to War
Objectors, P.O. Box 39, Richmond. Further information is available from Gregory at 277-0976
nights.
— kurt hilger photo
MID TERM BREAK.  Three  days.  All   rainy.  Monday. First day back. Sunshine. You can't win.
Tory senator raps Grits
By IRENE WASILEWSKI
Senator Wallace McCutcheon said Monday
that the Liberal government was unquestionably
defeated when its budget bill fell 84 to 82 in
the Commons last week.
McCutcheon, a former Conservative finance
minister, told 50 students in Ang. 110 the Liberals are now asking for a second chance.
"They can't even manage their own party
affairs. They have deep divisions in their cabinet. The Liberal government is arrogant, inept,
and divided."
McCutcheon said the government has serious
problems in housing and finance. He was sceptical about the implementation of medicare.
"Parliament is the best means of protecting
the people against a dictatorship. The Liberals
are running the risk of destroying parliament."
He said that an election in the near future
would be awkward, but more awkward for the
Liberals than the Conservatives.
When asked if he thought Air Canada and
the CBC  should be sold to the private sources,
McCutcheon said he had no serious objection to
Air Canada being sold but thought that it was
essential that the government have a broadcast
agency,  such as the CBC, at its disposal.
"Maybe we should remove the CBC from the
commercial field, and cut down on its broadcasting hours. It should contain public information and art performances instead of films from
the U.S. — even if Lome Greene is starring in
them."
Implimentation of the Carter Commission report would be disastrous to Canada, he said.
"If the capital gains tax, which is recommended by the report was imposed, it would be
for ideological rather than for physical reasons."
He was asked if the senate is functional.
"The senat-j serves as a much less expensive
alternative to the royal commissions," he said.
"However, it's powers should be limited."
According to McCutcheon, the senate should
be able to amend or reject a bill. If a bill is
rejected the Commons could start the bill again
at the next session and have it pass without
having to go through the senate again.
NEWMAN BALL
B.C. Ballroom, Hotel Vancouver
RECEPTION  . .  .  BANQUET .  .  .  DANCE
FRIDAY, MARCH 1st
7:00 p.m. to 1:00 p.m.
$7.00 Couple, Black Tie Optional
Music by Claude Logan
and His Orchestra
- FULL FACILITIES -
TRAVEL
ON  A SHOE  STRING
The Youth Hostel organization is well established
in over 40 countries. Youth Hostels exist in Asia,
Europe, North and South America and Africa. In
all 4000 well-equipped Youth Hostels are ready
and at your disposal when travelling. Travel the
economic   hostel   way.
WITH  THE
YOUTH HOSTELS
1406 West Broadway, Vancouver 9
738-0918  Days
738-9838 Evenings
Alma  Mater  Society
OFFICIAL  NOTICES
STUDENT COURT
AND DISCIPLINE COMMITTEE
Applications will be received up to March 7 for
positions on the Students Court and the A.M.S. Discipline Committee.   Submit applications to:
President,
Law  Students  Association
Box  No.   65
A.M.S., Brock Hall
Committee Members
Applications are now being received for Committee
members for the following Joint AMS—Administrative
Committees:
Academic  Symposium  Committee
Brock Art Committee
Student Union Building Clients Committee
Winter Sports  Centre Management Committee
Food Services Committee
Library Committee
Parking  and  Traffic  Committee
Book  Store  Committee
Residence Committee
Housing Committee
Applications for the above positions must include a
lett2r outlining qualifications, reason for applying, and,
where applicable, a proposed program. Eligibility forms
are available from the AMS Office and must be completed by the Registrar's Office before making application.
Letters of application and eligibility forms must be
submitted to the secretary, Box 54, Brock Hall by Noon,
March   11.
Committee Chairmen
Applications will be received up to Noon March 11
for the positions of Cairman of the following AMS
Standing   Committees:
Academic  Activities
Canadian University Services Overseas
Frosh Orientation
High  School  Conference  Committee
Intramurals Committee
Special Events Committee
Chairman   for  Speakers,   Entertainment and
Symposium
World  University Service
Applications for  the above positions must include
a  letter  outlining  qualifications,   reasons  for  applying,
and a proposed program.  Eligibility forms are available
from  the AMS  Office  and  must  be  completed  by  the
Registrar's Office before making application.
Letters of application and eligibility forms must be
submitted to the secretary, Box 54, Brock Hall.
Presidential By-Election
Nominations for the Presidential By-Election will
open Wednesday, February 28, and will close at 12 noon
Thursday, March 7. Nomination and eligibility forms
and copies of the Election Rules and Procedures are
available from the AMS Office. All nomination and
eligibility forms should be submitted to Penny Cairns,
Secretary, Box 54, Brock Hall. Page  8
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday,  February 27,  1968
IDEm^'MiMS^
By STEPHEN SCOBIE
A thing of beauty is a joy forever.
Such as the precise timing with which the driver of the B.C.
Hydro university bus at noon last Thursday pulled away from
Blanca loop just as the doors of the connecting Tenth bus were
opening.
The effect was exquisite. Ten seconds later, and he would
have been forced to pick us up; ten seconds earlier would have
been crudely over-obvious.
As I stood in the rain waiting for the next bus, I could
not help admiring the aesthetic finesse of this maneouvre. But
this particular bastard is only one of the better performers in
the large-scale and intricate maze which B.C. Hydro weaves
around us every day.
Somewhere in Vancouver is a mastermind, probably a
computer, which arranges all the bus schedules in an elaborate
and delicate system of non-connection.
The particular instance within my experience is the delightful way in which Dunbar buses reach the corner of Alma just
in time to see the Tenth bus heading off  up the hill.
Daily, hourly, such miracles of timing are being performed,
all over the city, for our benefit. We should be grateful.
I am therefore distressed to hear of certain dissident groups
who are less than enamored of this aesthetic masterpiece.
These degenerates actually believe that the bus system
should be run for the benefit of the passengers! (This is almost
as bad as thinking that a university exists for its students.)
They have planned a campaign of passive resistance, according to I. Wontwait, their bearded hippy-sympathiser leader,
whom I interviewed yesterday.
"Screw the system," advised Wontwait. "Drip wet umbrellas
on drivers' heads. Never have the correct change. Present American bills and haggle the exchange."
In this way, Wontwait claims, the system will be disrupted
by just a few minutes delay on every route. And then you might
even be able to make a connection.
What an anti-aesthetic idea!
When I left Wontwait, he was humming the movement's
protest song:
It's lonely and cold at  the bus-stop,
I've  been waiting here nearly  an  hour.
The   drivers   are sly,
They keep passing me by.
They know they've got me  in   their power.
~   Future teachers start
pilot teaching project
By GEORGE HOLLO
Each Tuesday night, the lights stay on at Killarney secondary
school in  Vancouver.  The  reason:  UBC  education   students.
Almost 300 high school students each week get individualized
instruction by UBC future teachers in a night school project,
unique to the city.
The six-week project, started by education students, has
been running since Feb. 6. Nearly 50 future teachers in various
fields hold classes for two hours each week.
Attendance of the high schoolers is entirely voluntary. They
_._ sign up for any course in which they feel a need for extra
" instruction. For many of them, it is the first time in small
classes.
It is up to each individual instructor how he organizes his
class, but none has more than seven pupils.
School authorities look upon this is a pilot project whose
continuation depends on its successful outcome.
So far, success looks probable. Very few students have
dropped out of classes, which indicates they fulfill a definite
need.
The high school students say they find classes which are
not overcrowded a welcome change. They receive ready help
with whatever problems they have  in  their curriculum.
Aside from observing a few rules of the public school
system the readers only need to satisfy student needs. In effect,
they say, it is an ideal situation which will serve as a unique experience for aspiring teachers.
Break away from AMS1
tSHELM
VOLKSWAGEN
SPECIALISTS
Large Stock of Parts on Hand
CERTIFIED  MECHANICS
UNIVERSITY SHELL SERVICE
4314 W.  10th 224-0828
Students in professional faculties should
break away from the Alma Mater Society and
form their own council, says engineering undergraduate society president-elect Fraser Hodge.
"There are two groups of students on campus — the professionals and what you might
call the truth seekers," Hodge said at a meeting
of newly-elected AMS council members.
"They're going in opposite directions. Engineers think in entirely different lines than some
other faculties."
Eventually, faculties like his want to set
themselves up as a separate AMS, he said.
Stan Persky, who with vice-president-elect
Carey Linde headed the discussion, said he
sympathized with Hodge's proposal.
"We arts people are the ones always talking
about self-determination," Persky said. "Now,
thsy'rc   calling  our   bluff."
The problem with a secondary council
would be maintaining communication between
them, he said.
In   an  interview  after  the  meeting,  Persky
said Hodge had already agreed that a council
for students in professional faculties would continue to pay $15 a year each to the AMS for
the costs of the student union building to be
completed by September, as well as $5 towards
miscellaneous expenses.
What the proposed separate council was
after, Persky said, was better provision for
^activities that particularly interested them.
The  current special events budget is $5,000.
Persky stressed, however, that a society of
students in professional faculties would not be
completely autonomous from the AMS, but
rather would possess special status in student
government.
The AMS would still continue to be the official representative of the entire student body,
he   said.
"We're not doing this just to screw the
AMS," Hodge said. "It's just that we feel we can
do things better separately."
A second meeting of the executive-elect
will be held Thursday noon in the AMS council
chambers. It is open to all students.
— kurt hilger photo
REFLECTING ON the charms of spring and wearing the
afterglow of a well spent mid-term break, two idle away
an   afternoon   in   the   sun  that   is   just   a   little  too   late.
UVic   prez
resigns post;
to teach later
VICTORIA (CUP) — Malcolm Taylor has resigned from
the job of university president
for the second time in four
years.
He is now president of
the University of Victoria, a
post he accepted after resigning as principal of the Calgary
campus of the University of
Alberta.
A student protest at the time
centred on the belief Taylor
was forced to resign because
of the position he faced as the
head of a non-autonomous university.
Taylor has denied his resignation from UVic has anything
to do with a policy disagreement with the board of governors.
After a year's sabbatical
leave Taylor intends to return
to UVic to teach political
science and develop a full program of public administration.
A committee, comprised of
all elements at the university,
including students, will choose
the  new  president.
THE BALLAD OF
ETIENNE BRULE
BY LEONARD  ANGEL
AN M.A. THESIS PRODUCTION
DIRECTED BY PETER SVATEK
February 28   —   March 2
8:30 P.M.
Frederic Wood STUDIO
RESERVATIONS:  228-2678 Tuesday,  February  27,   1968
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 9
Change prohibition laws'
By MIKE FINLAY
Ubyssey Council Reporter
UBC students will be able to drink and
gamble on campus next year, as far as student
council is concerned.
The change from ancient constitutional prohibition laws results from the approval of a
number of constitutional revisions brought before council Monday night.
The revisions are subject to approval at the
general meeting of council March 21.
AMS first vice-president Don Munton, chairman of the constitutional revisions committee,
said the bylaw in the present constitution forbidding gambling and drinking on campus is an
anachronism.
"It dates from about 1920," he said. "There's
no need to keep it now."
It was suggested that since students are still
subject to the criminal code regarding drinking
and gambling it was redundant to retain the
bylaw.
In other revisions, council approved a move
forcing a weighted vote in council at the request
of any voting member. At present, council must
vote on a motion to hold a weighted vote.
A change aimed at making it possible for
non-students to serve on the AMS executive was
also approved. The new ruling would make
members of the executive automatically members of the AMS.
A change in the constitution that would give
the ombudsman, a new position, a vote on
council was rejected.
Representatives, including ombudsman-elect
Bob Gilchrist, argued the ombudsman should be
kept impartial regarding council decision-making. A system will be devised whereby the ombudsman will be able to make complaints
known to student council.
Student liable
to  university'
LONDON (CUP) — The board of governors
of the University of Western Ontario had a right
to suspend Mark Kirk, president D. C. Williams
has told student council members.
Kirk, an 18-year-old freshman, was suspended
after a Nov. 15 conviction for possession of marijuana.
Williams, in answering questions submitted
to him by council members, said the case was
not one of double jeopardy.
He presented the analogy of a person in a
profession who is liable to both the law and his
profession if he transgresses its code of ethics.
Board chairman A. E. Shepherd drew an
analogy between the university student and an
employee who is liable to the law, his employer
and a civil suit for his actions.
Shepherd said, "It is a privilege to be a
member of this university."
Council rejected a revision that would allow
a member of senate and a member of the board
of governors to sit as voting members of student council.
Council approved a change giving $200
honoraria to each of the vice-president, external and internal affairs officers, secretary and
ombudsman.
In other council business, honorary activity
and academic awards were scrapped.
Honorary activity awards are given each
year to students contributing to campus activities. Academic awards are given for scholastic
excellence.
The awards were said to be irrelevant.
Fake broadcast
shocks students
MONTREAL (CUP) — Radio McGill
stunned evening cafeteria patrons Wednesday with an Orson Welles-type production
announcing that the United States had just
dropped a medium yield nuclear device on
Hanoi.
The announcement shocked most listeners into silent immobility and a couple of
girls began to cry. Angry students went
to radio McGill and were met by locked
doors, backed by staffers who barricaded
the inside.
The program was then claimed to be
a mistake and was retracted. Fifteen
minutes later, another announcement said
the original reports had been confirmed
and the U.S. had indeed bombed the North
Vietnamese  capital.
The program said the president was to
address the nation in 20 minutes and switched to reports from Washington, Ottawa and
the United Nations.
As the president was about to speak
the Star Spangled Banner began to play
and a quivering voice explained, "There is
a thin line between lunacy and reality.
Radio McGill has taken you over that line.
We now bring you back.
"The events described in the last 20
minutes were entirely fictional, this has
been a Radio McGill production."
Chris Partner of the Radio McGill managing board said the program was inspired
by Welles' 1938 broadcast of The War of
The Worlds —. "a serious program . . .
with the greatest sincerity of purpose."
"The belligerent attitude of those hearing the program would strongly support the
conclusion that the trend of events in the
far East have been so critical as to result
in the marked diminution of the thin line
between that which is credible and that
which is obviously fictional," he concluded.
loppy ponders a placid
pecuniary porker.
Uppy envisaged &&
delivery sysl&* as
a private oetl.
we dept tfml sfe is
r overly upset
our proposed
mcdi/icaiioH.
did we &&p tettycu
the Story o£ flow
our lapfliary . ,
compatriot tried
to talk us into a
special delivery
system?
well, lapinette likes
the idea o£ pigfrr-
$&3iks 9 becausewieie
is something numan
sfcnxi a ptegy* so
She propoSeZi an-
arran^stnenf where
WB would rnaiL your
cancelled True
Chequing Account* #
cheques ^>ack itipi£?>
kind of a luamey touch
■we had to admit.
well»goodness Jcnows,
we toy. so we have
decided to ^rve iV the
old campusbanfc
Tun-it-iftto.-an-account-
atid-see-if-.it -earns
any-interest.
bu,V we have to modify
it- a tat, because ,
there aren't enough-
pid tanks to do ,
icteme. but lfow
plan works out,
^ou, can sort- ot
pretend.
but iV all hin#s on
our succeeding in
talking the jwal
•mail   into pa&iling
their trucks pjnlc
campusbarik. branch.
in the admituslwlion building
g.f .peiraoxt, manager
Opm a-So -5 Monday Id Thursday - <33o-6 Fridojr
WON-KYUNG  CHO
Korean   foancer
y #p
Wed.   Noon
Auditorium   —   Special   Events Page  10
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday,  February 27,  1968
'TWEEN CLASSES
Nitty-gritty on  Grits
VISITING LECTURER
Dr. Pauline Jewett of Carleton University discusses the
Liberal leadership race today,
noon, Ang. 104.
ECONOMICS DEPT
Laughlin Currie, former adviser to Franklin D. Roosevelt
and to the government of
Colombia, critic and author,
speaks on The Emerging Crisis
in Development. Noon today,
Ang.  215.
PRE-MED
Dr. Szasz, dept. of preventative medicine, speaks noon
Wednesday in Wes. 201 on
medical opportunities and facilities in South America.
PEUS
All candidates meet, gym
211, noon today. Mark Ryan
and John Salmela will present
their platforms.
UBCSCC
Rally school tonight, chem.
250.
ONTOLOGY
Discussion of Why Am I
Here, Wednesday noon, Bu. 223.
Alice in
Wonderland
Thurs., Noon
Ed.   100
25c
WHAT IS A
HOLIDAY GIRL?
A   holiday   girl   is:
1. capable of earning an above-
average   income
2. willing   to   work   for   it
3. could   earn   $1000   per   month;
is   paid   commission
4. will  take  FREE  TRAINING
in   basic,   advanced   and   corrective   make-op
5. doesn'1   like   to   knock   on   doors
6. arfd enjoys demonstrating cosmetics and teaching her customers how THEY TOO can become
more  beautiful
Please   phone
Manfred  Schmidt
at 684-5762
9  a.m.  - 9  p.m.
IL   CAFFE
Records Wednesday noon, IH
400. Dance with live band Friday, 9 p.m., IH.
YOUNG SOCIALISTS
Peter   Camejo   discusses  the
deepening student revolt, Wednesday, noon, Bu. 104.
SKYDIVING   CLUB
Film   and   general   meeting
Wednesday noon, Ang. 407.
FULL GOSPEL STUDENTS
Mel Boring discusses walking
in the holy spirit, Wednesday,
noon, Ang. 212.
CULTURAL OPPRESSION
CONFERENCE
Marie Baker discusses power
for Indian communities, today,
noon, Brock lounge. Gerald
McGuigan discusses technology
and humans, Wednesday, noon,
Brock lounge.
PHYSSOC
Free physics movies each
Tuesday, noon, Hebb theatre.
GERMAN CLUB
Kommen, Sie und machen
Sie die Poster fuer unseren
Tanz, Heute mittag, IH 402.
Bringen Sie Papier und Blei-
stift mit.
UN CLUB
Election meeting Wednesday,
noon, Bu. 203.
HOUSING SURVEY
3,157 students who received
questionaires have already
completed and returned them.
How about yours? Don't wait,
do it now.
ANGLICANS
Ash Wednesday communion
service, 12:35 p.m., ATC chapel.
PRE LIBRARIANSHIP
Discussion of regional librarianship Wednesday, noon, Bu.
225.
GEOGRAPHY  CLUB
Dr. Warren speaks on energy
today, noon, geog. 101.
wusc
General meeting today, noon,
council chambers.
PRE-SOCIAL   WORK
Panel discussion at school of
social work, Thursday noon.
Meet in Bu. 203. All welcome.
EL CIRCULO
All members to attend Thursday noon meeting for elections,
IH 402.
EDUCATION US
Alice in Wonderland in ed.
100, Thursday noon. Admission 25 cents.
SAILING CLUB
General meeting and election
of officers Thursday noon in
Bu. 202.
WRITERS' RESTAURANT
Panel discussion on writing
for 8mm film, and role playing,
entitled Indian How Do You
Talk To White Man? At Mag-
lio's, 1739 Venables, today, 8
p.m.
EXPERIMENTAL COLLEGE
Karl Barau and Andy Schneider : forum on psychology.
Noon today Burau on Kirk's
theory of love, in Bu. 203.
THE WHO and
TOM NORTHCOTT
At The Agrodome
FRIDAY, MAR. 1,8 p.m.
Tickets $2.50, $3.50 & $4.50
ON SALE VANCOUVER TICKET CENTRE
& OUTLETS
2/
DEPARTMENT OF THEATRE
Sfc.
THE SCHOOL FOR SCUM
by   RICHARD   B.  SHERIDAN
HELD  OVER
Monday - Tuesday - Wednesday
February 26, 27, 28
STUDENTS $1.00 RESERVATIONS: 228-2678
or Frederic Wood Theatre Rm. 207
Support Your Campus Theatre
rmbmhhhh FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE——
&
BERKELY   CHAPLAIN
MEL *"%
(y
BORING
final meeting JR^JM
"WALKING IN  THE  SPIRIT'
Angus 212 Wed., Noon
CLASSIFIED
Rates: Students, Faculty & Clubs—3 lines. 1 day 75*, 3 days $2.00.
Commercial—3 lines, 1 day $1.00, 3 days $2.50.
Publications Office, BROCK HALL, UNIV. OF B.C., Vancouver 8, B.C.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Dances
11
"TWO BAND SMASH" — INTEN-
sions and Shockers, Totem Park,
March   2.   8   p.m.   -   2   a.m.
COMING SATURDAY MARCH 9-
Kentish Steele, Strange Brew —
Armouries — Light Show! — 8:30 ■
1:00.   —   Only   $1.00 - $1.50.
Greetings
12
G.L.E.,     HAPPY    21st     TOMORROW
from   the   Laarge  Daark  Aardvaark.
Lost & Found
13
LOST FEB. 16. SMALL (4" x 6")
notebook with bird design on front.
Important    reward.    Phone   263-5666.
LOST: LADIES BROWN LEATHER
Gloves probably left in car while
hitchiking on Tues., Feb. 6. Eve.
Phone Judy 277-4389 after 10:30 or
on wkends.
LOST: FEB. 16. RED AND GREEN
Ptomalin Ring on wide silver band.
Sentimental value. Please phone
266-6865   (after   5:30   p.m.)
LOST  BLACK   FRAME   GLASSES   IN
Gym.   Ph.   224-7581   (Feb.   18).
LOST RED MORROCAN WALLET.
Feb. 14 beside Buchanan. Urgent
phono   Scott   738-8560.
FOUND WEDS.. FEB. 21. MAN'S
watch in Bu. washroom. Claim in
Ubyssey   office.
FOUND BLACK FRAME GLASSES
with cover. Claim Pub. Office, "Brock
Hall.
LOST BROWN BRIEF CASE IN
Hie U.B.C. area with initials C.M.S.
Please   return.    Urgent   435-4985.
Scandals
37
SELLING YOUR TEXTBOOKS? TRY
The Bookfinder. 4444 West 10th
Ave.  228-8933.
TWO BAND SMASH—INTENSIONS
and Shockers, Totem Park, March 2.
8  p.m. - 2  a.m.
Typing
40
EXPERT   TYPIST    -   ELECTRIC
224-6129    -   228-8384.
EXPERT   ELECTRIC   TYPIST
Experienced   essay   and   thesis   typist
Reasonable Rates TR. 4-9253
TYPING — 25c PAGE — DOUBLE
spacing, legible work — Call Mondays to Thursdays and Sundays
after   10   a.m.,   738-6829.	
TYPING. PHONE 731-7551 — 9:00 to
5:00.   266-6662   after   6   o'clock.
SHORT  NOTICE  TYPING,   25c PAGE.
Phone  RE  8-4410.
•GOOD     EXPERIENCED     TYPIST
available    for   home    typing.    Phone
277-5640".
EXP. TYPIST, WORK GUARAN-
teed. Phone 684-5783 — 8 a.m. - 9
p.m.   any   day.
EMPLOYMENT
Help W'ted—Male or Female    53
INSTRUCTION
Instruction   Wanted
61
84
Rides & Car Pools
14
CAR POOL DRIVERS NEEDED UR-
gentlv. Central Park area, 9:30
classes,   433-5327.
Special Notices
IS
GET INVOLVED WITH CAMPUS
activities! Work on the Homecoming Committee. Applications in
A.M.S.   Office.
MARTIN McLAREN AND/OR
friend. Please contact your former
residence and pickup clothing left
behind. Also your car must be
moved before end of month to
avoid impounding by City, 224-5051
or  224-3777.
BACK TRUDEAU
Sign   Petition    Today   and   Tomorrow
in Brock or from Committee Members.
DON'T MISS KENTISH STEELE
and Strange Brew, March 9. Saturday, Armouries. 8:30 - 1:00. Only
$1.50 - SI.00.    Added    Light-Show!
WHY PAY HIGH AUTO INSURANCE
rates? If you have a valid driver's
license and good driving habits you
may qualify. Phone Ted Elliott,
321-6442.
UBC BARBER SHOP, OPEN WEEK-
days 8:30 till 6 p.m.. Sat. until 5:30
p.m.,  5736 University Boulevard.
Tutoring	
ARTICULATE YOUNG WRITER,
B.A. (Eng. Lat.) will tutor 1st, 2nd
yr. Latin, all Undergrad Eng. 522-
0974,   ask   for   Conrad.
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
—   OLD   TOTEMS   FOR   SALE   —
1963,   1965  &  1966  issues  50c.
Campus   Life's   25c.   Publications  Off.,
Brock   Hall
NEW SINGLE ACTION .22 REVOL-
ver for sale. Weight 40 oz. 5%,"
barrel.   Phone   987-8977   after   5   p.m.
SCUBA TANK %" K VALVE CAM
Pack. Healthways Regulator. Phone
224-0250   after  six.	
MEN'S EUROPEAN SKI BOOTS
(Size 10y2) — Like new. $20.00.
Phone   733-0381.
RENTALS & REAL ESTATE
Rooms
■1
Room & Board
•t
Ll'XURI OUS ACCOMMODATION,
superlative cuisine at Phi Kappa Pi.
Vacancies now and for this summer.    Phone    224-9667.
Travel  Opportunities
16
ON CAMPUS AT PHI KAPPA
Sigma. Good food, sauna bath, colour   television.   Call   Larry   224-7843.
Wanted—Miscellaneous
18
COINS WANTED, PAYING: CA-
nadian $5-35.00; $10-70.00: Dollars:
38-8.00; 45-20.00; 46-6.00: 47-
U-.00; 47ML-45.00: 48-160.00: 49-
5.00. 54, 55, 5'6 - 2.25. Sovreigns 10.00.
Also proof-like sets prior to 62. Ron
321-1487.
WANTED LADIES  FIGURE  SKATES
Size   6.   Ph.   738-1981.
AUTOMOTIVE & MARINE
Automobiles For Sale
21
MG.    MAG.NETTE.   $780.    EXCEL-
>"t   Condition.   Phone   731-8450.
1961     VOLVO    EX.     COND.
224-9956,   Pete.
Motorcycles
26
HONDA-FIAT
Motorcycles -   Cars
Generators  -  Utility Unit*
New  and  Used
SPORT  CARS
N T
O      Motors      S
R E
T       W
146 Robson H 688-1214
BUSINESS SERVICES
Miscellaneous
32
UBC BEAUTY SALON EXPERT
styling and cutting. Reasonable
rates 5736 University Blvd.  228-8942.
THERE ARE A NUMBER OF BEDS
available in residence for both male
and female students. For further
information please contact the
Housing   Administration    Office.
Furn. Houses & Apts.
83
Unfurn. Houses & Apts.
84
LARGE BATCHELOR SUITE ON
West 12th. Phone 736-5344 after 6:00
p.m. Girls  only.
BUY - SELL - RENT
UBYSSEY
CLASSIFIED Tuesday, February 27,  1968
bird A eife fteut
By BOB BANNO
A British Columbia-bred former UBC Thunderbird playing
in the National Basketball Association?
The sceptics will scoff and you can't blame them. The NBA,
after all, is the most exclusive athletic league in the world, an
association of veritable supermen.
A mere 12 teams comprise the league and each team carries
only 10 or 11 players.
The league is fed by hundreds of U.S. colleges and nearly
all of them play much better basketball than  UBC.
Though there have been isolated cases of Canadians breaking
into the National Football League and major league baseball,
the chances of making an NBA team, Canadian or not, are
infinitesimal to say the least.
But when 8,129 basketball enthusiasts jammed into Pacific
Coliseum on Saturday to watch the Boston Celtics and the Seattle
SuperSonics, the chances for a B.C. product increased considerably.
It was the largest ever home-game crowd for the expansion
Sonics.
And it opened two possibilities:
1) the scheduling of one-third of Seattle's home games in
Vancouver, and
2) the entry of a Vancouver franchise in  the NBA.
Either way,   it  would  profit  the  team  to  carry  a  homegrown Vancouver product on the squad.
Aside from IGA Grocer stars Billy Joe Price, who comes
from New Mexico State, and Dave Way, a UBC grad, Ron
Thorsen, now toiling for the UBC Jayvees, has to be the most
likely to succeed.
Though still a freshman collegian, Thorsen is already considered by many the best guard in Canada.
A superlative ball-handler with a hard driving lay-up, he
is at his best on the fast break. He is amazingly quick and, said
Thunderbird coach Peter Mullins, "always hits the open man".
Superlatives describe every aspect of Thorsen's play, except
shooting. But a year with the varsity Birds should cure this
vital deficiency.
For though coach Mullins' genius as a game tactician may
be doubted, he has the ability to convert an average shooter
into a good one and a good shooter into an excellent one.
Thorsen is a good shooter.
A pipedream, you say? Maybe, but after Saturday's happenings, a pipedream that may come true.
Sports centre expands;
squash   courts   included
UBC's board of governors has approved the leasing
of additional lands to the Alma Mater Society, for the expansion of the Winter Sports Centre.
The land is south and east of the existing centre and
will be used to construct four single squash courts, two
single handball courts and a new ice rink without seating.
The lease was approved subject to receiving a formal
request from the AMS.
Under the agreement the administration pays for taxes,
water, gas, light, heat, janitor and watchman service,
general maintenance, land, ice and ice plant service, plus
half the insurance premiums.
THE     U BYSSEY
IN ICE HOCKEY
Page  11
Braves dig cup; SFU next
The Stevenson Power
Digging Cup emblematic of
supremacy in the Richmond
Intermediate ice hockey
league ?
It's true and our UBC Braves
won it after finishing first, 12
points ahead of the second
place squad.
The Braves are now embroiled in the league playoffs
against the Vancouver Hornets
who finished third in the
league. Braves tangle with the
Hornets on Wednesday at 8
p.m. in the Richmond Arena
in the first game of the semifinals.
On Thursday night the
Braves meet the Simon Fraser
University varsity team for the
second time this season and
this time UBC plans to win.
In their first encounter, SFU
scored a goal in the dying minutes of the game to tie 2-2 with
the Braves. UBC's law squad
also battled to a tie with
the Simon Fraser team on Feb.
9. That time each team scored
four goals.
The Braves finished their
season in the Richmond league
with a 16-2 win-loss record for
32 points. Second place Ladner
had 20 points, Vancouver 18
and Richmond 17. Steveston
Fishermen were last and consequently out of the playoffs.
Ernie Lawson, the Braves'
hard-working centre, won the
Metro Paving trophy for being the top scorer in the league.
Lawson had 46 points on 23
goals and 23 assists in 18
games.
The best goalie in the league
was UBC's Don Cram. He won
the Progressive Cartage and
Contracting trophy for his 1.95
goals-against-per-game average.
The Braves' playoff series
with the Hornets is a best two-
out-of-three affair. The winner
of the final series advances to
play for the Lower Mainland
championship.
But Braves' coach Andy Bak-
ogeorge feels that the upcoming game with SFU is his
team's biggest of the year and
he would like to win it.
Bakogeorge thinks Simon
Fraser is weak on defense and
he has plenty of strong forwards including Lawson, Wes
Borkowski,   Frank   Lanzarotta
and Dwayne Biagioni, who is
so highly thought of that he
plays for both the Braves and
the Birds, who can take advantage of this situation.
Simon Fraser's b i g g e s s
threats are center Ken Taki-
uchi and forward Jerry Dol
son, both of whom impressec
Bakoageorge in their firsi
meeting.
Game time on Thursday
against SFU Jin the Winter
Sports Center is 5:30 p.m.
FILMSOC  PRESENTS
TONY CURTIS
JACK LEMMON
//
THE GREAT RACE
//
THURS., FEB. 29
12:30,   3:30,   6:00,   8:30
COLOR  &   PANAVISION
AUD.   50c
Soccer site switches
The Forestry and Phys. Ed.
soccer teams -will do battle in
the "A" league final on Wednesday at noon on the field behind the gym, not on Wolfson
as previously announced.
VOTE TODAY!
- AMS Constitutional Referendum
Are you in favour of amending By-Law 4(3)(a) of the A.M.S.
Constitution  to read  as follows:—
"(a) The President, who shall have successfully
completed his second year or its equivalent, and
who has attended the University of British Columbia for at least ONE year, and who has not previously held the position of President of the
Society."
YES     □
no   a
To ratify this change at least
15% of the student body must vote!
SPECIAL EVENTS AND CULTURAL OPPRESSION CONFERENCE
presents
JOHN   PORTER
speaking on
'Canadian fecial Structure and Change: Quebec "
DR. PORTER, A SOCIOLOGIST AT CARLETON UNIVERSITY, OTTAWA, IS THE AUTHOR OF THE DEFINI
TIVE WORK ON CANADA'S SOCIAL CLASS AND POWER STRUCTURE THE VERTICAL MOSAIC
Friday Noon
FREE     ADMISSION
Auditorium Page   12
THE     UBYSSEY
Tuesday, February 27, 1968
— peak photo
UBC'S FRANK ROTERING towers over Clansman John Drew
as the Simon Fraser captain attempts to get away from
the tenacious Thunderbird in Friday night's basketball contest at SFU. The Birds won 79-61 but lost the John Buchanan trophy by eight points.
AND THE MELODY LINGERS ON
FOR THE ICE HOCKEY BIRDS
By BRIAN RATTRAY
UBC 5, Alberia 2
Alberla 5, UBC 2
In weekend intercollegiate ice hockey, the UBC Thunderbirds played the familiar tune that has haunted them all season.
The tune — "Win one—lose one".
On Friday night in Edmonton, the Birds looked as if they
deserved the conference championship as they downed the University of Alberta Golden Bears 5-2.
Despite the fact that the Birds looked less than ready in
practises prior to the Edmonton series, all three lines were
clicking.
Mike Darnbrough, Miles Dssharnais and Jack James with
one goal apiece and Wayne Hunter with two were UBC's
scorers.
The Birds had to start Saturday's game without Hunter and
Laurie Vanzella who both suffered injuries Friday. Hunter was
hit in his left eye by a stick and suffered a ruptured tear duct.
Vanzella stretched ligaments in his leg.
Their absence was obviously felt as the Bears jumped into
a quick 2-0 lead.
Don Fiddler had to leave the game midway through the
first period when he was also hit in the eye with a stick.
With the Birds playing with only two makeshift forward
lines and only three defensemen, the Bears skated to a 5-2 win.
UBC's marksmen were James and Blaine Pollock.
This series was supposed to have been a two game, total-
point affair for the Hamber  Cup but as  each team  produced
seven goals, the  trophy  will  be  on  the  line  this  Friday  and
Saturday when the Birds play host to the Bears.
ICE CHIPS
• Bird trainer John Cartmel says that Hunter and Fiddler
. should be ready by Friday but Vanzella may  not  recover in
time.
• Mike Darnbrough and Dwayne Biagioni both Jayvees
brought up for the series, played strong games.
Intramural wrestlers unite
"* The weigh-in for those wishing to compete in intramural
wrestling will be held in the memorial gym men's locker room
on Friday from 12:30 p.m. to 1:30 p.m. Weight classes will be
listed in the locker room as will the bout draws.
Ah, sweet, sweet revenge
as hoop Birds win (almost)
By BOB BANNO
UBC 79—SFU 61
SFU 125—UBC 118 (Two Game Total)
Ever since The Disaster two weeks ago, the
much - maligned UBC basketball Thunderbirds
have been hotly criticized and bitterly cajoled.
They knew that if they lost again, coach Peter
Mullins would be burned in effigy by the UBC
faithful. Or, at least, that they would never be
forgiven, even if they went on to win the Canadian college championship.
So in the heady atmosphere of Burnaby Mountain, they were out for blood from the start —
and their rage continued throughout the game.
It showed when SFU transfer student Frank
Rotering thumbed his nose at the jeering SFU
throng after sinking a foul shot.
It showed when UBC reserve Ken Shields,
often a hothead anyway, threw John Drew to
the floor while the SFU guard was in the air
for a lay-in.
And it enabled UBC's Derek Sankey to come
off the bench, grab six offensive rebounds away
from SFU's tough Dave Murphy and notch 12
points.
In fact, the big difference between the two
clubs was on the offensive boards. The Birds
snared 20 while SFU, perhaps weary after a
gruelling four-game Alaskan trip, could manage
only two.
Overall, UBC outrebounded the Clansmen 44
to 29.
The Birds spurted into a 6-0 lead and led
41-28 at the half. SFU retaliated with four quick
baskets after the break to narrow the margin
to 41-36.
But it quickly became apparent the SFU
spurt was a dying gasp. The Birds scored again
and pgain and at one point were within two
baskets of overtaking the Clan in the total point
score.
(SFU enjoyed a 25 point lead in the two-game
total point series for the John Buchanan trophy).
SFU coach John Kootnekoff then ordered a
stall, Drew connected on a pair of free throws,
Murphy scored from under the basket and UBC's
hopes for a series win were dashed.
But the Birds accomplished their primary
task; the final score for the game was 79-61 for
UBC.
Dave Rice, the [Birds' fine sixth man turned
in a gritty performance.  He hit on five of eight
attempts from  the field and converted all five
of his free throws to finish with 15 points.
Guard Phil Langley, hitting well from outside, added 13 for UBC.
Bob Wright and Gary Smith paced the Clan
with 13 points each.
In preliminary action, the UBC Junior Varsity clubbed SFU's Jayvees 84-71. Guard Ken
House, a former SFU performer led UBC with
23 points. Rudy Teichrob scored 18 points for
SFU.
FOUL SHOTS
UBC stalwarts Ian Dixon and Neil Murray
again had below-par games Friday. Dixon shot
four for 12, Murray two for 12 from the field
. . . Gunnar Kuehn, who had 20 points for SFU
in the first game was held to next to nothing
(one point) by defensive ace Bob Molinski.
The water is hot
for soccer squad
The UBC soccer Thunderbirds are in hot
water.
The Birds seriously dampened their chances
of finishing first in the Pacific Coast Soccer
League when they lost a 2-1 contest to the
Victoria O'Keefes Saturday in the Vancouver
Island city.
The Victoria win vaulted the O'Keefes into
a first place tie with UBC and the Firefighters.
The New Westminster Labs are one point behind the leaders and Columbus is one point
behind the Labs.
UBC has only three games left to play as
do the Firefighters. Victoria and New Westminster have four left while Columbus, with six
games remaining, stands the best chance of
winning the league.
In Victoria the Birds led 1-0 at halftime on
a goal by Jim Briggs at the six minute mark.
But a tally by George Paul 13 minutes into the
second half tied the game and Jim Menzies'
penalty kick gave Victoria the win.
The Birds were infuriated by the officiating
of referee Jack Adams, particularly late in the
game when Adams called back a UBC goal for
an apparent off-side and then awarded the Birds
a free kick instead, for a foul by O'Keefe goalie
Barry  Sadler.
MAKOTO SAKAMOTO from the University of Southern
California is considered the top gymnast in the United
States. He will be on campus March 1 for the North
American Gymnastic Championships. Tournament competitions will also be held on Feb. 29 and March 2 in the
Pacific Coliseum. Students will be admitted to the War
Memorial Gym competitions on March 1 at 12:30 p.m. for
$1. Advance tickets can be picked up at the gym athletic
office.
Austin drives
rugger team
to victory
The UBC rugby Thunderbirds defeated the University
of Washington 27-3 Saturday in
a Northwest Intercollegiate
Conference game played in
Seattle.
Dave Austin scored three
tries for the Birds and Don
Crompton added another nine
points with a penalty kick and
three converts.
UBC now has a two win, one
loss, one tie record in the conference. The Birds have one
game left to play, that with
Western Washington. The contest was postponed earlier in
the season and arrangements
are being .made to have it
played within the next two
weeks.
In other weekend rugby
action, the Braves tied 3-3 with
Simon Fraser in an intermediate division game, and the
Teepees defeated the University of Washington seconds 11-8.

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