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The Ubyssey Mar 7, 1986

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THE UBYSSEY
Vol. LXVIII, No. 42
Vancouver, B.C. Friday, March 7,1966
228-2301
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Women open
Avenue for
Lobbying
-By PATTI FLATHER
Special To The Ubyssey
§
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patti   flather   is   a   former
Ubyssey editor who is currently
freelance writer in Hong Kong.
HONGKONG — On the streets women's breasts
leap from the covers of countless soft porn
magazines at hawker's newstands, competing with Time
magazine and the Asian Wall Street Journal.
ri
-J-
a
In the classified telephone directory there are 22 pages of prostitution ads under the escort heading,
and 13 pages of massage ads. One
agency is called "Young Girl
Escorts" while another promises
"Asian and Western young girls."
It is not surprising that it took a
steering group of the Hongkong
Council of Women several years of
lobbying government and private
groups before they had enough
money to establish a resource centre
for women's development.
"It took us a long time to get
recognition for a need," says Fanny
Cheung at the official opening Jan.
25 of Hongkong's first women's
centre. Cheung chairs the women's
centre committee and teaches
psychology at Hongkong's Chinese
University.
But some funding has come
through — from the Hongkong
government, which also arranged
the location, from the American
Women's Association, from a German organization called Bread for
the World and from others.
Cheung says Hongkong has a
high standard of living compared
with other Asian cities. The
women's centre was turned down
for funds from the United Nations
because it is not considered a
'developing' nation.
But Cheung adds: "Resources do
not reach women as such."
"Hongkong is a densely packed,
heavily industrialised and urbanised
city," reads a blackboard display at
the centre opening. "It is a place
where east meets west and where
cultural conflicts arise. Women face
a tremendous amount of pressure:
on the one hand the traditional
Asian family is dying, on the other,
the modern Western support system
is not fully established."
Cheung says it took years for the
government to even admit that
some women were being physically
abused. There is one shelter for battered     women     in     crowded
Hongkong, which has a population
of 5.5 million.
The shelter, Harmony House,
opened in 1985. It was sponsored by
another steering group of the council, and is now supported with
government funding. The government is scheduled to open another
shelter this year.
The women's centre began a
crisis telephone counselling service
in 1981. On Tuesdays and
Thursdays, Chinese-speaking
volunteers take the calls.
The centre has a fulltime worker,
Tai Sau Wai, a recent university
graduate interested in working with
women. Tai says in the three months since she started work, she has
been surprised at how many
telephone calls are from battered
women.
There are more than 200
women's groups in Hongkong but
communications between them are
poor. Among the most outspoken is
the Chinese-language Association
for the Advancement of Feminism,
while other groups are more traditional and quiet.
The women's centre hopes to increase networking between groups.
Located in a Kowloon public housing estate, the centre is easily accessible by subway. It has a fledgling resource library with titles in
Chinese and English, including
classics from Simone de Beauvoir,
Betty Friedman, and others.
There is a private counselling
room and a childcare room — the
latter is bare because the centre
lacks money to furnish it. A health
clinic is also planned.
Women involved with the centre
say it is necessary because
Hongkong women are still disadvantaged at home and in the
workplace. Many women work outside the home but they are expected
to perform a dual role, doing all
housework as well.
Few workers are unionized, par-
See page 2: WOMEN
HONGKONG—Wong Kwai-
wan was brought to Hongkong
from China when she was four
years old. It was 1947.
China was in ruins. The brutal
14-year Japanese occupation had
ended but China was torn by the
civil war between the Communists
and the Kuomintang. Starving
families sold their children.
Kwai-wan and her siblings begged for a living in the streets of
Hongkong. Before long her
younger and older sisters had died
of starvation.
The shy, neatly dressed woman is
the key speaker at the recent official
opening of Hongkong's first
women's centre. She is introduced
to the small gathering as a role
model for Hongkong women, kwai-
wan is modest, though, as she talks
See page 2: SONS Page 2
THE    UBYSSE \>il~>Vi  Qjfo
Friday, March 7, 1986
Sons valued more than daughters
From page 1
about her life and how she became
active working for tenants' rights.
"My mother valued sons more
than daughters," she says, speaking
in the Chinese dialect of Cantonese,
with an interpreter present.
"I never had any chance of going
to school." Sons are still strongly
favored in China, and female infanticide still occurs.
Kwai-wan's surviving older
brother made it to school. But when
Kwai-wan was 11 she became an
amah, or servant, for a family.
When she was 14 she joined a factory.
Her co-workers at the factory encouraged her to study. Kwai-wan
can read but not write.
"I still have a sense of
inferiority," she says.
Kwai-wan knew her husband for
two years before marrying him
when she was 17. She thought she
had a good husband and had high
hopes for life.
But although Kwai-wan met her
Women shafted
From page 1
ticularly in the crucial textiles sector
where women predominate.
Piecework is common.
Employers advertising jobs
almost always specify the sex, race,
and age of the suitable employee,
with Chinese women being offered
the lowest paying jobs with less opportunity for advancement. Some
ads include requests that the female
applicant be attractive.
In the media the unequal role of
women is rarely addressed and
treated frivolously when it is. For
example, the major Enlish-language
newspaper here, the South China
Morning Post, printed an article on
the women's centre in the children's
section, alongside stories about pets
and schoolchildren.
Fanny Cheung and a colleague
are completing research comparing
the support systems of working
class women who do participate in
the community with those who
don't. Cheung thinks the main problems facing Hongkong women are
"lack of confidence that they can
do something and lack of social
support for them to come out and
doit."
husband in a community group,
once married he opposed her involvements outside the home. By
the time she had three children she
had totally stopped these activities.
Kwai-wan was unhappy. She
worked fulltime. She played mah-
jong, a game using tiles that can be
heard in any Hongkong home during leisure hours, in all her spare
time. Her husband started drinking.
By age 25 Kwai-wan had four
children, in 1963. She made three
suicide attempts that year.
Three years later was the turning
point for Kwai-wan, when government social workers came to her
public housing estate.
Hongkong's housing estates have
to be seen to be believed — ugly
skyscrapers full of small apartments
which house thousands of people.
Most Hongkong people live on such
estates. The alternative for more
than 500,000 people here is squatter
huts.
Kwai-wan complained about living conditions on her estate: 40
households had to share two simple
public washrooms with squat
toilets, and there were nine people
living in her 200-square-foot apartment.
Residents held a general meeting.
Kwai-wan and other housewives
emerged as representatives of the
resettlement estate.
Kwai-wan says after this she was
encouraged by one particular social
worker. Although the worker was
Christian and she herself is Buddhist, Kwai-wan says "she was able
to give me a sense of mean-
ingfulness in life."
Kwai-wan began receiving family
counselling. Her husband refused.
He was unemployed for long
periods of time and still overdrank.
He also objected to sending the
children to school. He wanted them
to make money by selling dim sum,
Cantonese food commonly eaten
for breakfast and lunch.
Kwai-wan says she was also
physically abused by her husband.
"I would grin and bear it," she says
now.
Instead of leaving her husband,
Kwai-wan and the children tried to
explain her activities to him. She
says he did become more tolerant.
In 1977 the government social
agency recognised Kwai-wan's
potential as a community leader
and hired her as an assistant social
worker. The same year her husband
died, and she pulled herself
through another emotional and
financial crisis.
Kwai-wan says she felt insecure as
an assistant social worker because
she lacked professional experience.
But the families she dealt with and
other social workers identified with
her informal approach. She continued the job for eight years.
Kwai-wan says through her example other women in resettlement
estates became active, starting their
own tenants rights groups. One
woman is now an elected district
board member.
Kwai-wan describes one campaign when the Royal Hongkong
Jockey Club wanted to set up a betting office in a housing estate.
Residents were opposed. Kwai-
wan and other tenants conducted
an assessment study on resident opinions, with the help of a statistician. The proposal was defeated.
Currently Kwai-wan handles affairs on a volunteer basis for
thousands of tenants in the Tai
Hang Tung and Namshan Estate
<$H0RP-
LJO?ft) Aquinp ssop WW
GREAT NEWS!
Mon. Ihru Thurs.
in March & April
P.J.'s on 4th is
offering all food al
Vi price
after 10:00 p.m.
29U> Iri/&r4m Avenue
Residents Association. Four of her
five sons are working and help support her.
In 1983 Kwai-wan ran for elected
office as a district board member,
one of the few positions in
Hongkong chosen by direct elections. Her children, now aged between 15 and 25, fully supported
her.
"It's not only men's responsibility and right to participate in
politics," she says. Few women in
Hongkong hold high-level positions.
Kwai-wan says she feels that
although she is in middle age she is
still growing as a person. She lost
her election bid but plans to run
again.
for Men & Women
SHAMPOO, CUT, BLOWDRY
9.95
Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday
(reg. 12.95)
3621 W. 4th A ve. 733-3831
mm nominations ma
NOW
OPEN FOR
APPOINTMENTS TO
Thunderbird Winter Sports Centre
Management Board
Aquatic Centre Management Board
and
Student Representatives on the following Presidential Advisory Committees:
Child Care Services
Concerns of the Handicapped
Food Services Advisory
International House Board
of Directors
Land Use Committee
Men's Athletics
Safety, Security &
Fire Prevention
Student Placement
Student Services
Student Union Building
Traffic & Parking
United Way Campaign
Walter H. Gage Memorial
War Memorial Gym Fund
Women's Athletics
Youth Employment Program
Nominations Close
4 p.m. Friday
March 21
1 position
1 position
3 positions
1 position
1 position
3 positions
1 position
1 position
2 positions
1 position
4 positions
1 position
1 position
1 position
1 position
1 position
Applications
Available
SUB Rm 238
I Friday, March 7, 1986
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 3
Geers poll geers on Godiva issue
By SVETOZAR KONTIC
The engineering undergraduate
society is polling its members to
gauge the popularity or unpopularity of the controversial Lady Godiva
Ride.
Results from the questionairre —
distributed to engineering students
yesterday and today — may decide
the future of the contentious ride
says Doug Martin, Engineering
Undergraduate Society presidentelect.
"We would like to get a base
from which to make future decisions on the matter," says Martin.
"With all the hassles and controversy that has taken place in the last
while we need a perspective."
Under the threat of severe sanctions from engineering faculty
president Axel Meisen, the EUS
broke more than 30 years of tradition and did not parade a nude
woman on horseback through campus. The society, however, stirred
administration ire when it staged a
private   stripshow   in   a   campus
building.
The poll, which must be filled
and submitted by today, asks
engineers what sex they are, if they
have ever participated in the Godiva
Ride, whether they wished to see the
ride or the "exotic dance" portion
continue, and if they wanted the
EUS to provide separate funding
for the annual event.
Ballot boxes were posted at
CEME, McLeod and the Computer
Science building. Results from the
election are private and no indication of public release has been
given.
"This is a private poll among
UBC engineers and we do not feel
any need to publicize the results,"
said Martin.
Axel Meisen, UBC applied
science dean, said he supported the
referendum. "I think the students
have full right to consult in some
formal kind of manner concerning
the issue."
Jamie Andrews, a member of the
coalition against sexism on campus
Blacks earn less
By DALBIR TIWANA
Individuals should decide how
and where they will invest their
money, said the general secretary
for the Federation of Transvaal
Woman in South Africa Thursday.
Jessica Duarte, a member of the
Federation which is an affiliate of
the United Democratic Front, said
although she opposes apartheid
which is, "a system of institutionalized racism which was
developed and decreed law ... to
ensure the wealthy would remain
wealthy," she cannot talk directly
on the effects of divestment because
to do so would be a "treasonable
act."
Instead Duarte focused her talk
to about 100 people in SUB
auditorium on the current economic
situation in S.A.
Duarte said multinational corporations there "exploit cheap
labor" and use a system of racism
to gain profits. Black South
Africans currently earn about three
dollars per hour for the same jobs
Canadians would earn $13 to $16
dollars per hour for.
It is only now in 1986 that the
mining industry is beginning to
negotiate for minimum wage, said
Duarte.
About 99 per cent of the black
people in South Africa work for
very low wage jobs and don't "contribute to decision-making policy"
she said and added South African
employers defend this by saying the
pay is decided by qualifications —
higher pay for higher skills.
Duarte said black people are by
the above argument kept from getting the education needed to gain
the skills for higher-wage jobs.
The United Democratic Front, an
anti-apartheid group demands the
S.A. gov't establish national
democracy, right of free speech,
and the right of free association.
Duarte says the South African
government has "all the right P.R.
approach" to pacify outsiders.
Duarte said the government's P.R.
is a "blatant lie" and leaves people
outside the country "completely
confused" of the situation in South
Africa.
Duarte said a "polarization" of
the white working class to the conservative right wing occurs every
time the anti-apartheid campaign is
strengthened. This class is unwilling
to give up their many material
possessions gained as a result of
apartheid she said.
"South Africa's export income
does not go back into the country
for development but to the pockets
of employers."
Said Duarte: "the majority of the
white people just don't actually
think of (the apartheid) situation at
all." They see (the) South African
government as protecting their
needs and support them on the basis
of that, she said.
The anti-apartheid campaign is
working, said Duarte. "I don't
think it will take another 30 years. .
. (the complete abolishment of
apartheid) will happen when it happens."
said, "In the past the EUS have not
necessarily been official representatives of the people."
UBC engineers were happy about
the idea and results of the election.
Engineer Pat Cruickshank said,
"I think it should be held. I don't
see how Lady Godiva really hurt
anyone. The election is a good way
to begin the campaign and I will say
yes on the ballot."
Engineer Rick Morrow said,
"It's good to find out what the people think. A lot of people were
writing down comments so they
were interested. Most people are far
too reluctant to comment on the
issue and this is one way we can find
out."
Doug Martins said, "I am not offering any opinions on the Godiva
Ride myself. I am not commenting
on the issue, only the fact that we
are holding a debate referendum."
4fi£
—edward mou photo
"WHAT IS ALL of this garbage?" says man walking in rain. "All this incredible copy — mounds and mounds of
journalistic prose for all the world to see. And what's wrong with this photo? Photos should be the primary considerations, not trivial after-thoughts whose sole function in life is to cast asperasions on the photog's abilities.
Later man was nixed from page entirely by jealous non-photog editor.
Jewett urges letter campaign
By JUDITH REES-THOMAS
Overwhelming public input convinced Prime Minister Brian
Mulroney's not to sign an agreement with the United States on the
Star Wars program last fall, NDP
external affairs critic Pauline Jewett
said.
Guards hired; vandalism cited
The Alma Mater Society hopes a
tighter student union building
security policy and the hiring of additional security guards will protect
SUB furniture and offices from the
clutches of vandals.
Martin Cocking, AMS director
of administration blamed the recent
increase in SUB vandalism on the
greater volumes of bookings in the
building on weekends. Youths
hanging out near the games room
on skateboards have been responsible for the recent rash on false fire
alarms he added.
SUB proctor Dennis Ackland
Snow said couches have been torn
in the coversation pit, notice boards
have been vandalized and offices
have been broken into. He added
many incidents have involved liquor
and drugs for which the RCMP had
to be called in.
Under the new security policy,
those 16 years of age and under will
be prohibited from loitering in SUB
after 9:30 p.m. unless accompanied
by an AMS card holder or adult.
The Student administrative council also hopes to hire three part-time
employees to patrol the building
Wednesday evenings. Their wages
will be recovered through a sur
charge to be levied on future bookings.
Cocking said similar policies have
been established in the past but
there has not been a need for enforcement until recently. "The
youth problem seems to happen in
cycles," he said.
Speaking to about 80 people at
Robson Square Tuesday night,
Jewett urged Canadians to write
Mulroney to oppose renewal of the
North American Air Defense Command agreement.
"We need to get the message to
the Prime Minister that his gut feelings were right in September, and to
please consult them again," she
said.
Jewett said of those who spoke to
the standing parliamentary committee on SDI last summer, 89 per cent
were against Canadian participation
in Star Wars.
"There is no doubt at all. . . that
input influenced the Mulroney
government who had originally
been very keen to have government-
to-government co-operation."
AMS gives company free ad
One per cent of foreign service examination candidates get jobs in the diplomatic corps.
But the Alma Mater Society sponsored a lecture
Wednesday promoting an $85 "How to succeed in
the 1986 foreign service competition" seminar this
Sunday.
"I'm just surprised. I've never heard of this sort
of thing," Hugh Hiscox, public service commission
of Canada regional director, said Thursday.
In 1982-83, the latest year with complete figures,
4,447 people wrote the exam. Of that number, 640
were interviewed, but only 25 actually got jobs with
the foreign service, according to public service
figures.
The exam was cancelled in 1983-84 and last October.
AMS president Simon Seshadri said the society
sponsorship of the seminar — providing free advertising worth $110 in the Ubyssey and free use of a
room in SUB — originated with last year's president Glenna Chestnutt.
He said the AMS sponsored the event because the
firm offering the seminar, Foreign Service Examination and Career Counselling, Inc., has a student discount off their regular $120 fee.
She said classified military
research cannot occur in Canada
without an government-to-
government agreement.
If the strategic defence initiative
is approved, NORAD would be an
essential ingredient in active
ballistic missile defence she said. It
is significant that a clause prohibiting Canadian participation in
an active ballistic missile defence arrangement was quietly dropped
when the agreement was last renewed in 1981.
Jewett said that the more activity
would break the existing ABM treaty.
Cliff Andstein, Canadian Federation of Labor secretary treasurer,
who also spoke at the meeting, said
the labor movement is committed to
a non-nuclear defence posture. He
said that while there is some
disagreement within the movement,
the federation is convinced SDI
would not make any impact on
unemployment in Canada, adding
research into armaments is capital-
intensive, not labor-intensive.
"The SDI proposal is absolute insanity and it is important that we as
Canadians not participate in that
insanity."
Jewett's talk was organized by
End the Arms Race, sponsors of
Vancouver's Walk for Peace and
co-sponsors of this year's Peace
Festival, to be held April 24 to 27. Page 4
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, March 7, 1986
Listen
Letters
Macdonald and Mussoc shirk
their duty; Groberman absolved
Having seen the UBC Musical
Theatre Society's production of
Fiddler on the Roof, and having
read both Michael Groberman's
review of said production and the
MUSSOC president's response to
said review (Ubyssey, Feb. 28), I
feel a personal obligation to offer
my own disinterested opinion.
Mr. Groberman's unrelenting
criticism of Grace Macdonald's
direction and choreography caused
me more than once to shift uncomfortably in my seat as I read the
Feb. 7th issue of the Ubyssey.
From an editorial point of view,
it might have been more diplomatic
to remove one or two of the 12.
scathing references to Miss Macdonald (by name); but the Ubyssey
staffers deemed such a mollification
unnecessary.  As a result, we the
Valentines day
leaves something
to be desired
In the 4/March/86 Ubyssey, Liz
Robertson and Mary Desbrisay
have suggested that Valentine's day
be the "one day out of 365" reserved for "words of romance and
love". May I suggest that the
13th/14th of February might better
be reserved for the commemoration
of the 1945 fire-bombing of
Dresden, which left about 135,000
people dead, most of them
civilians? Perhaps the contemplation of this anniversary will give us
a better appreciation of just how
precious life is.
Jonathan Thornburg
grad student, astronomy
readers were treated to something
not often found in the everyday
realm of theatre criticism: a heartfelt, honest appraisal of a production, and not a milky, pseudo-
intellectual discourse on everything
but the production.
In fact, I should like to thank Mr.
Groberman for expressing in words
the outrage I felt as I watched the
deft emasculation of perhaps the
most vibrant, powerful, and inspiring work of the musical theatre
genre. Nobody is demanding
perfection, but one would hope that
even the most unprofessional company mounting a production of
"Fiddler . . ." would take it upon
itself to convey the depth and
range of human feeling that it has
to offer.
MUSSOC — usually renowned
for its professionalism — took it
upon itself to offer nothing more
than snazzy dancing and good singing; they utterly disregarded the
play as a whole. And Mr. Groberman was saying simply, albeit
adamantly, that the responsibility
for this reprehensible carelessness
falls rightfully upon the director's
shoulders. Grace Macdonald just
happened to be the director.
There was nothing in the review
to suggest, as Mr. Quan puts it,
"the critic's hatred of Miss Macdonald." Moreover, I found it
quite distasteful that Mr. Quan
should have used his letter, primarily designed for hostile purposes, as
a medium through which to thank
Miss Macdonald for her 34 years of
dedication to MUSSOC. Not only
does this unfairly insinuate that Mr.
Groberman had intended to cast
aspersions   on   Miss   Macdonald's
past work, it makes one question
the sincerity of MUSSOC's
gratitude.
Finally: Mr. Quan's contention
— that it was the responsibility of
the reviewer to acquaint himself
with Jerome Robbins' Broadway
choreography of "Fiddler ..." —
is nothing short of laughable. Isn't
the whole point of restaging a show
for the umpteenth time to make an
original contribution to it, and let it
stand on its own merits?
In any case, even if Miss Macdonald did judge the original
choreography too good to alter, it
was then her duty to justify the
startling inconsistencies and ambiguities which Mr. Groberman
pointed to in his critique. She did
not, and thereby succeeded in insulting the artistic conscience of at
least two members of her audience.
Stefan Winfield
arts 4
Tommorrow, March 8 is International Women's Day.
It is a day to look at how far the women's movement has progressed.
We can now cast our own vote. And it is socially acceptable to choose
between the home and a career or to have both.
Women are coming close to achieving equality in many areas, but one
area that often goes unrecognized is in daily conversation.
According to author Dale Spender we should all be recording our daily
conversations. Especially when both men and women are present. The
results may surprise you.
Spender's research revealed, that men do most of the talking, interrupt
more than women do, and tend to determine the topic of conversation.
Her findings can be proven by examining ratio of men to women in
politics, the media, and education.
A career move can only be successful if a woman feels free to express
herself on an equal basis with men, without being labelled domineering.
Listening is an important way to understand group dynamics. It's an important way to learn. But listening without an equal participation in discussion will only lead to mental stagnation.
International Women's Day should be a reminder to both men and
women to monitor what they say, and when they say it.
Buying votes
Rumor has it post-secondary education minister Russ Fraser announced
doubling of student aid funding yesterday. Oddly enough, his secretary
had not to have heard of the announcement — what stellar organization
the man has backing him.
And the Socreds have instituted a $110-million "educational excellence
fund" for universities, colleges and schools mere weeks ago.
And, lets drink to their good health, they have announced more money
for hospitals and medical care.
Not even the traditional Socred forte — roadbuilding — has been
neglected; there's money for that too.
Of course, the kiddies aren't left out either. They are being treated to
funding for trips to Expo '86 (with money formerly devoted tofield trips,
but who's counting).
Could there possibly be a provincial election in the works.
We need only look for a decrease in the sales tax to know for sure.
Letters
New fund a rip off
The February 11, 1986 announcement of the Socred Governments'
$110 million fund for "Excellence
in Education" sounds at first like a
windfall for post-secondary education.
On closer analysis, however, it
doesn't come close to the $330
million cut from the budget for
operating costs since 1982. Only a
small portion of the total fund is
available to cover operating costs of
existing institutions, with the larger
share going to "special initiatives".
Allocations from the fund are to
be made by Cabinet on a "merit"
basis, in effect giving the executive
of the Government more control in
directing funding, and moving
towards further centralization of
the education system.
(The question of democratically
elected College Boards vs. Socred
appointees becomes irrelevant as
the government moves towards full
control of all aspects of education.)
These "Special Initiatives" may
be legitimate undertakings, (such as
small  business  development,  and
advisory services to entrepeneurs)
but these are essentially economic
rather than educational activities
and should therefore be funded as
such, rather than with "scarce
education dollars".
It is vital to realize that to the
'average man on the street', the
$110 million 'increase' would appear to be a lot of money invested in
education, and another indication
that Uncle Bill cares. It is up to all
students who are concerned about
the quality and accessibility of
B.C.s' poorly funded universities to
let the public know that the new
"Educating for Excellence" is
simply a program designed to channel what will be called education
funds into non-educational activities.
Anyone interested in working on
a public awareness campaign
should contact Carol Pedlar, the
new AMS External Affairs Coordinator, in SUB 250.
Freyja Bergthorson
arts 2
From little acorns . . .
Students For Forestry Awareness
(SFA) is sponsoring a Multiple Use
Symposium, to increase public
awareness about land use conflicts.
Topics will include the current and
potential roles of Multiple Use in
B.C.,   criteria  and   evaluation   of
THE UBYSSEY
March 7, 1986
The Ubyssey is published Tuesday and Friday throughout
the academic year by the Alma Mater Society of the University of British Columbia. Editorial opinions are those of the staff
and are not necessarily those of the administration or the
AMS. Member Canadian University Press. The Ubyssey's
editorial office is SUB 241k. Editorial department,
228-2301/2305. Advertising 228-3977/3978.
I wanna have a party. D'ya hear me? I say, do you hear? Well, lets see. Can't have one at Corinne
Bjorge's because of something ot other about something or other. And then of course, we could
never, hush the thought, have a pahtay at Stephen Wisenthal's. Unless, of course, we all . , - nah
that'd never work. Bud if we did, Neil Lucente and Gordon Clark would show up. Sort of like moths to
a flame. And then there would be Camile Oionne and Amy Lam. Steve Chan and Ed Mou would show.
You just know they would never miss a party, not even to discuss superstrings. Or was that compressed springs. I think it was -t-2 slings. No no it was set the modem for 24 rings. Huh? Never mind. Where
was I? Who are you? Where's the zen in all of this? asked David Ferman. I dunno but mayhap it be in
here offered Debbie Lo gesturing to the fateful words inscribed on the wall, and which are also about
to be painted over and forever stricken from the face of the earth. "Ingot we trust". Jennifer Lyall
came in mumbling about De vine. Nobody could understand. I sure couldn't. Well, it looks like another
day that I wont get home until the cows come home too. Or was that till the bedbugs bite? One last
thing: Zen is practically indistinguishable from nihlistic flights of parafantasy. Seek ye the Tao.
• non-market resources, problems of
Land Use Allocation, and multiple
use in the Stein Valley.
The symposium will be held on
Saturday, March 8, in
Woodward-2, and will run from
8:30 to 5:30. Registration will begin
at 8:00 a.m. and admission will be
$10 for the general public, $5 for all
students (with a student card) and
seniors.
Panelist will include John
Cuthbert, B.C.'s chief forester,
John Payne, Department of
Fisheries and Oceans, Dr. Vernon
Brink, Federation of B.C.
Naturalists, Forest Industry
Representatives, and Ruby
Dunstan, Chief of the Lytton Indian Band, to name a few.
The symposium should be a great
opportunity for the public to
become acquainted with some of
the problems involved in land use
allocation, and to discuss the issues
with people who are involved in the
decision making process.
Dave Duncan
forestry 4 Friday, March 7, 1986
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 5
'" ——i in. _—,^—'    ';'[ ■ i m_^_^_^i^—., _. ll. ..     in        h^mmmmmmm9!mmmmt »»———■—
Are your erections for the right reasons?
ibute to the liberality and       "You suggest that there are right     UBC students, but the Ubyssey's     Ubyssey could run a Macho Special   this question, but an
_ c   .i- -    t ti     .1...    :j.      —„ „ 1 r -,.,.. ^   .i ... ,.        :,.,.,,,*   + ~    ~J..~„ + ~   *u„   _...ui:„   -1 *       aore>e* With  the* p»Hitr»rio
It is a tribute to the liberality and
tolerance of the Ubyssey that it
recently printed so many letters
from the student body demeaning
and belittling the sexual preferences
of a sizable campus minority. As
evident from the recent Gay and
Lesbian Special issue, the Ubyssey
favors the free expression of a person's sexual nature.
The Ubyssey's position was made
even clearer Feb. 25 in- an editorial
addressed to Doug Collins:
'You suggest that there are right
reasons and wrong reasons for a
man's penis to become erect . . .
But can you not appreciate the subjectivity of that experience?"
While plausible, this view is controversial, for as we all know, there
are many males on campus, some of
them engineers, whose penises
become erect at the thought of
dominating naked women. This
conception of a good time is, of
course,   repellent  to   many  other
FILMSOC is unclear
In their advertisements for the
upcoming Cinemawest film "Myra
Breckinridge", the AMS Film
Society states that it is being shown
"in memory of our unjustly sanctioned Engineers". By this, Filmsoc
is apparently implying that they
consider the one sanction that has
been imposed on the EUS to be unjust.
I remind the readers that this
sanction is the one which prevents
the EUS, as a body, from booking
rooms on University property. In
my understanding, it was imposed
by the Administration in direct
response to the use, by the EUS, of
an unbooked room on University
property, for an event which they
told the Administration was not going to be held.
In light of this fact, I wonder if
we could get some clarification
from Filmsoc and the AMS on
whether this is their official position
on the subject.
Jamie Andrews
science 7
Make the rich pay
On March 8, the 75th Anniversary of International Women's
Day, the Democratic Women's
Union is holding a march along
Commercial Drive in East Vancouver which will assemble at Clark
Park (14th and Commercial) at 1
p.m. They will hold a meeting at
3:00 at the Britannia Community
Centre as well. These events are being organized to uphold the revolutionary traditions of this day of
women's struggle.
The Democratic Women's Union
works for the unity of all working
women and women students to
fight side by side with progressive
and democratic men to oppose imperialism and imperialist war, to
make the rich pay for the crises and
I used to write
coherently in full
sentences, with no
grammatical errors,
and I never
misquoted anyone.
Then I joined
The Ubyssey. My life
will never be
the same.
- Bert Smegg
Ubyssey
Fashion Editor
to put an end to all forms of exploitation and oppression in order
to achieve the full equality and
freedom of all working people. This
was the tradition established by the
founder of International Women's
Day, Clara Zetkin, the outstanding
German communist woman
organizer and co-fighter of Lenin
against imperialism and imperialist
war.
Today anti-imperialist women of
B.C. are preoccupied with the
struggle against war preparations of
the United States and Soviet Union,
and their military alliances, NATO
ant the Warsaw Pact. Women are
also organizing against mass
unemployment, education cutbacks, increasing impoverishment
and so on with the main aim of
making the rich pay for the crisis of
the capitalist system.
Women also struggle against
racism and chauvism being promoted, especially in B.C. where the
East Indian community is under attack, as a especially in B.C. where
the East Indian community is under
attack, as a way to divide the people. All these problems are inherent
in the imperial system. A handful of
wealthy oligarchs dominate powerful and aggressive states and openly
plunder the people's of the world.
This system leads to the double exploitation of women and to the triple exploitation of immigrants.
Although much money and effort
has been spent to divert the struggles of women away from this goal
of abolishing the imperialist system,
and to set up all sorts of "women's
issues" and even present men as the
"enemy", such diversions have not
been able to silence the voice of
revolutionary and democratic
women. Such women continue to
fight shoulder to shoulder with men
for the emancipation of the entire
working class and people as the
precondition for the emancipation
of women. This tradition will be
marked with bright red flags and
banners this March 8th.
I invite all democratic women
and men students to join the
Democratic Women's Union in
celebrating the 75th Anniversary of
International Women's Day on
Saturday; March 8 at 1 p.m. at 14th
and Commercial, and at the Britannia Community Centre at 3 p.m.
Barbara Waldern
unclassified student
UBC students, but the Ubyssey's
lucid statement of the equality of
sexual preferences commits the
Ubyssey to defending the right of
these persons to celebrate their sexuality by openly dominating consenting naked women. Doubtless
some student elements would label
this "strange" or "queer" or
"perverted".   If so,  perhaps  the
Ubyssey could run a Macho Special
issue to educate the public about
macho sexual styles.
If, on the other hand, the
Ubyssey believes that there really is
something intrinsically morally
wrong with some forms of sex between consenting adults, I would be
extremely interested to hear what it
is. I have devoted much thought to
this question, but am inclined to
agree with the editorial cited that it
is intrinsically a matter of taste, not
morality.
The best compromise theory
would seem to be that while there is
nothing intrinsically wrong with
macho sexuality, it contingently has
bad consequences in that it encourages participants to oscillate
between aggression and submission
in all their daily interactions with
other persons.
If habitual power inequality in
personal relations proves, as seems
likely, to lead on balance to harm
and unhappiness, then this would
constitute a good reason for asking
macho types to stay in the closet.
The engineers are therefore to be
applauded for having their strip
show behind closed doors, where
only those who enjoy such things
are exposed to them.
Even so, if the Ubyssey is right
that sexual preferences are purely
subjective, then engineers should no
more be criticized for liking strip
shows and naked women on horses
than should lesbians for liking other
women. Even if no woman would
consent to be dominated, this
would not show that there was
anything wrong with a man's desiring to dominate women. It would
only be wrong for him to act on his
desire.
Analogously, even if there were
only one gay man on earth, so that
no man would consent to be his
lover, this would not show that the
gay man was wrong to desire other
men.
It is courageous of the Ubyssey to
confront sexual issues and take a
stand on them regardless of the
public opinion. However, the principle of the equality of sexual
preferences is a Pandora's Box — I
suspect that some Ubyssey staffers
will not feel at all comfortable with
some of the clear implications of
their current stand. I look forward
to evolution in the Ubyssey's position on sexual preferences.
Nick Sleigh
philosophy 9
Is Canada a "greatpower"?
I would like to address a letter of
Mark Fettes, "Rethink NORAD,"
(Ubyssey, Mar. 4). First of all, I
would like to remind him that the
Tories recently brought out a Green
paper on Foreign Policy that only
emerged after extensive public
debate and input; this Paper is to be
used as a basis for a more thorough
revaluation of our foreign policy
soon to be tabled.
But not to be wholly negative, I
have to agree with him concerning
Dyer's program, "The Defence of
Canada." I, like him, watched the
show with great interest. However,
I differ on several points.
Specifically, I cannot agree that
Canada "acquired the habits of
thoughts of a Great Power" near
the end of World War II; if Mr.
Fettes would examine the speeches
and statements of any of the politicians or External Affairs officers of
that era, he'll see that they all
recognized the limitations placed
upon Canadian freedom of action
and thus worked within those
limitations. Indeed, Canada's input
at the San Francisco Conference in
1945, that was organized to draft
the Charter of the UN, is the
epitomy of the realization of
Canada's stature as a Middle
Power.
Furthermore, Mr. Fettes' statement concerning NATO — that
Canada's commitment to it was
"almost a reflex action" — is totally misleading. Canada, in fact, was
the first nation to propose the formation of such a body, in the fall of
1947 — a year and a half before the
North Atlantic Treaty was signed.
And over that period, from
1947-49, the Canadians were probably the most active initiators of
ideas in the negotiations. They
recognized that Canada needed to
push for such an alliance in order to
best promote Canada's interests.
Also, I have to again differ with
him concerning his claim ' that
Canada's participation in NATO
has never been debated. Actually,
this subject was one of the most frequently discussed issues in political
and academic fora during the
1960's; it has remained an active
issue of debate today.
However, agreement has obviously been achieved on the question of Canada most effectively
asserting its limited influence by remaining within this and other
alliances. This is evidenced by the
fact that the Mulroney government
has begun, albeit in small measure,
to reemphasize Canada's commitment to her alliances, a commitment that had been somewhat curtailed by the Trudeau government
because it did question the viability
of Canadian involvement.
I would have to say that I myself
feel that Canada can best advance
its own interests by maintaining its
participation in as many diverse international organizations as possible.
Finally, I would like to end by
saying that I will definitely watch
the remaining two episodes of
Dyer's program in order to see his
perspective on Canada's present
role in international affairs. Also, I
would like to read the brief that his
group has put together. If he would
like to discuss this topic with me, he
can contact me through the International Relations Students' Association.
Gordon Haskins
I.R. 3
rem-
GREAT NEWS!
Mon. thru Thurs.
in March & April
P.J.'s on 4th is
offering all food at
Vi price
after 10:00 p.m.
(frfr-VT-W-''ftl:rinWWJ:r,rV<J:>)
' oeiaiMJC
29U Uje>r4tW. Avenue Friday, March 7,1986
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 7
DO
Lessing examines the prisons in our minds
By CAMILE DIONNE
Nineteen-eighty four was two years ago but
according to Doris Lessing the threat of government mind control is still with us.
In her latest book, "Prisons We Chose to Live
Inside," Lessing examines the ways we have had our
thinking manipulated by groups around us, especially by
governments and priesthoods'
Lessing uses graphic examples from her own life
growing up in Southern Rhodesia (now Zimbabwa) to illustrate her points.
"Prisons" opens with a humorous story about a
farmer in southern Rhodesia shortly after world war
two. He had a prize bull which killed its twelve year old
keeper. The farmer decided that the bull was a murderer
and deserved to die. He had the bull executed for the
crime of murder.
Lessing uses this as one example of how easily we
revert to primitive ideas and behaviours.
Lessing's book is a collection of five CBC lectures she
gave in October 1985 on the ways people have been
manipulated throughout history. She sees in people a
tendency to follow the beliefs of the group and to be
easily swayed by propaganda and rhetoric.
According to Lessing we are all brainwashed to some
extent by religions, political ideologies or groups we are
part of. She sees in humanity a tendency to see things in
a black and white, right and wrong, us and them manner.
Lessing examines the strategies used by governments
and churches to control the thoughts of the people. She
sees the dynamics of the group to be the most powerful
force in society.
Lessing sees the "soft sciences" — psychology,
sociology and social sciences, as well as history, as the
key to understanding how we are manipulated. She also
feels that children should be educated to recognize this
manipulation.
Lessing sees the greatest benefit of a democratic society as the freedom to examine what is done to us,
although our thinking is confused by governments, who
use trained public relation experts. We can then use our
knowledge of what is happening, to in some way stand
against the almost irresistable force of the opinions of
the group.
At times I found Lessing wandering in her presentation. However, she somehow always ended up at her
destination however obscure the path.
Prisons We Choose to Live Inside is provocative and
it challenges the reader to think about the things we have
accepted without question, good and evil, right and
wrong.
Lessing's book is interesting reading and leaves one
with new ideas and perceptions of society to chew on.
CARMEN
is a powerful, skillful, beautiful film
By ROSANNA DITMARS
Carmen, the film, has received deserved universal acclaim. To make things
even more tricky the genre of "opera film"
has not been sufficiently developed to allow
for extensive comparison between Carmen
and other films of its type (La Traviata being a fortunate exception).
The idea of adapting opera to film is
essentially a good one and ideally can
enhance both art forms. However, the inherent problem in such an adaption is there
are certain elements of opera so inately
theatrical that they often seem artificial and
staged in a cinematic context. Hence a few
ludicrous scenarios such as Micaela perched
precariously on a mountainside, singing to
Don Jose that his mother is dying, while his
fellow bandits sit calmly drinking wine
around a fire.
Carmen
directed by Francesco Rossi
at the Vancouver East Theatre
Despite this problem there are still several
advantages to presenting an opera on
screen. The visual reality of the opera is
greatly enhanced as the film-maker can
paint a much more vivid picture of its
historical and cultural context then could
ever be done in a theatre. In this respect
Rossi performs admirably. The scenery is
breathtaking and the settings of Seville and
the bull ring are historically accurate and
strikingly beautiful.
At times his crowd scenes seem to melt
into warm-colored impressionist paintings
full of light and movement. At other times
nature is awesome and all-powerful; huge
caverns gape like the very jaws of romantic
fate as Carmen and her friends read their
tarot-card fortunes. In fact the film's three
hours are immersed in powerful imagery,
beginning with the initial slow motion close-
up of a wounded, bleeding bull reeling in a
ring and ending with several beautiful gypsy
women, weeping over the dying Carmen.
Cinematographer Pasqualino De Santis'
artistic prowess is undisputed as are
choreographer Antonio Gaddis' magnifi
cent folk dances, which provide the film
with a wonderful rhythmic vitality.
Placido Domingo delivers a solid performance as Don Jose and effectively portrays
the soldier-turned criminal's insane love for
Carmen. His strong but subtle vocal performance is emotionally powerful and complements Migenes Johnson's knock-em
dead, overdramatic style.
Actually, apart from a few moments of
lagging action, Migenes Johnson's performance which often borders on melodrama,
is the only thing that really bothers me
about the film. It's true that she does have
an incredible voice and screen presence and
that the gypsy, Carmencita (Mignes
Johnson, she of flared nostrils and curly
hair) is a character that must be played
strongly, but Migenes Johnson's portrayal
sometimes borders on caricature.
She struts around in the La Boheme sequence with jutting hips and flashing eyes,
playing "la femme en rouge" for all its
worth. In fact, her sensuality is so emphatically displayed that it makes you want
to stand up in the theatre and yell, "Will someone please tell that woman to keep her
skirt down!"
Of course the fault lies not entirely with
Migenes Johnson, but also with the original
opera by Bizet in which the female
characters are one dimensional to the point
of allegory. Carmen comes to represent evil
incarnate, a femme fatale who traps men
with her charms and drags them down to
her base level. Hence Don Jose turns to a
life of crime when he falls in love with her.
Micaela, in contrast, is all innocence and
purity, a young blond girl who wears a blue
frock and crucifix and prays to God for
protection from Carmen. However Faith
Eschen's effective portrayal of Micaela is
successful and somehow less grating than
Migenes Johnson's, despite her character's
sugar coatedness.
All in all, Rossi's Carmen is a powerful,
skillfully crafted film, whose visual beauty
more than compensates for its occasional
dramatic lapses.
wo®
Allen soys enjoy life in his most mature film yet
By DUNCAN STEWART
If Woody Allen was ever asked what he
wanted to do when he grew up, he probably would have said Hannah and Her
Sisters.
Hannah and Her Sisters
directed by Woody Allen
at the Bay Theatre
"Hannah" is Allen's most recent release,
and it shows genuine filmmaking maturity. If
Annie Hall and Manhattan are Woody Allen
posing cinematic questions, then Hannah and
Her Sisters shows he has found some of the
answers. It is also one of his least neurotic and
pessimistic films.
This is not to say that the movie is
recognizable as a Woody Allen film. It contains many of the elements that have made his
other movies so enjoyable.
The film opens and closes with family
Thanksgiving dinners, set three years apart.
The title characters are Hannah (Mia Farrow),
and her sisters, Lee (Barbara Hershey) and
Holly (Dianne Wiest).
Lee is a beautiful and vulnerable type who
attracts the eye (and some other parts) of Han
nah's husband, Elliot (Michael Caine), even
though she is already living with an isolated
and moody artist, Frederich (Max von Sydow).
The third sister, Holly, fights over an attractive architect with her friend (Carrie Fisher).
They spend ten minutes together in his car,
each of the two friend;, trying to pick a route
home that will get them dropped off last.
Woody Allen plays Hannah's ex-husband,
Mickey Sax, a paranoid hypochondriac. His
greatest fear (hope?) occurs when he finds out
he may really have a brain tumor. Watching
Mickey neurotically wallow in self-pity shows
that Woody Allen still has a talent for making
the tragic hilarious.
Mickey eventually discovers that he is not
going to die, at least not right away, and encouraged by his brush with mortality, sets out
to find a religion. To far from stoic reaction of his Jewish parents, he tries
Catholicism. Returning from his conversion,
he dumps a grocery bag onto the table revealing a spiritual sandwich: a crucifix, mayonnaise and Wonder bread.
Through all of the romantic entanglements
and personal crises of her family, Hannah remains calm and self-assured. In fact, it is Hannah's independence from her husband that
drives Elliot to have an affair with Lee. He
feels that Hannah could live just as well
without him, and he needs a woman who needs
him.
All of the actors play their roles flawlessly.
Dianne Wiest plays a perfect drug-using,
unstable flake. Max von Sydow is wonderfully
disdainful as an artist who will not sell his
work to a rock star who wants a painting to
cover up wall space and match his living room
color scheme.
The best performances, however, come
from Michael Caine and Barbara Hershey.
They convey genuine sexual tension, and give
new life to the over-used adulterous comedic
situations.
The writing is up to the usual Allen standards. Of course, Woody gets to deliver most
of the good one-liners. Commenting on Nietz-
clie's view that man will repeat his life over and
over again, Mickey complains, "That means
I'd have to sit through the Ice Capades again."
A date where the conservative Mickey spends
time in a punk bar is compared, unfavourably,
with the Nuremberg trials.
Woody Allen uses interesting devices to get
the audience's attention. He divides the movie
into segmented chapters by beginning each
scene with title projected on the screen. These
titles are usually a line from that scene, but
they are very effective in creating the appropriate mood for what follows.
Allen also sub-divides the movie with music.
Each couple is shown with specific background
music. For example, whenever Elliot and Lee
are alone together, classical music is setting the
mood. Jazz and big band music are used for
other scenes.
The only complaint I had about the movie
was a scene where Hannah's parents (Maureen
O'Sullivan and Lloyd Nolan) fight. The sole
point of the scene seems to be a spurious and
shallow attempt to create "rounded"
characters. It does not advance the plot of the
movie or explain the main characters' motivations in any way.
The movie's conclusion, arrived at by
Mickey, is "just enjoy life while it lasts." Not
original, but true enough and I too encourage
people to enjoy this phase of Woody Allen's
filmmaking while it lasts.
inn**1*10"1
By JENNIFER LYALL
Three hundred pounds of jiggling, gyrating fat falling out of a
leopard-skin bodysuit while making
overtly suggestive gestures with a
microphone. It sounds gross, but
really ... it was Divine.
Divine is a three-hundred-pound
transvestite who first entered the
limelight in the seventies starring in
fringe? cult? weird? movies including Pink Flamingoes and
Female Trouble, and has since earned a living and a cult following from
her (his?) lewd and crude movies
and stage extravaganzas. Originally
scheduled to perform at the Luv-A-
Fair on February 19, she finally
made it on Wednesday, explaining,
"I couldn't have crawled here two
weeks ago. Someone tried to poison
me. I think it was Alexis; she hates
me because I'm more beautiful than
she is."
She belched, she made lewd
gestures with her microphone, she
made jokes about the Pope's
foreskin, she asked the audience,
"You want to fuck me, don't
you?"
The whole thing was so completely tasteless, that I felt a bit guilty for
liking it so much.
In between the jokes and the
belches, Divine managed to sing
(screech? lip-synch?) her way
through a number of raunchy songs
with decidedly off-color lyrics such
as "I'm not so tight but that's all
right", accompanied with hip
swivels that made Elvis look like
Lawrence Welk.
Throughout the show she maintained a lively, to say the least,
banter with the audience, exclusively on the subject of her and their
sexual interests and preferences.
And wow, does she ever know
how to dress. Skin-tight bodysuit,
brizzy white wig, and positively
frightening makeup including long
false eyelashes to flutter at the audience. Her hair was reminiscent of
Tina Turner gone berserk — "I
must have left it in the socket too
long tonight," she joked. With her
stomach protruding from her sleazy
leopardskin suit she looked a bit
like a lard jellybean on legs.
And Divine wasn't the only
unusual looking person there,
either, as she was quick to point
out. "What is this, Hallowe'en?"
she demanded. "I get paid to dress
like this. What's their excuse?"
Divine is not into being polite.
So if it was so tasteless, why did I
like it? Perhaps I just have a sick
sense of humor. I occasionally enjoy hearing people make jokes
about things most people won't talk
about; such uninhibitedness can be
refreshing. Divine treats sex, which
most of us take to serious, as a colossal joke_. She has guts.
The only real problem I had with
this show was its price - $13, and
Divine was only on stage for about
thirty-five minutes. That comes to
about $25 an hour. Even Divine
herself knew it was a rip-off. "I'm
assholing all the way to the bank,"
she said.
-neil lucente photo
DIVINE . . .looks
down, looks out,
and looks back up again Page 8
T(1EUBT95CT-
Friday, March 7, 1986
Beaudry tells
of transition
By SARAH MILLIN
The occupation of Vancouver's
transition house is now over.
Women occupied the house after
the provincial government cut funding and have now left with
assurances from city council that
the house will be staffed 24 hours a
day, provide legal advice for
women seeking refuge, and provide
child care.
Battered Women
by Micheline Beaudry
published by Black Rose Books
Most news coverage does not explain the history of transition
houses, government funding and its
effects on the houses, nor the important political basis of the
houses. Battered Women by
Micheline Beaudry examines the
history of shelter for women, particularly in Quebec, and an overview of the transition house movement in Europe, where it
originated, and elsewhere in
Canada. Beaudry is well qualified
to write the book, holding a
master's degree in social work and
nearly ten years involvement with
transition houses in Quebec.
The term "battered women" is
younger than the feminist movement. The problem was first
recognized by feminists, Beaudry
says. After all, the first feminists
were housewives. This is reflected
by the shelters they created for
women.
"In seeking help and support, the
women whose plight is most
desperate — battered women —
have thus chosen a familiar and
anonymous background for combatting violence: the house, the
home. They have reclaimed possession of the home and turned it into
a place of action, and thus a public,
political space," Beaudry writes.
In Quebec and Europe, women
who set up transition houses wanted
the space to be used as a public
forum for a problem previously
considered private. Women at the
houses are/were encouraged to
discuss the issue and other things as
part of a push to help them regain
their confidence. All transition
houses deal with the media to increase awareness of domestic
violence.
The fact houses are used as a
refuge for women as well as public
forum has been labeled deviant by
society. Certainly it is rare for a
place that is usually a form of isolation for women and a quiet one, at
that to be thus used. But as Beaudry
writes, the home is what women
who have set up these services knew
best as well as being a more
familiar place for the women using
the home.
Although the needs of women are
first, transition houses usually provide services for children. Beaudry
details in one section of the book
the different services offered by
various shelters and the politics and
policies behind the services.
Beaudry recounts how as the
house in Quebec became more
dependent on government funding,
the internal structure of some transition shelters became more
bureaucratic and removed from the
origins of women helping other
women. Beaudry points out the
irony of the governments funding
something they chose to ignore for
years and as deviant even when they
fund them as evident by their
policy. The bureaucracy has been
created by the government funding,
Beaudry writes.
Whatever the structure of the
transition house, no woman leaves
one feeling helpless and isolated.
Anyone who doubts the value of
transition houses should read
Beaudry's clear and complete book.
im NOMINATIONS NOW 0IH
OPEN FOR
Appointments to
BUDGET COMMITTEE
OMBUDSPERSON
and
EDITOR, INSIDE UBC 1986-87
Nominations close Applications
4 p.m., Friday, March 21        Available SUB 238
ROCK & ROLL
SEMINAR
What is the Truth
about Rock & Roll?
Very Controversial?
You will love it!
Fact filled with
concert footage
Tue. Mar. 11, Scarfe 100
at 7:00
Wed. Mar. 12
University Hill High
School
Marantha 228-8554
GREG BALL
"Worldwide Evangelist"
Spoken on College
Campuses   in    Canada,
USA, Australia
THE GREATEST
EVENT IN HISTORY
or
"What you history prof
never told you"
Thur. Mar. 13 Woodward I
7:00
Fri. Mar. 14 Woodward I
7:00
Marantha Christian Club
UNIQUE... ANY WAY YOU SERVE II
If you're graduating this year and you've
■ accepted career-oriented employment
at an annual salary of $10,000 or more
and have a clean credit record, you can get
the American Express Card.
That's it. No strings. No gimmicks.
(And even if you don't have a job right now,
don't worry. This offer is still
good up to 12 months after you   , |pp
graduate.)
Why is American Express
making it easier for you to
get the Card right now? Well,
simply stated, we recognize
your achievement and we
: atir? ajrJbTJjflsoob
believe in your future. And as you go up the
ladder, we can help-in a lot of ways.
The Card can help you begin to establish
a credit reference. And, for business, the
Card is invaluable for travel and restaurants.
As well as shopping for yourself.
Of course, the American Express Card
is recognized around the world.
So you are too.
So call 1-800-387-9666 and
ask to have a Special Student
Application sent to you. Or look
for one on campus.
The American Express Card.
Don't leave school without it™
American Express Canada, Inc is a registered user of the trade marks owned by American Express Company ^'Copyright American Express Canada, Inc 1986. AU Rights Reserved. Friday, March 7,1986
(4uC   mtkaMOAa&
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 9
fan pood sportsf
INTRAMURAL SPORTS
UNIT POINT STANDINGS
March S. 1*M
Woman'* Unit
1. Physical Education
2. EUS
3. Forestry
4. Phrateres
5. Arts
6. Kappa Kappa Gamma
7. VST
8. Nursing
9. Science
10. Alpha Gamma Delta
11. FNSc.
12. Rowing
13. Gamma Phi Beta
14. Delta Gamma
15. Soccer Team
16. Medicine
17. Gage
18. Swim Team
19. Rehab Medicine
20. Vanier
21. Pharmacy
22. Tennis Club
23. Ski Team
24. Agriculture
25. Ballet UBC Jazz
26. Ski Club
27. Law
28. Alpha Phi
29. Alpha Delta Pi
30. Centre for Cont. Educ.
31. Regent College
32. Commerce
33. Grad Studies
34. Education
35. Delta Phi Epsilon
36. Sub Bound
37. Recreation
38. Japan Exchange
Men's Unit
EUS
Beta Theta Pi
Science
Forestry
Medicine
Fiji
VST
Physical Education
Dekes
Commerce
11. Arts
12. Rowing
13. Phi Delts
14-    Ksppa Sigma
Law
Cycling Club
17. Totem Park
18. St. Andrew's Hall
19. Zeta Beta Tau
20. UBC Fire Dept.
21. Ski Club
22. Pit Staff
23. Education
24. Grad Studies
25. Alpha Delta Phi
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
15.
16.
Pta.
2140
2035
1305
862
798
774
750
547
532
521
476
458
419
364
290
249
217
215
187
187
186
165
156
148
133
129
126
91
89
64
30
23
21
19
15
15
0
0
Pts.
4019
3384
2411
1662
1576
1388
1386
1287
1124
1047
1023
967
958
711
590
489
448
410
406
400
391
375
345
329
271
26.
27.
28.
29.
30.
31.
32.
33.
34.
35.
36.
37.
38.
39.
40.
41.
42.
43.
44.
45.
46.
47.
48.
49.
50.
51.
52.
53.
54.
55.
56.
Chariots of Manure
IVCF
Orienteering
Gage
Psi Upsilon
Roma
Vanier
VOC
Rehab Medicine
Japan Exchange
International House
Third Salish Alumni
Zeta Psi
Sigma Chi
Nursing
Regent Collage
II Caff ee
Dentistry
Tennis Club
CVC
Field Hockey
Subterraneans
Pharmacy
CSA
Native Indians
Ski Team
Triumf
Squash Club
FNSc.
Architecture
Agriculture
ALPINE SQUASH TOURNAMENT I
March 1-2. 1SB6
WOMEN
Winner
Jane Miller. Forestry
Runner up
Tamsin Finnigan, Gage
MEN - DIV. I
Winner
Dave Jackson, Betas
Runner up
John Worrall, Forestry
MEN - DIV. II
Winner
Brad Imrich, VST
Runner up
Leo Brewin, Physics
MEN - DIV. Ill
Winner
Chiku Verma. VST
Runner up
Doug Brown, Betas
265
198
190
175
168
163
160
160
156
145
143
136
128
87
84
. 79
75
74
73
70
66
45
43
32
20
3
2
0
0
FLOOR HOCKEY LEAGUE STANDINGS
Div. I A
1. Gage Terminators
2. Gage Smokeaters
3. ILCaffe
4. Civils
5. Eng Phys
6 Alpha Delts
Div. II B
1. ZBT
2. Baa
3. Geotech
4. St. Andrews
5. Science
6. Gagel
Div II C
1. CompSd
2. VST
3. Zeta Psi
4. Geo Eng
5. Sigma Chi
6. Gage 3
AS OF FEB. M. 1«
MEN'S
W
WOMEN'S
Div. I
1. Commerce
2. Forestry
3. Phed
4. Kappa Kappa Gamma
5. EUS I
6. Gagel
Div. II
1. Medicine A
2. Aggies
3. Nursing
4. Pharmacy
Gage II
6. Recreation
Pta
6
4
4
2
2
0
2
2
2
2
2
4
4
4
2
2
2
4
Pta
4
2
0
2
2
2
2
2
0
2
2
First Anniversary
PIZZA FACTORY
ANNIVERSARY SPECIALS
CREATE YOUR OWN PIZZA
LTD.
TWO TOPPINGS
2 small pizzas Only $9.95
2 medium pizzas Only $13,95
2 large pizzas Only $15.95
THREE TOPPINGS
2 small pizzas Only $10.95
2 medium pizzas Only $14.95
2 large pizzas Only $16.95
Plus Free 26 oz. Coca-Cola or Sprite
VEGETABLES
MEAT
Gr. Peppers
Salami
Onions
Ham
Olives
BacV Bacon
Tomatoes
Side Bacon
Pineapple
Pepperoni
Mushrooms
Beef
Spinach
Capocollo
FISH
Anchovies
Shrimps
Oysters
Spice
Greek Oregano
Hot Chili Peppers
All Pizzas are Made From Finest Flour
and Baked with Cheese and Homemade Sauce .
Phone: 224-2417 or 224-3333
FREE FAST DELIVERY
OR PICK-UP ORDERS
Offer expires March 31st, 1986
BROOMBALL TOURNAMENT
Women's League
Overall Standinga
1. Rehab Med #1
2. Pharmacy
3. Tied: Beta #2 and Gamma Phi/Phi Delts
5.    Tied: Commerce and Rehab #2
7.    Tied: Betas #1 and Fiji K
9.    Tied: Education #1 and Geography #1
11.    Tied: Phed and Geography 02
13.    Tied: Fiji #1 and Betas II
15.    Tied: Pre Dents and Fiji 12
AT A GLANCE
March 17-20
Thurs., March 13
Sat. and Sun.
March 15-16
SPECIAL EVENTS
Storm the Wati
12:30-4 pm
TOURNAMENT
-Bookstore Tam Tug-o-War
SUB Plaza
12:30 pm
Red Roughensore Rugby Tournament
Thunderbird Stadium
10 am-4 pm (men and women)
THIS PARTY
COULD CHANGE
YOUR LIFE
If you are in third or fourth year and you're looking
for a career in the business world, come see us. We're
Chartered Accountants from downtown firms who will be
on campus March 11 to talk about career possibilities in
one of the most stable professions — chartered
accountancy.
There are jobs available in chartered accountancy for
non-Commerce grads from all disciplines. Chartered
Accountants come from all backgrounds, bringing new
skills and diversity to this growing dynamic profession.
Chartered Accountants set the standard for
accounting and auditing in Canada and, because of their
education and training, are in demand by business around
the world.
Here is an opportunity to talk to CAs on an informal
basis and explore opportunities. You may be an ideal
candidate for Canada's fastest-growing profession.
You're invited to;
A "Beverage" and Cheese Evening
Music Room
UBC Faculty Club
Tuesday, March 11
7 p.m.
For more information contact Lisa Kershaw
at 681-3264, The Institute of Chartered
Accountants of British Columbia.
:?±i
The Institute of Chartered Accountants
of British Columbia
.^■^■B.^
Summer is Coming, and
BRIDGES is Hiring.
BISTRO-RESTAURANT-PUB
Complete applications at our office, Mar. 10
thru 14 (3-5p.m. only).
#5 1551 Johnston, Granville Island
Spend Your Summer on Our Dock!
LOOKING FOR JOBS
IN TOUGH TIMES
A CAREER SERIES FOR WOMEN
+ RESUME WRITING
Learn to.write an effective resume & cover letter.
DATE:        Thurs. Mar. 13. 1986
TIME: 12:30-2:20
PLACE:     Brock 106 A.B.C
ANNE BUDGELL, Employment Advisor, C.E.C.-U.B.C.
JOB HUNTING
Discouraged before you've started? Learn clues to finding
unadvertised jobs, and survival techniques while hunting.
DATE:        Thurs. Mar. 20. 1986
TIME: 12:30-2:20 pm
PLACE:     Brock 106 A.B.C
CAREN DURANTE, Women Students' Office
INTERVIEW TECHNIQUES
Prepare yourself to answer the questions.
DATE:        Thur. Mar. 27. 1986
TIME:        12:30-2:20 pm
PLACE:     Brock 106 A.B.C
RAY EDNEY. Grad Student (Counselling Psychology)
PRE REGISTER:
THE OFFICE FOR WOMEN STUDENTS
Brock 203 • 228-2415 Page 10
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, March 7, 1986
folA
ftU0Ofi
TODAY
MOTORCYCLE CLUB
Bzzr garden and elections, free videos, 4-8 p.m.,
SUB 213.
LATIN AMERICAN SOLIDARITY COMMITTEE
Bzzr garden with Latin American music, crafts,
food, 4-8 p.m., Buch lounge.
UBC ANARCHIST CLUB
Bzzr garden, videos, music, crafts, food, excitement, 4-8 p.m., Buch lounge.
PHILOSOPHY STUDENT'S ASSOCIATION
Bzzr garden with videos, all welcome, 4-8 p.m.,
Buch lounge.
BAHA'I CLUB
"Mona" video moved from today to Monday.
BALLET UBC JAZZ
Drop-in classes at $5 per class, 8:30-10 a.m.,
SUB partyroom, noon, SUB plaza south.
ISMAILI STUDENTS ASSOCIATION
Elections ongoing, vote at Woodward /Sedgewick libraries up to March 13.
DEPARTMENT OF HISPANIC AND ITALIAN
Spanish play to Caries Muniz, "Las viejas drficil-
ed," admission is free, noon and 8 p.m..
Graduate student centre.
PREMEDICAL SOCIETY
Open gym, 4:30-6:30 p.m., Osborne gym B.
THE UBYSSEY
Staff meeting, screenings for next year's
editorial collective, 3 p.m., SUB 241K.
BALLET UBC JAZZ
Registration for unlimited winter dance classes,
any or all for $46, noon, SUB 208.
CHINESE STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Beginners' Cantonese conversation class, noon,
Buch B317.
MARANATHA CHRISTIAN CLUB
The bible and government, 7-8:30 p.m., SUB
215.
CAMPUS CRUSADE FOR CHRIST
Special outreach — contact staff or students if
interested for more info, 5:30-9 p.m., downtown
Vancouver.
INTERNATIONAL HOUSE/BALLET UBC JAZZ
Registration  for cultural  dance workshop,   introduction to belly dance, March  15,  limited
space. Registration 8:X a.m.-4:30 p.m.. International house office.
STUDENTS FOR PEACE AND MUTUAL
DISARMAMENT
Dianne DeMille: How to influence Ottawa, noon,
SUB 205.
UBC NDP
NDP house leader lan Deans — on the budget,
noon, SUB 207.
SATURDAY
STUDENTS FOR FORESTRY AWARENESS
Symposium on multiple use and land use con
flicts in B.C., 8 a.m., Woodward lecture hall 2.
CAMPUS CRUSADE FOR CHRIST
Ski day, contact staff or students in SUB 216E if
interested, all day. Mount Baker.
INTERNATIONAL HOUSE/BALLET UBC JAZZ
Cultural dance workshop: introduction to ballet,
3-4:30 p.m., International house, tower lounge.
ISMAILI STUDENTS ASSOCIATION
Alumni nite, 8:30 p.m., SFU. cafeteria (acros
the library).
SUNDAY
MARANATHA CHRISTIAN CLUB
Worship service,  10 a.m., UBC daycare gym,
2845 Acadia Rd.
THE UBYSSEY SCHOOL OF SOCCER
Game and chance to meet those running for
positions  on  next  year's  collective,   everyone
welcome, 11 a.m., 28th and Camosun.
UBC BOWMEN
No shooting Sunday night.
MONDAY
UBC ASSOCIATION FOR BAHA'I STUDIES
Showing a rock video on a sixteen year old girl
who was killed in Iran because she was a Baha'i,
noon, SUB auditorium.
CHINESE STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Beginners' Mandarin conversation class, noon,
Buch B317.
INTERNATIONAL HOUSE/BALLET UBC JAZZ
Registration for cultural dance workshop March
15, "Introduction to belly dance", limited space,
8:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m.. International house office.
THE UBYSSEY
Voting for next year's editorial collective, see
Camile for ballots. SUB 241K.
BALLtl UBC JAZZ
Drop in classes at $5 per class, 8:30-10 a.m.,
Students for peace and mutual
disarmament are showing "The
atomic cafe", the bitter, funny,
moving film classic about the first
two decades of the nuclear age.
Come to SUB auditorium Tuesday
to see it. It only costs $2.
SUB partyroom,  noon and 5:30-7 p.m., SUB
plaza south.
UBC BOWMEN
Members and interested people, annual meeting
and elections,  7:30 p.m.,  Graduate student's
centre, garden room.
WORLD UNIVERSITY SERVICE OF CANADA
Information session for overseas employment, 7
p.m.. Woodward lecture hall 6.
STUDENTS FOR PEACE AND MUTUAL
DISARMAMENT
Video   from   Gwynne   Dyer's   "War"   series:
"Keeping the old game alive", noon, SUB 215.
TUESDAY
THE UBYSSEY
Voting for next year's editorial collective, see
Camile for ballots, voting ends Wednesday, SUB
241K.
MARANATHA CHRISTIAN CLUB
Bible study and discussion, noon, Brock hall 304.
CHINESE STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Beginner's Mandarin conversation class, noon,
Buch B317.
BALLET UBC JAZZ
Drop in classes at $5 per class, 8:30-10 a.m. and
2:30-4 p.m., SUB plaza south.
MARANATHA CHRISTIAN CLUB
Rock and roll multimedia presentation, 7 p.m.,
Scarfe 100.
STUDENTS FOR PEACE AND MUTUAL
DISARMAMENT
Video   from   Gwynne   Dyer's   "War"   series:
"Notes on nuclear war", noon, SUB 215. Film:
"The atomic cafe", 7 p.m., SUB auditorium.
Want to see a rock video on the
big screen? Want to discover what
the story behind a popular song is?
The UBC association for Baha'i
studies is showing a rock video
"Mona and the children" at noon
on Monday in the SUB auditorium.
6PAND
6 y?4) ??*/ hjjvaj v y/R? hoA op imjrj)
GREAT NEWS!
Mon. thru Thurs.
in March & April
P.J.'s on 4th is
offering all food at
Vi price
after 10:00 p.m.
79U IH&r4m Avenue
Dependable
(di«pen»da*bul)adj. 1. trustworthy
2. reliable 3. responsible 4. Kinko's
FREE SELF-SERVICE TYPING AVAILABLE
FOR A LIMITED TIME
IBM-SELECTRIC
kinko's
Cre.it copies Great people
5706 University Blvd.       222-1688
M-Th 8-9 F 8-6 Sat 10-6 Sun 11-6
S1IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIH
DO YOU EXPERIENCE
EXAM ANXIETY?
^TrwSySv** ft party « >*•• Ubyuay nffi-e. mom 2t1K SUS. n th* eatebrMMptttttivfUy
crawl out al (ha wooaVvoik I which by lim way. is in bad need of • paMt Jooi.  .
Qordaiw Raaic « putting ina move* on Msl Gibson in tha darkroom white Ejsa MaOea
dlaeuaaaa antartaintnant (nudge, nudge) with Tim Hurton. MeanwNla. 0aobia Lo and ftob"
Lowe are Batting graphic*.
Elsewhere. Staphan Wisenthal j* tailing Kathleen Turner about layout (heh, hah) and
Michael Groberman i» reviewing Nauaaaia Kiraki - in person, of cautpa. DavWFerman orHy
looks at Roaama Arquatte and sighs.
Sea what you're mining out on bv wonting for the Ubyseey? . *. ,
ARTS UNDERGRADUATE
SOCIETY
Get Involved!!
ELECTIONS HELD MARCH 19
Nomination forms for:
President Social Coordinator
Vice-President Intramurals Coordinator
Treasurer AMS Council Representatives
Public Relations
A vailable at Buchanan A107
Deadline for nominations
4 p.m., Friday, March 14, 1986
THE CLASSIFIEDS
RATES: AMS Card Holders — 3 lines, 1 day $2.50; Additional lines, 60c. Commercial -
1 day $4.50; Additional lines, 70c. Additional days, $4.00 and 65c.
Classified ads are payable in advance. Deadline is 10:30 a. m. the day before publication
Publications, Room 266, S.U.B., UBC, Van., B.C. V6T2A5
Charge Phone Orders Over $10.00 - Call 228-3977
5 - COMING EVENTS
40 - MESSAGES
85 - TYPING
THE VANCOUVER INSTITUTE
Free Public Lecture
Martin Goldfarb, President
Goldfarb Consultants
THE ROLE OF POLLING IN
CANADIAN SOCIETY
(The Vancouver Sun Lecture)
Saturday, March 8
Lecture Hall 2, Woodward
Building, 8:15 pjn. Free
PLAY DOUBLE-UP, circular 2-man strategy
game. Tournament possible. For free instructions write: Double-Up Club of Montreal, Box 5453, Station B, Montreal,
Quebec, H3B4P1.
50 - RENTALS
FULLY FURNISHED comfortable bachelor
apartment. Sub-let for May and June only.
$3307month. Phone 733-3877 for details.
65 - SCANDALS
LITERARY DELIGHTS
Reasonably Pricedl!
LASSA BOOK SALE
SUB Concourse
Mon.. March 10 9-4 p.m.
Find out what informaniacs readl and help
send  UBC  Library School Students to
C.L.A. Conference this June.
TBIRD VOLLEYBALL thanks UBC Track &
Field for their support. Good luck at
Nationals.
70 - SERVICES
11 - FOR SALE - Private
PANASONIC 21" colour TV. Good cond.,
& bamboo blind, maroon colour, 6'x5'. TV,
$175; blind, $20. Ph. 732-7216.
IBM-APPLE-MAC PROG. $5-$20/disc.
Academy Software. #17-712 Robson St.
681-4184.
74 MAZDA Exc. running cond. New brakes,
muffler. Some rust. Ski rack included. $650
firm. Cash only. 688-9641.
'69 PONTIAC PARISIENNE. 4-dr. hard
top. Good mech. cond. Michelin tires. 2
owners. Only 88,000 mi. $790 obo.
273-6870.
ONE-WAY FLIGHT - Vancouver to Toronto
leaving April 30. $150. Call Mike at
224-9431.
20 - HOUSING
LUXURY FALSE CREEK w/view, 7 appl.
furnished except B/R. M/F N/S to share
end March. 733-5438. Rob or Barb.
University Hill United
and Presbyterian
congregations
invite you to join us in
worship Sunday mornings at
10:30 a.m. in the Epiphany
Chapel Vancouver School
of Theology.
6050 Chancellor Boulevard
EXPERT TYPING: Essays, t. papers, fac-
tums, letters, mscpts, resumes, theses.
IBM Sel II. Proofreading. Reas. rates. Rose
731-9857, 224-7351.
GEETECH WORD PROCESSING. Student
rates. Fast turnaround. 7 days-24 hrs.
Kingsway/ Fraser. 879-2027.
WORDPOWER-Editing, proofing & word
processing professionals. Xerox copies,
student rates. 3737 W. 10th Ave. (at Alma)
222-2661.
PROFESSIONAL TYPIST. 30 years experience. Student rates. Photocopier.
Dorothy Martinson, 228-8346.
WORD WEAVERS - Word Processing
(Bilingual) Student rates. Fast turnaround.
5670 Yew St. at 41st. Kerrisdale 266-6814.
FAST, ACCURATE TYPING. Student rates.
All types of typing jobs. Fraser-Kingsway
area. Paula, 873-2227.
JUDITH FILTNESS, quality typist. 3206
West 38th Avenue, 263-0351.
GALAXIE WORD SHOP for all your word
processing. Greek, math. P/U & Del. on
campus. Stud, rates. Mastercard/Visa.
985-4250.
WORDSWORTH wordprocessing. Hardware: IBM. Software: wordperfect. Call
Kerry Rigby. 876-2895. 12th & Commercial.
TYPING   —   fast,   accurate   -   reasonable
rates  734-8451.
E    30 - JOBS
$$MONEY$$ 1 days training. You can
make $400-$1200 p/time working from
home. Ms. Pan 684-3008.
| Workshop for practical ways of reducing exam anxiety =   35 - LOST
= will be offered by the |
| STUDENT COUNSELLING &  I
I RESOURCE CENTRE
i BROCK HALL
FEMALE VOLUNTEERS
REQUIRED FOR DEPT. OF
MEDICINE STUDY
If you are taking oral contraceptives and are willing to
come to VGH for six appointments, we will pay you
$45.00. All records are strictly
confidential. For info call
Karen or Anita at 875-4588
M-F.
LOST IN SEDGEWICK Fri., Feb. 28, men's
black Ornata watch. Reward for finder.
Chris, 222-4612.
§    40 - MESSAGES
= Dates: March 13, 20 or 27 (choose one) =
| Time: 12:30-2:30 p.m. |
= Space  is   limited,   so   please   register   early  with   the |
5 receptionist in Brock 200. =
= There is no charge for these workshops =
iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiliiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiir?
ST. MARTHA. I resort your protection
& aid. In proof of my affection & faith, I offer this light which I will burn every Tuesday. Comfort me in my difficulties &
through the great favours that thou didst
enjoy when the Saviour was lodged in Thy
house. Say this prayer for 9 Tuesdays.
I intercede for my family that we may be
provided for in our necessities I beseech
Thee, St. Martha (ask for the Favour) for
help and Grace as Thous didst receive when
you overcame the Dragon which Thou had
at they feet. (Our Father, Hail Mary, Glory
Be, three times).
LOSING MONEY??
By doing your own tax return, you may
be. We are experts. Let us make sure that
you don't.
Personal Tax Returns,
Accounting & Financial
Statements for Entrepreneurs
228-1024
80 - TUTORING
ACCENT word processing / translation
French - English - Italian — $18/hr. Del. on
campus. 536-7172/536-9214.
FAST, EFFICIENT TYPING done on Word
Processor. $1.50/Page. Call Rachel,
228-3881 or 224-0866.
TYPING & WORD PROCESSING. Reason
able rates. Call Gail, 732-8311 or 266-2879
EXPERIENCED TYPIST. Term papers, take-
home exams, theses, manuscripts, etc.
IBM Selectric, $1.50/page. Near campus.
224-7794.
W/P & TYPING: Term papers, theses,
mscpts., essays, tech., equal., letters,
resumes. Bilingual. Clemy 266-6641.
ADINA WORD PROCESSING. Student
discount. High quality work. 10th &
Discovery. Phone 222-2122.
TERM PAPERS & resumes. Minimum notice. 222-4661. Wed., Thurs., Fri. Noon-5
p.m. Weekends before noon.
SPEAKEASY TYPIST REGISTRY. Find a
typist or register as a typist. No charge.
SUB Concourse.
ANYTIME TYPING. Term papers, etc.
$1.25 per page. Phone Chrystal, 261-3157,
5940 Crown Street.
EDITING.   PROOFING.  WRITING  HELP.
English/German.   F.   David   B.Sc,   M.A.
738-6942 eves. Low rates.
85 - TYPING
WORD    PROCESSING    SPECIALIST.    U
write,  we  type  theses,   resumes,   letters,
essavs. Davs. evgs., wknds. 736-1208.
Student Rates $1.50/pg. db. sp. text
Theses - Equations - Reports
All work done on Mlcom Word Processor
FAST PROFESSIONAL SERVICE
JEEVA'S WORD PROCESSING
201-636 W. Broadway
876-5333        (hrs   9-4:30 p.ml
Eves., Sun. Thurs.   939-2703 Friday, March 7, 1986
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 11
+*************************^
•
West Coast artist Ron Hamilton, accompanied by an elder will present an illustrated
talk on the costumes of native dance, March
9, at 2:30 p.m., at the UBC Museum of Anthropology (6393 NW Marine Drive). Programmes are free with price of admission.
Members of the West Coast Water-
colour Group will exhibit a selection of their
work in the New Westminster Library Art
Gallery (716-6th Ave.. New Westminster),
from March 13 to April 5.
. Paintings by seven-year-old Ingrid
Gerberick are reproduced as large paintings
by her father, Vancouver artist Ken
Qarterlck at the Grunt Qaltory (2M East
6th Avenue) from noon to 6:00 p.m. from
March 5th to 15th. For more information call
875-9616.
Theresa Henry is probably the only EC-
CAD graduate who has made a painting
dedicated to her favorite party dress. Her
show opens at the Pitt International Gallery
(Pittcorp Building, the grey gallery. 36
Powell Street) from March 3-22.
The Arts, Sciences Er Technology Centre (600 Granville Street) is presenting Mad
Hatter's Haberdashery on Saturday, March
8 at 12:00 to 4:00 p.m. and Sunday March 9
from 1:00 to 4:00 p.m.. Come down and
create a hat. The workshop will provide the
materials if you provide the madness. Admission is $3.00 for adults, $1.50 for seniors,
students and children. For more information
call 687-8414.
Chinese-Canadian artist Mary-Ann Liu
pulls off a cross-cultural feat in an exhibition
of sculptured heads at the UBC Asian Centre.
The show, Eastern Eyes/Western Lenses,
runs March 2 to 16. For more information call
681-5833 or 688-7139.
The Sierra Club presents Photographer
Freeman Patterson showing a slide/music
selection on the sand dunes of the Namib
Desert in Namibia. There will be two showings at the Robson Square Cinema, Monday March 10 at 7:00 p.m. and 9:00 p.m.
Tickets are available at the door for $6.00
general admission and $4.00 for seniors,
students and unemployed.
AMS Art Gallery is exhibiting the
photographs of Stuart Dee from March 10 to
March 14 from 10 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. in the
Student Union Building, UBC.
Enjoy alot of airplay in recent weeks the
Beastie Boys have given us the nasty single,
'She's On It' . . . as well Fine Young Cannibals have been eating the needle as have
Violent Femmes w/'The Blind Leading the
Nakes' and the Jesus and Mary Chain . . .
Teeny heart throbs from the British Columbian hinterland, Grapes of Wrath will be with
Moev (and ex-54-40 drummer, Daryl
Neudorf) and the 4th Floor tonight at the
SUB Ballroom . . . reportedly almost sold
out . . . The Grapes will also be opening for
the ever-soft boys from Cambridge, Robyn
Hitchcock and the Egyptians in Seattle,
Saturday March 22 at the Moore Theatre if
you're into road trips and goat-pee American
beer . . . Closer to home Robyn and his
merry boys will be bringing their demented (?)
repetoire to the Town Pump, March 23-24
and the former Soft Boy promises one of the
more interesting shows of Spring '86 . . .
Tonight and Tomorrow, the Town Pump
present Rank and File outa the States and
outa a record contract but not out the hearts
of young British Columbian cowpunks . . .
And Seattle's sensational U-Men will be playing with the Rhythm Mission at Luv-A-Fair,
march 12, Tix $5.
The Curious Savage by John Patrick at
the Surrey Playhouse 7027 184 St. Surrey
until Mar. 8. 576-6677 or 576-2243.
Aria da Capo ends Mar. 7 at the Firehall
theatre, 280 East Cordova St. 689-0926.
Vagabond players presents the heart stopping ghost play The Haunting of Hill House
till Mar. 8 at the Vagabond Playhouse,
525-1829.
Cue to cue players present I Ought To Be
In Pictures, a Neil Simon comedy at
Cumberland Hall, 104 Ave. and 144 St. Surrey. 594-4785. Running until Mar. 29.
Only in Vancouver held over through
Mar. at the Revue Stage, 687-1644.
Children of a lassar God, the story of a
fiercely independent deaf woman and her
hearing husband. At the Arts Club Theatre
Granville Island Stage, until March 29,
687-1644.
Carousel Theatre presents Shakespeare's
Romeo and Juliet Mar. 19-29 at the Waterfront Theatre Granville Island, 685-6217.
City Stage presents Mothers and
Fathers-Consummate Comedy from
Down Under Mar. 18th to 24th at 8:30 p.m. 2
for 1 Saturday matinee at 4:%, 688-1436.
Capilano College Theatre Program The
St. Nicholas Hotel - Wm, Donnelly Prop.
Wed. to Sat. Mar. 12-15. Tues. to Sat. Mar.
18-22. 8 p.m. at Presentation House Studio
Theatre, 333 Chesterfield Ave, North Vancouver, 986-1911.
Green Thumb Theatre, Theatre for youth.
Media performance Thurs., Mar. 13, 9:30
a.m. Hugh Mc Roberts Junior Secondary,
8980 Williams Road, Richmond B.C. for info
contact Maureen Verkaar 272-2479 or
682-4664.
Frederic Wood Theatre-UBC presents
William Shakespeare As You Like It 8 p.m.
Mar. 5-15 special information and reservations
228-2678.
Headlines Theatre company presents The
Enemy Within, a political comedy about the
premier, his cleaning woman, restraint, and
you. Touring the Lower Mainland until Mar.
23. 738-2283 for locations, playing at UBC
Graduate centre ballroom Mar. 19.
Huac
The Vancouver New Music Society brings a first to Western Canada as it highlights
the works of John Cage, Philip Glass,
Meredith Mong and Robert Ashley in films
directed by Peter Greenaway
(Draughtsman's Contract). Films will be
shown at Robson Square Cinema, Wednesday, March 12 through Saturday March 15
with one complete showing of the series each
night beginning at 7 p.m. For more information call 731-3511.
Pianist John Browning joins the Vancouver Symphony Orchestra under the
direction of Gunther Herbig to feature works
by Ravel, Liszt and Schumann at the Orpheum, March 9 at 2:30 p.m., March 10 at
8:30 p.m., and March 11 at 7,30 p.m. Tickets
are available at VTC/CBO autlets 1280-3311 or
280-4444). For further information call
875-1661.
The Hot Jazz Society presents the sixteen
piece big bands sounds of Woody Herman
and his Young Thundering Herd at the Hot
Jazz Club premises (2120 Main Street),
Monday March 17 with a 8:30 p.m. and 10:30
p.m. show. Tickets are available for $12.00 in
advance or $15.00 at the cioor.
Vancouver Opera presents Mozart's The
Magic Flute at the Queen Elizabeth
Theatre, March 8, March 11, March 13 and
March 15. All performances are at 8:00 p.m.
For ticket information call 280-4444 or
280-3311.
The Arts Club Theatre is showcasing
talented local musicians in an intimate cabaret
atmosphere with the veteran performers of
Gettin's off easy appearing on March 9 and
the African pop sounds of Mojo on March 16,
at the Revue Theatre on Granville Island.
Performances are at 8:00 p.m. For further information call 687-1354.
The Romeros Quartet will be giving a rare
recital which will include works by Telemann,
Bach and Albeniz on Monday march 24 at the
Orpheum. Concert time is at 8:00 p.m. and
tickets can be charged by phone by calling
280-3311 or 280-4444.
The Deep Cove Chamber Soloists string
quartet will premiere new works by Canadian
composer, Kobylansky, Sunday, March 16 at
8:00 p.m. at the Presentation House
Gallery. Tickets for the concert are $8.00
general admission, $6.00 for students and
seniors. Information and reservations are
available by calling 986-1351.
Pacific Bluegrass and Heritage Society
explains the how to's of wrapping and plugging chords in a Sound Workshop/Open
Stage beginning at 7:00 p.m. Tuesday March
10 at the ANZA Club (3-West 8 Avenue).
Tickets are $2.00 for members, $3.00 general
admission. For more information call
376-9788.
1&&\ CO-OP OUTDOOR
^-' GEAR SWAP
Want to sell those hiking boots that
never really were your size? Buy the
gear you need to go summer backpacking without spending a
bundle?
The Co-op's Spring 1986 Outdoor Gear Swap is the answer.
Call 872-7858 for more details.
P.S. you don't have to be a
Co-op member to
participate.
Win a
Pentax
Binocular
When you come to the Gear
Swap be sure to enter to win a
Pentax Mini Binocular to be given
away at 3 PM the day of the Gear
Swap. No purchase necessary to
win. Binocular is courtesy of
Pentax Canada Inc.
M
MOUNTAIN
EQUIPMENT
CO-OP
Gear Swap
Sunday, March 16, 10am_3pm
428 W. 8th Ave., Vancouver
WALKmnn
WM-F15
IF IT'S NOT A SONY
■ STEREO CASSETTE PLAYER
■ FM STEREO/AM TUNER
■ LIGHT AND COMPACT
EXTRA 10% OFF
WITH AMS CARD
IT'S NOT A WALKMAN
■ CHROME SWITCH
■ DOLBY B
■ HEADPHONES INCLUDED
$
169
2053  WEST  41st   AVE.
VANCOUVER
263-0878
DANCE
presented by
PHYSICAL EDUCATION
ALL WELCOME
SAT., MARCH 15
8 p.m.
SUB BALLROOM NO MINORS
Tix $5: AMS Box Office, War Mem. Gym
^•••••••••••••••••••••••••;
*
STUDENTS 1/2 PRICE
ALL PERFORMANCES
SAM SHEPARD'S
searing love story
/       WWW-    |f£      i^d
fof-lOVB
"A KNOCK-OUT", Twigg, CBC
"WONDERFUL", Dykk, SUN
ARTS CLUB SEYMOUR ST. STAGE   Box0ff,ce
687-1644
THE OFFICE FOR WOMEN STUDENTS
offers a workshop for women students whose academic
and career plans are restricted by
HATH AVOIDANCE
THURSDAY, MARCH 13th & 20th
BROCK 210
SATURDAY, MARCH 22nd
BROCK 203
12:30-2:30 p.m.
12:30-4:30 p.m.
Pre-register at The Office for Women Students, Brock
Hall, Room 203, Telephone: 228-2415.
Spring/Summer Series TBA
\\\<9/7 What A Fun III
V« place to be fff
Home of the frosted mug    "**
Thru' Mar. 8th —Rob Pietre
Mar. 10-15— Richard Stepp
CW&CKEQ5
CHECKMATE
$5.95
12 oz. Burger
on a 10" bun
Share it with a
= friend =
^overlooking English Bay Page 12
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, March 7, 1986
Tories axe funds for youth
OTTAWA (CUP) — The federal
budget estimates released Feb. 27
show the government will spend at
least $20 million less on youth programmes next year.
The Minister of State (Youth) has
been spared the budget axe, but no
specific budget has been allocated,
unlike the other junior ministry
under the secretary of state, the
Ministry of State
(Multiculturalism), which does have
a budget.
The government allocated $5.5
million to wind down Katimavik,
the youth volunteer programme cut
last month. The estimates say the
other $14.2 million of Katimavik's
regular budget has been
"reallocated to new government initiatives and priorities." But these
priorities aren't spelled out
anywhere in the report.
The budget of the citizenship
development programme, which
one treasury board official said includes most of the Ministry of
Youth's spending money, will drop
from $24.3 million in 1985-86 to $10
million in 1986-87.
The government will save another
$6.8 million because there is no
money being spent this year on
youth projects. Last year the
government spent $12 million to
celebrate International Year of
Youth.
The total personnel in the
Secretary of State will decrease by
139 full time jobs.
A hastily drawn-up memo to
CUP from Minister Andree Champagne's press secretary, Caroline
Carel, lists loan guarantees for
small businesses, measures to help
farmers, an increase in the Child
Tax Credit, the Refundable Sales
Tax Credit, and support to university based research and development
as budget measures that will benefit'
youth. But none of these measures
are administered by the Ministry of
Youth.
Youth critic Howard McCurdy
(NDP - Windsor-Walderville) is not
impressed. "They (the government)
have managed to write a whole
budget with the only specific mention of youth being the elimination
of a programme, he said. "It does
not bode well for a ministry whose
portfolio virtually empty."
Barb Donaldson, chair of the
Canadian Federation of Students,
agreed. "It's incredible that two
reports come out in one week stressing the problems of youth
unemployment, that 700,000 young
people in Canada are unemployed
or underemployed" and the budget
doesn't mention it, she said.
McCurdy  and  Donaldson  con-
curr:  there is no reason  for the
ministry of youth to exist.
Since  there  is  no  money   for
Champagne to spend, her remain
ing role is to be an advocate for
youth in the Cabinet.
"She's not even doing that,"
Donaldson said.
Carel disagrees.
"As the advocate of youth within
the federal government," Carel
writes, "Champagne is confident
that the 1986 budget and its
associated measures . . . will be of
short-term benefit to Canadian
youth.
"Over the longer term, the aims
of deficit reduction and sustained
growth will return Canada to its
status as a land of hope and prosperity."
i
UBC
HE    EAT E RY
1 FREE BURGER
THE GOOD DEAL IS YOUR LEAST EXPENSIVE BURGER IS FREE WHEN
TWO ARE ORDERED. THIS APPLIES TO BEEF &TOFU BURGERS ONLY.
AND ISNT VALID FOR TAKE-OUT OR ANY OTHER COUPON.
EN JO Y YOUR BURG AND HA VE A NICE DA Y!
3431 WEST BROADWAY 738-5298
r
RED LEAF
RESTAURANT
Smorijiisbord
228-9114
10'     DISCOUNT ON
PICK UP ORDERS
JCENSED PREMISES
V     .■       Fm       11    JO   ^   00    I      I-
■AOSED SATuRD,
S.."'td,s ,i"d  HuUl.iys
» X ii m   9 00 [, "■
" 2142 Western Pj.kwjy
I UBC VMijue '
^ Al^
&
GRADUATE
STUDENT
SOCIETY
Nominations are now open for the positions of:
President House Director
Vice-President Programmes Director
Secretary Finance Director
Closing date March 14, 1 p.m.
Nomination forms and further information can be obtained
at the GSS Office 228-3203.
CHILD WELFARE SOCIAL WORKER
Competition No: NW8113-4-UBC
Various Worksites/Northern Rural - Are you a professional Social
Worker looking for an opportunity to apply your skills in Child Protection? We currently have positions in various locations in Northern Alberta in the department of Social Services and Community Health. You
will be joining a dedicated team responsible for investigating reports of
child abuse or neglect, providing support for the family, apprehension
where necessary, case plans, reports and presentations in Family
Court. You will also be involved with adoptions, foster care, and handicapped childrens' services. This is a very demanding role requiring
strong skills in interviewing and assessment, counselling, and problem
solving. A high energy level and a strong commitment to the potential of
families is also essential. Qualifications: Completion of a B.S.W. or
M.S.W. is essential. Provision of reliable transportation and acceptance
of some irregular hours is required. Relocation assistance will be available. This competition will be used to fill present and future vacancies. A
recruitment team will be in your area in early March. If you are interested
and have the required qualifications, please contact Mr. Wayne Olm-
stead collect at (403) 324-3801 to arrange an interview.
Salary: $26,196 - $32,352 (B.S.W.) - $29,112 - $36,312 (M.S.W.)
Closing Date: Open until suitable candidates selected.
Social Services & Community Health
Please send an application form or resume quoting competition
number to:
Alberta Government
Employment Office
4th Floor, Kensington Place
10011 -109 Street
Edmonton, Alberta
T5J 3S8
alberta
Crisp &Schnappy
•^\^
After your favourite activity schnapp over to a couple
of fresh alternatives. Peppermint Schnapps and new Orange Schnapps,
two cool blasts of freshness. So what are you waiting for?
HIRAM WALKER SCHNAPPS
TASTE THE DIFFERENCE
iwe >evj
3t • I'/j Blks h«" kits Beach

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