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UBC Publications

The Ubyssey Oct 14, 1971

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Array Plants against the sunrise .. . UBC through the eye of an early bird ... a production of The Ubyssey's Dirk Visser.
Union charges unfair practices
By KATHY CARNEY
UBC personnel director John
McLean will meet Friday with
17-year employee Jeanne Paul to
discuss her job status at the
university.
Paul was asked Sept. 30 for her
resignation from her job as
administrative assistant to the
dean of science faculty.
The request was made after
Paul attended a union organizing
meeting Sept. 28 sponsored by
local 15 of the Office and
Technical Employees Union.
OTEU spokesman Bill Lowe
charged Wednesday that Paul was
asked for her resignation for
union activities.
Paul said she had been given no
reasons for the request. She
refused   to   speculate   on them.
The recommendation for her
dismissal was made by acting
science dean Robert Scagel.
Reasons for the recommendation
have been given to McLean in a
written report but he is refusing
to release the contents.
McLean denied that the
recommendation for the dismissal
was made on grounds of union
activity.
'This had nothing to do with
the union," said McLean. "If a
person wants to join the union
that's okay but it takes a majority
to get certification."
He said Paul is still on the
university payroll.
He added that if the
recommendation for dismissal is
Vol. LIU, No. 13
VANCOUVER, B.C., THURSDAY, OCTOBER 14, 1971 «^p»>18    228-2301
approved, the personnel office
will attempt to find her another
position within the university.
Lowe warned that the union
will lay an unfair labor practices
charge against UBC before the
provincial Labor Relations Board
if Paul is dismissed and requests-
assistance.
He said the union is willing to
do  the  same  for  any university
employee who gets into the same
situation.
The dispute between the union
and the UBC administration
appears to stem from a major
organizing drive on campus during
the past two weeks.
The administration is
attempting to stifle union
organizing by refusing employees
the right to meet on campus to
discuss unionization.
Lowe said there has been a
favorable response to the
organizing attempts.
When asked to give reasons
why employees should join the
union, he said: "Primarily because
their salaries are lower than they
would be if they were members of
a union."
McLean told The Ubyssey that
Campus shutdown continues
MONTREAL (CUPI) - Faculty members at the
University of Montreal have reaffirmed their
support for the school's 1,000 non-academic
employees who walked off their jobs last week.
The Association des Professeurs de l'Universite
de Montreal agreed Tuesday to give $2,000 to the
strike fund and urged each of its members to
contribute a full day's pay.
Faculty and students have been respecting
picket lines around the campus.
More than 25,000 students and teachers are
now supporting the workers' strike, resulting in a
total shutdown of the university, while union
representatives affiliated with the Canadian Union
of Public Employees continue negotiations with the
administration.
The university administration claims it cannot
meet the union's wage demands because of financial
restrictions imposed by the Quebec government.
Union officials say the administration is
obsucring the wage dispute by ignoring the
breakdown in job classification presented at the
bargaining table, making union demands seem
outrageously high.
If the deadlock continues past next week, the
professors agreed to meet again to reconsider their
stand on the strike.
Students, have indicated they will respect the
picket lines indefinitely until a settlement is
reached.
grievances are first handled by an
employee's immediate superior.
If an agreement is not reached
at that stage, he said, the dispute
goes up the university
bureaucracy until it reaches the
department head and McLean for
a final joint settlement.
Lowe also said present benefits
given to UBC employees would be
preserved in writing and that the
workers would have "an increased
voice in salary and promotions."
A meeting of university
employees interested in
unionization will be held at 5:30
p.m. today at the Ironworkers
Hall, 2415 Columbia.
60 clubs out
for members
The Alma Mater Society's
annual clubs day is being held
today in SUB.
Sixty of the 120
AMS-sponsored clubs will be
participating in this yearly effort
to recruit new members and show
what they can do.
Most of the familiar groups
such as Filmsoc, Mussoc and
Radsoc will have displays, as will
political and religious clubs,
skydivers and sailors.
Clayton Vogler of the clubs
committee said he expects club
membership to increase by 500
people as a result of clubs day.
Last year's membership was
5,500, Vogler said. Page 2
THE       UBYSSEY
Thursday,  October  14,   1971
Alternate food service
'dead issue,' says Ruthie
The alternate food service
has been doing a booming
business on the main floor of
SUB despite administration
threats to close it down.
And it appears that the
administration-run food
services is dropping its
campaign to wipe out the
alternate service.
Food services director Ruth
Blair said Wednesday she no
longer has any complaints
about the alternate service
operation.
"The alternate service is
now a dead issue, as far as I'm
concerned," she said.
"The administration
notified them that they had to
leave, and as far as I know they
have left."
Blair has been engaged in a
fear campaign designed to pit
food services workers against
the alternate operation. She
has claimed that the service
will force layoffs in cafeterias.
Lyle Osmundson,
owner-operator of the alternate
service, said business is "better
than ever," despite a letter
from depute president William
White informing him that he
was expected to move out.
"We've even opened another
table, and we've no intentions
of leaving," Osmundson said.
"All we're interested in
doing is providing good cheap
food. So many people are
complaining about food
services that if we left I'm sure
someone else would take up
the cause."
Sue Kennedy, Alma Mater
Society co-ordinator, said after
a meeting she had with Blair on
Tuesday, that she got the
impression that Blair was
dropping the issue.
"However, if she decides to
revive it and cut employees'
hours in the future, then the
AMS will want some figures on
how much money food services
People who ride bikes are
very quiet, don't mess up
the  air,  and  stay  skinnier
and sexier. So ride a bike.
We'll peddle you a neat one.
Cyclery Sales, Rentals and
Service at three centres.
4385 W 10th Ave 228-8732
620 E Broadway 874-8611
7007 Kingsway 524-9768
Use your Chargex.
- the Peddler.
peddler
bicycle centres
HELPER, OSMUNDSON
—david bowerman photo
. . continue alternate food service.
is supposed to be losing
because of this alternate
service," Kennedy said.
Bill Morrison, president of
Canadian Union of Public
Employees Local 116, said
while he doesn't want any of
his employees to lose their jobs
because of the alternate
service, he otherwise has no
objections to it.
"I support the students in
their fight for better food,"
Morrison said. "As far as I'm
concerned, it takes no longer
to prepare a good meal than a
bad one."
Morrison     said     he     also
supported the fight to remove
disposable dishes from the SUB
cafeteria.
"They're annoying to use,
and they create a garbage
problem," he said.
Kennedy said she had
discussed the matter of paper
cups and plates with Blair in
Tuesday's meeting.
"Blair plans to continue the
throw-away dishes until
Christmas and then do a study
on the benefits and problems
of their use," Kennedy said
"She also plans on asking
the purchasing agent to specify
only union grapes."
UNIVERSITY SHELL
SERVICE
PETER LISSACK
SHELL  111   PRODUCTS
Featuring unleaded gasoline
FIAT
REPAIRS - SERVICE
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CVQ1.VO)
SPECIALIZING IN ELECTRONIC TUNE-UPS
DISC BRAKES - EXHAUST CONTROL
LICENSED MECHANIC
12 YEARS IN THIS LOCATION
4314 W. 10 Ave. 224-0828
SAVE THIS AD - IT'S WORTH 10% ON REPAIRS
MEMO FROM
INTERNATIONAL HOUSE
INTERNATIONAL=
BETWEEN NATIONS
^SUNDAY, OCTOBER 17TH-
 BUS TRIP TO WEAVER CREEK
To view Salmon Spawning — $2.00 for transportation. Bus leaves
International House at 9:30 a.m. Please sign up in advance at I.H. office
by   Friday,   Oct.   15
NOTE CHANGE:
OCTOBER 22/24 WEEKEND VISIT TO PENTICTON IS NOW
SCHEDULED FOR OCTOBER 29, 30, 31. - for overseas students as
guests of Penticton families. Minimal charge for transportation. Sign up
at I.H. office not later than Oct. 22.
TUESDAY, OCTOBER 19TH—12:30 p.m.
UPPER LOUNGE OF I.H.
CHINESE TABLE TENNIS COACHING DEMONSTRATION - by Mr.
Chuang Chia-Fu and Miss Lin Hsi-Meng, National Chinese table tennis
team. Everyone welcome.
I.S.P.C. MEETING
The first meeting of the International Student Program Committee will
be held on October 19, 1971 at 12:30 in Rm. 400 at I.H. This
committee is for all overseas and Canadian students interested in
planning cultural and social activities for the 1971-72 term. If you have
ideas which you would like to see implemented into constructive action
please attend this meeting. We would really appreciate seeing all new
overseas and Canadian students.
Authentic International Hot Lunches Daily—85e
i.e. Indonesian Paella, East Indian curries, Greek Shish Ke-babs,
Yugoslavian Cevapcici, Italian spaghetti. French, Russian and
Hungarian soups (a full meal) 25c and 45c. Open-face sandwiches 35c
and up — choice of fillings.
SOUL IS COMING TO I. HOUSE-OCTOBER   29th
SOUL DANCE, SOUL FASHIONS and FOOD. $1.50
v    WATCH FOR MORE DETAILS
When
you .
need
aBank
It's nice to know you're
near one.
The Commerce.
Come in,
And find out how more of us
can do more for you.
There's a Commerce branch
AT 5796 UNIVERSITY BOULEVARD
CANADIAN IMPERIAL
BANK OF COMMERCE Thursday, October  14,  1971
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 3
'Don't cut school budgets'-BCTF
The British Columbia Teachers Federation has
initiated a campaign to prevent the provincial education
budget cut from becoming legislation.
The budget announced Monday by provincial
education minister Donald Brothers is slated to be cut
from 110 per cent of last year's budget to 108 per cent.
Under the new plan, B.C. school districts will be
allowed an eight per cent increase in their budgets from
last year, instead of the traditional 10 per cent yearly
increase.
As part of the provincial education act, the budget
can only be altered by an amendment to the act in the
provincial legislature.
Brothers said Monday he will bring the amendment
up in the legislature next January.
BCTF president Jim MacFarlane said Wednesday his
federation will make every possible effort to arouse
•public   concern   over   the   issue   before   the  January
legislature session, to discourage MLAs from supporting
the amendment.
"We have contacted many B.C. school boards and
the B.C. School Trustees Association, and all have
agreeed to support our actions," MacFarlane said.
He said the BCTF would stage an "all-out publicity
campaign against the budget cut" in the upcoming
months.
"We must convince the public how destructive this
cut is to the needs of our children," he said.
He said the budget cut would result in cutbacks in
the special education program for mentally and
physically retarded children, supplies and materials to
school boards and ancillary services such as school
janitorial maintenance and buses for field trips.
He estimated the cut as a loss of $5 million to the
Lower Mainland school boards and over $1 million for
the Vancouver district alone.
"But most importantly, the budget cut will.result in
the further overcrowding of classes which are already
overcrowded," he said.
Teachers' salaries constitute two-thirds of the
education budget.
'This is the worst educational deterrent I can think
of because the children are just not going to get the
individual help they need, if teachers will have time to
give them extra help at all," MacFarlane said.
MacFarlane said he personally does not feel the
budget will be cut.
"(Premier W. A. C.) Bennett is full of these
straw-in-the-wind ideas which never come to pass," he
said.
"We just want to make sure that this one will meet
the same result."
Quebec liberation support march set
A demonstration of support for the national
liberation movement in Quebec will be held
Saturday — the anniversary of the declaration of the
War Measures Act.
A spokesman for the October 16 Committee
which   is    organizing    the   demonstration,   said
Wednesday demonstrators are to assemble Saturday
at 7 p.m. in Thorton Park, in front of the Canadian
National Railway station on Main St.
From there they will march to the federal
building at Granville and Hastings, where there will
be short speeches in support of the Quebec
movement.
BLUES SINGERS, Sonny Terry (right) and Brownie McGhee wowed a standing room only
audience in the SUB ballroom Tuesday night. The received a standing ovation in the
—david bowerman photos
middle of the concert and stayed behind for an.encore. Pair have been together for more
than 30 years.
-^-.
- '*r Mi **- ^m&««<«mN» jti»* ~ ^%mi
NFTU tired of talk, wants binding negotiations
The non-faculty teachers union will present a list of
demands Friday to graduate studies dean Ian Cowan.
NFTU spokesman Mark Madoff said Wednesday the
union hopes to establish more concrete grounds for
improvement of the situation of teaching assistants on
campus.
"We don't see any point in engaging in more talk
about what we want. We want to enter into negotiations
of a more binding sort," said Madoff.
The now-defunct committee for the review of the
TA's situation was set up last summer under the
leadership of Cowan. According the the NFTU the
committee held only one meeting.
"If the university really means to do anything about
the situation, they have to set up a committee in which
we all participate with real decision-making authority."
The brief prepared by the NFTU states four
demands for determining the composition of a
committee on TAs:
• That it have a membership consisting of equal
numbers of representatives from the administration, the
Graduate Students Association and the NFTU.
• That     the     committee    be    a    binding
recommending power, and that it cease being referred to
as a workshop.
• That there be vote parity on all issues, one
vote per member.
• That there be a deadline date for the first
meeting called - Oct 30.
In the past the NFTU has received unsatisfactory
reaction from Cowan's committee.
"We've shown real interest in getting out and
helping them work, but they've just changed the
committee format around and so on," Madoff said.
The union hopes that the new committee they are
proposing would solve these difficulties, although
Madoff said there is no assurance that the committee
will be set up.
The brief presented to Cowan will accentuate the
most pressing needs of the NFTU that should be dealt
with by such a committee.
The first of these demands is for a minimum wage
of $3,200 per year for non-faculty teachers.
"This still allows for higher rates to be paid,"
Madoff said. "But it assures at least this payment for all
non-faculty teachers at UBC."
The second demand is that the committee be a
continuing consultation and decision-making body for
non-faculty members.
"This way we would be able to communicate with
the university in a way never done before," Madoff said.
The union also recommends that one faculty
member be responsible for TA grievances.
Finally, they want the university to make clear the
administration policies on the hiring of non-faculty
teachers and the university's responsibility to graduate
students.
"Right now the university is saying that you have to
have a lot of money to be a graduate student here,"
Madoff said.
He said that past dealings with the administration
about TA grievances have only led to "delaying tactics"
by the university.
However, the NFTU has now organized a new
caucus which is hoping, through the new brief, to get
more concrete action from the university in dealing with
their situation.
Anyone interested in helping out or looking into the
NFTU can contact them in SUB 262 or at 228-3975. Page 4
THE       UBYSSEY
Thursday, October  14,   1971
Uniondom
It appears that UBC — and other Canadian
universities — are suddenly being confronted by one of
those nasty manifestations of the real world which
sometimes succeed in forcing themselves upon the
corporate realm of academe.
Within recent weeks, unions composed of varying
classifications of university workers have been making
their presence felt.
In an area of society geared almost completely to
producing the data and the managers for the
profit-making classes, such a presence is a rude and
unwelcome nuisance.
But it's long overdue.
We know what UBC thinks of unions and — by
extension — university workers.
UBC is quietly (this is a polite, scholarly place, after
all) doing what it can to smash attempts at union
organization and to keep a foot firmly on the main
existing union — the Canadian Union of Public
Employees.
Housing administration has already tried to cut the
wages of its unionized residence maids and food services
is trying to do the same. Funny how labor is always the
first area hit when a budget cut is contemplated.
And more recently, a union was refused a place to
meet on campus for organizational purposes and a
woman apparently dismissed from her job for getting a
little too close to union organizing.
It's no coincidence that these events have occurred
at a time when there seems to be a major push across
Canada* to unionize university workers or use existing
campus union locals to better the wages and working
conditions of memberships.
We have already seen union actions at the
University of Alberta in Edmonton and are now
witnessing a strong union, move at the Universite de
Montreal.
No wonder UBC administrators and the board of
governors (read: directors) are trying to assert
themselves over workers here. (Having the anti-labor,
tight-fisted Socreds breathing down their necks doesn't
make things any easier either.)
But a strong union movement is a necessity on a
university campus because, along with the reality of
lousy wages, it has become evident that workers at UBC
have about as much control over their working lives as
students.
That is to say, almost none.
In fact, the stall tactics used by the UBC senate to
keep CUPE representatives off that august body suggests
that workers' claims have even less weight than those
made by students.
In one area at least the student conscience is clear:
The AMS has encouraged its workers to unionize and
they have done so.
However, until administration harassment of unions
ceases'at UBC and until the workers here have strong
representation on all governing bodies and until they
have some measure of control over their working lives,
the problem will remain unsolved.
In the meantime, we'd better realize where our
allegiance should lie.
And it ain't with the administrators, the polluting
pulp millers, the forest barons and the Socreds.
TMU9YSSSY
OCTOBER 14, 1971
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the university year
by the Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C. Editorial opinions are
those of the writer and not of the AMS or the university administration.
Member, Canadian University Press. The Ubyssey publishes Page Friday, a
weekly commentary and review. The Ubyssey's editorial offices are located
in room 241K of the Student Union Building.
Editorial    departments,    228-2301,    228-2307;
228-2305; advertising, 228-3977.
Page    Friday,    Sports,
Editor: Leslie Plommer
Bernard Bischoffed (as usual) which set the stage for Tricia Moore and
Kathy Carney to sharpen a million pencils in preparation for the annual pin
the pencil on the Dick Betts contest. Jan O'Brien gave Mike Sasges his very
own eraser and told John Andersen and Sandy Kass to shoot Sandi Shreve
on sight unless Mike Finlay intervened, in which case to aim at the elbow.
Tim Wilson came by to inhale the nostalgia before the narcotics squad
moved in, aided by Shane McCune and Laurence Leader.
Vaughn Palmer insisted he was for real but Leslie Krueger had the test
tubes out in a flash and turned John Twigg and Linda Hossie into little
grains of sand. Paul Knox bought a pail and shovel for the occasion and
built castles with Ginny Gait and Gord Gibson. Dirk Visser talked on the
subject: Is Art? And if so, how high? But Mike Buck and Kent Spencer said
he was full of string and Simon Truelove agreed with David Bowerman,
who wondered where he'd gone wrong.
And for everyone, there's a staff meeting today at noon. Your lives
could be at stake. Photogs meet Friday noon.
mw    >Wr*   ,.
a\p
"Excuse me, but where do I find the Reality Club?"
Letters
Ol' Walt
I only just recovered from the
permanently crippling shock of
learning that Santa Claus is really
only a front for the Downtown
Merchants' Association.
But any naive illusions I may
have had on righteousness or
decency in the world were forever
expelled from my head when I
discovered last night that the hero
of every child and creature is in
truth a homicidal rapist.
It was with deepest regret that
I read an article describing the
Disney Productions (of Mickey
Mouse and apple pie fame)
proposal to erect a massive
recreational spectacle in the
middle of the one of the few truly
beautiful wilderness areas left in
the U.S. - Mineral Kings.
Mineral Kings is situated on the
western slopes of the High Sierras
in California. I have had a
personal relationship with this
area, as I spent a good part of a
month a few summers back hiking
and camping through its heart and
mine.
Now good ol' Walt and Co.
have submitted plans for a project
"including swimming pools,
specialty shops, ice rinks, tennis
courts, a golf course, a five-story
hotel complex of 1,030 rooms, 22
ski lifts, and an eight-to-10-level
parking structure located at the
base of the valley. The whole
facility is geared to handle up to
8,500 visitors per day."
Just what is going on here?!!
How can such a delicate and
beautiful piece of wilderness hope
to withstand the trampling
onslaught of 8,500 visitors per
day?
Disney Productions has
rationalized the whole proposal
by stating it will make Mineral
Kings "more available" to the
general public.
Just who do they consider the
"general public"? The
above-average-income day skier
who has to pay through the nose
to stay in the expensive hotel,
that's who.
It is up to us to become
increasingly concerned in the
battle to see no irreversible
damage is done to our
non-renewable environment by
phonies such as Disney
Productions, whose only motive is
for its own pockets and who
shows little regard for that which
should be free and unaltered for
all time.
It wasn't my intention to
preach or anything, because I am
probably as ill-informed on what
is going on as most of you. But as
a person who has spent the
majority of his tender young life
in love with the outdoors (and its
preservation) I just want to bring
this criminal injustice to your
attention.
I appeal to you to think twice
about taking your kid brother or
sister to see a "nice, wholesome"
Disney movie — because the bucks
you pay are helping to destroy
Bambi.
Arnie McRader
Forestry 1 Thursday, October  14,  1971
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 5
Disgusted
Having read your report about
the AMS rejecting a proposal to
demonstrate against the Soviet
Union's policies on the grounds
that a demonstration does not
reflect an AMS "priority", we are
absolutely disgusted.
Either those who rejected such
a proposal are ignorant of the
history of internal oppression and
military aggression of the .
U.S.S.R., or they are simply
indifferent to a history of
injustice and persecution.
How can they have the nerve
to justify their rejection on the
basis of their narrow "priority"?
Premier Alexei Kosygin will be
the first high official of the
U.S.S.R. to visit Vancouver; thus,
as never before, concerned people
have an opportunity to express
their disgust with the policies of
that country.
There is no embassy, consulate,
trade commission or other
permanent Soviet government
agancy in Vancouver; thus a
genuine opportunity is to be
disregarded because of a question
of AMS "priority".
Perhaps we should forget about
the millions (yes, millions) of
persons who have perished in
Siberian labor camps — after all,
they are no longer a matter of
priority. Forget about the
Estonians, Latvians, Lithuanians
and Ukrainians who were
uprooted from their homes and
settled throughout the U.S.S.R. so
as to destroy their cultures — this
doesn't concern us, it's no
priority.
Forget about the invasion of
Czechoslovakia in 1968 — old
news is no longer a matter of
priority. Don't bother recalling
the ruthless invasion of Hungary
in 1956 — older news is no longer
a matter of priority. Don't
concern yourself with the plight
of three million Jews in the Soviet
Union — they were never a matter
of priority.
Are there no priorities relating
to the Soviet Union to concern
ourselves with today? Why does
our AMS council refuse to
concern itself with the following
policies of the Soviet Union?
1. There is no freedom of
expression and speech for writers,
scientists and people in the arts.
Any political dissent is swiftly
dealt the lethal blow of Soviet
justice.
2. Minority groups, in
particular the Jews, face an
official government policy of
cultural and religious genocide.
3. The U.S.S.R. has disregarded
the "international declaration of
human rights" to which it was a
signatory. It has callously
disregarded the rights guaranteed
Soviet citizens under the
constitution.
4. In the past month the Soviet
government has discharged three
nuclear bombs underground, the
last being the largest one so far
detonated by any country. The
Soviet Union has shown no
indication that such nuclear tests
will cease.
5. The U.S.S.R. is presently the
second largest manufacturer and
dealer in conventional  weapons.
6. The "Brezhnev doctrine" is
an open statement to the world
community of that country's
intention     to     carry     out
Letters
imperialistic manoeuvres when it
so desires.
7. The U.S.S.R. has and
continues to openly intimidate
and threaten the sovereignty of
Rumania, Albania and Yugoslavia.
8. The U.S.S.R. is another of
the super powers failing to
comply with a moral
responsibility to the human
community.
9. The legal system of the
U.S.S.R. is no more than an
administrative arm of the KGB,
and the Kremlin policy-makers. A
system in which such terms as
justice and fair trial are reduced to
verbal exercises. A system with
such open and nebulous crimes as
"slandering the state" and
"anti-Soviet propaganda" for
which the mildest punishment
upon conviction makes our penal
system seem Utopian.
We as human beings must be
concerned with such policies.
Indifference makes us
accomplices. Our silence is the
perpetrators' glory.
As a matter of "priority" we
must condemn those who rejected
the proposal put to the AMS and
urge them to reconsider their
priorities. This is a question of
issues not politics. We urge all
those who ' disagree with the
"AMS priority" — or more aptly,
policy — to turn out and join
those who will be protesting the
policies of the Soviet government.
After the AMS has expressed
itself in such a narrow manner,
perhaps students will be
influenced to vote on the Oct. 27
referendum and suggest to the
human government just what they
think of its "priorities".
Jerry Adler,
Larry Flader,
Harry Lipetz,
Law 3
If you had attended the AMS
council meeting you refer to, you
would know that council
members agree with many of the
points you have made about
oppression within the Soviet
Union.
However, some council
members pointed out that there
are literally hundreds of similar
cases of oppression which UBC
students might legitimately
protest. (We note, for example,
that you are not enraged enough
to write about oppression in
Quebec or genocide in Bangla
Desh.)
This being the case, it was
argued in student council that the
constraints of AMS time and
money dictate that decisions must
be made on the basis of priorities,
especially considering the fact
that any number of groups have
already stated they plan to hold
demonstrations during the
Kosygin visit.
And if any UBC group plans
such a demonstration, The
Ubyssey will be glad to convey
the information to the campus.
Blood
To the human government:
You've really done it now, you
bastards.
What earthly reason do you
have for kicking the Red Cross
blood donor clinic out of SUB?
When considering the good that
these people were doing, it seems
asinine that you intend to increase
the difficulties they already
encounter    by    moving    their
headquarters to an even less
accessible area than the second
floor of SUB.
Perhaps you intend to use the
space they occupied for the
installation of your FM radio
station?
This tricky little move really
caps off some of your others. For
instance, your intention to cut off
all funds to intramural sports.
You are playing on the apathy
of the student body and know
bloody well you can get away
with practically anything you
want.
How can you sleep at night?
Five signatures
We don't know where your
information comes from, but it's
all false.
1. Florence Edwards, the Red
Cross employee who booked
rooms for the blood donor clinic
in SUB, informs us that the clinic
operated as planned from Sept. 27
to Oct. 1. She says there is no
truth to your statement that the
clinic was kicked out of SUB.
2. If you check with the Radio
Society people you will find that
neither they nor the AMS has
current plans for installing an FM
radio station.
3. The AMS is not "cutting off
all funds to intramurals." A look
at the proposed budget published
in The Ubyssey (Friday, Oct. 8)
shows that $3,500 is earmarked
for intramurals, and the hope of
the AMS council, as we
understand it, is that the
university will contribute
additional funds out of the $5
compulsory athletic fee which
now pays for extramural sports.
In future, you would be well
advised to check your information
before getting hysterical about
imagined evils.
Bikes
Some years ago a student
cyclist was killed in an accident
on Chancellor Boulevard, which
prompted the construction of a
rudimentary cycle path along a
section of this road.
A few weeks ago, two cyclists
were seriously injured in a
head-on collision on the so-called
cycle path on University
Boulevard.
If you're interested in
improving cycling facilities at
UBC, please come to the cycle
club general meeting on Friday at
12:30 in SUB 207, and the
picnic-cum-tour of campus
trouble spots on Sunday.
Norm Hughes,
Chemistry
Courage
Reading The Ubyssey at 4
a.m., I came upon the letter titled
Hit Back.
I was intrigued with the idea of
phoning up administration and
faculty offenders against the
writer's moral code, especially at
the most irritating hours of the
day or night.
Also, I had to applaud the
writer's astute use of material
from the Georgia Straight's
Harold Hedd strip.
It's this sort of plagiarism — er,
make that research — that
distinguishes a university-educated
person.
I was going to phone up the
writer and congratulate him on his
incisive, original and courageous
latter, but I couldn't find a single
N&me Withheld in the entire
pl|ione book.
David Schendlinger
Grad Studies 7
The Ubyssey welcomes letters
from all readers.
Letters should be signed and, if
possible, typed.
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FPR UBC 35 Page 6
THE      UBYSSEY
Thursday, October 14,  1971
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The men behind th
the government of
OTTAWA — Canadians have long suspected that power in
official Ottawa was not exercised quite the way the textbooks
imagined it, that the neat little divisions among parliament,
cabinet, civil service and so forth were not really how the whole
thing worked.
Speculation has always focussed particularly on the prime
minister's office (PMO), where clever, scheming individuals are
thought to run the man who runs the country. These suspicions,
of course, are firmly grounded in fact. In the 1940s, for instance,
Jack Pickersgill had no small influence on his aging boss, prime
minister Mackenzie King, and in the first days of the regime of
Louis St.-Laurent, according to Peter Newman (who admittedly
has a tendency to hyperbole), "the country was to an astonishing
degree run by Jack Pickersgill." In the Lester Pearson era, Tom
Kent (who has since gone on to preside over the dying collieries
of Cape Breton) was singled out for the game role.
With Pierre Trudeau as prime minister, curiosity about what
goes on in the East Block has, if anything, intensified. It has also
changed its focus in that it is no longer a single man is supposed
to run the show from behind the scenes (although individuals
such as Marc Lalonde and Michael Pitfield do get special
attention) but an entire group.
This genre of political analysis is best represented by Walter
Stewart's new book on the prime minister, Shrug, published this
week by New Press and previously serialized in The Globe
Magazine. "To all intents and purposes," says Stewart, "Canada is
no longer run by parliament, or the cabinet, or even the party in
power; it is run by the prime minister and his own personal power
bloc," which Stewart calls the Supergroup.
Understandably, Stewart is now out of favor in the prime
minister's office.
Equally understandably, the PMO has become increasingly
sensitive about this type of criticism. It has even taken the
extraordinary step of responding to it in a paper presented by the
prime minister's principal secretary, Marc Lalonde, to the
Institute of Public Administration in Regina in early September.
This document, along with a companion paper on the privy
council office (PCO) — an equally inscrutable advisory
organization also operating out of the East Block - by its boss,
Gordon Robertson, provides the clearest picture to date of how
the prime minister's advisers view their own function, and has
received wide attention among columnists and writers for op-ed
pages.
PM's power increases
Lalonde agrees that the power of the prime minister has
been increasing (he refers to the multi-dimensional growth of the
demands made on the prime minister in all the roles that he is
called upon to fulfill) and that the function of his staff has
widened correspondingly ("an unavoidable increase in service
support functions" and "a deliberate increase in political advisory
support functions").
He is, however, hesitant about discussing at whose expense
the accretion of power to the prime minister's office has been. He
vigorously denies that it has been at the expense of parliament
and the cabinet, and attributes it rather to the increasing role of
government (no discussion of public administration is complete
without mention of the increasing role of government).
However, both he and Robertson provide hints that they
believe there is more involved in the changes Trudeau has made.
Here is Robertson explaining why Trudeau has allowed deputy
ministers and other senior civil servants to sit in on meetings of
cabinet committees:
'The seasoned public servant will recognize that what are at
issue are the policies of the government, to be decided by the
judgment of the ministers, even though this means accepting
gracefully  decisions  that  may  be personally distasteful. The
Robert Chodos of the L
analyzes some rising sti
prime minister's office
advantages in decision-making are clear. There are equal
advantages in administration. The exposure of senior officials to
the thinking and policy concerns of ministers helps them to
explain to their departments the logic decisions that might
otherwise seem wrong, incomprehensible or 'petty polities'."
It sounds almost like the arguments of an enlightened
university administrator for allowing students to sit on the-
faculty council.
Robertson is a model civil servant, and accustomed to being
discreet. Lalonde is more direct. Here he describes what he
believes the purpose of the growth of the advisory staff in the
PMO and PCO to be:
"Sensitive and responsive government requires firm political
control. It requires that parliament, the cabinet and the prime
minister possess more than mere nominal power to originate and
assess policy and to decide on its final disposition. In the exercise
of political control, the prime minister must wear many hats — as
a public figure, statesman, co-ordinator, planner, thinker,
legislator and representative. In trying to achieve this important
objective, the prime minister must have help. Herein lies another
principal rationale of the prime minister's decision to increase the
size of his office.
The prime minister's office is seen as an instrument of
establishing political control over the civil service, so that "real
and effective decision-making remains the prerogative of
politicians and not bureaucrats."
Stewart, in his own way, shares this view: "The prime
minister's "counter-bureaucracy is playing hell with the real
bureaucracy. Canada's civil service has been, bv and large, a good
one, firmly rooted in the notion of responsi       overnment. But, Thursday, October 14, 1971
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 7
i men b ehind
Canada
rt Post News Service
s, of the
—brett garrett photo
)t surprisingly, the bureaucrats have begun to withdraw . . ."
So both Trudeau's friends and his enemies agree that the
;pansion of the prime ministerial staff is directed, at least in
irt, at the civil service. The ultimate political responsibility of
e civil service is, of course, a concept to which lip service has
ways been paid (although it has not always worked out so well
practice). But Trudeau's supposed moves in that direction raise
many questions as they answer.
In theory, the civil service is impartial and non-political,
ithful to its mission of carrying out the policies of whichever
trty has been entrusted with power by the sovereign will of the
:ople. In practice, implementation of that theory has been
cilitated by the fact that one specific party has been in power
r thirty of the last thirty-six years ( the remaining six years, the
Tiod of John Diefenbaker's prime ministership, were a time of
most open warfare between the civil service and the
ivernment).
The durability of Liberal stewardship has encouraged a
rtain easy identification between the civil servants and their
Jitical masters. When the Liberals came back into power under
arson in 1963, no fewer than ten of the new ministers sworn in
lcluding the PM) were former civil servants (as compared to
ily two of the old Diefenbaker ministers).
This blurring of roles is epitomized in the career of
ckersgill, who came to Ottawa as a junior civil servant, then was
conded by Mackenzie King into a semi-political job in the PMO,
en occupied the senior civil service post of clerk of the privy
■until and secretary to the cabinet (the position now held by
ardon Robertson), then became the most partisan of Liberal
Ps, and finally disappeared back into the civil service.
We do not have a non-political civil service, we have a
Liberal one. And one of the chief sources of the Liberals' ability
to stay on top has been, along with its corporate financial base,
its base in the civil service. The politics of the mandarins, their
cautious, continentalist, Merchant-Heeney, don't-rock-the-boat
liberalism, have been one with the politics of the regime.
If Pierre Trudeau is trying to impose political control on
this body, what kind of politics is he trying to impose?
Back in 1964, a manifesto appeared in the Montreal
intellectual magazine Cite Libre (which Trudeau has just wrested
back from the untrustworthy hands of Pierre Vallieres) and
simultaneously in the Toronto intellectual magazine Canadian
Forum. Entitled "An Appeal for Realism in Politics" and signed
by seven university-based French Canadians, all but one under
thirty-five (the exception was Pierre Trudeau), the document is
liberal, optimistic about the possibilities of the technological
society, profoundly rationalist in its view of human nature, and —
what is remarkable for manifesto coming out of Quebec in the
sixties — anti-nationalist.
Some of the demands of the manifesto have been
implemented, others (such as full employment) have not, still
others have become irrelevant with the passage of time. But it
remains valuable as a handy guide to the political thought of the
prime minister and his circle.
It is civil-service liberalism brought up to date, or at least up
to the early 1960s. Come to power, it is the programming,
planning, budgeting system, cost-benefit analysis, and other
genuflections to the bitch-goddess, efficiency, as interpreted on
earth by the word-made-flesh, Robert McNamara. The prime
minister and his advisers are the kind of people who could easily
go for Herman Kahnian futurological think tanks, which they did,
to the tune of $ 10 million.
A shift in influence
Which brings us to the second question: as an attempt to
impose political control on the civil service, what does this
amount to?
Lalonde had been generally accepted as the eminence grise
of the Trudeau administration, until columnist Douglas Fisher
(who keeps the closest watch on the civil service of all Ottawa
reporters) tabbed Michael Pitfield for that position. Lalonde is in
the PMO, Pitfield is Robertson's deputy in the PCO and,
eminences grises or not, there is a close parallel between their
careers.
Both were members of the coterie of bright young men
who surrounded Davie Fulton when he was Diefenbaker's justice
minister. Lalonde was one of the seven signers of the 1964
manifesto; it was Pitfield who translated it for English Canadian
consumption. Both returned to Ottawa in the later Pearson years
(along with their fellow Quebecers Marchand, Trudeau, and
Pelletier), Lalonde as Pearson's chief policy adviser, Pitfield in the
privy council office. And both saw their influence increase
substantially in the regime of their common friend, Pierre
Trudeau.
Their primary identification is with the prime minister, not
with the civil service or even the Liberal party - but then
Trudeau, who flirted with the Co-operative Commonwealth
Federation in the 1950s and bitterly denounced the Liberals as
late as 1963, is rather a late-blooming party man himself. What
the change amounts to is a shift in influence from people
identified with the old-style don't-speak-above-a-hush politics of
the mandarins to the new-style souped up politics of the prime
minister.
One wonders whether this was what political control of the
civil service was supposed to be all about.
And that brings us to the third question about the Trudeau
initiative: will it succeed?
Stewart thinks that "the power so assiduously won away
from cabinet, parliament, the party and the bureaucracy will not
be readily returned; the trend toward centralizing power in the
PMO will not be easily reversed." And Lalonde suggests the same
thing: "I am convinced that any future prime minister, upon
assuming office, would want to maintain at least the same basic
organization."
Lalonde is no doubt right in the narrow sense that the days
when a prime minister could get by with a staff of two or three
secretaries are over. But in the wider sense of whether the trends
Trudeau has set in motion are irreversible, the answers are not so
clear.
After all, the John Diefenbakers come and go, and so do
the Pierre Trudeaus, so even do the Lalondes and Pitfields, but
the bureaucracy, massive, irresponsible, and self-contained, jus'
keeps rollin' along.
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Evenings - 985-6364 Page 8
THE      UBYSSEY
Thursday, October  14,   1971
Post-grads now have
opportunity to join GSC
Any application from UBC post-graduate
students wishing to join the graduate student centre
will be "looked upon with great favor," said
Malcolm McGregor, chairman of the centre's board
of directors.
But the students from such faculties of law,
medicine, dentistry and architecture and the schools
of librarianship and social work cannot belong to
the centre because they are not enrolled in the
graduate studies faculty.
"We are, however, allowed to grant these
people associate membership this year," McGregor
said Wednesday.
"We'll ask them if they would like to be treated
by us as we treat students in the graduate studies
faculty," he said.
He said the centre's directors will ask the
university's board of governors to change the
constitution if a majority of post-graduate students
wish to join the centre.
"And, of course, if we get a lot of new
members, their fees will help us," he said.
Grad students pay $26 in fees - $14 for the
expansion project completed last spring and $12 for
the centre's operating costs.
The associate membership fee is $15, said John
Lomax, the centre's treasurer.
"We've been getting inquiries from students
with degrees to join the centre and thought we
better do something about it," Lomax said.
AMS handicraft store opens
The Alma Mater Society has begun a
community handicrafts store at the south end of the
SUB lobby.
Store organizer John Cull Wednesday urged all
students and faculty to contribute handicrafts,
inventions and second-hand items to the
newly-opened market.
The goods will be sold on consignment with
students receiving two-thirds of the sale price of
their articles.
The remaining third of the price will go back
into store funds.
From' store profits, Cull hopes to create a
co-operative craft industry which will enable
students to support themselves financially while at
UBC.
the
Like   the   AMS-sponsored   book   store,
handicrafts store will be self-supporting.
SUB management • committee member Colin
Portnuff said Wednesday the AMS store will not
interfere with students wishing to sell goods on an
independent basis.
Burau bedevilled
There will be no Experimental College classes
today due to Clubs Day.
Karl Burau, the wheel behind the machinery of
the Experimental College, made the announcement
Wednesday upon discovering that SUB 111, the
room normally used by the college, will be occupied
by a club display.
^ .^*.
"W
It may shock you but it's true.
If a pregnant woman is
addicted to heroin her unborn baby
will also be addicted to it. Withdrawal
symptoms are frightening for a grown
person. You can imagine what they are
like for a baby only a few days old.
This is one of the many human
tragedies of heroin addiction that
doctors see in increasing numbers
throughout British Columbia. Heroin
enslaves its user at a cost that can
run to over $10,000 a year. An
overdose can cause coma or death.
Withdrawal causes severe symptoms
of nausea, cramps and diarrhea.
Possession carries a penalty
of up to 7 years in prison, and
trafficking, up to life.
If you're hooked on heroin
and want to get off, see a doctor or
the Narcotic Addiction Foundation of
B.C., 2524 Cypress Street, Vancouver.
If you're tempted to try the drug,
don't. The misery you will suffer
just isn't worth it.
For more information, mail this coupon:
Government of British Columbia
Council on Drugs, Alcohol, and Tobacco
Parliament Buildings,
Victoria, British Columbia
Please send a free copy of "GET IT STRAIGHT
- some facts about drug abuse."
Name_
Address_
GOVERNMENT OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
COUNCIL ON DRUGS, ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO
Hon. D.L. Brothers, Q.C., Minister of Education-Chairman Thursday, October 14,  1971
By PATRICK MacFADDEN
Last Post News Service
A spectre is haunting the
campuses of English Canada. It is
called futurology.
Closely allied to both star- and
navel-gazing, futurology is the
latest U.S. import. It marks a
further step in sociology's
manic-depressive sweep towards
ultimate meaninglessness.
Trooping back to campuses
after a summer spent in
make-work projects, students have
been presented with lengthy
bibliographies featuring such
seminal works as Charles Reich's
The Greening of America and
Alvin Toffler's Future Shock.
Neither book addresses itself to
concerns that are in any way
Canadian. Both are products of
the stunned consciousness that
has emerged in post-My Lai
America. Both books are
concerned with the future, which
is considered problematic. Neither
has anything to say about the
present, which is considered
unspeakable.
Yet the popularity of such
books does bring a sigh of relief to
hard pressed college
administrations. From 1967 on,
favorite reading among the cord
bell set has included Fanon,
Cleaver and Malcolm X,
disquieting authors whose
formulations were clearly
designed to wreak havoc in the
free marketplace of ideas.
In 1971, all has changed. Work
boots and lumberjack shirts may
still prevail, but all in all the new
fall semester marks a retreat from
UBC chases
big money
UBC plans to ask industry to
help fund a three-year building
program in the agricultural science
faculty.
UBC has already allocated
$500,000 to the faculty, which is
the only agricultural school in the
province.
The university is asking for an
additional $512,000 to build
dairy barns, field buildings,
experimental plots and units for
mink, poultry, sheep and larger
animals in the south area of
campus.
The faculty's enrolment is 223
this year.
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 9
College,
the '70s
and the
future:
haunts
the air
the confrontation politics of the
late sixties. The failure of both
Yippie and SDS brands of social
activism to make an appreciable
dent in the horny hide of
Leviathan liberalism has taken its
mournful toll.
The new quietism includes
music. A typical campus scene is a
student lounge in which the
occupants, individually wired into
headphones,    will    spend    the
Pile of porno
here for free
Anybody want some free
porno?
The porno was found in a
brown bag in the SUB parking lot
Thursday and since it lacks
pictures we've got no use for the
stuff.
The 12 novels include
Portnoy's Complaint, Naked
Came the Stranger, Eros and
Erotica, The Final Blow,
Alexander Fellatio meets Myra
Breckinridge at the Fall of Sodom
and Gomorrah and The
Piledrivers.
So come and get it — we won't
ask questions and anyway we've
read it all.
afternoon letting Elton John or
James Taylor massage the
wounded ego.
The music itself propagates a
message of helplessness: "And
Jesus, you gotta help me this
time," runs a line from a Tom
Rush album. James Taylor has
issued similar calls for help to a
deity who sounds more and more
like the director of a mental
health clinic.
Individual solutions for
essentially social problems were
considered passe in the activist
sixties. Not so in 1971. Another
new campus classic, The Primal
Scream, is essentially a replay of
the therapeutic techniques
popular in kindergarten circles 20
years ago. It is required reading as
we enter the seventies.
On the women's liberation
front, Germaine Greer remains
germane. The Female Eunuch,
however, far from heralding a new
brand of activism, may represent a
holding action. Out of the welter
of trendy non-books devoted to
all that is irrational in the human
spirit, from astrology manuals to
the agressive tootlings of a
Toffler, Greer's dedication to a
rational critique of social and
sexual institutions stands out as
an almost old-fashioned
affirmation of the power of the
human mind to come to grips
with man-made problems.
"I dunno, man," said one
student, "we don't seem to be
into too much this year."
(Patrick MacFadden is a
professor of journalism at
Carleton University in Ottawa.)
Gays to meet
The UBC Liberation Front will
hold an organizational meeting
Friday in SUB 213.
Homosexuals interested in
overcoming their alienation and
repression are urged to attend.
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A T REASONABLE PRICES
EAT IN - TAKE OUT
We have enlarged our dining room
to offer you better service.
Open Every Day from 4:30 p.m. to 11 p.m.
5732 University Blvd.
Phone 224-6121
BIRD CALLS;
UBC'S STUDENT
TELEPHONE
DIRECTORY
AVAILABLE
NEXT THURSDAY
Only 75e
The Most Useful
Book on Campus
o
UBC'S "WHO'S WHO"
BIRD CALLS;
DO THE DEAD RETURN 1>1>
A Startling and Controversial Program Dealing with
Extrasensory Perception — Predictions of the Future
— The Supernatural
by Andre Kole
AMERICA'S LEADING ILLUSIONIST
Andre Kole has spoken in 43 countries on five
continents of the world, and on national television in
30 countries. This year, he will probably be
performing and speaking on more college and
university campuses throughout the world than any
other person.
'UNMASKING THE UNKNOWN'
Is the title Mr. Dole gives to this intriguing
presentation in which, among other things, he will
give a visible demonstration of the fourth dimension,
and reveal some amazing predictions of the future
which could affect the life of every person in
attendance.
This unusual presentation is sponsored by Campus
Crusade for Christ International. Due to his interest
in the supernatural, Mr. Kole will include some
observations he made from his investigation of the
miracles of Christ from the point of view of an
illusionist. This will no doubt be the most unusual
program you will ever witness.
TONIGHT
8 p.m.
SUB BALLROOM
$|    EA   ADVANCE
'•Jv   SUB MAIN FLOOR
AT DOOR '2.00 - DON'T MISS THIS UNUSUAL EVENT Page 10
THE      UBYSSEY
Thursday, October 14,  1971
'Tween classes
THURSDAY
CAMPUS CAVALIERS
Square dancing in SUB 207 and 209
every Thursday 12:30-2:30.
KUNG FU CLUB
Kung   Fu   demonstration   in   SUB
ballroom 12:30-1:30.
VARSITY
CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP
All    day   Thursday    in    the   SUB
ballroom  a clubs day  presentation
will be held.
FRIDAY
ROWING CREW
The   last  introductory meeting for
everyone interested  in  rowing will
be held at 12:30 in SUB 209.
EXPERIMENTAL COLLEGE
Professional R. Clarke and Karl
Burau will speak on a guaranteed
annual Income at 12:30 in SUB
125.
PANG0-PANG0 (UNS) -
Residents of this island republic
are wondering what to do about
an invasion of shithawks which
has covered the capital city with
guano.
Chief birdwatcher Anne
"Stormy" Petrel proposed that
the birds be allowed to set up
their own government, similar to
B.C.'s Socred regime. This, she
said, would bring about a
revolution on the island.
rUfiPAiNTEb"!
i FURNITURE j
FiTSirch-Poplar-WhitawaaT'l ■
Provincial-Italian-Colonial
Campaign and Modern Styles
PHONE
299-3902
■SEE
S OUR 3
■ SHOWROOMS
5 3-Drawer Desks ......      9.95
B 4-Drawer Chests          7.95
5 6-Dr. Mr.&Mrs. on Legs    13.95 ■
■ 9-Drawer on Legs  ....    19.95 ■
5 Nite Tables .       3.95 ■
m Double Pedestal Desk . 19.95 ■
■j Toy Boxes, Hinged Top 14.95 ■
m Parsons Tables from .      9.95 ■
E3-Shelf   Bookcase    9.95 ■
Benches — Vanity Chairs — ■
■ Tables  -  Chairs  -   Buffets  - ■
■ Bookcases - Rockers - Stools. ■
■I Hutches, Childs and Adult ■
■j         Wardrobes,  Lingerie Chest         ■
■ FLAT.* SPINDLE HEADBOARDS    ■
■ WALL-TO-WALL UNITS ■
■ ARBORITE and FANCY TRIMS     ■
■ CHESTS PAINTED ON REQUEST    ■
■ SAMPLE   COLORS   ON   DISPLAY   ■
Si   Hours: Tuei: tolo7"9"fo"4?3o""| g
S Modem Woodcraft Mfg. 3
■ 4412 DAWSON ST. ■
B Vi Block off Willingdon 1
■ North Burnaby—Closed Mondays  9
■      save ...*$$ s s $      m
■ *This is NO Warehouse Outlet* S
•H ONE LOCATION ONLY 5
Buy Direct from the Mfg. Plant =
■■■    299-3902    ■■■■■■£
A.8.?
WKrW:K£-fiWftW:WSW:%w^
CHINESE
CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP
Discussions will be held at 12:30 in
SUB 205.
CLUBS COMMITTEE
General meeting 12:30 In SUB 125.
ALLIANCE FRANCAISE
General meeting at International
House 12:30.
PHRATERES
General meeting In Bu. 104.
Contact Aroon Long for time.
CYCLING CLUB
Talk about the campus cycle tour.
New members welcome to attend
meeting at 12:30 in SUB 207.
SPECIAL EVENTS
Canadian poet M chael Ondaatje
reads In SUB art gallery at noon.
PRE-SOCIAL WORK CLUB
J. Colnner will speak on
opportunities for volunteer work In
SUB 105A at 12:30.
VARSITY
CHRISTAIN    FELLOWSHIP
Will Wilding will speak on worship
in the SUB party room at 12:30.
SKYDIVERS
General meeting will be held about
carpools for the weekend in SUB
215 at 12:30.
VARSITY
CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP
A worship service will be held in the
Lutheran Campus Centre at 7:30
p.m.
SATURDAY
voc
Members welcome to the long hike
at Whistler cabin and environs.
WOMEN'S CURLING TEAM
Practice from 10:15-12:15 a.m.
Thunderbird arena.
SUNDAY
TAEKWON-DO   CLUB
Practice led by Mr. Choi and Mr.
Quon, new members welcome, from
6-8 p.m. in the Physical Ed building,
Gym B.
MONDAY
EL CIRCULO
Chilean consul will talk on recent
events in his country In room 402,
International House.
Contact  Daryl  Breen for the time.
ALLIANCE FRANCAISE
General    meeting   at   the   upstairs
lounge   of   International   House  at
12:30.
WOMEN'S LIBERATION
General      meeting      in      Biological
Sciences   building   2449   at  8   p.m.
Women only.
A CRY OF PLAYERS
By William Gibson
(An M.A. Thesis Production)
Directed by Roger Dunn
October 13-16
8:00 p.m.
Adult Tickets - $2.00
Student Tickets-$1.00
SPECIAL STUDENT MATINEE -
Thurs. Oct. 14 - 12:30 Noon
Reservations: Room 207, Frederic Wood Theatre
SOMERSET STUDIO UBC
Auditions for the Theatre Department's
THE BIRTHDAY PARTY by Harold Pinter
to be presented January 21-29
will be held
on
Thursday, October 14    12:30-2:30
in the Frederic Wood Theatre
—Actors must be available during the Xmas recess—
Open To All UBC Students, Faculty And Staff
CLASSIFIED
Rales: Campus — 3  lines,  1   day $1.00;  3  days  $230
Commercial  — 3  lines, .1   day $1.25;  additional
lines 30c; 4 days price of 3.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone and are payable
in advance. Deadline is 11:30 sum., the day before poblicatkm.
Publications OScet Room 241 S.U.B., UBC, Van. 8,B.C. \
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Dances
11
Greetings
12
FUR COATS $19 & LESS. PAPPAS
Bros. New Annex, 459-461 Hamilton
at Victory Square. Double fur bedspreads $79. Open Fri. nite 7:00-
9:30 p.m. Sat. 11:00 a.m.-5:30 p.m.
Satisfaction guaranteed!
Lost & Found
13
LOST — AQUAMARINE RING —
great sentimental value. Generous
reward offered. Contact Iris Rich,
224-9873.	
WILL THE PERSON WHO AC-
cidently took the mottled light
brown suede jacket from the rack
at the Back From the Bush Bash
please contact J. Franzen c/o UBC
Geology Dept. office and leave a
.message. Phone 228-2449.
Rides & Car Pools
14
WHEELCHAIR STUDENT IN Vicinity of 41st & Nanaimo requires
ride Monday thru Thursday. Call
Audrey Hill, 434-7052.
Special Notices
15
TONITE! YOUNG ALUMNI FOLK
Nite, (8-12) Cecil Green Park featuring Gastown's Tally Honk and
Dick Coe.	
SUNDAY EVENING WORSHIP —
7:00-7:45 p.m. Chapel of Vancouver
School of Theology, 6050 Chancellor. Sponsored by residence
members   and   Student   Christian
Movement.	
SUNDAY FIRESIDE & COFFEE.
8:00 p.m. Guest: Geoff Huddard —
detached worker. Subject: "Drug
Use Among Young People." —
Lounge   6050   Chancellor   (U.S.T.)
All welcome!	
THE GRIN BIN HAS THE LAR-
gest selection in Canada of posters and pop art. Also Jokes, Gifts
and 24" x 36" photo blowups from
your own prints and negatives.
Enquiries welcome at the Grin
Bin, 3209 West Broadway across
from    the   Liquor   Store   —   Call
738-2311.	
DISCOUNT ON STEREOS — SAVE
dollars! Example: tuner-amplifier
automatic turntable, 2 speakers,
regular $199.00 your cost $125.00.
2-year parts guarantee. Carry
Sony, Sansui, Dual, Akai, A.G.S.,
Warfdale. Phone 732-6769 for sav-
ings.	
WIN SET OF GREAT BOOKS AND
earn $123.00 week minimum doing
it. 687-8872.	
THE PURCELL STRING QUARTET
at Grad Student Centre, Tues., 19
Oct.,  8  p.m.   Tickets  75c  each  at
the Grad Centre office.	
Wanted—Information 17
ANYONE WHO SAW THE PICKUP
truck hit me at the Sumas border
demonstration please call 224-7326
or leave your name with AMS
office. I have been charged!
Wanted—Miscellaneous 18
ARTISTS — PAINTINGS NEEDED
to be sold in a new, attractive
gallery. Phone 853-2400. House of
Fine Art, Abbotsford, B.C.
AUTOMOTIVE
Autos For Sale
21
1951 AUSTIN, GOOD THROUGHOUT Snow tires. $75 or trade for
good guitar, 10 speed. 224-5537.
1968 TRIUMPH GT6, 38,000 MILES,
Michelins, green. Best offer! 731-
1401 evenings.	
1963 ECONOLINE VAN. '68 EN-
gine. transmission. Fully camper-
ized.  Best offer! 738-3438.
1970 MG MIDGET.  ONLY 8.500 MT.
Radials. mags, reel, seats, undrct.
tonn.  Must sell.  Wife is pregnant
and  can't fit inside. $2,150.  Phone
, 263-9044.	
'55 VW. EXCELLENT CONDITION.
Just  overhauled.  Ready to  drive.
Good   trans.,   brakes,   tires,   radio
hook-up.  738-6003.
Automobiles—Repairs 24
CAR REPAIRS TO
VOLVO,MERCEDES
PORSCHE, VOLKSWAGEN
* Factory trained mechanics
* Fully Guaranteed Work
* Reasonable Rates
P.S. We also now repair
Datsun, Toyota, & Mazda Cars
SALES AND SERVICE
8914 Oak St. 263-8121
Motorcycles
25
BUSINESS SERVICES
Typing
40
TEDIOUS TASKS, PROFESSIONAL
typing. IBM Selectric—days, evenings, weekends.. Phone Shari at
738-8745. Reasonable rates.	
FAST & ACCURATE TYPING IN
my home on IBM Exec. Reason-
able.  685-1982.	
EFFICIENT ELECTRIC TYPING —
my home. Essays, thesis, etc. Neat,
accurate work. Reasonable rates.
Phone 263-5317.
Photography
35
ufyt HtnH anb gutter
\Vi.j       Cameras!
3010 W. BDWY. 736-7833
also at Dpnman  Place
Want fo   shoot  from
the waist?
Don't waste money with costly
accessories!
RICOH TLS 401
Dual Metering, Dual Viewing
17 Different Lenses
Rip-offs  NOT  our Specialty!
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted
51
SOMEONE TO CARE FOR TWO
children every school Friday, 9:00
a.m. to 1:00 or 2:00 p.m. $1.00 per
hour. 266-8492.	
GRAD STUDENTS: UBC TUTOR-
ing centre needs tutors in all
university subjects, $3.00 per hour.
Register SUB 228 (12:30-2:30).
DEAF-MUTE PARAPLEGIC RE-
quires student to live in his home
to do light cooking and housekeeping in exchange for free room
and board. Interested persons
please call 261-1335.  9:00 a.m.-5:00
 p.m. Monday to Friday.	
Work Wanted
52
INSTRUCTION &
SCHOOLS
Music Instruction
61
Special Classes
62
TAI CHI CHUAN: LEARN THIS
graceful art of meditation-inaction; also for centering, increased health, dexterity & self-defense
from Raymond Chung, N.A.'s foremost master ($6 month). Also joint
hands practise for the experienced.
Contact Doug Seeley, 228-4143.
HAVING PROBLEMS WITH A
course? UBC tutoring centre will
find you a tutor — any subject,
any course. Come and see us, SUB
228 — 12:30-2:30.	
HATHA YOGA CLASSES AT
Shyam Yoga sh ram beginning
week of Oct. 18. 206 E. 6th. 879-3703
 MEDITATION	
Tutors—Wanted
64
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
ARIA GUITAR, CLASSICAL, NY-
Ion strung. Only 6 mo. old. Excel-
lent  condition.   $30.   Call   732-5905.
KENWOOD KR-4140 95 W. AM/FM
tuner, Lenco L-75 turntable w/$60
cartridge. JMI Monitor V speakers,
Pioneer headphones (SE-45). $950
value. Offers! 987-3897. 	
LANGS PROS SIZE 8N. KASTLE
CPM70 205 cm, Rossignol Alais
Majors 210cm. Rossignol Stratos
200cm. Excellent condition. Phone
Joy, 732-9160.	
DIAMOND WEDDING & ENGAGE-
ment rings, both for only $79 at
your campus jeweler. The Diamond
Room, 2109 Allison, next door to
World Wide Travel. 	
BUDDHIST BOOKS
for further information and
free   catalogue
Write   to:
THE BUDDHIST BOOKSTORE
1710 Octavia Street
San Francisco, Calif.. 94109
RENTALS ft REAL ESTATE
Rooms 81^
ACCOM. 1 ROOM, $50. KETTLE,
toaster, fridge. Non-smokers. Men
only. Mrs. M. Jambresic, 4570 W.
12th Ave. 228-8408.	
NEAR CAMPUS. LARGE ATTRAC-
tive suite for two people. Priv.
bath & entrance. $40 ea. 224-6389.
Room & Board
82
MEAL PASSES AVAILABLE AT
the DKE House, 5765 Agronomy,
224-9691. Enjoy excellent home-
cooked meals on campus at prices
you can afford.	
GREAT FOOD! ROOM & BOARD
at Delta Upsilon Frat House. Also
meal tickets. Call 224-9841.	
ROOM AND BOARD $85.00 MONTH.
2120 Wesbrook Cres. Dan Dalton,
224-9073.	
Furn. Apts. 83
FEMALE TO SHARE 1 BEDROOM
apt. 7th & Vine. $75.00 inclusive.
Phone 731-0969.
Unf. Apts.
84
STUDENT SPECIAL
3 Rooms of Furniture
From $199.95
HOUSE OF GROUPS
1278 Granville
Day 687-5043 Eve. 277-9247
Houses—Furn. ft Unfurn. *   86
GIRLS!   GUYS!   COUPLES!   —   TO
share   large   house   near   Varsity*
Theatre   on   11th.   Nov.   1st.   Call
224-0230. Thursday, October  14,  1971
THE       UBYSSEY
Page  11
Soccer squad beats Yanks
By KENT SPENCER
The UBC 'Bird soccer team
returned home Saturday after a
very successful trip down South.
They played seven games in
nine days, winning five, losing
one, and tieing one.
The opposition got only two
goals, while UBC netted 27 goals
on the trip.
Len Lenvoy scored six. Wayne
Larson, Phillip Sanford, and Bob
Mathieson got four each.
The team beat Colorado
College 5-0, Littleton Soccer Club
9-0, Aspen Soccer Club 6-0, The
Naval Post Graduate School of
Monteray 6-0, and San Francisco
University 1-0.
San Jose State beat them 1-0
on a penalty kick, then tied them
1-1 the next night. These were the
final two games and the team was
tired.
Coach Joe Johnson said the
social aspects of the trip were very
helpful to the team.
Cross country win
The UBC cross country teams
continue to dominate Pacific
Northwest competition.
In the Fort Casey Invitational
meet on the weekend against
teams from Oregon, University of
Victoria, and the Seattle Falcons,
the UBC team emerged the overall
winners.
THELMA FYNN: number two in
world cross country.
Rick Woods led the varsity
team to their third victory in as
many starts. The women's team
also won their division with
Thelma Fynn placing second
behind Doris Brown, three time
winner of world cross country.
Fynn, ranked second in the
world, finished with a time
13:57:00 only 13 seconds behind
Brown's 13:44:00.
UBC freshman Janis Evans
came    third    in    the    women's
Rugby 'Birds
thump Bears
Monday the UBC rugby team
showed some of their former
superiority by scoring 12 tries
against the University of Alberta
Golden Bears.
The final score was UBC
54-Alberta 0.
Saturday the 'Birds will travel
to Victoria to battle the
University of Victoria Vikings for
the famous "boot". The Vikings
were the only team to beat UBC
last year.
The Tomahawks, UBC's second
team, maintained their unbeaten
record, winning their third game
24-0 over the University of
Western Washington. The smaller
UBC team overcame Washington's
brute strength by teamwork and
strategy.
UBC Frosh also won their
game beating Douglas College
23^!
competition with a time of
14:30:00. Cheryl Spowage was
fourth, Anne Covell eleventh, and
Penny May twelfth to give the
women first place.
Lou Laroque won the junior
varsity race for UBC.
The cross country teams have
races coming up at Portland,
Seattle, Lethbridge, and
Fredricton and are still looking
for new members.
"The players got to know one
another better, and made some
good friends."
At San Jose State they played
before 6,000 fans. In fact, the
gate revenues were high enough
for Johnson to ask for a split next
year.
"I don't think they would
object to a 60-40 split," he said.
This year the 'Birds are again
competing in the Pacific Coast
Soccer League, which
encompasses eight teams and most
of the Lower Mainland.
Johnson looks forward to a
good season.
"I can't promise goals or
games. It's foolish to stick your
neck out."
It's a 14 game schedule this
year. Most of the games are
played at Empire Stadium,
because the league already has a
rental agreement.
Last time out the 'Birds tied
Inter-Italia 0-0. Next league game
is October 23 against New
Westminster.
It's at Empire Stadium.
Used outdoor
equipment sale
OCTOBER 28 IN SUB 205
# ■
If you have equipment to sell, bring it to the VOC
clubroom any Tues., Thurs. or Fri. at noon.
You can buy or sell boots, packs, skis, ice axes, etc.
OWNERS!
Come Down And See Our Wide Selection of Goodies
For 1200-510-240Z - Everything From Front Spooks
To Steering Wheel Covers
1845-W. 4 Ave.
Vancouver
732-3731
Intramurals
Well, Turkey Trot is over for
another year.
The big surprise this year being
Science, who nipped out P.E. to
take the first place turkey.
Commerce jogged in with 64
points to take third place.
Individual winners were:
Ed Day—P.E. 22:39
Al Smith—Arts 23:19
Colin Pike—Fort Camp 23:47
Sean Duffy—Science 24:15
Craig Runyan—Science 24:42
Much of the success of this
meet can be attributed to Ken
Aimer and the UBC
Cross-Country Team for their
organization and participation.
A special tip of the hat goes to
Graham Laughlin who paced the
gang around the route, without
losing any participants along the
way.
UNIT MANAGERS: Don't
forget the emergency meeting
tonight at 7:00 p.m. in Room 213
War Memorial Gym. Bring your
petitions.
TUG O'WAR goes today at
12:30 outside the Barn Coffee
Shop.
BADMINTON Ladder
Tournament winds up Oct. 18.
All players A-Z must meet then.
Deadline of Cycle Drag is
October 18.
ED DAY: number one turkey
The preliminary basketball
schedule is now up. Check outside
the Intramural Office for dates
and times.
HOCKEY: Season is now
underway. Games start tonight at
5:15 at the Winter Sports Centre.
Consult the schedule outside the
intramural office.
SWIMMING: Preliminary
round starts October 18 at noon.
Need
Eyeglasses?
WE PROVIDE
for most eyeglasses
Thousands of Frames from the 4 Corners
of the World!
• Lenses Duplicated; Prescriptions Filled
• Provocative Exciting Sunglasses
In 3 minutes we can copy the prescription
from your present glasses and use that
prescription to make up new glasses or
sunglasses.
$
5
YOUR
CHOICE OF
FRAMES
and ip.
WESTERN OPTICAL LTD
Direct factory to you!
736 Granville (mezzanine)
638-2728
AND SNOWMOBILE SHOW
SHOWMART BUILDING
PACIFIC NATIONAL EXHIBITION
OCT. 15, 16, 17
THIS COUPON IS WORTH A 50c
DISCOUNT     ON     THE
PURCHASE  OF  A REG. $2.00
TICKET WHEN PRESENTED AT
BOX OFFICE.
SHOW HOURS
FRIDAY 6-11 P.M.
SATURDAY ... 1-11 P.M.
SUNDAY    1-6 P.M. Page T2
THE      UBYSSEY
Thursday, October 14,  1971
'*     * *    .       % * ^,    . <        m     *
These pigeons probably sympathize with the fantasies the students living underneath them are having about flying the coop as mid-term approaches thought pthotog Dave Phillips.
UBC bookstore $212,492 in red last year
By SANDISHREVE
A $212,492 deficit for the university bookstore in
1970-71 was the result of a large five-year inventory
buildup, says assistant manager Bob Smith.
Smith said leftover books had to be sold at a loss
because they were no longer used for courses and were
out of print, so could not be returned to the publishers.
Part of the deficit was offset by a $127,972 reserve
from the previous year, said Smith.
The remaining $84,700 of the deficit was paid with
a loan from UBC's consolidated revenue.
Smith told The Ubyssey that most professors are
now using several paperbacks rather than one major text
which means more processing costs while profits remain
static.
"By the time we get the paperbacks on the shelf we
have lost six cents on each," he said.
Smith said the bookstore buys most books from
publishers at a 20 per cent discount of the retail price.
Labor cost is 14 per cent leaving six per cent for
operating costs.
However a random survey made by The Ubyssey
showed that four of 13 books examined were bought by
—=•"!"
the bookstore at a 40 per cent discount, one at 33 per
cent and eight at 20 per cent.
Four of the five higher discount books were
paperbacks.
Of the 13 books, 12 were foreign texts, some of
which must be bought through Canadian vendors.
'Some American publishing firms have agreements
with these vendors not to deal directly with Canadian
buyers.;
"If a book passes through a vendor it gets more
expensive," said Smith.
An American book would sell in the U.S. for $3.25
while in Canada the price would be $3.75 - a difference
of 14 per cent. The difference shown in The Ubyssey
survey ranged as high as 30 per cent.
"We don't set retail prices on books — they are all
manufacuturer's list prices," said Smith.
"Freight cost is not passed on to the student.
Normally it would be. The cost of purchase is usually
the cost of merchandise plus freight."
The buyer ordinarily deals with freight charges after
the order leaves the publisher, said Smith.
-   ]<■■■ ____________ vmw..
»~"- **" * mmW  $'     Wm^l^mmWmmmmmmmWl M  .
Some money is saved by consigning orders to a
trucking company rather than having the publisher ship
them.
The bookstore does not pay freight on sundry
items.
Smith said a student-faculty committee is collecting
information on bookstore prices for a brief containing
criticisms and complaints. It will be presented to
consumer affairs minister Ron Basford.
"This brief would ge't his group to do a more
thorough study and legislate on the part of textbook
buyers to improve the publishing industry," he said.
• "Not many college bookstores are making big
profits these days because all are under pressure from
publishing firms."
Smith said the bookstore broke even for five years
and the loss last year was because of accumulated
inventory.
Commerce professor Jim Forbes said the accounting
system, is not giving enough information to make it
work.
"They still can't control things until they get a
decent system," Forbes said Wednesday.
The bookstore uses a monthly inventory system
which states the total sales minus the cost of- the goods
sold and operating costs, yielding a net profit, said the
bookstore committee member.
However new stock is continually being purchased.
Those purchases cannot be carried over except on a
yearly basis, he said.
He said one result of this is a large inventory
buildup which accounts for most of last year's deficit.
Forbes said an accrual system would be more
efficient as it provides the necessary monthly purchase,
profit and inventory information.
The present yearly budget system is going to be put
on a monthly basis. This will be of little assistance
without an accrual system, said Forbes.
However the immediate problem is clearing up the
present inventory buildup, he said.
"This" will take a while but I am satisfied with the
progress over the last seven or eight months."
Smith said shoplifting losses amounted to more than
eight per cent last year.
Smith said it is impossible to say how effective
bookstore detectives are but "we think the adverse
publicity we've been getting from The Ubyssey is
stopping the shoplifting more."
There is no deadline on paying back the $84,000
loan from UBC.
"We are doing everything in our power to clear it up
but it won't be this year," said Smith.
He said attempts to clear the loan involve increasing
the efficiency in the ordering system and speeding the
process of supplying departments and students so sales
will increase.
The front section of the store, previously used for
offices, now is a shop selling miscellaneous goods.
The 10 per cent faculty discount on book
purchases and the five per cent student rebates on
bookstore purchases will end Dec. 31 this year, said
bookstore business consultant Byron Hender.
"Last year the bookstore committee saw this as a
way of reducing costs without raising book prices. The
rebates and discounts equalled $55,000 last year," he
said Wednesday.

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