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The Ubyssey Oct 25, 1968

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Array THE UBYSSEY
Vol. L, No. 20
VANCOUVER, B.C., FRIDAY, OCTOBER 25, 1968
228-2305
PROF CLUB INVADED
JERRY RUBIN, portrait of a rebel. See stories and pictures inside.
— dirk visser photo Page 2
THE     UBYSSEY
Friday, October 25,  1968
— powell hargrave photo
REASSURING NERVOUS FACULTY and private bodyguard in faculty club suite at rear, Singapore prime minister Lee Kuan Yew smiles and says: "All this isn't bothering me at all."
Against opposition of faculty, Lee agreed to speak to The Ubyssey and promised an interview
before he leaves.
Singapore P.M. unfTightened,
chortles at 'great fluster'
By JAMES CONCHIE
"Thanks for the pic, how about an interview ?"
So said the sign held up to the window of
Singapore prime minister Lee Kuan Yew's
suite in the faculty club.
The bit of sign language with the English-
speaking prime minister took place during
Thursday's occupation of the faculty club.
After trying several locked doors, I located
Lee, who is living at the faculty club during
his 19-day stay at UBC, by looking through
french doors on a second story balcony.
After Lee's picture was taken and signs
were read, a smiling Lee ordered his slightly
frightened-looking    secretary    to    unlock    the
doors. Against the opposition of several very
worried-looking faculty members, he agreed to
speak to The Ubyssey.
Lee, who has indicated a strong desire for
privacy during his stay, seemed amused by the
occupation of the club. With a large grin, he
said: "All this isn't bothering me at all. It takes
something of a much more serious nature than
this to get me excited."
"What is happening here ? Everyone seems
to be running around in a great fluster," he
said.
And then, after promising to speak to The
Ubyssey again before he leaves the city, the
quiet prime minister locked the door and returned to reassuring some very, very upset
faculty members.
If reactionary Malcolm
there'd be norevolt-or
"As one of the under-privil-
edged members of this university, I think the whole thing
is damn silly. If they want to
close the place down, what's
the point of occupying it?
They  should burn  it to the
ground."
The thoughts of dirty, dope
smoking communist, outside
agitator?
No, just the reaction of as-
sitant English professor Dr.
Peter  Quartermain   to   Thurs-
— powall hargrave photo
BASH OF THE YEAR at faculty club was well attended by
many well known local dignitaries and socialites, among
them Joachim Foikis.
was prez
love either
day's occupation of the faculty
club.
Quartermain's statement
echoed the thoughts of a large
number of faculty members
who were inclined to treat the
incident as a joke.
Said associate zoology professor Dr. John Phillips: "I
can't see the point of it all,
other than it's a damn funny
thing."
Said assistant economics prof.
Dave Bond: "What the hell
can we do?"
Classics department head Dr.
Malcolm MacGregor took a
dimmer view of the incident.
"I'm disgusted. The guttersnipe comes up from the U.S.
and organizes this thing and
all the students follow along
like sheep," he said.
In response to a question
from a listener, MacGregor
said: "Generally, I believe in
my country, right or wrong.
Your flag is more important
than your life, in most circumstances. I am fed up with this
business of living and loving
with other people. I am reactionary."
CAST OFF BONDS,
RUBIN TELLS 2000
Jerry Rubin, dug a verbal fork into the creeping meatball
Thursday and students ate it up.
Yippie leader Rubin's speech in front of SUB provided the
mood for the events later in the day.
"The ground on which you are standing is liberated," he
said, urging students to cast off the mental restrictions society
places on them.
"This society turns everybody into policemen, imposing all
sorts of rules on themselves. You are brought up into a society
which constantly tells you 'don't do this, don't do that'."
"I say do this, do that. Wherever you see a rule, break it."
Rubin emphasized the fact that only action meant anything,   -
that words are wasted if they are not accompanied by action.
"The university tries to tell you that discussion and study
are the things that are meaningful. That's shit. I never learned
anything in school, I learned in the streets."
Rubin called  universities  "big baby-sitting  agencies".
"American society is closed, there is no need for more people
to take part in production. So they build universities and start a,
war in Vietnam to get the young whites off the streets into
university and get the young blacks killed off.
"This prevents them from taking action on what they want."    .
Rubin said every person should be able to control his body
as well as the ground on which he stood.
Rubin objected to things like drug laws and specially-
planned buildings which prevented people from doing whatever
they wanted with their bodies.
He said the Yippies, the Youth International Party, was a
religious movement, not a political party. He said all its members
were like priests spreading the word and that he came to UBC
to give a sermon.
He outlined the slogans of the party and their relevance to
students of today.
'Abandon the creeping meatball', he said, meant drop out
and reject anything that oppressed you, such as school, exams,
teachers, or the political structure.
He said "Fourteen or fight' is the demand of the party that
the voting age be reduced to age fourteen.
He suggested that on Nov. 5, American election day, people
all over the world march to demand a vote in the American elections. Since America controlled most of the world, the people
there should have a choice in how America is governed.
Rubin, wearing a stylish cape made from a National Liberation Front flag, received a generally hostile welcome when he
started his speech but quickly won over the crowd of about 1,500.
He said television and advertisements helped spread revolutionary ideas because they brought the whole world into the
individual's consciousness and urged him to want much more
than he had.
"When the young black kid is ueged to want a refrigerator,
he says 'Ya, I want it, and I'm going to take it'."
Near the end of his speech, Rubin introduced the Yippie   *
candidate for president, Pigasus the pig.
"Why vote for half-pigs like Humphrey, Wallace, and Nixon
when you can have the whole hog, Pigasus."
He said that the original idea was to roast and eat Pigasus
after he was nominated ("In the regular parties, the candidate
eats you after the nomination") but this was dropped because
the party's vegetarians threatened to split away if this occurred.
At the end of the speech, Rubin re-emphasized the need
for students to take action to liberate themselves.
"We've got all these people here, now let's do something.    .
It there any place on campus that needs liberating ?"
"The faculty club," yelled out several members of the crowd,
and off they went.
*>
— powell hargrave photo
"YES, AAARTHA, that's real money being burned, and you
can  bet that ain't maple leaves  in that cigarette." Friday, October 25, 1968
THE     U BYSSEY
Pago 3
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,„•■*,*»-.■*,   ■   -    *.-*. :-t%i|tisfc»*v
; *   ... Mj*^       ^^'^SdXM V* ,
.'.P******..*'".!.
SHADES OF BURT LANCASTER! An unidentified student tried the faculty' pond Thursday. It was part of the festivities arising from Jerry Rubin's noon-hour speech
STUDENTS PARTY
AS  PROFS   DEPART
RAUCOUS RUCKUS ROUSES FACULTY CLUB
By JOHN GIBBS
It was a quiet Thursday at UBC's faculty club—
. until 2 p.m.
That was roughly the time 2,000 students, a
presidential-pig-candidate, and a horde of newsmen
joined the faculty for lunch.
The students created mass confusion and participated in such activities as drinking the faculty liquor,
smoking their cigarettes, doing up dope, climbing
over the furniture, burning dollar bills and an
American flag, swimming nude in the patio pool
and basically enjoying themselves.
Most  of  the  faculty   in   attendance   seemed   to
accept the situation with resignation and merely left when it became apparent the students       'X*.
wouldn't. =:
Club maitre d' Bob Robert later told The       -
Ubyssey that when the students entered the
building, he was told by faculty officials to
lock everything up, let the students do what
they wanted and serve them coffee.
Of those faculty members who remained,
some just sat and looked amused, some looked
disgusted and appeared to be waiting for
" someone to throw the protesters out while
still others entered into arguments with the
students.
When asked for reaction, most of those
watching said either they didn't know what
was going on or they had no comment. Those
arguing with students made their opposition
eloquently apparent.
Meanwhile,   the  students  had   taken   the
building  over,  rushing  gleefully  into  every
'open room and forcing most  of  those  that
weren't.
The bar was a popular place to be. Despite
efforts   to   lock   the   liquor   coolers,   several       -I
students beat the staff to it and before long       **«
there was a general rush to get the  "free       C*x
booze".
When everything in sight was gone, they began
opening cupboards and looking for anything that
was to be had. People stood with a bottle in one
hand and a fistfull of cherries in the other.
At this point two students assumed responsibility
for stopping the looting and physically prevented
further looting.
Their stand was met with angry shouts from those
attempting to get into the bar's lockers. Accusations
kof "stopping the fun" were voiced.
"The idea is to disrupt and do what you want,"
screamed one thirsty patron. "If you bastards don't
get out of the way, we'll throw you out."
Before they had time to act, however, the president of the faculty club, commerce prof. D. S.
Huberman, climbed on a chair and got the attention
of the gathering.
He made several sarcastic remarks about how
"great" the occupation was and invited the mass to
stay for the afternoon. He was met with catcalls and
yelling to the effect that the invite wasn't really
necessary—they were going to stay anyway.
"If you're going to steal and loot, we will be
forced  to call the police and prosecute,"  he  said.
Protest planned?
Thursday's mini-revolution was a classic example of
the spontaneous response of students to the stimulus of
a celebrated radical. Right?
Not quite. While it is true that the march on the
faculty club began with Jerry Rubin asking where students were not allowed to enter and a student shouting back, "The faculty club," the idea for the march was
conceived a little earlier.
The truth is, plans for occupying the faculty club
were laid by Rubin and a number of UBC radicals Wednesday night at an infamous Stephens Street house
where several of the radicals live and where Rubin
stayed during his visit to Vancouver.
The plans were mentioned when Rubin spoke at
Simon Fraser University Wednesday afternoon.
Wednesday evening there were rumors circulating
on campus concealing a Pig Parade culminating in a
march on the faculty club.
Most ideas that arise on campus never get off the
ground due to impossible situations or student apathy.
This one was different. —M.F.
Catcalls. "As long as you don't break things you are
quite welcome here this afternoon." Cheers and jeers.
Meanwhile, back at the bar, an employee arrived
and relieved the two student guards by padlocking
everything in sight.
Later as the students settled down to demonstrating and enjoying themselves in earnest, a pot-party
became the centre of interest in the main dining
room.
Ruth Dworkin, AMS internal affairs officer,
was very much in evidence as she was obviously
pleased with the affair.
"This is the most fun I've had in a long time,"
she said. "Now the hare is gone, it's time for the pig."
Asked about destroyed and stolen property, she
said, "Oh, on't worry . . . the good ole AMS will
pay for everything."
Later a very disgusted looking former AMS president Shaun Sullivan arrived and was met by catcalls and jeers.
"The whole thing is ridiculous," he said. "This
will put faculty support for academic reform back
at least three years."
Someone   shouted:   "Why   didn't   you   do
- •       things like this when you were the boss?"
Sullivan, who was AMS president last year,
1       just smiled weakly,.
i Stan Persky said he thought the situation
1       was O.K.
1 "What I want to know is, are the students
j       going  to   do   anything   tomorrow,"   he   said.
H "This is great fun now but sooner or later we
have to address the problem of governing
ourselves.
"The student government is too concerned
with petty issues like the administration of
SUB. This shows what the students feel—the
AMS should have reflected it before now."
Meanwhile, in the midst of the action, two
young professors stood and discussed Freudian
theories of sexual repression and its consequences.
A worried looking Dave Zirnhelt, AMS
president, rushed through the main foyer to
discuss the situation with faculty officials.
"They h<^ve no right to invade and destroy
private proprey. However, I understand the
motives," he said before entering the office.
•v, "The faculty club should take any action
- \       they see fit. The AMS will not take any. It's
not their pla0*- ** "
Back at the ba^^ ' wondered about
the  loss  and  damage^^^ any  of the
faculty diners had left wufl^^,—^*"*»Xat there
was cigarettes and liquor missing and a lot of glasses
had been broken.
It was also reported that an unidentified student
saved some $200 worth of meal receipts from destruction, although some were destroyed.  Without
these, there is no record of the day's transactions.
Continued on Page 15
See: OCCUPATION Page 4
THE     UBYSSEY
Friday, October 25,  1968
THEUBYSSEY
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the university years
by the Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C. Editorial opinions are
those of the editor and not of the AMS or the university. Member,
Canadian University Press. The Ubyssey subscribes to the press services
of Pacific Student Press, of which it is founding member, and Underground
Press Syndicate. Authorized second class mail by Post. Office Department,
Ottawa, and for payment of postage in cash. The Ubyssey publishes Page
Friday, a weekly commentary and review. City editor, 228-2305. Other
calls, 228-2301 editor; Page Friday 228-2309; sports 228-2308; advertising
228-3977. Telex 04-5843.
OCTOBER 25, 1968
Support the NFL Saturday
On Saturday there will be a march protesting the American war against the people
of Vietnam.
Since the reason for U.S. involvement isn't
a moral one, it follows that the U.S. won't leave
because of moral persuasion. The main factor
that will compel the U.S. to withdraw is the
continued military success of the people of
South Vietnam under the leadership of the
the National Liberation Front which has resulted in widespread disaffection amongst
American and puppet trooops.
Nobody likes the war, but if the NLF were
to pursue pacifism in the face of American
agressions, the people would be kept in bond
age under a very barbarous police state. The
victory of the NLF is the only road to a just
peace.
The march leaves from in front of the CNR
station at 10:30 a.m. and the rally takes place
in front of the* American Consulate at Georgia
and Burrard. Among the speakers will be Mordecai Briemberg for the NLF.
SUPPORT THE NLF I
U.S. AGRESSORS GET OUT OF VIETNAM I
END CANADIAN SUPPORT FOR
U.S. AGRESSION!
END UNIVERSITY COMPLICITY!
WITHDRAW U.S. TROOPS NOW!
SMASH IMPERIALISM!
EDITORIAL:
Occupation due to frustration, inaction
Why did the faculty club occupation happen?
It was not an organized action —
Jerry Rubin talked about the restrictions society places on students, and
the need to take action.
He then asked: "Is there anywhere on campus that needs liberation?" \
Several people yelled out "Tiie
faculty club". Most students laughed),
but as a few moved off, incrediblyj
almost the whole 1,500 people moved
after them, calmly, casually, and picking up interested passers-by as the
march moved across campus.
The group was not led by anyone,
nor composed of any particular types
of students. As students returning
from the faculty club told their
friends about what happened, many
more came over to see what was going on, and stayed around.
Fully 3,000 students, at a minimum, consciously decided to enjoy
themselves for a time at the faculty
club.
But the question is why did they
do it?
There were no goals, no objectives,
no definable reasons for picking the
faculty club to occupy, or even the
concept of occupation itself.
But the reasons why it happened
are probably the same, though not as
concrete, as why black residents of
ghettos may suddenly take to rioting
and looting.
The reasons, and the prediction
that something like this would happen, were outlined in the editorial
'Burn baby burn' of Sept. 17.
Students feel a great personal oppression by the authoritarian university, are frustrated by tiie narrow
channels open to change, and don't
know what action to take to get what
they need to give their lives some
meaning.
For the students Thursday, the
symbol of the faculty club housing
the affluent, complacent faculty who
are their nearest contact with the
power structure, although not being
the controlling forces, was the nearest
part of the structure they could attack.
Much like the small businessman
in the ghetto, representing but not
controlling the repressive economic
structure, is the one the ghetto residents have closest contact with, and
whom they attack during the riot.
Some of the actions during the
occupation had great similarities to
looting, and the enjoyment of the
physical act of taking things they
have no 'legal' right to, of the ghetto
residents.
People took liquor and cigarettes
from the bar, but not just for themselves. To the cheers of the onlookers,
they joyfully passed the drinks and \
cigarettes among the crowd, every- '
one smiling and laughing and obviously enjoying the act of sharing
these things.
Some others took the opportunity
to show their disdain for the structured material environment by burning dollar bills and an American flag,
again cheered loudly by the onlookers, j
During this time the mood of the
people was changing from one of confrontation and destruction of things
they opposed (destroying the invisible barrier in front of the faculty
club, violating the sanctity of private
property, i.e. the cigarettes and
liquor) to more a happy parjjrjriood,
a positive enjoyment of their newfound 'freedom'.
Some started singing and dancing, one went swimming, and the
mood was set for the party that followed during the evening.
Later on a band arrived, and the
party continued.
In political terms, however, the
occupation forces did not have any
concrete goals in mind, as was obvious from the very negative reaction
to the few people present who attempted to organize discussions of
why people were there and what they
wanted to do next.
The people did it simply because
they wanted to strike out in some
way, to register a protest, and, after
this wanted to have fun.
Anyone who tries to use the. fact
of the occupation to justify a sit-in or
sleep-in of the faculty club to press
certain demands on the administration
is misinterpreting the mood of most
of the 3,000 students who took part.
It was a political act only in the
yippie terms of striking out against
authority, making the protest, and
then having some fun.
Perhaps a small minority were
motivated on some concrete issues,
but not the majority.
It was a significant action, it undoubtedly scared the administration
badly, but it certainly was not an
endorsement for any particular demands or endorsement for a continuation of this particular action.
A significant number of students
registered a protest, then had a party,
and that is where it ends.
But for the majority of the students the purpose of the protest has
been completed, and any further occupation of the club by small numbers of students will only result in
setting up a reaction on campus which
will more than negate the good effects of the first action.
CANADA as colony and U.S. partner
American domination of Canada is painless compared with their attempt to dominate Vietnam. But,
in spite of the relative comfort of Canadians, we
share with the Vietnamese and other people living in
"neo-colonies", the same lack of national independence. The Canadian economy is controlled by American corporation. Canadian newspapers give us American propaganda instead of news. The majority of our
trade unions are controlled from the U.S. (and we
are the only country in the world whose trade unions
are controlled from outside its borders.)
Canadian universities, built and maintained at
Canadian taxpapers' expense, allow faculty members
to carry on war reseach for such organizations as the
U.S. Army and the U.S. Department of 'Defense'.
Such activities in no way benefit Canada, and their
result can only increase pain and suffering throughout the world. In addition, again at our own expense,
our universities turn out skilled technicians and managers for American subsidiary colorations both in
Canada and throughout the world.
Both in the school system and in the universities,
many of the texts are American. Whether it be
lying about the justness of the struggles of the native
peoples and of the Af*""*-4-^-'"' * ■•**, or directing the
social sciences to a* ^^fndustrial complex;
these texts sgry ^eXhe Americanization of
Canada. Arid, of— ■ MET Canadian politicians dance
to the tunes played from Wall Street and Washington.
In the last year, our Army has been conducting
exercises using mock villages that are strikingly
similar to ones found in Vietnam. Within the last
month, a joint Canadian-American war game took
place in Alberta. The form it took was chemical
warfare.
Chemical warfare is specifically outlawed by International conventions of which both Canada and
the U.S. are signatories. Of course, the Army assured
us that this was strictly for defensive purposes only.
But how is it conceivable that the Army could be
of any use in an urban or rural area if chemical or
bacteriological warfare were used against the civilian population ? And who would this enemy be ?
It is known that the U.S. has already used chemical
warfare against the Vietnamese, and it is also known
that a large number of sheep died near a bacteriological warfare centre in Utah. Would a country
whose president publically awards university scientists for their research into an internationally illegal
form of warfare abide by international law and
humanitarian principles ?
Most Canadians resent American domination of
our country, but few of us are willing to do anything
about it. Most of us are busy trying to make a decent
life for ourselves and our families — and this is hard
enough, with prices going up faster than wages, the
housing shortage, fantastic interest rates on loans,
etc. etc.
But for the Vietnamese living under American
domination, a decent life is impossible. In the Saigon
controlled areas, the unemployment rate is regularly
50 per cent of the potential work force, and prices
rise as much as 11 per cent in a single month. Rent
for peasants is normally 50 per cent of their yearly
crop. Political repression is intense, and it affects
not only supporters of the NLF, but also pacifists,
'neutrals', and anyone who is openly critical of the
Saigon regime. For the Vietnamese, national inde
pendence and the opportunity to live a decent life
are one and the same thing.
Canadians can't be so sure that the American
domination of our country will always be as painless
as it is today. As America's economic empire decreases due to the success of the NLF in Vietnam
and future national liberation movements around
the world, U.S. corporations will try to maintain
their profits by tightening their grip on their remaining economic colonies. Canadians may taste
some of the oppressive conditions that face most of
the people in Latin America, Africa, and much of
Asia.
This doesn's mean that Canadians should side
with the United States against the national liberation
movements, because whatever side we put ourselves
on, U.S. imperialism will fall just as hard as the
Roman Empire did. The black people in the U.S. and .
oppressed people all around the world are rising
up in greater numbers every day. The Vietnamese
have shown that oppressed people will not be kept
down forever. 'Neo-colonialism' is already dying —
in the next few decades it will probably be dead. We
should join the Vietnamese and millions of others in
looking forward to a world based on the principle
of self-determination for everyone. More and more
Canadians will become interested in international
questions as economic conditions worsen. American
corporations control our economy and repressive
measures like Bill 33 are passed in the interest of
U.S. imperialism. In the long run, the fight for a
decent life for ourselves and our families involves
a fight for national independence, just as it does in
Vietnam. In a very real sense, the fight of the National Liberation Front is our fight. Friday, October 25,  1968
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 5
ANOTHER EDITORIAL:
AMS complicates chaos
Student council in their outright condemnation of the takeover of the faculty club
showed an incredible lack of perception as to
the reasons for what occurred Thursday.
The cries that this action set back the
cause of university reform are ludicrous —
like Berkeley and Columbia, this will likely
provide a much-needed impetus to get some
real reform off the gorund — though it will
in no way result in any effective student control over the university.
As is pointed out in the previous editorial,
a significant number of students (almost as
many as vote for a wining candidate in an
AMS election) consciously decided that they
wanted to occupy the faculty club in protest.
They had real reasons, and acted on
them.
One of them was that they felt student
council is not providing the leadership, and
administration - faculty not allowing the
changes, they feel are needed to get some
of the university's problems solved.
We believe this was a predictable and
positive action.
Granted, a continued occupation does not
serve any good purpose, and indeed will have
a harmful effect by alienating most students.
Perhaps this is one of the reasons the authorities reacted so cautiously, and even encouraged the students to stay at the faculty
club.
But council, in totally condemning all
the day's events, condemn the just initial
action of the occupation.
In fact, they condemn themselves, for almost all of them, as well as roughly 1000
others, at one time or another dropped in to
the faculty club to see what was going on.
But throughout the whole council meeting
Dave Zirnhelt, for once, was the only one
with a realistic grasp of what was happening,
but his proposals were given short shrift by
the rest of councillors.
Zirnhelt suggested that because of the obvious  fact   that   students   were   not   rallying
Studying
It was extremely pleasing to
note that not only does the
University administration find
that there is sufficient study
space to allow the construction
of the "erection" in front of the
library rather than additional
they have gone so far as to eliminate study space that was
there last year.
Considerable study space
was removed from both Sedgewick and Ridington. The only
two possible answers to the
question of why is that either
exames are being abandoned thus there is no need for
any amount of study space or
the administration feels that
the only way to eliminate
studying doldrums is to study
two to a seat.
George Shindler
EDITOR: Al Birnie ""
News  John Twigg
City  _   Paul  Knox
Managing   Bruce Curtis
Wire   Peter Ladner
Associate    Mike  Finlay
Photo    Powell   Hargrave
Sports     Jim Maddin
Page Friday   Andrew Horvat
around the action council has taken on Fair
Weather or Foul, or anything else council
was doing in the area of university reform,
the meeting there should try to come up with
proposals for more definite action and/or
more forceful presentation of demands so that
students could be rallied back under the leadership of the AMS.
But council wasn't having any of that
sort of reasonableness.
With George Wallace-like dries of 'law
and order', 'protection of private property'
and the like, council could not see beyond
outright condemnation without any proposals
that would create a path out of the chaos.
Another of Zirnhelt's suggestions was that
because of the relatively small number of
people present at the meeting, any AMS decision on the matter should be put off until
today at the rally at noon, where many more
students could have a say in the decision.
But with the emotional lynch-mob attitude of the spectators present, and council
being what it is, they decided to 'lynch them
now' and not wait for any more rational
trial the next day.
Frank Gergory of forestry twice stated
that a large number of members of his undergrad society were prepared to see to it that
no future occupation occurred — "by any
means necessary." We must add that Gregory himself and forestry president Derek
Webb do not feel this way and have done
their best to discourage their members.
Gregory said that the occupation will
cause a distinct split along the reactionary/-
radical line and cause much violence in the
future .
But council itself by total condemnation
of the occupation has furthered the split by
not realizing what the positive aspects of the
event are and following Zirnhelt's suggestions to do something positive for a change.
They have proven more than ever their
inability to see what is going on this campus
and provide positive leadership.
They're Going Fast
Buy Your Copy
Today
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OFFICIAL  NOTICES
Alma  Mater  Society
Election for the Office of AMS Co-Ordinator
On Monday, October 28th at 12:30 in SUB ballroom,
those candidates involved in the election for Alma
Mater Society Coordinator will be speaking about their
platforms and other pertinent issues. Come, listen to
them speak, and have your questions answered.
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THE     UBYSSEY
Friday, October 25, 1968
Club take-over condemned
despite split council vote
By ALEX VOLKOFF
Ubyssey Council Reporter
The Alma Mater Society voted Thursday
to condemn the take-over of the faculty club.
In a meeting well-attended by the students
held in the conversation pit in SUB, council
passed the following motion:
"We in no way condone the actions of the
body of students and non-students, who participated in today's "take-over" of the faculty club.
We believe that all citizens in a free society
have the right to express their opinions and
frustrations whatever they may be, but at the
same time are accountable for their actions
whenever these actions break the law. On behalf of the students of this university we emphasize our disapproval of today's events."
Forestry representative Frank Gregory was
the first to say council should condemn the
events of the evening.
"What students probably don't realize, is
that a lot of action has already been taken by
the administration towards the reforms we
want," he said.
"I'm afraid that action such as what happened tonight will put all those hard-worked
hours in jeopardy."
"Talks and negotiations have just begun
on the student brief, and now nothing will
happen."
But Gregory had one good word to say
about the take-over.
"At least this is going to polarize the
students and will let people know where they
stand."
But Shaun Sullivan, former AMS president,
thought that this polarization was a bad thing.
"Now students are versus students, faculty
is versus faculty, and students are versus faculty," he said.
He said this was a very sad day for the
university.
"You just delude yourself if you say the
faculty is taking an attitude of utmost co-operation and making a benevolent effort at communication.
"Sure they're doing this tonight, but that's
just to keep the lid on. Tomorrow you will see
how they've changed their minds."
Sullivan said students have a responsibility
as social beings to other students and the
university community.
"This was an emotional, do-your-own thing,
and I don't think the people of the province
or the government are going to be very sympathetic towards the students," he said.
Commerce representative Russ Grierson
said many of the people in the faculty club were
there out of mere curiosity, and the take-over
turned into a bad affair.
"Many weren't even students from UBC,"
he said. "The place has turned into a real
pigsty."
Carey Linde, AMS vice-president said this
was the precise reason the council should not
condemn the evening's affairs.
"If people were there as you say, out of
curiosity, and if they didn't know what they
were doing or supporting there, then you're
condemning the curiosity," he said.
"We student councillors were there too, so
you must want to condemn us as well."
Linde supported the action saying, "This is
the largest group I've ever seen do something,
and it's got to happen again."
One student visitor said the march showed
individual student support and students are
seriously and sincerely trying to show they
want reforms.
In answer to him another student said the
students were obviously not sincere in what
they were doing.
"The march displays many students are
pissed off but don't know what at," he said.
"If students really meant what they said,
they'd have gone into the faculty club, through
it, and out the other side, instead of letting it
turn into what it did."
AMS president Dave Zirnhelt disagreed
with most of the'other councillors in saying
some good came out of the take-over.
"Now we've got something definite to work
with," he said. "If we can get the same number
following us, we could get something done."
Zirnhelt said the AMS should be careful
not to over-react.
"Perhaps we shouldn't react at all, but act,"
he said. "We must go tomorrow noon and propose to students some concrete ideas and ask
their opinion.
"We mustn't demonstrate we are split ourselves. We can't be led by a minority, but must
show how the whole student body feels about
this."
Zirhelt said he saw the need for more than
just condemnation.
"Certainly we can disapprove of the minority that broke the law and messed the place up,
but we've got to come out with something
positive as well."
Mike McPhee, science representative followed up Zirnhelt's feeling of hope.
"This morning I was going to a university
where this couldn't happen. Tonight I find myself on a campus where this did happen. It's
shaken things up now, and perhaps we can get
something good moving from here."
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OQGQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQOQQQQQQOQQQQQQGQQQQ  By GORDON FIDLER
She walks long after midnight. Her body nude,
except for slightly unfleshcoloured makeup on
her breasts and a knitted patch with an over-the-
shoulder strap. She is alone but for a cheetah
which she restrains by a leash. They stroll together through the underground shopping mall in
Place Ville Marie in Montreal.
I stalked them once, along with thirty other
guys, dressed as I was, in black hat and tails, our
eyes made up darkly and sunken in, our gaze as
blank as we could manage.
By five o'clock the wild-eyed young
French director had finished spending thousands
of dollars of your money on a thirty-second shot.
All the quartz lights could now be taken down;
■b__b________^______b p£ 2wo h^^^i^^b^
with a highly original and imaginative film which
they believe they will not be able to sell to the
public of whose criticism they are afraid.
Last summer, a unit from the Board spent
some weeks in Toronto with a group of teenagers.
The object of the exercise was to show them how
films are made by letting them help make one
about themselves, and to be at the same time a
presentation to the public on how 'modern youth'
thinks. "Interpret Canada to Canadians" says the
Board to its employees.
Christopher's Movie Matinee (along with a
companion piece, Flowers on a One-Way Street,
about the hippies of Yorkville) contains some
rather strong anti-establishment comments such
as showing the mayor to be, to put it mildly, ineffectual in dealing with anyone. A charge was
an experimental film — probably the most expensive home movie in history as both he and his
wife and his baby son are in it.
Contrary to what the Film Board usually
wants, which is complete information on what a
film is going to contain before it goes into production, Derek more or less made this one up as he
went along, with jugglers, and Tiny Tim's music,
plastic seals and rummage sale statues of Atlas.
But this was a special case, the Board was
willing to put up with that because he was trying
out some new equipment, and the Board loves to
test new  equipment,   and  invent things.
Derek was interested in producing an effect
similar to ancient Chinese shadow drama. Like
Angel and Niagara Falls, there is an element
of the fantastic in the film, the substratum of some
Not
Filming
Bad
camera and dollies and cables packed away and
we extras bussed back to the Film Board to remove costumes and make-up.
To this day, I don't know what the film is
about. Everyone involved except two people spoke
French and they didn't know either.
The National Film Factory of Canada sprawls
itself over twelve acres of land just outside
Montreal. It has a large chimney. It also has
boilers. And massive parking lots, company cars,
chain link fences topped with barbed wire, and
security guards whose thing is to check passes.
The tastefully decorated and endless corridors
are full of people magically turning taxes into
films like Better Housing in B.C. and Treasure
of ihe Forest but also, and fortunately, films like
Derek May's Angel, Ryan Larkin's animated
experimental film on walking, Norman McLaren's
Pas de Deux and several features thinly disguised as documentaries.
The "good, grey board" is two-faced, to be
sure. One of the faces, however, displays a small
smile. Films of a non-propaganda nature are beginning to find a wider acceptance with the NFB
brass, and imagination, even in the propaganda
films, is gaining a foothold. It is still wise policy
though, for a creative director and producer, not
to tell the business managers and the higher-ups
precisely what they are doing. There can't be too
many people who know, for example, that Claude
Jutra's latest film, Waooh is using Board resources to show young people indulging in their
wildest fantasies: bouncing on mountains of styro-
foam, or running naked down St. Catherine's
street or blowing up nice middle-class homes of
nice middle-class taxpayers. The big thing that
those holding the money are afraid of is that a
film is going to run out of control: that a director's concept of what he is doing will change while
he is making his film, and changes will be necessitated in his strict budget which was carefully
plotted beforehand. The Board will then be left
stirred up that the unit was deliberately setting
up disturbances among the hippies in order to
have something to film. The papers splashed it
around, the Board got scared of the public reaction and recalled the unit, but the film exists
and will be released.
Several years ago, they started the summer
student program. One year, they gave the students complete freedom, but some of them screwed up, and the Board got almost nothing out of it;
the next year the students were only allowed to
make 8mm film loops — single concept jobs to be
used for educational purposes. The students were
forced to conform to what the Board in general
feels to be the purpose of film: the transmitting
of information and facts.
This summer, all the students hired had some
experience with film before, and this must have
confused the Board.
They began by giving us a tour of the building and a lecture on professionalism. That's been
one of the hang-ups of the board for a long time:
the concern with doing things the right way, the
concern with the gloss on the form of the film.
The head of the camera dept. is still like that, but
things are changing bit by bit. The director of
English production, who gave the little speech,
suffered a bloodless coup, and the new director
of production is a little more personable.
And then we were placed in our office with
two typewriters, two telephones (one of which
was removed later), and an air conditioner (also
removed) for a week while they decided what to
do with us. They came up with a solution they
thought would be acceptable to both parties. We
would spend the first part of our tenure each
making a one minute film clip for television telling people to be safe: wear your seat belt, and
don't fall down stairs unless you enjoy that sort
of thing.
Before I made my clip, I met and worked with
Derek May for two weeks while he was making
wierd madness that lurks just under everyday
life. It is called Pandora's Box and is a strange
mixture of the classical and the mundane. Pandora
stretches out her washing on a line hung between
the pillars of what could be the Parthenon, there
are statues gliding mysteriously through forest
glades and Zeus, as he speaks, spews huge clouds
of coloured shadow onto the background. If
you're interested in celebrity spotting, Derek
appears as Assman, and I am behind, and moving
one of the cardboard heads, at least once.
After that, I played director for a while, with
camera and lighting crew at my command and
showing a 75 dollar a day judo expert how to
fall downstairs for 40 seconds as an example to
Canada's vast television audience not to do the
same.
We were back to making films by ourselves
after that. We had some troubles with the bureaucracy and one of us was completely screwed
up because they didn't like his idea or approach.
But I managed to keep away from explaining what
I was doing until I had finished.
Bureaucracy at the Film Board is a game
played at the major league level — very much of
our time was spent waiting for someone to do
something; for a form to travel from one department to another, or for film rushes to be found,
because some minor functionary had stamped
them with the wrong rubber stamp and they were
magicked away into some third floor limbo. There
was the amazing stretching of hours into days
while one's creative impulses dribbled down the
drain. The government is very anti-impulsive.
But that's the price you have to pay for having
all equipment and services under one government
financed roof.
Of course, the advantage is a professional looking film.
A valid concept, but only if imagination is not
sacrificed.
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THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, October 25,  1968 TUXEDO
RENTAL & SALES
GARMENTS TO CHOOSE FROM
• Full Dress (Tells)
• Morning Coats
• Directors' Coats
• White * Blue Coats
• Shirts a Accessories
• Mail Orders Invited
(Downstairs)
E. A. Lee Formal Wear
623 Howe MU 3-2457
SUZUKI
MOTORCYCLE CENTRE
Service - Parts - Accessories
2185 W. Broadway 731-7510
NEW YORK
COSTUME SALON
RENTALS
WHITE DINNER JACKETS
TUEXDOS,  DARK   SUITS,  TAILS
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OVERSEAS
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The war is not over
By HILDA THOMAS
Despite tho much publicized Paris 'peace talks*-*, the U.S. has continued
the war against Vietnam, and has in fact escalated it. The daily tonnage of bombs
dropped north of the demilitarized zone—in an area which includes almost 25%
of the land and the population of North Vietnam—is almost double that dropped
over the whole of the North before Johnson announced the 'limitation' of the
bombing. In June of this year the 0.& House of Representatives passed a bill
authorizing the addition of a billion dollars to tbe 26.7 billion-dollar Vietnam
war budget, and more than 40,000 troops have been seat to Vietnam since
Johnson made his announcement, bringing the total number of U.S. troops
tQ. 649,000,-.
The current rtttiors ©f a breafctftcough in the Paris talks can be clearly
seen as an effort to prop lip the shaky campaign of Democratic presidential
candidate Hubert Humphrey. In the recently published Mis-don to Hanoi,
Ashmore and Beggs provide ample documentation to show that the unconditional
cessation of the bombing was an iibsGkite and unnegoliable prior condition to
any substantive discussion aimed at bringing about a -settlement of the war.
The understanding of Hanoi was. that an announcement of the cessation of the
bombing would be made at the first meeting between the representatives of
the U.S. and the Democratic Republic of Vietnam. Of course, no such announcement was forthcoming. The American attempt to lay the blame for the failure
of the talks at the feet of the Hanoi Government has relied upon the general
ignorance of their own people of the basis on which the talks were agreed to, a
condition which Mission to Hanoi should do much to dispel.
What about the role played by the Government of Canada? As a member
of tho Inti-rnntional Control Commission. Canada was committed to act as a
detached obs-rver in enforcing the Geneva Agreement. Her failure to carry
out this responsibility is a matter of record. Canada has persistently refused
to support thi call of U.N. General Secretary U Thant for a cessation of the
bombinn, on ihe grounds that it is "Unrealistic" (Pearson) or "Unbalanced"
(Sharp)
Canada continues to sell military material to the U.S.—to the amount
of 300 million dollars in 1965, a figure that has probably doubled since then.
The excuse is given that the 1059 defence production sharing agreement makes
it impossible for Canada to refuse to sell arms to the U.S., even when it knows
that much of what Canada supplies is shipped immediately to Vietnam. This
position sorts oddly with the scrupulousness of the Canadian Government in
other areas of conflict, notably Cuba, India and Pakistan, the Middle East, where
Canada removed its peacekeeping forces at the request of one party toy the
dispute, and Biafra, where the Government refused even to supply relief planes
for use by the Red Cross until it had the agreement of the Nigerian Government.
Moreover, Canada has consistently refused to sell nuclear materials abroad
without guarantees that such materials will be used only for peaceful purposes.
Canada's profession of neutrality would be more credible if we followed the
lead of Sweden and placed an embargo on the sale of arms and military equipment to the U.S. for the duration of the war, or at least on those destined
for use in Vietnam.
The Canadian Government position reveals a degree of moral, political,
and economic subservience to the U.S. that makes a mockery of Trudeau's
"Just Society". Are we to have justice only in the nation's bedrooms, while
acting as accomplices in what former President of the Privy Council Walter
Gordon called a "bloody . . . war . . . which cannot be justified on either moral
or strategic grounds"? Farley Mowat has said, "If we are a people who place
any value on ethics or morality, then we must take an unequivocal stand against
the actions of the United States. We must declare publicly and privately . . .
that the United States is guilty of a great crime against mankind."
When the leaders of a nation reveal themselves to be morally bankrupt,
the people must use other means than the ballot box to make themselves heard.
In the United States, thousands of people faced with an electoral choice which
is no choice are taking to the streets to express their rejection of the political
mendacity of their government. It is up to Canadians, also, to use all legitimate
means to bring about a reversal of the policy of their own government; to
demonstrate that labels such as "Quiet Diplomacy" or " realism" are no longer
adequate disguises for a policy of servile expediency.
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Ragas and Muffins
By STEPHEN SCOBIE
FRAYED FILMS
Last Monday, Cinema 16 showed what
purported to be a print of Sergei Eisen-
stein's Battleship Potemkin. one of the
great classics of the silent cinema. In fact,
what we saw was a travesty.
The print supplied by the distributor
had, in the first place, been adjusted for
showing at sound speed, which is half as
fast again as silent speed: so a good thirty
minutes of running time is lost right off.
Secondly, the print had been used so often,
and had been so maltreated, that at least
another ten or fifteen minutes was missing
from it.
Arthur Knight, in The Liveliest Art,
describes the film's progress "from its
opening sequence of increasingly turbulent waters dashing against a quay to its
final shot in which the entire ship, seen
from below, glides triumphantly across
the screen." Neither of these scenes were
present in the print received by Cinema 16.
What happens is simple enough. A
film distributor holds, usually, one 16mm
print of a film, which he rents out to film
societies and small groups all over Canada.
The standard of projection and equipment
in these societies ranges from good to incompetent. The print gets broken, burned,
torn. In each case, a splice has to be made,
which entails the loss of a few frames on
either side of the join. The more splices
are made, the more likely the film is to
break again, and need more splices, thus
losing some more of the print, and again
increasing the likelihood of another break.
And so on. Damage is especially likely at
the beginning and end of reels, where
changeovers are being made.
Add to this the fact that many of the
16mm prints available for society rental
have come through television showings, in
which the print would be farther chopped
up to fit into time-slots and make room for
commercials. The missing footage does not
always go back in.
Yet, if a society like Cinema 16 wants
to show a classic like Potemkin, it has only
the one source. The distributor is sitting in
a monopoly situation: he has the only
print, and he is still getting bookings for it,
so he has no commercial incentive at all
to try getting a new print.
This monopoly situation also means
that the distributor can charge any rental
fee he likes. For that battered, incomplete
abortion of a print of Potemkin, Cinema
16 paid rental of $100, for a single showing.
There is, at present, no way out of this
situation. Any film society booking an old
film — or even a new one — has no guarantee of the quality of the print it will
receive.
We can only look to that happy future
in which technological advances will have
put both distributor and film society out
of business; in which anyone can buy a
cheap home projector, and prints of new
films will be mass-produced like books and
records, so that you can go down to the
local store and buy a copy of the latest
Godard or Bergman, or maybe even a reprint, in perfect condition, of The Battleship Potemkin.
• * *
FAN MAIL
It's nice to get fan mail. F. B. St. Clair,
of the French department, writes:
"I very much enjoyed your article on
El Cid. While talking about Anthony Mann
I was wondering if you've seen his western The Devil's Doorway? At the time it
first came out it impressed me as one of
the best things he'd done, but I've had no
chance to re-see it and was wondering if
my taste then could have played me
tricks."
I'm, sorry to say that I haven't seen
this particular film; but Mann is best
known for a series of very fine westerns,
including Winchester 73, The Man from
Laramie, and Man of ihe West. My own
view, that his best work is in El Cid rather
than in these films, is decidedly esoteric.
Also, last week's arrangement of positions, prepositions, and propositions, drew
several comments. Mr. Roger Field suggested that I should add the word "predisposition"; and Miss Lilita Rodman told
me that I had just written the fourth chapter of her linguistics thesis on "The generation of adverbial phrases in the transformational grammar model."
Miss Rodman also contributed a translation of the piece into Latvian. It is entitled Letts Do It.
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•       •       •
PLUG
To the north of Seattle is the suburb of
Edmonds, and in the main street of Edmonds is a cinema called the Edgemont.
This can be reached from Vancouver in
two or three hours driving, depending on
the extent to which you exceed the freeway speed limit.
Just take the Edmonds exit and keep
straight on, down a hill towards the
water, then ask directions. But be warned:
the natives are pretty dumb.
This weekend, the Edgemont is showing
a Polish film called The Saragossa Manuscript, a weird collection of ghost stories,
ranging from the grotesque to the bawdily
hilarious. At one glorious moment, the
film attains to a story-within-a-story-within-
a-story-within-a-story-within-a-story-within-
a-story-within-a-story.
Among other goodies due at the Edgemont in coming weeks are Luis Bunuel's
Nazarin (another sermon on Bunuel's text
"Thank God I am an atheist") and Jerzy
Skolomowski's Polish-Belgian-French Go-
dardian extravaganza Le Depart, as well as
many other fine foreign movies which are
not likely to be shown in Vancouver for
a long, long time.
• • •
FINALLY
Shalako (now playing at the Capitol) is
such a lousy awful movie that it took a
good dose of Sergio Leone (in For A Few
Dollars More, at the Lyric) to restore my
faith in the medium.
One scene, however, is notable: that in
which Honor Blackman is attacked by six
Apaches, who strip her to her underclothes
(no farther: this is family entertainment,
after all) and then ingeniously throttle her
by stuffing down her throat a diamond
necklace which she had wickedly envied
and stolen.
The Jacobean dramatists would have
loved this kind of thing: but it is a sad comment on the modern film that its only
flash of genuine imagination should be a
sadistic one. There are so many different
ways of killing people: but there is only
one way of getting born.-
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, October 25,  1968 ILLUSTRATED DIAMOND $225.00
AT MILLERS you are assured of excellent value,
superlative styling, and fine craftsmanship with
courteous   service.
Convenient credit terms arranged with courtesy
discount   to   U.B.C.   students   &   Personnel.
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New  Westminster
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at INTERMEDIA
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TONIGHT thru
Sunday, October 27
"FESTIVAL
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Including works by Robert
Breer, and other independent - underground filmmakers.
two showings each night:
8 & 10 p.m.
SHELL
ENGINEERING,
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GRADUATES REQUIRED
In the Following Departments:
EXPLORATION - PRODUCTION - GAS
Shell Canada is successful and growing. Since our success depends
to a great extent on sound technical knowledge and achievements,
much of the strength of our company lies in the development and
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Opportunities for graduates with Bachelor and Masters degrees
exist in the above departments. We invite you to speak with
Shell's representatives to obtain career information.
Check with your placement office for company booklets, interview
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CAMPUS INTERVIEW DATES
NOVEMBER
pf 6ix
Break down,
crack up
By DALE WIK
You feel that reality is letting you slip through its
fingers.
Approaching mid-terms creates a bland vacuum inside. But you really begin to wonder when sign-posts
start looking like skinny people.
The only thing wrong with your mind is that it is
susceptible to the fashion that says mental unbalance is
a status symbol. With emphasis upon individuality at all
costs the slightly insane person is charismatic, as long as
his brand of insanity fits the mould.
Cracking up has glamour. It shows the world that you
are an individual and sensitive to the pressures of university life.'Sensitivity is popularly equated with creativity,
because of the belief that an artist is unable to live in our
frustrating society.
Having a breakdown is expensive. There are more
breakdowns in higher income groups because those who
can afford them are more prone to encouraging them than
those unable to afford the luxury.
Let's say that you have a breakdown. You're an aver
age person who gets stoned at parties because everyone
says it's fun. You're a radical because students are supposed to be radical. You've led the affluent life of
working little for a lot. Unable to overcome problems,
you use a nervous breakdown as an excuse. You schism
yourself from sanity for brief splendour and live in a
heaven of your mind.
A nervous breakdown is a great excuse for anything
that you want to do. It lets you scream and rant at the
world without in any way being responsible for it. You
can do fantastic things like neck in a holy roller gospel
meeting.
But more often than not, nervous breakdowns are
merely imitation. These are the ones to watch for. Surely
this is the ultimate in hyprocrisy, a faked nervous breakdown. And it's not even healthy.
If you're considering having one, be happy, because it
purges the mind. Everyone should have the right to
crack up in our society; it shouldn't be the exclusive privilege of an elite, but there must be honesty and sincerity
in your motivation.
Having a breakdown is not as easy as it might look,
even with a sincere desire. As with every art you must
practise and perfect it. The rewards will be infinite, tiie
knowledge that you have done a thing as well as it can
be done.
One of the most elementary exercises is the catatonic
schizophrenic stare. There must be rigid immobility of all
the muscles in the body, and the eyes must never waver
in their blank stare. This will soon become second nature
to you.
Having mastered the elementary step, proceed to a
more advanced level, mental attitude. Try looking in the
mirror and seeing nothing. Become convinced that the
resident dietitian is a genocide fiend. Fix an obsession in
your mind, such as suicide.
Of course suicide should be attempted only by practised virtuosos in the art of the breakdown. This is the
ultimate, "to cease upon the midnight with no pain." What
a shame, to see such a noble art corrupted by amateurs.
So have your breakdown, but do it properly. Let it be
a breakdown to be remembered forever, maybe even
longer, in the annals of psychiatry.
•?*
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, October 25,  1968 \
■^■■^^^^^ p£ 5ive ^^^^^^^—^
Rubin as theatre
By KIRSTEN  EMMOTT
Why did so many students turn out for
the Rubin Travelling Roadshow? Was it
basically because they knew he encouraged
people to mock the system, and they
wanted to be encouraged? Surely they'd
all come already to some sort of decision
about the ideas Jerry Rubin has. So they
came hoping JR would stir them up and
people in that mood generally get what
they want. Life is theatre indeed when JR
is on the stage and the audience quickly
joins the play.
Curtain rise came when JR refused to
put up with usual lecture-hall conditions
that keep most of the interested people
from getting involved, since they can't
even hear the speaker. By moving from
the crowded tiers of Hebb Theatre to the
stairs and plaza, SUB theatre, JR spoke
to an audience that was already a packed
and shifting mob.
Thus the audience was pre-structured
for the next act.
The balcony scenes with audience
shouting pro- or anti-JR slogans, continued the motion of the play away from
a mere soliloquy. Suddenly everyone was
in direct personal communication with the
yip prophet. Not just the shouters (not
"hecklers" — they were talking with him,
not at him) but everybody. Reason: JR
had purposefully moved to a spot where
everybody could see and hear.
Act III: the action. JR says, "Overthrow the government. Run a pig for office. March on US polling places demanding to vote. Liberate the ground under
your feet. Disrupt elections . . ." etc. And
we all thought, gosh! These aren't suggestions! They are what we will be doing!
They're being done! This man did them!
We can so do it! And so we became committed to continuing the play to the end.
All we needed then was some real yippie
action, since we had just discovered our
identity as yippies.
Act IV. So the would-be actors moved
on the faculty club. Integrate those segregationists, yessir. And everyone else went
along to see the end of the play. Some were
in it and some were just watching but we
were all in the same theatre.
As we go to press, the play is over, but
the actors don't feel like leaving the stage
just yet and the audience is feeling around
for their hats and coats, wondering
whether   it's   time to   leave.
The downtown press, of course, will
pan the show, saying the male lead disrupted the audience. Wonder if anyone
will realize that the audience incited itself?
■ dirk visser photo
Critic likes virgin
By K. TOUGAS
"Who cares about a 35
year old virgin?" Everyone
should: Rachel, rachel is a
tender and beautiful film.
The natural simplicity which
seems to float through every
colorful moment touches —
ever so gently—the moving
experience in Rachel's existence: her growth away
from a mental and physical
cloister towards the unknown: life.
Based on Margaret Laurence's A Jest of God (Governor    General's     Award),
Rachel, rachel opposes quiet
exterior and raging interior:
the demure and lonely
small-town school teacher in
her hesitant metamorphosis
through love, involvement
and fantasy.
A TV soap opera you
say? The movie escapes
through its subtle understanding of inner feelings
and emotion. Every step
taken by Rachel traces her
basic fears and desires. On
screen and pictorial symbolism is neat and controlled:
childhood memories of her
father's funeral   trade  and
HAIRY BREAST is James Olson's;  unrealistically held
blanket is Joanne Woodward's.
corpses of drowned children
mingle with fantasies of
rocking her expected child
in a hearse-like baby car-
riag. The grainy shots, the
wafting images, the running
child — beautiful! Follows
her living upheaval with
Nick. "The moon (she says)
is so bright I can even see
the cemetery . . ."
Directed by her husband,
Paul Newman, Joanne Woodward is excellent. Rachel's
at first reticent steps of joy
and desire, fear, bewilderment and anguish flourish
through the actress's refined
performance — the fantasy
becomes very real, not a
dream but a life.
Newman himself has a
feeling for directing never
apparent in his hackneyed
acting, and is strongly supported by the flowing color
phography of Gayne Reseller and the astute editing of
Dede Allen (also editor of
Bonnie and Clyde); each
scene retains its unmistake-
able imprint) creating the
impact and the mood which
so effectively shape the
film.
But her child doesn't exist, and she does, so she goes
—not deluding herself, but
moving forward where she
once stood still.
FILM SOCIETY PRESENTS
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The Vancouver Art Gallery
November
Friday, October 25,  1968
THE      UBYSSE The feel of music
By MICHAEL  QUIGLEY
Sex in music, believe it or not, is not limited to the
Rolling Stones' Satisfaction, Going Home and assorted
lyrics by the Fugs and Doors. "Classical" music also holds
many aphrodisiacal possibilities for increasing one's musical potency. In hopes of inducing people away from "fuck-
rock" and hopefully expanding their musical horizons, I
offer the following selection of pieces whiGh I find sexually
interesting.
One such work is the first movement of Bela Bartok's
Music for Strings, Percussion, and Celesta, particularly
the version by Bernstein and the New York Philharmonic.
The music begins with a longing theme on muted
strings, this theme combining with itself in fugue-like
form, the harmonic tension slowly building. As the mutes
on the strings are removed, the music becomes more heated and more intense, finally reaching a climax and then
subsiding into a musical after-play of shimmering celesta
colours and a gradual fade-away into silence.
However, such an example of a musical orgasm is a
rare one, since "feeling" in abstract music is generally a
question of personal taste. Opera, on the other hand, can
combine abstract musical "feeling" with a dramatic text,
which can result in a powerful unity.
Richard Wagner's Tristan and Isolde is one such example — an opera of "unconsummated passion" resulting
from a blending of erotic-chromatic harmony and the story
of the two lovers who face the paradox that great love
is incompatible with any sort of tangible or temporal
satisfaction and that death is the only permanent fulfillment. Critical opinion on Tristan has been extensive,
ranging from that of Charles O'Connell, who thought that
the excerpted Prelude and Love-Death from the opera was
a "twenty-two minute musical orgasm" to that of D. H.
Lawrnce who thought that Tristan was "much nearer to
pornography than is Boccaccio" and that Wagner was "in
the state where the strongest instincts have collapsed, and
sex has become something slightly obscene, to be wallowed
in, but despised."
The Big Daddy of the musical-sexual neurosis was
the modern composer Alban Berg, who died in 1935. In
his opera Wozzeck (based on Woyzeck by Buchner, recently shown on campus), Berg overemphasized rather than
played down the psychosexual sorididness of Buchner's
drama.
However, Berg's masterpiece (though regretfully left
unfinished at his death) was the opera Lulu, based on two
plays by the German expressionist playwright Frank Wed-
ekind.
Lulu is the eternal bitch-woman, an amoral heroine
of fourth dimensional power who destroys all that she
attracts. Her husbands and lovers suffer various fates: one
dies from a stroke when he catches Lulu illicitly posing
for a painter; the painter, her next victim, slits his throat;
and another pursuer is shot by Lulu. However, as Lulu
loses her physical attractions, she loses her power over
men and becomes their victim instead, exploited by pimps
and finally disembowelled by Jack the Ripper. With Lulu
dies her Lesbian lover, Countess Geschwitz, the only
creature in the opera capable of love since in her abnormality she does not fully belong to mankind.
Berg's music to Lulu, like Wozzeck, emphasizes the
sexuality of the work, even to the extent of including a
jazz band. However, the music sometimes breaks out into
beautiful lyrical passages which remarkably produce sympathy for this phenomenally evil bitch-goddess.
In addition to the above, many other musical works
could be termed sexual, from Mozart's Don Giovanni to
Debussy's La Mer and Alberto Ginastera's "topless opera",
Bomarzo. I hope that the few examples which I have here
mentioned in hopes of encouraging others to make sexual
pursuits in all kinds of music will help affirm the assumption that sex is a vital force in music and consequently in
art, as in life.
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OPENING SOON IN THE BASEMENT OF S.U.B.
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The saga of Harold...from dedicated lawyer
to more dedicated dropout.
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681-2362
Feat.  1*2:35, 2:50, 5:00, 7:15, 9:25
No. 3 Road — 273-4474 — Free Parking
2 Shows 7:00 & 9:00 p.m.
Friday, October 25, 1968
THE     UBYSSEY pi
During the past week,
various individuals have expressed their indignation, on
certain radio shows, about the
dirt and tilth which we on
Page Friday take such pride
in peddling.
It is not the editorial policy
of Page Friday to defend the
editorial policy of Page Friday.
We did, however, feel that we
should answer such arguments
against us as we had found to
be of any validity.
Andrew Horvat
Stephen Scobie
pS Sight
Pfreview
Tonight the VSO begins
its series of special concerts,
the opening programme featuring The Romeros, a
family  guitar  quartet.
The programme includes
Rodrigo's Concerto Andaluz, Rossini's Semiramide
Overture, Walton's Facade
Suite, Bolero by Ravel, Concerto in G by Vivaldi, plus
selections for unaccompanied
guitars.
This special concert is
being sponsored by Woodward's Stores, which supplies vouchers to get two
tickets for the price of one.
These can be picked up at
the Hastings Street store in
a booth across from the elevators on the main floor (or
so they told me), but to take
advantage of this bargain,
you'll have to pick up your
voucher and pick up your
tickets at the Vancouver
Ticket Centre before 5:30
tonight.
Tonight's concert should
be interesting to see if the
VSO can continue the high
' standard of performance
which it set at last weekend's concerts, when conductor Meredith Davies managed to draw out a performance of Sibelius' Second
Symphony which was full
of warmth and beauty. The
orchestra was amazingly
well balanced and tonally
rich, with even the normally piano pizzicato strings
managing to fill the theatre with sound.
Visiting violinist Austin
Reller, on the other hand,
faded into the background
of the tonally rich orchestral accompaniment of
Beethoven's Violin Concerto.
It was clearly a case of the
soloist accompanying the
orchestra.
M.Q.
Pfetc.
One of the wildest new
groups to hit the Vancouver
Teen Scene was let loose
yesterday in the SUB ballroom. The band known as
the Vanilla Budge has one
of the most exciting rock
soul sounds to be heard in
the whole iLower Mainland
(Delta Municipality included).
Says lead axe player Mike,
"We want to project our
space to all the beautiful
people. If people would
only think about the love of
the world; I want to tell
them about the Other Side
of Nothing so they can all
perceive the why and the
why not.
"Yeah man", interjected
bassist Simon, "I just want
to stay the way I am:  na
turally stoned on peace and
love. I wish my love could
transcend all nastiness."
The flower children of
Vancouver will be looking
for more great things from
this new and groovy group.
Added Peggy the little singer who wails big blues with
a lot of feeling, "Freaky is
all I can say".
PRINCE
Pfart
The Younger Vancouver
Sculptors exhibition currently showing in the UBC Fine
Arts gallery questions the
relevance of earlier, more
traditional sculptors.
The show includes works
by Robert Arnold, Audrey
Doray, Cathie Fallk, Sherry
Grauer, Glenn Lewis, Al
McWilliams, Michael Morris, Bodo Pfiefer, Rick Ross,
Marianna Schmidt, Dallas
Selman, and Takao Tanabe.
Alvin Balkind says the
show points out the need
for sculpture to merge with
or even become architecture   and   technology.
Sculptors such as the ones
in the show are beginning
to use geometrical and mathematical forms and materials
such as plexiglass, plywood,
nails, light, mirrors and
even sound.
Audrey Doray's Wheel of
Fortune invites audience
participation to turn a spinning wheel which activates
sound and lights and tells
you what your fortune will
be.
Some observers says the
machinery seems to have a
mind of its own — seems
it ends up on the "SEX"
portion of the wheel a lot.
Doray also has a light box
on display titled Falling
Woman, with much detail
and moving lights to entice
the eye.
Gathie Falk has some
really funky pieces on display including a grey velvet covered bureau with a
sculptured shirt on top.
Then there is the Fred
Ralzenburg Tin Can Memorial by Robert Arnold.
It consists of a fantastic
great wooden crate with a
womb-like opening through
which the audience can
walk. Inside the crate are
hanging clumps of tin cans
tied to the top by string.
Also part of the show, although not in the gallery are
pieces by the N. E. Thing
Co. They are in various
homes in the Point Grey
area and visitors are encouraged to take a map provided in the gallery and
find the objects.
All in all it is a very exciting show, that, while new
in approach, should be widely accepted.
F.C.
B'NAI B'RITH HILLEL FOUNDATION
presents
AT STUDENT UNION BUILDING
A FESTIVAL OF FILMS
All  films  are  aimed   at  dramatizing   Jewish   life   and  the
teachings and spiritual values of Judaism.
MONDAY, OCT. 28 -  72:30 P.M.
Auditorium — A CHASSIDIC TALE — "A warming and
entertaining tale about a rabbi who is different".
Featuring Theodore Bikel
WEDNESDAY, OCT. 30 -  12:30 P.M.
Rooms L & M - THE WORLD OF SHOLOM ALEICHEM-
"Brings to life some of the inimitable folk characters
in an East-European small town", created by Yiddish
Folk Humorist Sholom Aleichem.
FRIDAY, NOV. 1  -   72:30 P.M.
Rooms L & M - THE TALL SPINSTER OF GIMEL - "A delightful folk tale about the trials and tribulations of a
six-foot spinster who wants a husband".
NO ADMISSION CHARGE
All students are cordially invited to attend
POLAND and RUSSIA
4 SPECIAL DEPARTURES
from London
June 14 - July 5 & 26 - August 16
A TOUR SPECIALLY-DESIGNED
FOR THE YOUNG
20 Adventure-Filled Days
$210.00 Can.
Call for Details or come in
and chat with Lina Rogers about this exciting
New Idea in Touring
INTERNATIONAL.
on CAMPUS
5700  University Boulevard Ph.   224-4391
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, October 25,  1968 Friday, October 25, 1968
THE     UBYSSEY
Page
— frizell photo
FLUTE PLAYERS or dope smokers? Come to Treasure Van's last gasp all next week in SUB
party room. Koala bears, camel saddles, incense and hash pipes from the middle east all
being sold at bargain prices.
You think it's bad here?
Take a trip to Berkeley
BERKELEY (CUPI) — Close
to 1,000 San Francisco Bay
area policemen virtually occupied the Berkeley campus
Thursday in order to prevent
seething students from erupting into massive rebellion.
Roving bands of students
have moved from building to
building in the past two days
staging a series of sit-ins in
protest of the university regents handling of a lecture
course given by black militant
Eldridge   Cleaver.
More than 200 students have
been arrested since Tuesday
in the aftermath of police dispersal   of  the   various   sit-ins.
Early Wednesday, administrators were forced to lock themselves in Sproul Hall, the administrative centre, in face of
a threatened student demonstration. Students said they
would take over the building
and administer the university
themselves.
About 120 students were arrested in Sproul Hall Tuesday
night after a 10 hour sit-in
protesting lack of accreditation
for Cleaver's course. A hundred policemen battled a huge
student crowd, estimated at
2,500 persons, as the rock-
throwing mob tried to get in
the building to prevent the
arrests.
The sit-in Tuesday began the
whole affair and followed
Cleaver's third lecture which
ended at 1 p.m. About 200
students from the class invaded
the registrar's office and sat
there to protest the credit
problem.
At 7 p.m., they were told repeatedly to leave the building
or face arrest for trespassing.
They refused and were quickly
busted by the police.
Student leaders at Berkeley
say they will probably call a
general student strike Friday.
The dispute stretches back
to Sept. 20 when the regents,
acting on severe pressure from
California governor Ronald
Reagan, voted to limit Cleav
er's lecture series to one non-
credit appearance.
A compromise engineered by
administration president Charles Hitch, allowed Cleaver use
of a campus lecture hall for
an unlimited number of lectures provided they were non-
credit.
The university senate accepted the compromise but many
students were greatly upset by
it.
OCCUPATION
From Page 3
The number of "protesters" had dropped by 5 p.m. to an
estimated three hundred but the occupation continued on into
the evening.
By 8 p.m. there was a sign over the bar reading "People's
bar—free for everyone" and drinks were being served by three
student bartenders. There was also rock band playing and the
people seemed content to just socialize indefinitely.
Shortly after 9 p.m. about 50 Place Vanier residents arrived
in front of the club and chanted: "Out. Out."
Grad student Paul Simes asked that the residents either
remain outside or come in with the aim of discussions with those
inside.
At this point, one of the residents slipped past Sims and
rang a fire alarm in the building.
Three more alarms rang shortly after and SUB management
committee chairman Peter Braund joined fellow liberal Shaun
Sullivan in manning the doors, informing people outside that
they could not come into the building because it was on fire.
There was no fire in the building.
Nevertheless, fire trucks arrived, departed, Braund and
Sullivan gave up and the student returned to drinking pop supplied by the administration and listening to the rock band.
FULL RANGE OF WINEMAKING AND
BEERMAKING SUPPLIES AVAILABLE AT
WINE ART
3417 West Broadway
Vancouver 731-4726
1108 Lonsdale
North Vancouver 987-8713
4525 East Hastings
North Bumaby 299*9737
1548 Fairfield
Victoria 384-1741
,.*£'*.''-■*.*».
WHEREAS WE ARE CONCERNED
FOR THE RIGHT OF MIGRANT
FARM WORKERS IN CALIFORNIA
TO BARGAIN COLLECTIVELY, WE
DECLARE OUR PUBLIC SUPPORT
OF THE TABLE GRAPES BOYCOTT.
- U.B.C. CHAPLAINS COMMITTEE
BUY YOUR TICKETS NOW
1968
with 2 Big Bands
SOUL UNLIMITED with CARL GRAVES
ERIC SANDQUIST'S BIG BAND
Dance:
Saturday, Oct. 26, 1968
SUB Cafeteria
$4 per couple
Ticket Sales
AMS Ticket Office, Brock
SUB Information Desk (Noons)
Regular Officer Training Plan
IN THE
Canadian Armed Forces
Do you have the qualifications to receive
a Government sponsored education ?
IF YOU ARE . . .
— a Canadian citizen
— Single
-Physically fit
— Between 16 and 21 years of age
AND IF YOU HAVE . . .
— A junior or senior matriculation
— A desire to serve your country
You are eligible to apply for enrolment as an OFFICER
CADET. The standards required of Officers are high, the
work is hard — but the satisfaction is great. Not only do
you have the opportunity to serve Canada but the financial
rewards range to $18,000 per year.
Full Details ot the R.O.T.P. may be obtained from:—
THE CANADIAN FORCES RECRUITING CENTRE
545 Seymour St., Vancouver Phone 684-7341
PAUL'S
EAT-IN, PICK-UP
FREE DELIVERY over $2.50
3623 W.
BROADWAY
Phone 733-1617
TRY OUR SPECIALS
PAUL'S    SPECIAL
salami,   olive,   green   pepper,
mushroom
THE    FIREBALL
pepperoni,   onion   capocollo,
hot   peppers
THE  SUPER
salami,   pepperoni,   onion,
green   pepper,   olive,   mushroom
SPECIAL COUPON OFFER
This coupon entitles the bearer to
gurchase mouth-watering t'4" Paul's
Special Pizza at our Special Price.
Good for delivery, take-out or in our
Store.
Paul's Special  Pizzas are made from
fresh  dough,   specially  spiced tomato
SIZZLING  HOT PIZZAS I sauce, mozarella cheese, tasty salami,
_ ... _ ..... garden fresh mushrooms, & green pep-
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r ' per.   Also  black   olives to   give  your
3 a.m. Week-ends pau|'s Special Pizza Pizzaz.
Regular $3.50
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THE     UBYSSEY
Friday, October 25,  1968
PROCTER 6 GAMBLE
ljfVI_ IJj Jj J_ lO in Business Management
To College graduates eager to assume substantial management
responsibility early in their business lives, we offer a unique climate
for rapid personal growth, with unsurpassed advancement opportunities.
To understand the kind of opportunity that exists for you
at Procter & Gamble, you must first know a little about
us, and our philosophy of management.
It is our practice to develop and promote from
within. Virtually everyone in higher management at
P&G today joined the Company shortly after completing
his formal education, and progressed upward from a beginning level equivalent to that at which you would start.
We need more good people with management
ability because our business is steadily growing.
During the last 22 years, our business volume has increased
by more than 700'%. This expanding business generates a
continual need for more and more graduates with management potential. We welcome candidates who thrive on
hard work, relish responsibility, and like to compete.
We want you to develop rapidly, and we give you
every opportunity. You'll be given substantial responsibility as soon as you join us, and, in most cases, you'll
learn by doing, rather than enter a formal training period.
You'll be given additional responsibility as soon as you
demonstrate you can handle it. Your managers will take
a personal interest in your development, because your
growth is an important part of their responsibilities!
This emphasis on early development means you
can move ahead fast. We promote only on the basis of
merit, and you progress as fast as you demonstrate that
you are ready to move up. Because of this willingness by
P&G to match ability with responsibility, regardless of
age, it is not unusual to find graduates still in their 20's
transacting substantial portions of the Company's business. In fact, we do not know of any other organization
where there is greater awareness of ability, or greater
opportunity for unlimited advancement on the basis of
merit alone.
We have openings in many fields of interest for
graduates at all degree levels, and with all kinds of
educational backgrounds. Basically, we ask that all candidates have a good academic record, and be able to show
evidence of leadership on or off the campus, with goals
set and achieved.
In joining P&G, you would be joining a company
widely  recognized  for  management excellence.
In a survey conducted by Dun's Review, a panel of nearly
300 top business executives named P&G as one ofthe ten
best-managed companies in industry. The business practices that resulted in such recognition will be an important
part of your career training.
Procter & Gamble is a growth company with remarkable freedom from cyclic trends. Although we are large in
terms of sales, we are small in terms of people (approximately 1800 employees in Canada). The Company's
continued growth is one reflection of its deep interest in
research. About one P&G employee out of every ten is
engaged in research of some kind, and more than one-
third of our business volume is in new products developed
in the last ten years.
Our work is creative and challenging. Management
at P&G involves a genuinely creative approach to varied
and often complex problems that will challenge your resourcefulness to the utmost. It requires a competitive
interchange of ideas with other good people. It demands
fresh, dynamic thinking and wholehearted participation.
If you prefer this method of working instead of "cut and
dried" routine, you will find a degree of personal satisfaction in your early assignments that will become even
greater as your career responsibilities increase.
"One or more P& G products are used in 95 out of
every 100 homes, a penetration unequaled by
any other manufacturer of anythingX
Procter & Gamble representatives will be on campus for interviews with interested
students on:
OCTOBER 30 and 31, NOVEMBER 1 and 4
Ask your Placement  Office for a copy of the P&G Careers brochure and an
interview appointment.
PROCTER & GAMBLE
for Management Careers in Marketing / Advertising,
Sales, Finance, Purchasing and Traffic, Data Systems Friday, October 25, 1968
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 17
— gordie tong photo
HOMECOMING QUEEN candidate is escorted ac ross War Memorial gym floor strewn with computer cards to the tuneful wailing of bagpipes.   Annual   harvest rites  culminate  in  Saturday
night bash.
Gears, science to set rules
of annual crap-fling race
Representatives of the engineering and forestry faculties meet today to discuss rules for
the infamous annual chariot race during half-
time of the Teacup game.
Spokesmen for both teams expressed confidence of victory late Wednesday, prior to the
meeting.
The race itself consists of two teams of 30
people pulling chariots around the field. Complications occur however when the "goons
squads" are introduced.
These are extra teams whose job it is to
stop the opposing chariot by any means necessary. The result is usually conflict of a rather
bloody nature.
Derrek Webb, forestry undergrad pesident,
predicted "we will win by half a length of the
field at least."
He said that, unlike the engineers, they will
stay within the rules.
Speaking for the red coats, Vic Hardy, engineering undergrad vice-president, cited experience, brute strength and a lack of morality
as reasons for an engineering victory.
"We've won six years in a row and with
our improved veteran chariot we aren't about
to lose now."
Their pressurized "water" tank will be in
action he said, but with new added features.
"There'll be plenty of pig shit for the foresters."
Suds guzzlers
open teacup
Suds will bubble in the halls
of SUB Monday noon as representatives of the nursing and
home ec faculties gurgle their
way through a boat race.
The event, which measures
the speed, quality, and amount
of beer consumption, will take
place in the main foyer of SUB
and is to mark the opening of
a publicity display for Thursday's upcoming Teacup game.
Half-time events at the game
will feature a chariot race and
another boat race with repre-
sentitives from several faculties. All drinking is for charity,
not pleasure.
Village Restaurant
and DINING ROOM
The Ideal Place to Hold Your
Special Events
BREAKFASTS - LUNCHEONS - DINNERS
MON. TO SAT. - 8 A.M. to 11:30 P.M.
SUN. - 10 A.M. to 11:30 P.M.
Take-out Service
5778 University Blvd. 224-0640
For Action I
Personalized Service
Come to
Joseph for
HAIRCUTTING
and STYLING
lAniqjusL
BARBERS
Q144 WESTERN PARKWAY
In Ihe Village Shopping Plaza
(behind University Boulevard)
Student-Faculty
Forum
'Should   students  participate
in the selection of the
Dean of Arts ?"
Wed., Oct. 30 - 7:30 p.m. - Hebb Theatre
Sponsored by the Student Assembly on the University
professional opportunities
at
GETTY OIL COMPANY
Getty Oil's rapid growth as an international
natural resources company offers a variety of
challenging opportunities in various disciplines,
especially in
Chemical
Electrical
Mechanical
Petroleum
engineering.
ON-CAMPUS INTERVIEWS
FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 1
an
Please contact your Placement Office to arrange
an appointment with our company representative.
GETTY OIL COMPANY
P.O. Box 54050, Los Angeles, California 90054
an equal opportunity employer
IT'S MORE FUN TO
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NOW BY POPULAR DEMAND!-with every original pair of
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Vent-Air lenses are available only in our offices. Come in
for your no-obligation demonstration today . . . you may
see without glasses tomorrow.
10%  DISCOUNT WITH A.M.S. CARDS
AVAILABLE ONLY AT
HOURS: 9
CALL
MU 37207
FOR
FULL
DETAILS
A
BIFOCALS, TOO!
KLEAR VISION CONTACT [ENS CO.
A.M. to 6 P.M. daily Incl. Sat.; Mon. to 8 P.M.
Suite 616, Burrard Bldg. ,»,«,_.
1030 W. Georgia Street    UBC "W*
Vancouver, B.C. MU 3-7207
■■Mrs
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Please send me your free Illustrated booklet
and the cost of invisible lenses.
Mr.
Mrs.
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OFFICES THR0U8H0UT U.M. AND CJUMM Page  18
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, October 25,   1968
CUS votes plague
two more schools
OTTAWA (CUP) — Referendum is fast becoming the word
most frequently heard in the Ottawa offices of the Canadian
Union of Students.
Two more campuses have indicated they will hold referendums on CUS membership in the near future. They are the University of Waterloo and the University of Western Ontario.
The Waterloo vote called by pro-CUS forces, will be held
Jan. 29. Said student president Brian Her: "Students should have
the right to decide whether they want the council to re-commit
them to CUS next year or not. CUS membership has become a
widely debated issue on campus and I hope the referendum
will bring this debate out in the open."
At Western, the student council has set up an investigation
commission to hold open meetings and discuss CUS membership.
The commission will report to campus before the referendum
scheduled for the first week in November.
Fund pays
fees, board
The Fund for Theological Education is again
offering fellowships to
prospective preachers.
Fellowships are for a
year of study at an accredited theological college in Canada or the
United States.
Interested students
should apply in Ma. 222,
or phone 228-2721 for an
appointment with an in-
terviewing committee Nov. 14.
Brock study
hall opens
UBC is opening study facilities in Brock Hall with a potential of 50,400 extra study
hours per week.
That's 18 hours per day for
450 students.
Areas of Brock Hall, formerly a multi-purpose building
for clubs, cafeterias, AMS offices, and lounging, have been
converted  into  study   carrells.
Librarian Basil Stuart
Stubbs said the Brock study
areas will be open from 8 a.m.
to midnight daily.
Carpeting and new lights
have been installed to create
an atmosphere totally conduc
ive to study.
The former cafeteria area
has been set aside for students
who smoke while they study.
Stubbs has requested, how
ever, that students refrain
from consuming food or beverages  in the study  areas.
The first part of the conversion will be open Monday,
and the remainder will be
ready Nov. 4.
BETTER BUY BOOKS
UNIVERSITY TEXT BOOKS
NON-FICTION PAPERBACKS
Specializing in Review Notes
and Study Guides
4393  W.  10th Ave.
224-4144
NOTICE TO 69 GRADS
Thank you for your co-operation
while we were taking your Grad
Photos on campus.
Those who have not as yet been photographed
should phone and make an appointment for
a "studio" sitting.
(This service is covered by your Grad Fee)
CAMPBELL STUDIO
10th & Burrard
736-0261
^—~^i
Slacks Narrowed
Suits and Tuxedos
Remodelled
UNITED TAILORS
549 Granville St.
Remember Those Far-Away Friends!
See our New Stock of
OVERSEAS CHRISTMAS CARDS
UNIVERSITY PHARMACY
5754 University Blvd.
(In The Village)
224-3202
U.B.C. CAMPUS SALON
\  Open 6 Days a Week
Monday thru Saturday
Mr. Leo Mis* Lillie Mr.   Samir
fa Specializing in Hairshaping
fa Body Waves . . . Styling . . . Hair Coloring
fa Wigs and Hairpieces . . . Sales and Service
FREE ADVICE ON HAIR CARE EACH MONDAY
AT U.B.C. SALON
*   <&o'a foifgwiM   +
UBC - TWO SALONS TO SERVE YOU  -
2154 Western Parkway
Just off University Blvd.
224-7514
KITSILANO
2372 W. 4th Ave.
738-3640
Anti-Freeze Time
IS HERE AGAIN!
Be An Early Bird — Avoid the Rush and Save t
Bring this Ad in and Save 50c on
a Gallon of Anti-Freeze — Offer expires Dec. 15, 1968
See us for Winter Tires - Batteries . Chains
UNIVERSITY SHELL SERVICE
4314 W. 10th
224-0828
ALOUETTA WRECKERS
A COMPLETE STOCK OF NEW
AND USED REPLACEMENT PARTS FOR
VOLKSWAGENS
20% Discount to U.B.C. Students & Faculty
On New Parts (Except items that are on Special)
Guaranteed Mechanic Service
Open 8 a.m. to 9 p.m. Weekdays —
8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturdays
CLOSED SUNDAY & MONDAY
OCTOBER* SPECIAL
Complete Clutch job, including Flywheel Seal, Carbon
Throw-out Bearing, Clutch Disc, Pressure Plate and Labor
$38.00 Installed Fully Guaranteed
200 Victoria Drive - 255-7431
2 Blocks N. of Hastings Ask for Tyron or Linda
Metro Goldwyn Mayer presents
in Frank D. Gilroy's Pulitzer Prize winning
«W«£M»
The story of three strangers
A mother...
A father...
and
A son
co-starring
Jack Albertson • Martin Sheen
screenplay by
produced by
directed by
Frank D.Gilroy
Edgar Lansbury      Ulu Grosbard
$£> Metrocolor ^mgm
Starts Friday
Downtown
685-6725
965   Granville Friday, October 25, 1968
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 19
.«:f*J*
r'
:*- •**•
— dick button photo
THUNDERBIRD PLACE KICKER and convert expert Dick Stein hopes to get a few more chances
this Saturday 2 p.m. in the homecoming game against Pacific Lutheran University. This photo
was taken  at the  SFU  game.
WEEKEND   ACTION   BOX
This box, or one like it, will appear in The Ubyssey from now one, every Friday.
It will try and keep you up with what sports events are happening on campus over the
weekends. Sports who wish to ensure their events appear, should submit information to
the sports editor of The Ubyssey no later than noon of the preceeding Monday.
DAY
Friday noon
Friday night
Saturday
Sunday
Monday
SPORT
Homecoming rally
Ice Hockey
Cross Country
Field Hockey
Field Hockey "C"
Football
Rugby
Field Hockey "B"
Field Hockey "D"
JV Soccer
JV Football
OPPONENT
Grad Team
B.C. trials
India "A"
Pitt Meadows "B"
Pac. Lutheran Univ.
Georgians
Grasshoppers "B"
Hawks"C"
Columbus Juniors
Western Washington
State College
LOCATION
Buchanan Building
Thunderbird Arena
Stanley Park
Spencer Field
Spencer Field II
Thunderbird Stadium
St. George's
Spencer Field
Wolfson Field
Clinton Park
Thunderbird Stadium
TIME
12:00 noon
7:30 p.m.
11:00 a.m.
1:30 p.m.
1:30 p.m.
2:00 p.m.
2:30 p.m.
3:00 p.m.
3:00 p.m.
2:00 p.m.
2:00 p.m.
■-    .: .*.-.■ "■^-•;*
• -* . • : VF  ......
In continuation from last week, when I talked of student and athletic apathy, I would like to put forth some
ideas on the subject of the success of teams from this
campus.
People attending this university have communicated
to me a feeling of unhappiness with the teams that represent them. They say that they want changes in staff, and
or in personnel. This, they seem to feel, will bring great
changes in the success of any team.
They do not, however, take into account the success
of some of the lesser known sports, or of past records of
the team. The two best examples of this are the wrestling
team which represents UBC in Canadian Intercollegiate
competitions yet gets no spectator support from wrestling
meets on campus.
On the other hand, occasionally, and even in this past
year, the football team has been the butt of some unkind
remarks. It is unknown to the general griper really how
bad the record is. The football team has not had one
winning season in 15 years.
I do not advocate changing much, but I do believe that
something might be done here. The coaches are untouchable, for they have positions in the faculty which they also
fulfill.
The first group which must be castigated is those
athletes who. are on campus, but do not turn out, or those
who play with teams other than UBC teams.
This is the first revision that I suggest. Some interested
group should set about to contact these people to see if they
could, or would play for our teams. I don't think the
coaches could be expected to do this on top of their other
duties, so possibly committees should be struck from interested organizations such as the Men's Athletic Association, or the school of physical education.
If this type of effort were combined with a recruitment program on a wide level, that is to say, if alumni and
students were to canvas their old high schools and try to
convince youngsters to come to UBC and play with our
teams, then the coaches would have more bodies and talent
to work with.
The number of fans that has turned out for any of the
sports played on campus is what I would consider minimal.
The coaches that direct the teams also think that there is
not enough support; their feeling seems to be that lack of
support means a lack-luster performance from the team.
Possibly then, instead of clamoring for better teams,
the students should make an effort to promote attendance
by their own presence, and the presence of their friends.
This would especially aid if it was possible to draw larger
paying crowds.
FALL and WINTER SPORTS
1968 SKI SWEATERS
PEDIGREE SLACKS AND SKI PARKAS
SPECIAL SALE ON  C.C.M. SKATES
25% Off Regular Prices of 79.95 - 23.95 - 29.95
North Western Sporting Goods Ltd.
10th Ave. AT ALMA ROAD
flu
224-5040
If they're
U.B.C. Gals or Guys
You'll find them i n "BIRD CALLS''
Your Student Telephone Directory
BUY YOUR COPY TODAY-only 75c
PUBLICATIONS OFFICE, SUB - UBC BOOKSTORE
OR FROM VCF SALES GIRLS IN THE SUB LOBBY - 12 - 2.30 EACH DAY Page 20
THE     UBYSSEY
Friday, October 25, 1968
'TWEEN CLASSES ..
SUB war rally
counts on weather
Anti-Vietnam rally today
south west steps of SUB.
Speakers, discussion, and
Mother Tuckers Yellow
Duck. In ballroom if it
rains.
CHQM
Meeting for those interested
in weekly radio program
about UBC, SUB 213, Tues.
Oct. 29 noon.
ARTS US
Open forum on dean of arts
hassle, 7:30 p.m. Hebb
theatre, Wed., Oct. 30.
VARSITY DEMOLAY
Meeting Wed. Oct. 30 7:30
p.m. SUB O.
INDIA LECTURE
Berkeley prof. Dr. Thomas
Metcalf speaks Wed. Oct. 30,
1:30 p.m. SUB 209. Landlords, Peasants, Revolution;
Some Lessons Of India.
GERMAN CLUB
Meeting for those on Holly-
burn hike Sun., SUB 213.
noon today.
HISTORY UNION
All history students meet
with exec, candidates noon
today Bu. 104.
NVC BOWLING PARTY
Tonight 7-9 p.m. After party
SUB 209.
LSD. SPEED AND ME
Pre-Med Soc. sponsors discussion with experts Sunday
8 p.m. SUB B.
EXPERIMENTAL COLLEGE
Karl   Burau   on  human nature   and   education,    noon
Mon., Bu. 100.
PEACE MARCH
Protest war in Vietnam.
Meet Main and Terminal
Saturday 10:30 a.m. for
march to rally at U.S. consulate at 1 p.m.
DEBATING TEAM
Tryouts Wed. Oct. 30. Contact Mike Hutchinson for details c/o AMS office.
Debate noon today SUB 205.
AMERICAN REFUGEES
Meeting 8 p.m., Sunday Oct.
27,  Unitarian  Church  (49th
& Oak).
CIASP
Spanish conversation noon
today, SUB 117.
CIRCLE K
General meeting noon today,
council chambers.
ACE
Mr. Echelle, principal of
MacCorkindale school,
speaks Monday noon Ed. 209
on open area teaching.
SUPERDANCE
The Patch and the Boston
Tea Party SUB ballroom tonight 9-1. Chicks $1.25.
Sticks $1.50.
FILM SOC
A Man For All Seasons today in old aud. 12:30, 3:30, 6,
8:30. 50c.
VCF
Ross speaks on the only true
revolutionary noon today,
SUB conversation pit.
SKY DIVING CLUB
Important meeting Mon. Oct.
28 noon, Bu. 219.
UBC SOCREDS
Meeting for all convention
delegates to BCYS, Mon.
noon, Bu. 224.
SAILING TEAM
Meeting Mon. noon in SUB
G.
ALLIANCE FRANCAISE
Meeting noon in upper
lounge, International house.
CHINESE VARSITY
Car rally Sun., Oct. 27 leaves
42nd & Cambie 1 p.m. Refreshments.
FREE FILM WEST
SUB aud. Mon. noon. Chassidic Tale.
SPORTS CAR CLUB
Sun. Gymkhana cancelled.
BADMINTON TEAM
Practice Wed. Oct. 30 5:30 to
7:30 p.m. women's gym.
CAR RALLY
Noon today, start main mall
behind Buchanan.
POL-SCI
Planning session noon today,
I.H. 400.
GEOPHYSICISTS
Meeting of SEG, Tues. Oct.
29 noon, Geophys. annex
202. Job interviews.
ALPHA OMEGA
Ukrainian niversity students
meet noon Mon., SUB 213.
CONSERVATIVE CLUB
Beer night tonight 9 p.m.
Rm. 405 York Hotel.
YOUR PRESCRIPTION . . .
. . . For Glasses
for that smart look in glasses ...
look to
PlesclibtioH Optical
Student Discount  Given
WE HAVE AN OFFICE NEAR YOU
CLASSIFIED
Rates: Students, Faculty 8c Clubs—3 lines, 1 day 75*, 3 days $2.00.
Commercial—3 Unes, 1 day $1.00, 3 days $2.50.
Rates for larger ads on request.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone and
are payable in advance.
Closing Deadline is 11:30 a.m. the day before publication.
Publication Office: 241  STUDENT UNION BLDG., UNIVERSITY OF B.C., Vancouver 8, B.C.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Dances
11
VANCOUVER'S TOP BANDS ARE
managed exclusively by MCM &
Associates.  731-4741.	
DANCE — TWO BANDS. DIRECT
from Edmonton. The Patch and The
Boston Tea Party. SUB Ballroom,
9-1, Friday, Oct. 25. Chicks 11.25.
Sticks  |1.50.
FOR RENT: GIANT STROBE FOR
Dances of 200 to 1,000. For information  phone  922 1451.        	
HALLOWE'EN COSTUME DANCE
to-night 8:30 p.m. at International
House.
THE AUTUMN LEAF, FRIDAY,
Oct. 24, 9-1. SUB Ballroom. Couples
$3.00. Stag $2.00 & $1.50. Wiggy
Symphony.   Full  facilities.
ANDY  WORHOL'S
VELVET   UNDERGROUND
At  The Retinal  Circus
Halloween   Costume  Bash,   Oct.   31
$2.5'0
HALLOWE'EN COSTUME DANCE
to-night 8:30 at International House.
Featuring The Reign. Drinks.
Greetings
12
Lost & Found
13
REWARD FOR VALUABLE INFOR-
mation regarding theft of Mag.
wheel from brown 1950 Chev. in
"B" lot on Friday. Phone AL 5-5096.
FOUND     RING     IN     BUCHANAN
washroom.  Call  224-0056.
LOST—PICKETT YELLOW METAL
slide rule in black case in Hebb
theatre. Phone Jim 266-6076. Reward.
LOST TUES. NIGHT AT PUBLIC
Service Exam. Bu. 106, dark blue
sweater need badly.  Brian 228-8176.
Rides & Car Pools
14
RIDE NEEDED FROM LANGLEY
area. Will share expenses. Call after 6 p.m. Langley 532 2733.   	
RIDE DESIRED TO SEE THUNDER-
bird's second touchdown at Caldwell, Idaho Nov. 2. Phone Dan 224-
9706.
Special Notices
15
THE GRIN BIN HAS POSTERS,
Jokes, Cards, Gifts and a Post
Office. You'll find It across from
tbe Liquor Store at 3209 West
Broadway.	
THE NEW YORK LIFE AGENT ON
your campus is a (food man to know.
REDUCE THE COST OF YOUR IN-
surance by as much as 20%. All
risks insured and no cancellations.
Motor bikes also. Phone Ted Elliott,
299-9422.
GOOD SINGER NEEDED URGENT -
ly for R4's Band. Call John 987-
0496  or Ray 987-1706.
"ALL PERSONS INTERESTED IN
serving on the committee for the
'Brock Hall Art Collection' (now In
the SUB) please contact Professor
George Rosenberg, Fine Arts Department, Lasserre 401A, 228 2757
by Wednesday  30th  October."
KNIGHT ERRANT, SOLAR CROSS
please   contact   224-9031   Room   10.
•6g _ INVITATION — '69
A student-oriented booklet of 33
different entertainment passes
valued at over $50.00. Available
at the Bookstore, He & She Clothing (The Village) Canteens In the
Residences and the Information
desk at S.U.B.  $2.50.
Travel Opportunities
16
Wanted Information
17
Wanted—Miscellaneous
18
AUTOMOTIVE
Automobiles For Sale
21
1958 PONTIAC 4-DOOR STANDARD,
good condition. Must sell, going
cheap. Best offer! Phone 263-7119.
'63   VAUX;   6   CYL.;   RADIO;   EXC.
cond.   Ed   Smith,   224-9691.
'59 ZEPHYR 4-DOOR, 6 CYL. AUTO.
$275. 224-9822, Hu. Rm. 3, Hut 33
to leave your name and phone no.
IDEAL CAR POOL OR GRAD. STU-
dent car. Comfortable, dependable
quick 1960 Pontiac 6-cyl. auto. Ask
$650.00. Offers welcome! Take 10
min.  to look at thia car.  266-8621.
'62 GALAXIE 4-DR. V-8 AUTO. P.B.
& P.S., new brakes & trans. $900.
Phone  after  6.   732-8346.
1958 PLYMOUTH — CITY TESTED,
radio. Good transportation 2—2148
W.   2nd.   Phone  732-6978 or  987-0939.
1967 FIAT 850 SPYDER UNDER 6,000
miles.   Phone   266-6176.
1960 PONTIAC, GOOD CONDITION,
new battery, generator, tires. Must
sell. Best offer before Nov. 1, 926-
4009.
'58  AUSTIN FOR  SALE IN  EXCEL-
lent   running   condition.   Phone  224-
7441.
1953   STUDEBAKER,   GOOD   CONDI-
tion.  Best offer. AM  6-9544.
Auto. For Sale (Cont.)
21
'64 V.W. VAN. EXCELLENT CON-
dition. Overhauled engine. 4 new
tires. 44,000 miles. Double doors on
both sides. Best offer. 733-9047. Bill.
'62 AUSTIN HEADY 3000 MVII
Special Knock off Disc wheels.
$1,200.00. Phone 733-0993 and ask
for Ron.
1957 CONSUL LICENSED. CITY
tested. W.W. needs clutch work.
263-6159.
'59 PONTIAC PARISIENNE HARD
top, automatic, runs smoothly, $200
or  better,   CA 4-1528,  Acadia.
AUSTIN COOPER EQUIPMENT: 2
Dunlop GT Mags; 2 Cooper "S"
rims; 2 (new) Firestone 2 (used)
Goodyear racing tires. John Humphreys. 224-9029. If not available
leave   number.
Automobile—Parts
23
Automobile—Repairs
24
Motorcycles
26
1966 YAMAHA 350CC, $425.00. TRAIL
gear, good condition. 1965 Honda
65cc, $125.00, new engine, excellent
condition.   Call   Larry   732-8033.
'64 VESPA, GOOD CONDITION, GOOD
in wet weather, $170. Call Peter,
273-4105,   evenings.	
1967   SUZUKI   100  CC's.   EXC.   COND.
Offers 263-4462.
i6 YAMAHA 6,000 MILES. SUPERB
condition. $485 and offers after 6:00
p.m.    228-8105.
BUSINESS  SERVICES
Dance Bands
31
Miscellaneous
33
NOW WITH APPOINTMENT SER-
vice, Upper Tenth Barber Hair
Stylists, 4574 West 10th Avenue,
224-6622.
NO APPOINTMENT NECESSARY
at the UBC Barber Shop & Beauty
Salon. "It pays to look your best."
5736 University Blvd. 228-8942.
BUSES FOR CHARTER
Available  in  Vancouver
For Rates  That Please
SQUAMISH COACH LINES
580 Howe 684-0522
Home  Entertainment
35
Guaranteed Expert & Efficient Repairs
Color TV — Black and White TV
Record Players — Radios
Stereo Equipment — Tape Recorders
ALEXANDER  AND AXELSON LTD.
4512 W. 10th — 228-9088
Complete   Record   Department
Rentals—Miscelleous
36
DUNBAR COSTUME RENTALS
Costumes  for all  occasions.   New  address.   3567   West   41st.   Ph.   263-9011
Scandals
37
THE MT. BAKER SKI PASS IN '68
Invitation '69 is good any legal or
school  holiday.
TAKE FIVE?
SATURDAY, OCT. 26. 8:00 P.M.
Youth Resources Presents—Mother
Tucker's Yellow Duck — Winter's
Green — Penny Whistle at The
Garden  Auditorium.   P.N.E.
U.B.C. JACKETS —
See  the  Thunderbird Shop ad
For Further Information	
HEROIN
is one of the freakiest songs ever and
you can experience It at The Retinal
Circus when the  Velvet Underground
do up for the Halloween Bash Oct. 31.
Sewing 8c Alterations
38
SEWING, ALTERATIONS, GENTS
and ladies, new work, expertly done.
UBC campus. 224-7141.
Typing
40
WILL TYPE THESIS, ETC. GOOD
knowledge of medical terminology.
Phona   325-4729.
GOOD EXPERIENCED TYPIST
available for home typing. Please
phona  277-5640.	
EXPERT IBM SELECTRIC TYPIST
— Experienced essay and thesis
typist. Reasonable rates.  TR 4-9253.
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted—Female
51
OPPORTUNITY
I  am  looking  for  an  attractive well-
groomed    young    lady    interested    In
earning $150  to $200 per month part-
time.   Phone  683-7928.
Help Wanted—Male
52
OPPORTUNITY
I require an aggressive well-groomed
young  man   able   to work  well  with
attractive   women  $200   up   part-time.
Phone 683 7928.
Help Wanted—Male (Cont.)    52
APPLICATIONS ARE NOW BEING
taken for the Pizza Patio Pizza
tossing program. Training course
will be held at the Milano Pizza
Training Institute — Italy. For further Information contact:
Personnel Director — Pizza Patio
The Home of Perfect Pizza, 688-2381
Male or Female
53
DO YOU NEED EXTRA MONEY?
Become a sub-agent for "Canada
Savings  Bond".   Call  Eric,   526-1611.
Work Wanted
54
RESPONSIBLE MARRIED COUPLE
would like babysitting or odd jobs
for weekends. Reasonable rates.
Phone   733-1375.
INSTRUCTION
Tutoring
64
ENGLISH, FRENCH, HISTORY LES-
sons given by B.A., M.A., B.L.S.
Other languages offered. Phone 736-
•   6923.
TUTORING IN ENGLISH HISTORY
and French First and Second Year.
Reasonable rates. 733-4394 Evenings.
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
BUSY "B" BOOKS — USED UN1-
versity texts bought and sold. 141
W. Hastings, opposite Woodwards.
681-4931.
BUNK BEDS, SET, $29.50. 2'x4' TOP.
unpainted double pedestal desks,
each $29.50. New 25'2 coil single
Hollywood beds, complete, from
$49.50. Unpainted book cases, from
$8.95.
KLASSEN'S
3207  West  Broadway RE  6-0712
(Beer bottle drive-in at rear of store)
STEREO TAPE RECORDER GRUN-
dig TK47, 2-track professional quality stereo. Very fine condition. Asking $250.00. Reasonable offers con-
sidered.   224-9017,  Robert Rm.   418.
KNEISSL     SKI     210     R.S.     WHITE
Star    Epoxy,    M a r k e r   turntable,
Kneissl wood 200 cm, $99 & $50. CA
4-4136.
FOR SALE: "WINTERIZED DUNE-
buggy". Phone 596-3155 evenings.
Custom-Job.
7 PIECE PEARL DRUM SET. GOLD
sparkle in color. $150 or offer. 946
2798.
The Handiest Book on
Campus
BIRD
UBC's STUDENT
CALLS
TELEPHONE
Only 75c at
DIRECTORY
Bookstore  -
Publication
Office, SUB
RENTALS & REAL ESTATE
Rooms
81
CLEAN COMFORTABLE ROOM —
available after Nov. 5. Ph. 228-8256.
Near gates.
SLEEPING ROOM WITH SHOWER.
Male student. Near UBC gates.
Phone  228-8124.
QUIET ROOM FOR MALE STU-
dent, non-smoker, non-drinker. Near
gates,   excellent  hitchhiking.   Phone
224-3096.
LARGE ROOM, BREAKFAST AND
lunch. Room shared, $55. Male only.
Near gates.  4545 W.  6th.  224-9460.
NI£E   FURNISHED   SINGLE  ROOM,
L.-T&   bus   stop.   Washing   facilities.
Preferably oriental girl.  Phone 263-
9891. $50  mo.	
ROOM:    KITCHEN    LIVING    ROOM.
Privileges,   priv.   entrance.  $35.   263-
4258,   2677  W.   36th.	
MALE STUD. SEN. BED & BREAK-
fast.    $50    packed    lunch    optional.
Large,  bright  room,   desk  &  closet.
Mrs.   E.   Stone,   4545  W.   6th  Ave.,
224-9460.
BASEMENT ROOM, PRIVATE EN-
tranee — shower, phone, $35 month.
3372 W. 29th. 266-6576, newly refurnished.
Room & Board
82
ROOM AND BOARD. EXCELLENT
meals. Breakfast, lunch and dinner.
736-5036.
ONE TO THREE GIRLS. THREE
meals, laundry, priv. telephone extra, study, studio space. $90. 224-
0074.
COMPLETE PRIVACY FOR GIRL.
Bedroom sittingroom and toilet. All
meals.   $80.00   month.   731-9743.
Furn. Houses 8c Apts. 83
GIRL TO SHARE PLEASANT FUR-
nished apartment, Kitsilano. Low
rent in exchange for light babysitting.
733-3348
FURN. APT. AVAIL. OCT. 31 - Nov.
21. 10 min. to main library. Single
couple stud., $45. Others $60. 228*
9472 even.
SENIOR OR GRAD. TO SHARE
large legal suite near gates. Call
224-1935. Avail. Nov. 1, 1968.
HOUSEKEEPING SUITE GATES.
Available 1st November. Male student  to  share.  224-3517.

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