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The Ubyssey Oct 2, 1984

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Array THE UBYS
Vol. LXVII, No. 7 Vancouver, B.C.Tuesday, October 2,1984    c
Vancouver, B.C. Tuesday, October 2,1
Y
*48        228-2301
—eric eggertson photo
FORMER CIA OFFICER David MacMichael spoke in SUB on U.S.
policy in Central America Friday. MacMichael criticized U.S. claims
that Nicaragua ships arms to Salvadorean rebels.
CIA analyst
cks plans
By GORDON CLARK
A former political analyst for the
U.S. Central Intelligence Agency
attacked the U.S. government's
charge that Nicaragua is the hub of
revolution in Central America.
David MacMichael told 300 people in SUB auditorium Friday,
"I'm not here to defend Nicaragua,
I'm here to attack U.S. government
policy."
The National Intelligence
Council, the political wing of the
C.I.A., hired MacMichael in March
1981 as an estimates officer. His
responsibilities included reviewing
cable traffic from agency posts in
the region, intercepting radio
transmissions, and analysing other
raw intelligence datea.
MacMichael said during his
tenure with the N.I.C. he did not
see convincing raw or finished intelligence to indicate a significant
flow of arms from Nicaragua to El
Salvador revolutionaries.
"There has not been one
unimpeachable piece of evidence to
suggest there is a shipment," he
said.
During his lecture MacMichael
held aloft the Reagan administration's report on Nicaraguan "activities" in Central America — the
report is often quoted by Reagan as
concrete evidence of Nicaraguan expansionism in the region. MacMichael, a former university professor, said the report "did not prove anything."
"If you had produced this document as an undergraduate student
in one of my classes, your tenure at
university would have been seriously in doubt," he said.
The U.S. administration claims
the Nicaraguan government is arming Salvadorean rebels from the
sea, air and land, but MacMichael
said during the two years he worked
for the N.I.C. no shipments were
intercepted.
In the three years since MacMichael first worked for the agency
he said no crashes of aircraft carrying arms have been discovered, and
not even peripheral evidence such as
See page 2: CONTRAS
Student press denied access to pope
OTTAWA (CUP) — More than
7,000 journalists were granted
special media status to cover Pope
John Paul II's recent sweep across
Canada, but not a single student
reporter was among them.
"Student press are not bona fide,
full time journalists, therefore not
accredited," said Paschal O'Toole,
public relations coordinator for the
Canadian Conference of Catholic
Bishops.
The Catholic bishops, the RCMP
and the government task force
assigned to visit logistics made the
decision to exclude the student
press, O'Toole said.
O'Toole said he had no idea how
many student newspapers across the
country applied for and had been
denied credentials. He estimated
more than 13,000 journalists applied and only 7,300 were granted
the special status.
O'Toole said full-time clergy, the
Catholic and religious press in
Canada received priority, no matter
their size and frequency, because
the event was a pastoral visit.
The government task force asked
all journalists applying for accreditation to fill in a detailed application and a release allowing the
information to be stored in RCMP
Personal Information Bank P-20 or
P-140.
RCMP Personal Information
Bank P-140 is an exempt bank
under Section 18 (1) of the Privacy
Act, meaning that none of the information gathered in the investigation, relevant or not, can be accessed by the person applying for accreditation.
Canadian University Press,
which has a potential circulation of
350,000 at Canadian post-
secondary institutions, refused to
sign the release for the RCMP and
as a result was denied accreditation.
CUP's decision not to sign a
waiver was made after legal consultation. "It's outrageous that the
RCMP wants this information. It's
hardly necessary and it's an invasion of privacy," said Muriel
Draaisma, national bureau chief for
Canadian University Press.
"We did not want to supply any
more information to the RCMP
about the student press. I'm sure
they have plenty already."
Asked what effect the student exclusion policy might have on future
relations between the Catholic
Bishops and the student press,
O'Toole said, "If the student press
would like to write scurrilous
material, or whatever, about the
Conference of Catholic Bishops
and the Catholic Press, by all means
be our guests.
"Rome survived 2,000 years. I'm
sure it will survive the (student
press), he said.
Budget rushed
By ROBERT BEYNON
Most governments spend the majority of their time in session
discussing their budget. But in Jess than two weeks the Alma Mater
Society council brushed aside serious questions regarding its
budgetary process because it wants to be efficient.
Aug. 29 student council sent its budget back to the budget committee for the first time in its history.
Sept. 19 the AMS accepted the budget, quickly discussed possible
changes to budgetary procedure and dismissed the issue.
Although student council handles the $42 fee from more than
26,000 students, council did not think a detailed examination of their
budget procedure was necessary.
This happened although:
• the budget committee allowed the expenditure of $59,000 on the
AMS's Whistler cabin before the entire student council could discuss
the issue.
• a budget covering hundreds of thousands of dollars in expenditures was almost passed by council in less than an hour's notice.
Some of these issues were addressed by the AMS at Us Sept. 19
meeting but no amending motions were passed.
Even AMS finance director James Mollis said the process of
choosing die budget committee could be more rigorous. "Committee
members only require council approval," Hollis says.
. But Hollis does not agree that he or the budget committee
^ostameppwfrliwfr dkCT»aomgy-po<«ci^tay choowng^e approve th» •
$59,000 Whistler cabio renovations.
AMS vice president Doug Low and council member Duncan.•
Stewart, disagree with Hollis. Low said an article at Section 10 of the
AMS's code states the committee cannot allow an expenditure of
more than $409 without council's approval; the comotrttee defirateiy
overstepped its power this summer.
And Stewart said more time should have been allowed for detailed
discussion of the document.
Finance director Hollis said people could have discussed the
budget with the committee during it's three month preparation. He
claims none of the people who later attacked the budget did this.
Stewart said despite late presentation of the budget, allowances for
See page 2: PRIORITIES
CFS launches membership campaign at UBC
By ROBERT BEYNON
The Canadian Federation of
Students is working hard to pass the
membership referendum at UBC
this November, an organizer said
Thursday.
Duncan Stewart, a student
council arts representative, said
CFS is officially striking a committee to begin a pro-CFS membership
drive at UBC Wednesday.
"CFS isn't behind in its campaign," Stewart said.
He said CFS had to waste energy
organizing people and working with
student council before beginning an
official campaign aimed at the student body.
"We (the new committee) will be
starting a massive publicity blitz
Oct. 10 which will utilize posters,
pamphlets, speakers, forums, CITR
and The Ubyssey," Stewart said.
A major delay in CFS's original
plan was student council's unwillingness to take a stand on whether
UBC students should join CFS, he
said.
CFS originally thought council
would make a decision in August,
he said. "But now it looks like they
will make no decision at all," he added.
In fact, the failure of Nancy
Bradshaw, AMS external coordinator, to provide a leadership role
has delayed student council's stand
and CFS' campaign organization,
Stewart said.
College trains cameras on students
ST. ANNE de BELLEVUE,
Que. (CUP) — Administrators at
John Abbott College in this city are
tight-lipped about the appearance
of small grey boxes in the hallways
on campus.
The steel fixtures look like electrical connection boxes, painted
with the number "600V" on the
side. In fact, they are television
cameras, set up during the summer
to watch the 5,000 students attending the West Island CEGEP.
The school's administration has
spent more than $60,000 installing
the system, which uses unfra-red
lenses to film activity and store it on
video tapes.
"The cameras are for the safety
of the kids and to cut down on van
dalism and attempts of bodily harm
to students," said John
Mastropaolo, co-ordinator of
facilities. Mastropaolo refused to
say how many of the cameras have
been installed and what "600V"
means.
Jamie Patton, a student board of
governors representative, said the
board did not vote on allocating
money for the cameras. When he
inquired about the matter, he said
he received contradictory answers.
Luc Henrico, John Abbott's
director-general, first told Patton
that he had no idea where the
cameras came from. Later, Patton
said, Henrico admitted the cameras
were paid for from the school's
capital budget.
When pressured about the contradiction, Patton said Henrico
replied: "I don't know everything
that's    going    on    around    the
college."
"It's a college for god's sake, not
a prison. It's an invasion of privacy.
At nighttime, O.K., but not during
the day," Patton said.
Tom McDenna, an employee at
Montreal Video, which supplied the
cameras, said they cost $500 to $600
each and accompanying video-
cassette recorders cost $200 to
$5,000, not including installation.
McDenna said the Montreal
market for surveillance cameras is
booming.
"She was elected to take a position," Stewart said, "but she has
not done this."
Bradshaw said she does support
the referendum but she can see
arguments for not joining CFS. She
said if the AMS collected $7.50
from every student (the fee CFS is
asking for) the AMS could do a better job supporting the students than
CFS will because the AMS has more
resources.
She added, "Many student council members are in favour of UBC
having weighted voting at CFS conferences if we joined." She said
smaller members of CFS will never
agree to this because they feel they
equally represent students.
She said it is not her fault if CFS
had a slow start organizing its campaign at UBC. "CFS has not yet offered to set up a yes committee,"
she said.
She said she agreed to help
organize a yes committee, but she
added she was also willing to set up
a no committee although only one
person approached her about tne
idea.
She added council is not prepared
to vote on joining an organization
they do not know enough about.
CFS is a group of Canadian colleges
and universities organized to study
education in Canada and to fight
for more accessible and higher
quality education. Page 2
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, October 2,1984
.1
t
Contras killing thousands
From Page 1
a parachute has been found. MacMichael said it is "highly unlikely
small aircraft flying without complex navigational equipment in difficult terrain could maintain such a
high safety record."
"We're not getting our money's
worth there," he said.
MacMichael also attacked the
U.S. government's support for
Nicaraguan contras who regularly
attack   villages   inside   Nicaragua,
and who are committed to overpressure on the U.S. government,
you would still hear about it in
editorial pages around the world.
"The contras have killed over
throwing the official government
there.
MacMichael said the situation is
like the hostage taking in Iran in
1979-1980. "If the Ayatollah had
killed one American a day to put
3,000 people in the last three years
— that is roughly three deaths of in-
Priorities unclear
From page 1
detailed examination of the entire
document should be made to ensure
democratic concensus.
Despite these contentions surrounding the AMS' budget procedure council spent only part of
one session discussing the issue.
Council did not even have time
for an in depth discussion on the
AMS's monetary priorities*
Finance director Hollis said the
budget committee must design the
budget to get the most return for its
money, which means expenditures
on Whistler are justified and large
expenditures on the AMS' external
affairs department are not.
But in a time of serious cutbacks
students' money may get the best
return in an active lobby in the provincial legislature. Hollis said these
are matters of personal taste.
But the AMS has ignored seriously discussing these matters of taste.
They are in a hurry to keep the
AMS operating and to get that
budget out.
nocent people a day, and our
government is directly linked to that
bloodshed," he said.
MacMichael said he is bound by
the secrecy act not to reveal state
secrets, and his entire presentation
is passed by the C.I.A.
"I have an excellent attorney to
help me stay out of jail," he added.
MacMichael has come under attack from a number of people including Ronald Reagan. Secretary
of State George Shulz said "he
must be living in some other
world." MacMichael said he is not
concerned by such criticism, adding
the U.S. government must prove his
analysis is incorrect.
"I get up every morning and no
one has yet proved me wrong."
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If you are ready to turn your degree into a profession, we invite you to meet
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Applications, accompanied by recent course transcripts, may be submitted to
the Employment Centre on Campus until October 3rd. We will be in contact
with you subsequent to that date. Tuesday, October 2,1984
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 3
s anti-union bias attacked
By PATTI FLATHER
The Dre«idc-nt of UBC's teaching
assistants union attacked as antiunion a new report which says TAs
will unionize more in the future.
Horacio de la Cueva said Thursday education dean Daniel Birch's
coauthored report entitled
"Teaching Assistant Unionization:
Origins and Implications" contributes to the administration's attempts to weaken the TAU.
"The report perceives TA
unionization as a problem that
should be solved and not necessarily
in a friendly way," Cueva charged.
"They (the authors) complained
a lot that labor laws in Canada are
too lenient in allowing TA unions to
be formed," Cueva said.
One part of the report, which
recently appeared in the Canadian
Journal of Higher Education, says
TA union negotiators have made
demands consistent with "a radical
student world view." Examples
given were "autonomy and
academic freedom in TA duties,
Protection against discrimination,
retribution and harassment for
political, social and sexual
reasons."
Cueva said he is angry Birch considers these demands radical.
Cueva also said the report,
coauthored with Simon Fraser
University professor Robert
Rogow, gives ideas for busting TA
unions. The report says TA unions
would have more problems if antiunion TAs mobilized more.
UBC's TA union is five years old
and has yet to go on strike. The
TAU is open shop with more than
half its TAs belonging to the union,
Cueva said.
Birch was unavailable for comment.
Cueva said the report's antiunion tendencies are part of an
overall university attempt to break
TAU communications channels and
weaken the union.
The TAU lost the right to compel
attendance at orientation meetings
in last year's contract in exchange
for "a mutually agreeable information letter that should have gone out
with the registration package,"
Cueva said.
But the TAU and the administration failed to agree on the letter's
content so the dispute will go to arbitration Nov. 8. "There has been
no means of communication between the TA union and the TAs,"
Cueva said.
The TAU's contract expired
Aug. 31 but UBC Employee Relations officer Pat Brown said a committee has been struck. She added
she did not know when proposals
will be ready.
She said the union knows why its
letter was rejected and refused to
expand.
Jobs need filling
Many work-study positions have
not yet been filled, UBC's awards
director said Thursday.
Byron Hender said interested
students should go to the campus
employment centre and see the remaining jobs posted there. He added he could not say exactly how
many of the 600 jobs remained.
"But if we go beyond our present
$600,000 budget (to finance the
jobs) the UBC administration said
we may be able to get more money
yet," Henders said. He said in
previous years the work-study program has always gone over budget.
The program creates on campus
jobs for students, with a maximum
loan who need more money.
Hender said this year the maximum allocation receiveable by a
student has increased from $2,000
to $2,500 and now out of province
students requiring more money are
also eligible for the UBC program.
He added the awards office is late
processing work-study forms
because they have more jobs this
year than last year. "There are 200
more work-study positions
although the provincial government
cut the program this year,"
Henders said.
The provincial government cut
$100,000 from its allocation to the
program but UBC has increased its
contribution by $500,000. Work-
study therefore had a budget of
close to $600,000.
Work-study organizer Sheila
Summers said she was so busy processing work-study forms she could
not take time to discuss how many
people the program has accepted.
-kevin hatl photo
Aging garbage the result of budget cuts
By PATTI FLATHER
Campus budget choppers seem to
like their garbage well aged.
Funding cuts to UBC's Physical
Plant mean fewer workers are picking garbage up on UBC grounds,
assistant Physical Plant director
Chuck Rooney said Thursday.
Rooney said garbage collection
was done regularly last year and
may have needed two people a week
at this time of year. "It's not as
regular now because those people
are assigned to other duties we feel
have a higher priority."
Garbage cans are still being emp
tied regularly but there is no longer
a routine for lawn-cleaning,
Rooney said, adding lawns may
now be cleaned only once per week.
"That would be spot cleaning,
not a sweep through the entire campus," Rooney said.
But Rooney said he was surprised
to hear complaints of excess litter
and would not speculate on the effects of potential budget cuts.
"Its difficult to say whether
we're having problems because you
don't see them overnight. It's sort
of degenerative," he said.
Bruce Gellatly, UBC administra-
"FROM EACH ACCORDING to their blood pressure; to each according to their anemia," said 19th century
political philosopher about vital efforts of the Canadian Red Cross Society. You can share your oxygen rich
wealth with society all this week on the second floor of SUB. B.C. is acutely short of blood with the long
weekend coming up and motorcycles. Remember, the life you save could be your own. Next time you want to
meet someone just ask them what their blood type is.
British education cuts deny access
quotas.
Another organization, the National Advisory Body for Local
Authority Higher Education, said
the level of polytechnic and college
enrolment should not be allowed to
fall below current levels, the Guardian reported.
UBC education professor Murray
Elliot, who recently studied at Cambridge, said morale there was poor.
Elliot added teachers wages in Britain are very depressed. But he said
he could not draw similarities between Britain's post-secondary
education situation and B.C.'s.
British government advisers told
the university ministry this week
that Britain's post-secondary
education system will be unable to
meet the nation's needs if it receives
more cuts, a British newspaper
reported.
The Sept. 23 Manchester Guardian Weekly revealed a university
grants committee report that said
more money must be spent, and
40,000 more  places  for students
finance, said $645,000 was cut from
Physical Plant's 1984-85 budget But
he said he did not know the percentage of their budget this represents.
A university custodian picking
garbage up on a lawn Thursday said
it was not his job but nobody else
was doing it. The custodian did not
want to be named because he said
Plant management does not like
employees discussing cutbacks.
Laura Bennett, arts 1, said she
had noticed a lot of litter around
UBC recently. "I just thought more
people were pigs around here," she
said.
Publicity for Loto UBC tickets locking
must be found by the end of the
1980s.
The UGC allocates government
grants to Britain's universities and
colleges.
The report said academic planning has been disrupted, morale has
been impaired, thousands have
been denied access to university and
confidence in the government has
been shaken.
The UGC report added universities require a five million pound
(S8.2 million Canadian) funding increase to update laboratory equipment that have become obsolete.
Further cuts would result in the
closure of at least one university,
the report said.
But British education secretary
Keith Joseph earlier said further
cuts to the university budget cannot
be ruled out.
In the last three years Joseph's
ministry reduced student
placements in Britain by 20,000 at a
time when demand for higher
education reached record levels, the
Guardian said.
Britain's post-secondary system
is largely controlled by the national
government   which   sets   student
One FREE
SMARTy-PANrS
COOKIE
when you buy
a cappuccino
or cafe au lait
Room 101
Student I moil ButUinK
I
'   1
I
I   i
A random survey of students
in SUB showed many students
do not know the Alma Mater
Society lottery exists.
"I wasn't even aware of it,"
said Rosa Telegram, arts 1. "I
don't even know about it," said
John Ghatak, history 1.
Jeff Pentlin, arts 1, said he did
not care about the lottery. "It
doesn't affect me any, because I
didn't buy a ticket," Pentlin
said.
The AMS organized the lottery to raise attention to tuition
fees, to raise funds for its bursary fund and to award at least
one free tuition to the winner.
Nancy Bradshaw, AMS exter
nal affairs coordinator and a lot-
ter organizer, said all but 200 of
the 10,000 lottery tickets have
been issued to students to sell.
"That doesn't mean they've
been sold necessarily," she added.
Ticket seller Dan Andrews
said they sold only 200 tickets
during registration week,
although the ticket booth was
placed where "every student had
to pass our booth." Since then
he sold only 24 tickets.
Bradshaw claimed the lottery
was already a success in terms of
public attention. "It was successful in that we got media attention for the problems of stu
dent aid and tuition increases,
and in that we've gotten a great
deal of public support," she
said. She added B.C. support for
universities is the worst provincial support in Canada.
Bradshaw said ticket sales
have raised at least enough funds
to guarantee one prize of a
year's tuition. A standard
15-credit programme UBC tuition fee costs $1,115. "We'd
hoped to give out two or three
prizes," she added.
The AMS hopes to sell all the
tickets by the draw date Oct. 19
said Bradshaw. "So far it's been
only   mildly   successful."
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* Page 4
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, October 2,1984
Student's lefts
The concept of student rights has come a long way since the 1960's,
when students fought long and hard for a say in their education.
Unfortunately the concept has not come far enough. Student rights are
often pushed aside as irrelevant, or not solicited for the sake of expediency. Student autonomy over their affairs is seen by many as an impractical
dream to cast aside for efficiency's sake.
Recent examples of this trend are happening at UBC and at other Canadian universities. UBC housing's new rules banning parties Sunday to
Thursday were imposed with little consultation with students, then
perfected over the summer when few students are around. Housing claimed most students support the stricter rules but gave no proof this is so
amidst strong evidence to the contrary.
Another close-to-home gem is found in education dean Daniel Birch's
report on TA organization. He brands union demands as "radical". They
ask for autonomy and academic freedom, and for protection from
discrimination, retribution, and political, sexual, or social harassment.
These demands are not radical — one wonders if Birch opposes these
rights because they come from mere students, or in principle.
Other recent cases abound which are depressing. Student journalists
were denied press accreditation to see the Pope and also to Alexander
Haig's speech to the Young Socreds. Obviously the right of the Pope and
the Socreds to censor the media is valued by the powers that be more than
student rights to freedom of information via alternative student press. And
let's not pretend the commercial press is not biased.
Perhaps more alarming for the students of one small Quebec CEGEP is
the installation of cameras checking on vandalism — read — spying on
students. Students were not asked how they might feel about being spied
on, that was apparently unimportant. After all the only reason the CEGEP
is there, ultimately, is for the students. Of course the students don't like it
and no one quite knows who approved the camera purchases but that
doesn't matter since students wield less power, and might makes right.
Also disturbing was the reaction of the university of Toronto's arts and
sciences dean after students occupied his office protesting the quality of
education. He met with the students, which was very nice, but, as he left
he made it clear nobody would change his views in half an hour.
Well, maybe that's understandable.
How long would it take students to influence UBC's board of governors
to change their fiscal minds on tuition fee increases? Ten thousand petitions later? And counting.
Students can no longer assume their rights to a say in their own education will be considered. They must demand to be heard, and demand loud.
Letters
SUB garbage piles up inside and out
Each morning at 8:00 I arrive on
campus, hit the pool, then head off
to class. Usually, that is the only
time I get to this area of the campus.
At that time of day, everything
looks par normal to me. The
grounds look clean and tidy, as do
the people walking around (is 'preppy' an appropriate adjective?).
Now, last Friday while enjoying a
beer in the Gallery with some
friends, a conversation came up
which made my ears perk up. The
topic was the state of garbage and
litter around the campus, especially
around the SUB building.
My naive reaction was,
"Where?". Eyes turned on me as I
was told with some hostility, "Look
around! Where have you been?"
So on my way out I did look, arid
the state of affairs was not exaggerated. What a disgusting mess,
and this is to say nothing of the inside of the SUB. The hill outside the
SUB looked as though a snow
storm had hit it.
My reaction was, what kind of
mentality would do this (perhaps
the answers lie in the graffiti in the
SUB washrooms). It must take
someone all night to clean up the
mess so that I can enjoy seeing
those clean and tidy grounds each
morning. And I wonder why my
tuition is so high?
Taking this issue one step further, if there is no desire to keep the
campus clean, what then is the level
of our ecological concerns? Notice
how many paths of bareground
there are paralleling a paved
sidewalk. How much of the pave-
Drip, please
Your buddy may need your blood
and Buddy Blood Drop needs his
buddy!
'The Big Drip'! Please!!!
BRING BACK THE DRIP —
and — don't forget, come and leave
a litre Monday to Friday, on the second floor of SUB.
Reid White
engineering 4
THE UBYSSEY
October 2, 1984
The Ubyssey is published Tuesday and Fridays throughout the
academic year by the Alma Mater Society of the University of British
Columbia. Editorial opinions are those of the staff and are not
necessarily those of the university administration or the AMS.
Member Canadian University Press. The Ubyssey's editorial office is
SUB 241k. Editorial department, 228-2301/2305. Advertising
228-3977/3978.
The cold grey sand whisked lightly over the desert plain, Ron/ Alien swept the steps of the grim
saloon while chatting nonchalantly with Sarah Millin and Victor Wong. Suddenly, the blazing red sun
surfaced on the horizon. "Gaspl", cried Robert Beynon in a melodramatic tone, "Can it be?",
pondered Monte Stewart. Little Stephen Wisenthal ran about the tiny town ascreaming and ashouting
but, as usual, nobody could understand what he was saying. "Gangway!", boomed Patti Flather, Eric
Eggertson, and Denise Coutts as they hightailed it out of town. The lone figure emerged from the
General Store, eyeing the empty street with the most venomous of glances. "Honest, I ain't seen 'im,"
said Kevin Hall when the figure discovered him hiding behind the water trough. "I guess he isn't hee
after all!", she snorted. "Whewl", sighed the hunted one, "I'm sure dad burn lucky that she never
seen me." Gordon Clark silently thanked his lucky stars and gently massaged his munched red scalp as
he watched the disappointed Cannibal Fidelman stride slowly out of town. "Did I miss something?",
Chris Wong wondered rhetorically and then shut his eyes and went back to sleep.
ment that is here now is because
people had to walk on the grass.
And is the paper covering the campus only an archeological experie-
ment to see what an all concrete
campus would look like?
So we are a well educated,
enlightened group, aren't we? (Just
go to the SUB washrooms for empirical evidence). It is a shame we
don't have as much pride in our surroundings as we appear to have in
our outer appearances.
And will this issue end with this
letter, or is there a group
somewhere who will also want to
see a cleaner campus? One word of
Tricky cult
to be avoided
This is a warning to all UBC
students. There is a cult illegally
and illegitimately operating on campus soliciting funds for what they
say is food for starving children in
India generally.
They wear ID badges which say
registered Canadian charity and ask
for a small donation, maybe three
dollars, and they will give you a
sticker or button in return. In fact
this money goes into the cult, not
starving children and they are in
fact operating illegally since that
badge they wear is a misrepresentation as are their stated goals.
Legitimate charities do not solicit
money in this way (they are very
pushy too) and if they did they
would have a form from the provincial government. If you get approached by these people please do
your fellow students a favour and
inform campus security at
228-4721, they are aware of the problem.
Doug Dosdall
commerce 1
warning, please, no 'Keep UBC
Clean' flyers as we all know where
they will end up.
And think, perhaps if less time
had to be spent picking up garbage
at night, someone might be able to
do something about the SUB
washroom graffiti.
Robin Trudel
education 3
AMS security will be
watching you and yours
All Alma Mater Society clubs and
constituencies may be aware that
the AMS has a new security team on
duty in the Student Union Building
on Friday and Saturday nights. The
purpose of the team is to assist the
proctor in protecting SUB from
theft and vandalism, to aid and
supervise security teams hired for
functiotis in SUB, and to enforce
SAC policy in the games room. The
AMS security team can be recognized by their blue shirts with the
yellow logo and security name tags.
The security team's responsibilities may be viewed either in the
glass case outside the executive offices on the second floor of SUB, or
outside all Friday and Saturday
night functions.
Clubs and constituencies have
their own responsibilities. For example, at liquor functions, alcohol
must not be sold in bottles, or leave
the function in any form. Violations of these,  and other regula
tions, regarding functions in SUB
will not be tolerated.
The RCMP has promised to
check each function and to restrict
liquor sales to 11:30 p.m. Clubs and
constituencies have brought these
restrictions upon themselves by
neglecting to adhere to these regulations.
Consequently, the SAC clubs
commissioners in conjunction with
the SAC security commissioner, are
mounting a campaign to make sure
these rules are adhered to in order
that clubs and constituencies may
have greater freedom at future
functions.
Also of importance is the fact
that all members of SAC, upon
presenting their SAC ID cards must
be permitted access to any function
for the purpose of security spot
checks.
Martin Cocking
SAC security commissioner
Don Bobert
SAC clubs commissioner
Disgusting litterbugs lack pride
I am writing to say how disgusted
I am with the appalling amount of
litter that is being deposited and accumulating on our campus
grounds, especially the area in and
around the Student Union
Building.
What  can we do to stop this
senseless form of pollution? How
may we work together to instill a
sense  of  pride  in  our  university
community.  Your comments and
suggestions would be appreciated.
Maria Williams
2702 Keremeos Court,
Vancouver, B.C. Tuesday, October 2,1984
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 5
U of T protests low funding
TORONTO (CUP) - Students
who staged a dramatic 24-hour occupation of the arts and science
dean's office at the University of
Toronto last week in protest of
underfunding are pleased with their
efforts.
"We worked from the
grassroots, and we raised consciousness," said Ava Szczurko,
one of the spokespeople for the 25
occupiers. "We told people that the
education system is in crisis."
Fiona Keith, another spokesperson for the students, said the
"spontaneous" action brought
together many students who had
never publicly demonstrated their
concerns about post-secondary action.
"This was the first time any of us
had taken part in an action of this
kind," Keith said.
The students, carrying banners
and marching through hallways in
the arts and science building before
reaching the dean's office, began
the occupation at noon Sept. 20 and
stayed through the night until noon
the next day. A sign saying "Oc-
Meeting
ATTN. NEW
STAFFERS
We miss you dearly and
wish you were here.
Come up and see us
sometime.
Wed., 12 Noon
241K
MORE ATTN.:
New staffers interested
in attending the national
conference in Halifax
must sign up by Friday.
MAKE TRACKS
TO KINKO'S.
Class Readers at
low costs
to students.
5706 University Blvd.
Vancouver, B.C.
V6T1K6
(604) 222-1688
OCTOBER
SALE
through October 6
Top Quality Athletic Shoes
and Accessories
Some Examples:
Nike All Court $19.95
Nike Pegasus $51.95
Stan Smith $36.95
Osaga Leather (tennis) $29.95
Adidas Boston $29.95
Leather Soccer Shoes.. from $17.95
Best Quality Tube Socks $2.95
Running Shorts $12.95
Many More at Slashed Prices
ATHLETIC SHOES
For Top Quality Shoes at Lower Prices
3075 West Broadway
IK Blocks West of MacDonald
Phone 731-4812      10-5:30 p.m
cupied" was posted outside the office.
While groups of students
negotiated with arts and science
dean Robin Armstrong about their
demands, students in the building
and all over campus distributed
leaflets and collected more than 300
signatures on a petition supporting
the action.
"Underfunding, a problem for a
decade, has now produced a crisis
in education in Ontario," said a
statement released by the occupiers.
"Classes are overcrowded and
qualified students are being denied
access to courses they need in order
to complete their requirements."
The students demanded the arts
and sciences dean admit the faculty
is severely underfunded and that the
measures taken to alleviate the problem undermine students' right to a
quality education. The measures in
cluded balloting, a sign-up process
where students get the courses they
want on a first-come, first-serve
basis, limited enrolment in certain
programs and the redistribution of
funds from one financially strapped
department to another.
They also wanted the dean to extend the deadline for enrolment in
arts and science courses, which he
later did.
After two negotiating sessions,
dean Armstrong acknowledged that
some attempts by the faculty to
cope with underfunding are "band-
aid measures." But he quickly added that they do not in any way impede a student's education.
Emerging from his office after
the sessions, he said: "We don't
really have any different viewpoints
(than before). My mind is not
changed in half an hour conversation with everyone."
Climb into the saddle . . .
HORSEBACK RIDING
SAT., OCT. 13
x
register by Thurs., Oct. 11
organizational meeting Oct. 12, 12:30, W.M.G., room 35
A
with ASIYAH
FR ID AY, OCTOBER 5
SUB Ballroom - UBC - 8:30 p.m.
Adv. Tix: VTC/CBO & usual outlets. Info: 280-4411
Charge by phone 280-4444 NO MINORS PLEASE
Produced by AMS Concerts
FRIENDS OF CHAMBER MUSIC
SPECIAL LIMITED OFFER
SIX CONCERTS (Series one)
$45 Value Only $10.00
Prauge String Quartet     (Czechoslovakia) Oct. 9'84.
Melos String Quartet
Hagen String Quartet
Berlin Octet
Borodin Quartet
Rogeri Trio
(West Germany)
(Austria)
(East Germany)
(Russia)
(U.S.A.)
Nov. 13'84
Feb. 26 '85
March 12'85
April 2 '85
April 30 '85
THREE CONCERTS (Series two)
$36 Value Only $5.00
Audubon String Quartet (U. S. A) Oct. 16 '84
Muir String Quartet        (U.S.A.) Jan. 15'85
Panocha String
Quartet                          (Czechoslovakia) March 19 '85
AVAILABLE A.M.S. BOX OFFICE ONLY!!
DR. GEORGE PORTEOUS
is pleased to announce he is taking over the dental
practice of Dr. P. Piller.
Office Hours: Tues. through Sat., 8 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Thurs. 12.p.m. to 8 p.m.
Please phone for an appointment  —  New patients
welcome
#5-3615 W19th AVENUE (at Dunbar)
226-3115
AMS
Nominations are now open
for five (5) positions for the
Student Administration
Commission
Nominations close Oct. 8
Applications available from SUB 238
What's New??
I am pleased to offer
U.B.C.
Faculty, Staff & Students
25%
OFF
Frames and/or Lens
(with this ad. Student ID required)
□ All frames & lenses, including
smart designer frames by Dior,
Loren, Vanderbilt, Cardin, etc. &
famous brand names, Safilos, Ac-
tuell, Viennaline, & many more!
G Most single-vision Glasses Same
Day
G Quick eye examinations arranged,
usually within 2 days
G Complete frames & lenses . . .
from $27.88 & now 25% off.
See You Today!!    (CL^
Lynn Morse Optical
Designer Glasses al Discount Prices
1439 Kingsway (at Knight)
Thurs. & Fri. till 9 p.m.
876-8303
-Sat. till 4:00 p.m.
No other discounts apply, expires Sat., Nov. 3/84
ATTENTION: ALL TA's & MARKERS
This Thursday the TA Union presents the second in
a series of Education Workshops to help you in
your job as a TA or Marker. The Workshop will be
held Thursday, Oct. 4 from 7:30 p.m. - 10:00
p.m. in the room opposite the Dining Room in
the Graduate Student Centre.
TOPIC:
Leading Discussions
— Dr. Gail Spittler, Faculty of Education
Counselling Students
Lynn Cannon, Faculty of Education TA
SPONSORED BY THE TEACHING
ASSISTANTS' UNION Page 6
THE    UBYS S EY
Tuesday, October 2,1984
m.
<llJ0&fi
TODAY
JEWISH STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION/HILLEL
"Over coffee" — meet Vancouver's new Israel
Aliyah Shaliach, snack bar open, noon, Hillel
House.
PRE-MEDICAL SOCIETY
Lecture on volunteering, volunteer coordinators
from UBC and Shaughnessy hospitals, noon,
Woodward 1.
DANCE HORIZONS
Rehearsal with choreography Renaldo Rabu,
new members can still register, 6:30 p.m. to 8:00
p.m., SUB Partyroom.
CHRISTIAN SCIENCE ORGANIZATION
Testimony meeting and bible reading, noon,
BUCH D121.
UBC SCIENCE FICTION SOCIETY
Organization and preparation of Horizons SF, artists and writers welcome, 1:00 p.m., SUB 215.
CHINESE VARSITY CLUB
Aerobics class, 4:30 p.m. to 5:30p.m., SUB 205.
DANCE HORIZONS
Organizational meeting for the dancers and production staff, new members welcome, noon,
SUB 224,
THUNDERBIRD NIGHT
Campus social event featuring all the Thunderbird teams, theme '50s night, door prizes, 8:00
p.m. to 1:00 a.m., the Pit.
INTRAMURALS
Registration begins for inner tube water polo
league, min. three women per team, deadline
Oct. 5, 9:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m., War Memorial
Gym 203.
INTRAMURALS
Registration for the UBC 7-Aside soccer bowl
begins, deadline Oct. 5, 9:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m..
War Memorial gym, room 203.
INTRAMURALS
Registration for the Arts '20 relay begins,
deadline Oct. 12, 9:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m., War
Memorial gym, room 203.
UNDERWATER HOCKEY UBC
Practice, beginners welcome, we provide equipment, bring one heavy sock or glove, 7:00 p.m.
to 8:00 p.m., UBC Aquatic centre.
MARANATHA CHRISTIAN CLUB
Missionary evangelist Charles Doss and film
Journey to the Sky, 7:00 p.m., BUCH A 104.
UBC DANCE CLUB
Classes begining this week, bronze class 8:30
p.m. to 10:30 p.m., Silver class 6:30 p.m. to 8:30
p.m., SUB Ballroom.
WEDNESDAY
AMNESTY INTERNATIONAL
Guest speaker Margaret Morgan will speak on
P.O.C. week and the death penalty, noon, SUB
212A.
U4C WATER POLO
Practice, 10:00 p.m., UBC Aquatic centre.
JEWISH STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
HILLEL HOUSE
Hot home-made lunch, noon, Hillel house.
UBC WOMEN'S CENTRE
Wendo, register at Women Students Office,
4:30-6:30 p.m., Brock Hall, room 302.
DANCE HORIZONS
Registration, noon, SUB 216E.
MUSSOC
General meeting for West Side Story, all interested, noon, clubroom Old Auditorium basement.
INTERNATIONAL HOUSE FOLK DANCES
folk-dancing, tine, circle, couple, 7:30 p.m., International House, upper lounge.
GAYS AND LESBIANS OF UBC
Lounge meeting, 4:30 p.m.. Gallery lounge.
MARANATHA CHRISTIAN CLUB
Missionary evangelist Charles Doss, 7:00 p.m.,
BUCH A104.
THUNDERBIRD RUGBY
McKechnie cup game vs Vancouver Reps, 7;30
p.m., Thunderbird Stadium.
UBC DANCE CLUB
Classes begin this week, Bronze class 6:30 p.m.
to 8:30 p.m. and 8:30 p.m. to 10:30 p.m., Silver
class 8:30 p.m. to 10:00 p.m., Gold class 6:30
p.m. to 8:30 p.m., SUB Ballroom and SUB Partyroom.
THURSDAY
ISMAILI STUDENTS ASSOCIATION
Second general meeting, noon, BUCH B312.
JEWISH STUDENTS' NETWORK
Seminar — Dr. Shmuel Sandler — "The Middle
East in review - summer '84", snack bar open,
noon, Hillel House.
MUSSOC
General meeting for West Side Story, all interested please attend, noon, Old Auditorium
basement.
EAST INDIAN STUDENTS ASSOCIATION
General meeting, film "Time to Rise," noon,
SUB 206.
ANARCHIST CLUB
General meeting, noon, BUCH D352.
MARANATHA CHRISTIAN CLUB
YWAM drama/mime presentation: windows,
noon, SUB Plaza.
INTERVARSITY CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP
Greg Mitchell speaking, noon, CHEM 250.
APOLOGETICS OF CHRISTIAN THOUGHT
IN SCRIPTURE
Discussion: Assumptions of worldviews,  noon,
Scarfe 204.
THUNDERBIRD HOCKEY
Empress    cup    tournament    hockey:    UBC   vs
Calgary Dinosaurs, 7:30 p.m. Thunderbird arena.
UBC DANCE CLUB
Classes begin this week, registration continues,
Bronze class 12:30 p.m. to 2:30 p.m. SUB
Ballroom.
UBC WOMEN'S CENTRE
Wendo - register at the Women Students Office, 12:30 p.m. to 2:30 p.m.. Arts one building,
Blue room,
STAMMTISCH
Social evening for people interested in German
language and culture, 7:30 p.m., International
house, upper lounge.
DANCE HORIZONS
Rehearsal with choreographer Renaldo Rabu,
new members can stitl register, 5:00 to 6:30
p.m., SUB Partyroom.
PRE-DENTAL SOCIETY
Speaker will be Dr. J. Johnston on club history
and prosthodontics, also volleyball players bring
$6.50, noon, Woodward 5.
CHINESE CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP
A talk on the purpose of coming back to school,
everyone is welcome, noon, Scarfe 206.
jpac
sac
•yac
ONLY AT       ^^
FELUNI'S
WILD
ELEPHANT'S
FOOT SOUP
(When available)
c?oQcy
•GREAT SANDWICHES
• FABULOUS CHEESECAKES
• CAPPUCCINOS • ESPRESSOS
• NANAIMO BARS
Located at the back of the Village
doc
on Campus
DiK=:
\
Sirs:
CECIL
HOTEL
VANCOUVER B.C.
Good to October 31,1984
Present your student card for this special offer.
■*•■
i.\-:.\K.\-:*.:.-;.:.-;.:.-;.:.-;.:..:.*:.?..:.-;.\£
SPECIAL OFFER!!! F^f
W
One FREE
SlWAflfVPANrS
COOKIE
when you buy
a cappuccino
or cafe au lait
Room 101
Student Union Building
EXPIRES OCT. 5/84
•:•
»•:
&
ana s^appucano.v. •v.»V>VJ«V>'• *.•'»*.•
■>■
•••• •
SPACE-TIME
ALBERT EINSTEIN
>w
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HR MACMILLAN
PLANETARIUM
736-3656
ETHE CLASSIFIEDSn
TES: AMS Card Holders - 3 lines, 1 day $2.50; additional
lines, 60c. Commercial — 3 lines, 1 day $4.50 additional lines, .70c. Additional days, $4.00 and .65c.
issified ads arc payable in advance   Deadline's 1030 a.m. the
day before publication
Publications Room 26n, S.U.B., UBC,  Van., B.C   V6T 2A5
Charge Phone Orders over $10.00. Call 228 3977.
11 - FOR SALE - Private
1971 PONTIAC LEMANS S.W. PS PB. 350
V8 reliable transportation $350. Phone
Barry 224-4989.
TYPING. Essays & Resumes. Also Transcription from cassette. Spelling corrected.
Layout on resumes optional. 733-3676.
TYPEWRITER: Celebrity 12 correcting. $320
new in 1983. Asking $100 obo call 274-4031.
1981 HONDA C70. Excellent condition with
lockable rear containsr. 8000 mi. ph
261-9401 or 734-9142.
1970 DUSTER 318-V8 auto P.S. & PB.
excellent condition. One owner asking
$1750. Days 228-6828. i:ves. 733-5712.
YAMAHA L5-T4 street-trail motorcycle,
little used, $260, X3039 or 2779 for
messages.
STEREO. 2 Sansui speakers. Turntable.
Good condition. $250 obo. Must sell.
Catherine 733-1463.
1 MALE RET. AIRFARE Van-Calgary. Lv.
Oct. 6 return Oct. 10. $120. 733-7667 aft. 10
p.m.
20 - HOUSING
SIGMA-CHI has room & board (singles
Er doubles) available. Good food!!! Phone
224-3381.
FOR RENT. 1-br. ground-level suite. New
home nr UBC. Fern, or unfurn.
$400/month utilities incl. 228-1078 after 7
p.m.
FURNISHED RMS. available on campusl
Reasonably priced rent including great big
meals prepared by ojr full-time cook.
Phone David Kelly at 224-9930 or drop by
the Deke House at 5765 Agronomy Rd.
2 BEDROOM SUITE fo' rent. Appliances.
$320/month. 37th and Fraser. 324-6670.
25 - INSTRUCTION
PIANO LESSONS by Judith Alexander
graduate of Juilliard School of Music. Near
Cambie & 38th 731-8323.
LSAT, GMAT. MCAT preparation. Call
National Testing 738-^618. Please leave
message on tape if manager is counselling.
30 - JOBS
WANTED. Student Interior Designer for
small restaurant. Oriental feeling needed.
879-3612 or 689-9574. 1063 Davie St. Ask
for Steve.
THE EATERY RESTAURANT has part-time
openings for servers, liar helpers &• bus
people. Apply at 3431 W. Broadway.
85 - TYPING	
WORD PROCESSING $1.50/PG IDS)
CRWR major - Winona Kent 438-6449
located in south Burnaby.
EXPERT TYPING. Essays, term papers,
factums, letters, manuscripts, resumes,
theses, IBM Selectric II, reasonable rates.
Rose 731 9857.
WORD   PROCESSING   SPECIALIST.   All
jobs, year around student rates, on King
Edward route. 879-5108.
WORD WEAVERS - word processing.
Student rates, fast turnaround, bilingual
5670 Yew St. at 41st 266-6814.
TYPING — Fast, accurate, reasonable rates
734-8451.
YOUR WORDS PROFESSIONALLY
TYPED - TO GO. Judith Filtness, 3206
W. 38th Ave., Van. 263-0351 (24 hrs.). Fast
and reliable.
WORD    PROCESSING    SPECIALIST     U
write, we type theses, resumes, letters,
essays. Days, evenings, weekends.
736-1208.
WORD PROCESSING IMicom). Student
rates $14/hr. Equation typing avail, ph
Jeeva 876-5333.
W/P & TYPING: Term papers, theses,
mscpt., essays, incl. reports, letters,
resumes. Bilingual. Clemy: 266-6641.
WORD PROCESSING. Reports, essays,
resumes, etc. For professional results at very
competitive rates call 266-2536.
TYPING & WORD PROCESSING service.
Resumes, theses, etc. Reasonable rates.
Colleen 590-1894.
PROFESSIONAL (HOMEI TYPING. Essays
theses. Reasonable rates. Call 876-2895
and/or 872-3703.
WORDPOWER
SERVICES
3737 W. 10th Ave (at Alma)
Editing, writing     • Word processing
Xerox copies
Mon-Fri 7:30 a.m.-7:30 p.m.
Sat 9:30 a.m.-5:30 p.m.
222-2661
TYPING with expertise. Excellent rates El-
professional quality. University experience
with resumes, essays, term papers, etc.
Joan 299-4986.
TYPING SERVICES. Experienced typist.
Reasonable rates. Call Mary Lou at
421-0618 (near Lougheed Mall).
99 - MISCELLANEOUS
INTERESTED IN SINGING WITH OTHERS?
Join with the choir of West  Point Grey
Presbyterian Church.
4397 W. 12th Ave.
Choirmaster: Mr. E. Inglis ph. 733-1797 Tuesday, October 2,1984
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 7
Receiver arrives
By MONTE STEWART
The Thunderbird football team
has obtained receiving help for the
remaining portion of the 1984
Western Intercollegiate Football
League season.
Tom Vlasic has registered at UBC
after a brief stint at the University
of Wyoming. The Notre Dame
graduate was considered to be the
best college prospect in 1984. But,
much to the chagrin of several B.C.
football mentors, he opted to head
stateside.
The Wyoming club wanted to red
sirt Vlasic this season, a process
whereby a player practices with the
team but does not play any regular
season games. With the loss of
receivers Bob Skemp and Bruce
Rainer for the balance of the seson
and Rob Ros for the time being,
Vlasic will see action this Saturday
when the 'Birds host the University
of Saskatchewan Huskies in an
afternoon contest.
Skemp   and   Rainer   underwent
Join
Sports Ubyssey
So, you like reading about the T'birds
and their antics in the mud at UBC, eh?
Well, this story could have been longer,
but the poor sports writer had to go to
class and couldn't finish it. I know, I
feel the same way: depressed, I feel like
I've been left hanging. Where is that
stunning analysis about next week's
game against the Moosejaw Mud-
dleheads?
The Ubyssey needs sports writer really
badly. And its not like you really have
to know that much about either sports
or grammar. Jim Taylor has proven
that, and look how happy he is, or at
least seems. So, come in — do your bit
for unorganized sport and write some
words for the best sports rag west of
Blanca.
Rugby on
The varsity version of the UBC
rugby team hosts the Vancouver
Reps at Thunderbird Stadium
Wednesday night in the second
game of the six game Mckechnie
Cup schedule.
The teams take to the field at 7:30
p.m.
A junior varsity team will host
another division of the Vancouver
Reps in a Japan Cup contest immediately before and, starting at
6:00 p.m.
THEBACK
CHAIR
A new concept in sitting
Enjoy the Chiropracuralh
n-commendfd BA CKCHAIR
for betler care of your back.
Perfect for students, computer
programmers, musicians, writers.
WESTCOAST BACKCHAIR STORE
2170 West 4th Avenue • 734-7623 .
:* l°ve '.-'■
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x*»i
at
y+y Q/Sllirto
SOC1P / SALAD ''+/,
%
knee surgery following the 'Birds'
43-11 stomping of Manitoba three
weeks ago. Ros has a hand injury.
This Saturday's game was
orginally scheduled to start at 7:30
p.m. However, because of a conflict with the B.C. Lions' game at
B.C. Place, both teams agreed to
play in the afternoon.
The Huskies trounced the 'Birds
28-5 in Saskatoon Sept. 1. But
Saskatchewan's second most
popular team has lost two straight
games.
With a victory this Saturday, the
Thunderbirds can move into a third
place tie with the Huskies.
CITR FM 10?. (cable 100) will
broadcast this Saturday's game live
beginning at 1:45 p.m.
inS JB2*1K*i»W«*>««frV *«!».
IT'S NOT TOO LATE!!!
Register NOW with the
UBC DANCE CLUB
and enjoy
Meeting People — Learning to dance — Lessons
taught by professionals — monthly parties — and
much more.
at LOW, LOW, Prices!!
Contact: UBC Dance Club - SUB 220 (228-3248)
JOIN THE FUN!!!
SUB Ballroom
Come swing your racquet in the . . .
French Open
Indoor
Tennis
Tournament
OCTOBER 19, 20, 21
HOSTED BY
THE UBC TENNIS TEAM
REGISTER OCT. 1-5
WAR MEMORIAL GYM. RM. 203
FREE PERRIER, FRENCH BREAD
& CHEESE
OHH-LA-LA!
i
SILK-SCREENED
PRINT SALE!
"The Finest Silk Screened Prints
From Around the World
at Affordable Prices."
Tues. Oct. 2—Fri., Oct. 5th
9 a.mi. - 5 p.m.
SUB LOUNGE AREA
By Univers Designs
1
ARTS ELECTION
Fri. Oct. 19, 1984
Nominations now being accepted
for the positions of:
1 .   ONE AMS Council Representative.
2 .   TWO Representatives to the President's Ad
visory Committee on the selection of a Dean
for the Faculty of Arts. (Students eligible for
this committee must be registered as either
ARTS undergraduates, graduate students or
registered in the Schools of Family and Nutritional Sciences, Librarianship or Social Work.)
Nomination forms available at Buch A107 and
will be received until 4 p.m., Tuesday, October
9th, 1984.
HERMAN
VffsKm fJNCMsR
JIM UNGER
creator of HERMAN
will be autographing
copies of his new book
FOURTH TREASURY OF HEKMAN
on FRIDAY, October 5th
at the OBC BOOKSTORE
between 12:30 p.m. and 1:30 p.m.
mm BOOKSTORE
CALL 228-4741
Reserve your copy Now! $10.95 each
With hosts David Suzuki and Shah Ulrich. The information
magazine show that scans the horizons of tomorrow.
Tuesdays at 7 pm CBC 2 /Cable 3
Futurescan Page 8
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, October 2,1984
Field hockey squad comes in second place
By DENISE COUTTS
Sunshine and blue skies
highlighted a weekend of field
hockey action as the UBC women's
coach Gail Wilson, who used the
tournament to prepare her team for
this weekend's Canada West tournament in Calgary.
SPORTS
varsity team hosted the Early Bird
Invitational Tournament at
Thunderbird Park.
The tournament was a huge success, not only for the players on the
eight teams who enjoyed the excellent competition, but for UBC
The UBC team advanced to the
finals on Sunday afternoon by
defeating North Vancouver 2-0 in
semi-final play in the morning. In
the afternoon final they lost to
Doves by a score of 2-0 to place se
cond in the tournament.
Although Doves dominated play
in the first half, scoring both of
their goals, UBC fought back and
played a strong second half,
creating several scoring chances-.
But the 'Birds were unable to put
the ball in the net.
Coach Wilson said she was disappointed with the loss but not with
her team. "I think the team played
. . . better than I thought they
would. They're a very young team
and they have a lot of growing to
do," said Wilson.
The UBC coach used the
weekend play to refine the technical
aspects of the 'Birds' game. Even
though the UBC team is hosting this
year's CIAU Championships in
November and is guaranteed a
berth in the play-offs, Wilson and
the team are working extremely
hard at being seeded first in the
West.
The University of Victoria is the
main competition in the Canada
West league. The Vikettes will be
vying for a first place finish. A
strong rivalry has developed between   UBC  and   UVic   and   as   a
result, sports fans can witness top-
quality play whenever these two
teams meet.
UBC's next home stand is on the
weekend of October 20 and 21 when
they host the last Canada West
tournament before the national
championships.
This weekend, the T-Birds travel
to Calgary for the second Canada
West tourney of the season.
T-Birds score points
FIELD HOCKEY 'BIRDS look forward to nationals.
-rory a. photo
Hockey 'Birds get ready
By MONTE STEWART
The 1984 Canada West hockey
season is just around the corner.
The 'Birds defeated the UBC Alumni squad 8-3 at Thunderbird Winter
Sports centre Friday.
This weekend, the T-Birds host
the annual Empress Cup Tournament featuring UBC, the Calgary
Dinosaurs and the University of
Regina Cougars.
The UBC club underwent a major overhaul this season. Fred
Masuch replaced Jack Moores as
head coach because Moore could
not take time off teaching in North
Delta. Former All-Canadian Bill
Holoway has returned after a two
year absence while he played for
Japan's Seibu.
Bobby Hull Jr., son of former
National Hockey League and
World   Hockey   Association   star,
Soccer in Ontario
TORONTO (CUP) — After
years of playing on an ad hoc basis,
women's soccer has finally entered
the big leagues and become a full-
fledged intercollegiate sport this fall
in Ontario.
Women's soccer has been played
informally between schools for the
past five years, but this is the first
time it has been recognized as a
legitimate intercollegiate sport. A
rush of enthusiastic women joining
soccer teams last fall prompted administrators into putting it on their
sports roster.
Women's athletics administrators
are now anxious to have the Canadian Interuniversity Athletic Union
sanction a national women's soccer
competition.
also joined the team, showing considerable promise in exhibition
play. But he injured his hand in a
preseason contest in Nanaimo a
week ago and will miss the Empress
Cup games.
The tournament begins Thursday
when the 'Birds take on Calgary at
7:30 p.m. Friday the Dinosaurs
meet the Cougars. As host team,
UBC plays one less game. A victory
over the Cougars on Saturday (2:00
p.m. starting time) would put the
T-Birds in Sunday afternoon's
championship game.
The Dinos return here next
weekend for the Canada West
season start.
By MONTE STEWART
The UBC men's soccer club
began this season like it did last
year. Hopefully history will not
repeat itself.
After posting a win and a tie in
Canada West action last weekend,
the T-Birds are exactly where they
were at this time last season — in
first place with a 3-0-1 record.
The 'Birds tied the Alberta
Golden Bears 1-1 in Edmonton
before bombing the hapless Saskatchewan Huskies 6-0 in Saskatoon
Saturday.
Ken Mulleny led the UBC
onslaught with two goals Saturday.
Jonathan Pirie, Kent Burkholdter,
Rob Shelley, and Sean McLaughlin
also tallied for Joe Johnson's crew.
Shelley scored the lone UBC
marker against Alberta. The second
year striker found the net in the
65th minute.
Last year, the 'Birds started in
similar fashion. However, a tie
proved to be the difference between
a play-off spot and no spot. The
University of Victoria Vikings
defeated the 'Birds 1-0 in the final
game of the season to win the
Canada West title and the lone
Canada West placement in national
play-offs.
This weekend, the Blue and Gold
travel to Victoria for a game that
could determine their fate again.
Meanwhile, the UBC women's
soccer team rolled to a pair of victories last weekend.
THIS WEEK AT HILLEL
Tues. Oct. 2    "Over Coffee"
Come and meet Vancouver's New
Alliyah   Shaliach,   Ami   Rozenski.
from   Kibbutz   Masada   -   12:30
p.m.
— snack bar open
Wed. Oct. 3
Hot
p.m.
Home-made Lunch —  12:30
Thurs. Oct. 4   Network Seminar — First session
in a series with Dr. Shmuel Sandler
— "The Middle East in Review —
Summer '84"
— 12:30 p.m.
— snack bar open
Please note that the Snack bar is now open on Mondays as well
LET US PREPARE YOU FOR THE
DEC. 1, 1984 LSAT
OR THE
OCT. 20, 1984 GMAT
• Each course consists of 20 hours instruction for only $175.
• Courses are tax deductible.
• Complete review of each section of
each test.
• Extensive home study materials.
• Your course may be repeated at no additional charge.
To register, call or write-.
GMAT/LSAT
Preparation Courses
P.O. Box 597, Station "A"
Toronto   Ontario M5W 1G7
Edmonton (403)459-2659
Toronto (416)665-3377
GAYS AND LESBIANS AT U.B.C.
presents
"DISCOVERING SUPPORT IN
YOURSELF AND OTHERS"
AN EXPERIENTIAL
WORKSHOP FOR GAY MEN
Providing a context to explore issues affecting self esteem
and self confidence: relationships, effective scommunica-
tion, intimacy, rejection, loneliness, "coming out", belonging, lifestyles, etc. Sponsored by Richard Dopson,
psychologist workshop facilitator, Randy Boychuck, M.A.
candidate.
FOR FURTHER INFORMATION,
CALL 736-4017
(Leave message for Randy)
The 'Birds shut out Cariboo College 2-0 on Saturday in an exhibition encounter. Debbie Nielsen and
Shannon Scott scored for the
T-Birds, participants in the Vancouver Metro Women's Soccer
League.
Sunday, UBC routed the Cardinals 4-0 in a league match. Chris
Pinette, Zabeen Janmohammed,
Zenobia Pisani, and Irene Temple
tallied for the winners.
INNER TUBE
WATER POLO
LEAGUE
MONDAY NIGHTS 9:30-10:30 p.m.
Starts Mon. Oct. 15
UBC AQUATIC CENTRE
minimum of 3 women playing
Register Oct. 1-5
War Memorial Gym. Rm. 203
Is your "heart" in computers?
Can You Sell?
(^) Yes
Then we have the perfect job for you.
Call 536-0266. Ask for Debra
cita
computers
Thurs , Fri . Sat.
Oct. H,5^
0uK ICH* t>-    —
682-5608
566 Oas6e.ro Stttet
STUDENT DISCOUNTS AND
SAME DAY SERVICE
SAVE 20% &
SAME DAY SERVICE
AT THE.
WESTERN OPTICAL EYE LAB
With your prescription and
STUDENT I.D. CARD -
ChOOSe ANY FRAME
IN OUR STOCK.
WESTERN OPTICAL
 EYE LAB	
Mon. - Fri. 8:30 - 5:00
2nd & Burrard
(1742 w. 2nd Ave
731-9112

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