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The Ubyssey Oct 24, 1967

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Array 600 DEMONSTRATORS marched from city hall to the court
house Saturday to voice their opposition to the war in Vietnam peacefully in contrast to the war demonstrations in
Washington. The crowd broke up without incident when
speakers had finished.
Protests testimony
ho growing  concern
OTTAWA (CUP)—Demonstrations across Canada Saturday
gainst the war in Vietnam reflected a growing feeling concern
ver Canadian complicity in the war.
In Halifax, Nova Scotia Mayor Allan O'Brien was among
50 anti-war demonstrators. A mile-long trek to Victoria Park
ras organized by the Halifax citizens committee to end the war
a Vietnam.
It was the first mass Vietnam war demonstration ever in the
/Taritimes.
Mayor O'Brien told the marchers he was proud to act as
aaster of ceremonies as a concerned Canadian, not as a mayor.
"I jealously guard my rights as a citizen of the world,"
le said.
In Montreal 500 French and English demonstrators gathered
a downtown Phillips Square and marched through the rain to
he U.S. Embassy.
In Ottawa, T. C. Douglas, leader of the New Democratic
'arty of Canada told 500 people demonstrating in front of the
^rliament Buildings: "War in Vietnam is one of the greatest
noral issues of our times."
"It is also one of the greatest threats to world peace existing
;oday," he said.
"If this slaughter of Vietnamese civilians continues it will
imount to genocide."
Alphonse Morrissette, president of the University of Ottawa
student council implored the people to go out and convince their
leighbors, "not only those who believe like you do . . . but
;he skeptics."
"Life is sacred," he said.
An estimated 4,000 persons snarled traffic along Yonge Street
in Toronto for three hours Saturday afternoon in the biggest anti-
Vietnam protest march ever held there.
The marchers mobilized at Queens Park and paraded in
double file along the sidewalks down the main street to city
More Vietnam pages 5. 6
hall.   At one point the line stretched for two miles.
The demonstrators were forced to use the sidewalks because
the police department refused a parade permit along the main
street.
Students totalled only about one-half of the demonstration.
Women, children and old men made up a large contingent and
whole-families joined the march.
Draft resistors marched as a body carrying yellow placards
TO PAGE 2
Vol. XLIX, No. 15
VANCOUVER, B.C., TUESDAY, OCTOBER 24,1967    <^|^>48        224-3916
Senators ope
on secret m
The cloak of senate secrecy was given a hefty
yank Monday.
UBC's first four student senators proved Mon?
day they will live up to campaign promises to
report fully on what happens at senate meetings.
Kirsten Emmott, science 4; Ray Larsen, arts 5;
Mark Waldman, graduate studies 3; and Gabor
Mate, arts 4, were elected last week.
In a joint statement released Monday, the
senators said they had all received copies of the
agenda for Wednesday's meeting.
"In accordance with the students' wishes for
an end to senate secrecy, we are making this
agenda available to The Ubyssey."
Items on the agenda for the senate meeting
include: the campus plan; the positioning of
the clock tower; the introduction of student members to senate membership; the annual financial
report; report of the admissions and new programs committees; discussion on graduate
studies; and the annual report of the extension
department.
Wednesday's meeting, to be held in the administration building at 8 p.m., will be the first
time details of the meeting will be made available.
The student senators agreed to do the following things at this meeting:
"1. We shafrsig^hP Wirle Htff "juidorse the
principle of student-faculty control of the university. This is in accordance with student desires
for a democratic academic community.
"2. To end senate secrecy, we shall introduce a motion that a public gallery be opened at
senate meetings to which students and the student
press would be admitted.
"&. We shall ask what has been done concerning deleting the two-year language requirement in the faculty of arts. This point has been
debated in the senate before, but if nothing has
been done we shall introduce the motion to
abolish the compulsory two-year language requirement.
"4. In accordance with the expressed wishes
of Arts I students, we shall recommend that the
Arts I program be carried on to Arts II. We
shall also request that the possibility of a Science
I program be examined.
"5. We shall ask if the money for the proposed clock tower could not be diverted into
more urgent projects, such as the library.
"If any students wish to discuss these or any
other matters with us, please contact us through
The Ubyssey office."
Neanderthals psyched out
By JANE KENNON
Engineers are cynical and
destructive authoritarians, a
UBC staff psychologist said
Monday.
The psychologist, who asked
to remain anonymous, said engineers operate in a rigid type
of social structure. This makes
them intolerant and inconsiderate of basic human and
social values.
Their pranks illustrate a
lack of adequate education for
engineers, he said.
"They are being trained,
like someone trains lions, but
they are not being educated."
Engineers' work load does
not allow for studies in the
humanities. This results in a
'What's in it for me?' attitude
and a general lack of moral
consideration.
"An individual might feel
remorse after the prank has
gone too far, but the group
presence of the mob generates
enough emotion to make the
destructive activity seem less
serious.
Somebody must take steps
to tell them what other people
think or there will be no curbing them, he said.
"Every year pranks- are
more destructive; physical
abuse and property damage
are now synonymous with engineers' stunts."
The psychologist said he did
not want to be indentified because his offices were close to
the   engineering   building.   He
said he feared objects would
be thrown through his window!
Meanwhile, Alma Mater
Society treasurer Dave Hoye
confirmed the engineering
undergraduate society will pay
for an incident Thursday in
which 13,000 copies of The
Ubyssey were destroyed.
Ubyssey editor Danny Stoffman said the red-jackets who
destroyed Thursday's edition
did $1,000 worth of property
damage.
But, he said, more than $800
of it was covered by advertising revenues.
This revenue was recovered
by printing a second press run
of the~ Thursday edition. The
second run was distributed on
campus early Friday.
Few bounce at UBC
UBC students are straight dealers when
it comes to cheques.
That is the conclusion of the accounting
department so far this  year.
Accounting head John Lomox estimated
that 70 to 80 per cent of students pay their
fees by cheque.
"Only 600 cheques this fall were invalid,"
he said.
Despite increasing enrollment, the number
of invalid cheques is down 70 from last year.
"Eighty-five per cent of the 600 that bouc-
ed resulted from human error on the part of
the student. Most bounced because of honest
mistakes."
One reason, Lomax said, is that some
students erroneously think that an approved
student loan application magically puts money
in the bank.
Students writing bad cheques are treated
as if they had not paid their fees in the first
place, and are notified to send payment.
"Our experience with students has been
very good," he added.
Bum cheque . . . rubber robber Page 2
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, October 24, 1967
— dennis gans photo
600 PERSONS gathered in front of the library Friday for the
Vietnam talk-out, organized by the ad-hoc committee to
conduct a prelude to the Vietnam march. Persky, Epstein and
Mate officiated.
Council okays budget,
Arts  given  deficit
The $478,000 Alma Mater Society budget was passed by
council Monday night.
After five minutes of debate council passed it by a vote
of 15 to four.
Engineering president Lynn Spraggs, music president Walter
Coates, university clubs committee chairman Mike Coleman and
architecture president Jim Goodwin opposed its passing.
The budget, after hours of debate at the last two council
meetings, gives arts a $1,250 grant.
(After the anti-calendar deficit is subtracted, arts will have
a deficit of $41.69.)
"We have to pay for the deficit (anti-calendar) anyway
whether it shows in the budget or not," said law president
Jim Taylor.
"I'm voting for the resolution because it's the only way
the budget will pass," said AMS first vice-president Don Munton.
"I think it's very bad faith for everyone here to say arts can
go to the finance committee for more money then say we'll screw
them by voting it down in council," he said.
Arts president Stan Persky was not present at the meeting.
DEMONSTRATIONS
FROM PAGE 1
reading "We refuse to go".
In Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, over 100 students marched on
city hall carrying placards. They were addressed by Bob Wilkinson, Madison University student and former writer for the Saigon
Daily News.
All day Saturday The Voice of Women sponsored meals of
reconciliation at which Saskatoon Mayor Sid Buckwold, Billy
Graham, associate Leighton Lord, and representatives of the
Quakers, International Student Groups, and other addressed the
protestors.
In Winnipeg, Manitoba, 700 demonstrators listened to Francis
Ross of the Vietnam Veterans Against the War, and Mrs. Muriel
Duckworth, president of the Voice of Women speak out against
the war.
In Calgary, Alberta, a fifteen-block parade through the
downtown area grew from 80 marchers at its start to 200 at its
destination.
About a third of the marchers were university students.
Hippies, students and' others, 1,500 in all, turned up at
Vancouver city hall to join the nation-wide protest.
Other protest marches were held in Edmonton, Saskatoon,
Regina, Kingston, Kitchener-Waterloo, and other cities.
Few marchers were interfered with by police, although
some did encounter problems getting permission to demonstrate.
There were only a few scattered incidents of violence reported.
'Don't work
for war
suppliers'
Thwarting industrial war
production and opening doors
to draft dodgers are the best
protests against the U.S. in
Vietnam, says a UBC chemistry professor.
"Canada cannot affect the
U.S. politically because we are
only a satellite," Dr. Norman
Epstein told 600 persons Friday at a Vietnam protest rally
in front of the library.
"Nor can she stop the U.S.,
because we can ruin ourselves
with tariff barriers before they
would be felt in the U.S."
Canada can advocate peace
without aligning herself with
Russia and communism, he
said.
Stoppage of war production
can be partly done by protests
against the companies involved.
"Many Canadian industries
are selling war materials to
the U.S. You must not work
for such companies. The producer is a guilty as the user."
Student senator Gabor Mate
spoke at the rally.
Mate compared the U.S.
position to that of the Roman
empire.
"The U.S. also conquers and
loots other countries for its
own gain. An imperialist nation poisons the minds of its
own people."
The Vietnamese are rising
up against their oppressors in
much the same way U.S.
Negroes are, Mate said.
Arts president Stan Persky
also addressed the meeting.
Straight  to  shock
word watcher Tom
Four letter words are a certainty in Friday's issue of
the Georgia Straight, editor
Dan  McLeod  said  Monday.
"We are definitely going
to have all of them in it,"
MjcLeod said. "The paper will
not remain pure at the expense of freedom of the
press."
City license inspector Milt
Harrell, who returned the
Straight's licence last week,
said Monday if it is guilty of
"gross misconduct," its license
will be  suspended again.
The reinstatement of the
paper's license came after a
special two-page issue was
printed.
Harrell returned the license
on the strength of that issue.
The license was suspended
three weeks ago with the support of mayor Tom Campbell
and later of city council.
"Campbell has even let
down the people that wanted
us banned," McLeod said.
"He seems interested only
in personal publicity."
The Straight is now suing
Campbell and Harrell in
Supreme Court.
CUS STUDENT
DISCOUNT
SERVICE
With your AMS-CUS id card
you will save 10-25% at several Vancouver firms — see
lists on campus, in Birdcalls,
or phone CUS office for info.
224-3242, local 43
NOTICE TO '68 GRADS
Your FREE Grad Photos
Now Being Taken
Mobile Studio Location - Oct. 16-30
Huts by Brock
Arts Students Anytime
Hours — 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Don't Delay — No Appointment Needed — No Cost
(This Service is Covered by Your GRAD FEE)
CAMPBELL STUDIO
10th & Burrard
736-0261
PUBLIC SERVICE OF CANADA
Will you graduate in 1968 with a minimum of
8 full-year courses* in one or more of the
following  disciplines?
ECONOMICS STATISTICS SOCIOLOGY
DEMOGRAPHY    MARKETING
ECONOMIC GEOGRAPHY
If yes, the PUBLIC SERVICE OF CANADA can
offer interesting and challenging positions to
you as:
ECONOMISTS
STATISTICIANS
SOCIOLOGISTS
Our recruiter will visit the Placement Office of the
University of British Columbia on November 27, 28, 29
and 30 and December 1.
Arrange with your placement office for an interview
to discuss career opportunities in the Public Service of
Canada.
*For those who will have less than the required
number of courses there may be opportunities
for further education and careers as Labour
Market Analysts. Check with your Placement
Office.
PRE-CHRISTMAS SALE
ORIGINAL OIL PAINTINGS WITH
ARTISTIC FRAMES
18" x 24'
20" x 24'
20" x 30"
400 Paintings to choose from
HURRY, DONT MISS THESE BARGAINS
IMPERIAL ARTS
4458 WEST 10TH AVE.
224-3933 Tuesday, October 24,  1967
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 3
— kurt hilger photo
WELL, YOU SEE, we've been having quite a few hang-ups lately, what with branching into
all kinds of knowledge areas, and we found that in many cases we were barking up the
wrong  tree  say a  couple  of confused girls to a sympathetic member of the stronger sex.
SUPPORTS  NEW  SENATORS
Council demands open senate
By NORMAN GIDNEY
Ubyssey Council Reporter
Student council Monday night approved a
Resolution endorsing open senate meetings and
supporting the new student senators in their
;ampaign to end senate secrecy.
The motion, proposed by Alma Mater presi-
lent Shaun Sullivan was opposed only by en-
;ineering president Lynn Spraggs.
The policy resolution urges that the senate
lgenda for each meeting be published, a public
jallery be established and that the press be
allowed except when the senate deals with "con-
'idential matters".
AMS treasurer Dave Hoye moved the same
notion with regard to the board of governors.
Dnly Spraggs and science representative Jim
Sughes were opposed.
"Gee, we're really pushing our luck now,"
.aid agriculture president, Gene Zabawa.
First vice-president Don Munton said a
student was necessary on the BoG because the
board often disregards the students' interest.
He said the SUB access road and the Acadia
Park residence mix-up were two examples in
which a student on the board would have helped.
One  sought  for
Windsor  seminar
The Alma Mater Society is looking for a student who will attend the Canadian-American
Seminar Oct. 30 to Nov. 1 in Windsor.
The annual seminar invites students from the
U.S. and Canada to discuss major domestic problems facing America.
Council will provide a $200 travel grant for
its delegate. Deadline for applications is Thursday.
Mini-bus trial run
slated this weekend
A mini-bus system may be a reality on campus to spare
students early morning treks from parking lots..
The idea was suggested in a Ubyssey interview by Arnie
Myers, UBC director of information.
A call Monday to the office of A. P. Morrow, general
manager of the Pacific National Exhibition, revealed that three
"trackless trains" and two tractors to haul them might be
available for homecoming celebrations this weekend.
"This would provide us with a trial run," Myers said. "We
hope we can establish a permanent on-campus bus system."
The trains carry 40 people each and are normally used only
at the PNE in August. UBC has, however, rented them for
short terms in the past.
AMS first vice-president Don Munton was very enthusiastic
about the proposal.
"I think it's a really great idea. I don't see why it can't
be done," he said.
"We will have to assume responsibility for their pick-up and
return, as well as for any damage or loss, but I think that is
reasonable."
Munton dictated a letter to Morrow requesting the trains.
He would not put the university under any obligation to
make a permanent agreement to use the trains.
"But with almost 10,000 cars registered on lots as far as a
mile from where their owners study, we need a regular transit
system around campus."
Law students moot
The mental meeting of UBC law students has started with
the official opening of the mooting season.
Moots, or mock trials, will be held at the law school every
night until Nov. 16.
The moot takes the form of an appeal before a bench of
one faculty member and one local practitioner, magistrate, or
judge.
This is a traditional method of training law students, dating
from the 15th century when moots were held nightly.
Hypothetical cases are chosen for the legal problems they
involve, but topical questions are used whenever possible.
Students are judged on their ability to analyze, their logic
and manner of presentation, and their stamina in the face of
critical questioning.
Mooters compete for the Allan S. Gregory Memorial Trophy
and money prize, a place on the two-man team for an international law moot against the University of Washington and
the right to moot in the Western Canada Moot Competition.
All UBC moots are open to the public. Information is available from the law school at 228-2818.
Alumni create journal
for faculty creativity
The UBC board of governors has approved an $1,500
alumni giving grant to initiate an academic journal.
The journal follows faculty complaints that not enough
exposure is being given to material coming out of UBC departments, and that student theses are being filed away and
forgotten.
Known as B.C. Studies, the 100-page paper will be
published on a quarterly basis.
"It will not be ready for press before the first of next
year," said alumni spokesman Ian Malcolm.
A nine-person organizing committee for the journal
will be guided by Dr. Walter Young, political science instructor currently on sabbatical leave, and Dr. Margaret
Prang, associate professor of history.
Also on the committee are members of geography,
anthropology, sociology and economics faculties.
~,¥ i'(*<*>
.A^^f PICKING THE CAN-A
OIDATES! IT'S NOTDBM'j MWSStY
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays andi Fridays throughout the university year
by the Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C. Editorial opinions are
those of the editor and not of the AMS or the university. Member,
Canadian University Pres.. The Ubyssey subscribes to the press services
of Pacific Student Press, of which it is founding member, and Underground
Press Syndicate. Authorized second class mail by Post Office Department,
Ottawa, and for payment of postage in cash. The Ubyssey publishes Page
Friday, a weekly commentary and review. City editor, 224-3916. Other
calls, 224-3242: editor, local 25; photo. Page Friday, loc. 24; sports, loc.
23; advertising, loc. 26. Telex 04-5224.
§l§^3K^_l&iiiii§^_8:^i^_§
SW^ffittAX-:
iS3S5S«SSSSK?K!S3!iS^!
OCTOBER 24, 1967
,♦* . \ «'
x « j
For the defence...?
The system of undergraduate education at large
Canadian universities is under continued  attack.
On Oct. 28, The Ubyssey reported details of a University of Toronto investigation headed by political
scientist C. B. Macpherson. One of the study's chief
recommendations was the reduction of lectures in any
course to a maximum of one hour a week.
This was similar to the recommendations of most
of the frequent studies into what's wrong with undergraduate university education.
It was in line also with new UBC president Kenneth Hare's comment in a Ubyssey interview that the
threera-week lecture system is a form of "saturation-
bombing."
We agree with Hare that while an occasional lecture can be an important stimulus to thought and study,
an overdose is as deadening to the mind as "saturation-
bombing" is to a Vietnamese town. Cutting classes in
such a system becomes for many the only way to get
an education.
The alternative to lectures is a system of seminars and tutorials. But this alternative we are told, is
impossible because there isn't enough money.
We're not convinced, that it is impossible to use
present university funds in different ways. And we are
amazed that nobody bothers to defend the system as
presently structured. The deans, department heads and
instructors offering courses based on three lectures a
week have a duty to defend this system as the best possible under the circumstances — or to offer alternatives.
The Ubyssey earlier this month reported past president John Macdonald's previously-secret experimental
college plan.
In his proposal, Macdonald termed our present
undergraduate system a "burial  ground for talent."
We haven't yet heard from the deans, department
heads, and instructors in charge of this burial ground.
It would appear that they agree with Mac or don't disagree strongly enough to say so.
These members of the university, we suggest, have
two choices — either defend the system as it exists or
look for alternatives.
A new way
One organization beginning the search for an alternative structure to undergraduate university education
is the Canadian Union of Students.
CUS is beginning to study a concept called student-
centered teaching. According to a resolution on this
concept presented at the last CUS congress, learning is
"a process of self-enhancement in which the individual
learns because he wants to learn, not because of coercion."
The student, in this type of teaching, assumes responsibility for his own education. He takes part in
formulating the structure of his courses, including
methods of instruction and evaluation.
Attempts at introducing such methods have been,
made and are being made now at UBC by a few venturesome instructors.
But because of stringent examination and lecture
requirements such attempts usually fail. Whether these
efforts to centre teaching on students must continue to
fail should be a matter of concern to UBC's new student senators.  •
EDITOR: Denny Stoffman for a beef.   "I   will  not   Condon  It,"
City   Stuart Cray sai<1   Orson   Welles,   Safely.
m»w« «..._» /-™.i._ Meanwhile mumbling mirthless
"•*"   Sosan «ranjby morticians madly murdered mis-
Managing  Murray McMillan guided mummies. With grave ex-
Photo     Kurt Hilger pressions,      they     were     aided     by
a-..>i___      ai m-.__  vi-.*.- ___.u Norman      Gidney,      Jane     Kennon,
Associate      Al Birnie, Kirsten EmmoH Fran     McGrath,     Mark    DeCoursev
Senior   Pat Hrushowy and   Laurie   Dunbar.   Scott   Macrae
Sports  Mike Jessen went     treking.     Jade     Eden     held
Wi_                                ri._.i»»». u.i„ Steve   Jackson   over   a   sharp   cliff,
wipe   Charlotte Haire hut   he  rtenied   a  hangover.
Page Friday   Judy Bing Fizzing   on   the   jock   bench   were
Ass't. City   Boni Lee Miko   Fitzgerald,   Bob   Banno,   John
Twigg,   and  Jim   Maddin,   who   bub-
Rather    than     acquire    a    choir, Med   over   with   enthusiasm,
they   flexed    their   vocal    cords    in Springing  about   in  the   darkroom
discord    and    broke    six    windows. were       Bob       Brown,        Lawrence
Ann    Arky   fell   through   a   seventh Woodd,   Chris   Blake,   Lin   Tse-Hsu
and   was   in   extreme   pane.   A   rich and     I_eo     Tolstoy,     who     showed
young    shoemaker   who    reeked    of much   bounce.
sole  soon   made a pass  at  her.   "At A   free   demonstration    of   karate
least   I  got   a  breath   of   fresh   heir will  be   given   by  Ali   Akbar  Birnie
out  of   it,"   she   groaned.   A   straw- today   at  a  noon   news   seminar  for
hatted   butcher   lurched  past,   mak- staffers.   Free   hangover   cures   will
Ing    cutting    remarks    and    looking also   be  available.
'I know Prime Minister is a modest title — but the people
weren't ready for "God" yet.'
;**«■« >„^ *»» w v* ^ ;*.. tAS»w&k£«« %,
Come, let us
reason together
By KIRSTEN EMMOTT
Ubyssey  Associate  Editor
"Why is it," runs the old
wheeze, "that the American
House of Representatives has
a committee on foreign affairs
while the senate has a committee   on  foreign  relations?
Answer: "Because senators
are too old to have affairs."
That's a pretty grey fate for
a girl of nineteen.
Seriously, though, now that
I'm a student bureaucrat at last,
there are important things to
be considered without delay.
OVERJOYED
The first thing I want people
to think about is the way the
voting went. Why was I overjoyed when only a couple of
hundred votes were cast at the
engineering building? Because
I knew that most votes cast at
that poll were votes against
me and fellow senators, Ray
Larsen and Gabor Mate. Because engineers have a two-
valued orientation towards
people like Gabor Mate and
myself — Ubyssey staffers are
bad, non-Ubyssey staffers are
good.
Gabor and I were somehow
tagged with the label "radical", although I have never
taken part in revolutionary
activity of any kind and Ga-
bor's revolutionary politics
have nothing to do with his
approach to the university as
it now exists. Yet because we
work for this paper, people
figured we were going to run
into the senate chamber and
insult everyone's wives.
I asked one of Hugh Mad-
din's supporters, quite seriously, "Why would anyone not
vote for me?" and he could
only answer "Because you're
supposed to be a radical."
I won't accept this: there is
no reason why senators and
the students they represent
should assume a hostile stance.
Anyone who fears I will not
represent his ideas is invited
to hold a challenge meeting
and tell me what he wants.
This goes for all the technical
faculties, for the microbiology
student who wrote me an
anonymous letter filled with
slimy innuendos and personal
slanders, for the engineers
who rioted in The Ubyssey office Thursday.
Why should engineers humiliate and anger people by
tossing them in shallow ponds?
It would be much wittier and
more fun all around to toss
them in a blanket.
ANGLICAN EGGS
Why should the Anglicans
throw raw eggs at Catholic
theological students? Last year
a true wit nailed a copy of
Luther's 99 theses to the door
of St. Mark's.
Why should sciencemen
cover a group of calm, peaceful artsmen with detergent?
Sciencemen would score a bigger coup by having hundreds
of flowers delivered to John
Stuart Mill lounge with exaggerated messages of love, or
perhaps renaming the Physoc
clubroom  Buchanan  Lounge.
The surge of silly behavior
among college students isn't
going to impress the public
much. Who's going to give us
more representation in our
government if it keeps up?
If the 74 engineers who
voted for me did so for any
sensible reason, I invite them
to dissociate themselves from
this kind of crap and start some
sort of meaningful dialogue
with their radical, but reasonable, senate representatives.
Scared
of a word,
Angel Toml
By JOHN MATE
Archangel Tom CampbeJ
says he opposed the Georgi
Straight because it is immoral
obscence, and degenerate.
The kind mayor shouli
get off the pot, cut off his trans
parent wings and fall to th
ground. For a morning ea
ercise he should repeat tei
times daily, "I am not th
epitome of morality, I am no
the epitome of morality, I an
not . . . "
FOUR LETTERS
The word "fuck" is nothini
but a word. Just like house
tree, campbell, is is made u]
of letters, and the mayo
shouldj n°t be scared of read
ing or using it.
The same four letters coul<
be arranged in many othe
combinations like cufk, kufc
kcuf, ucfk, and there wouli
be no objections to their usage
It is therefore the meaning, thi
connotation attached: to thi
specific word, that the mayoi
along with the respectabl
mothers of the PTA, church
groups, Rotary clubs, after
noon tea clubs, girl guides, anc
all other upstanding citizens
are opposed to.
This however, must be jus
a minor hang up.
The word itself has the ba<
connotation simply because o
our bastardized morality. Act
ually it means "sexual inter
course" to which the mayor, a;
the mothers, surely can't bi
opposed.
It is only because our society
still has this hypocritic, medie
val hang up which attempts tc
force a forbidding taboo upor
this very natural act that tht
word is so terrible.
NATURAL
If our society would openlj
admit the fact that sexual in
tercourse is natural, beautifu
and essential, if society had <
sincere attitude towards thi;
most important activity, ther
the word "fuck", would no
have its present connotation
Consequently, it would not b«
used as it is, for that would b<
meaningless.
The fact is, however, that the
word does have the connota
tion it has, people do use it aj
such, and if people use it t<
communicate a certain feeling
which no other words can ex
press, then there can be no
thing wrong with its usage
Certainly it is easier to say
"that was a fucking thini
Campbell has done" than t.
say, "that was a sexual inter
coursing thing Campbell ha;
done."
VIRGIN MINDS
Surely Archangel Tom ha;
himself often used the term
possibly to describe his busi
ness acquaintances, his politi
cal rivals, or possibly th«
Georgia Straight.
As for the poor childrer
whose minds are to be fillec
with garbage and filth, th.
chances are that they are no
as naive as the mayor and his
mothers would have us be
lieve. However, if the papei
does touch upon some minds
it will do no harm, for tht
virgin mind will not under
stand it. And if it does, ther
it is no longer virgin. Tuesday, October 24,   1967
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 5
Undergrad societies need
dialogue, mutual respect
By VICTOR HARDY and GABOR MATE
The events of the past week have indicated
Jie need for further communication between
;he undergraduate societies.
The kind of rivalry that has existed in the
?ast has served only to alienate students from
_ach other, and to prevent the interfaculty
lialogue that is necessary to make UBC into a
•eal community.
Two   things   are  necessary.   One,   that  the
Victor Hardy, applied science 2, was the organizer of a stunt last year in which Senator
date, arts 4, was abducted and locked in the
_US office in a slraightjacket.
ivalry should become constructive rivalry, and
wo, that students of various faculties should
earn to tolerate and respect each other's opin-
ons and that they learn to discuss these opinions
n a nonantagonistic fashion.
In order to understand the past hostility, let
is look at why certain undergraduate faculties
tct the way they do. To begin with, the en-
[ineers.
IEASONS FOR HOSTILITY
Engineers are proud of their faculty and
heir work, as everyone else should be of their
twn. Because they practically all attend the
ame classes as a group for the first two years
aigineers get to know each other quite well.
i*or them, therefore, the complaints of many
tther students that the university is a cold,
mpersonal place doesn't have much meaning.
These facts help to explain why the engin-
;ers always seem to be so well "organized."
They use this organization to sponsor campus
lances, blood drives, teacup games, and to carry
»ut "stunts."
In the arts faculty it is easy to go to many
lasses and rarely to see the same faces. The
eeling of impersonality is quite understandable.
Also, a different mentality is created by the
act that the very nature of their studies causes
trts students to question and to probe the very
itructure of society, whereas the engineers
tudy precise technical matters in which there
s no cause to question the authority of the
.rofessors and the textbooks.
JLODS AND REBELS
This causes many artsmen to look upon en-
;ineers as insensitive clods, and many engineers
o view artsmen as purposeless rebels. This is
>ne example of the lack of understanding be-
;ween the two faculties.
We have dealt with the engineers and the
trtsmen because these two faculties seem to be
he furthest apart. However, the same things
vould apply in varying degrees to the other
'acuities as well.
A main source of hostility is the engineers'
stunts. One reason for hostility is a certain feeling of impotent envy that other students experience when they see a mass of red sweaters
emerge from the engineering building, because
they themselves lack the spirit and the unity
that the engineers display. But another reason
is the the engineers have sometimes carried
their stunts too far.
Over the years, engineering students have
used the excuse of "abolishing campus apathy"
to justify their stunts. However, you do not
decrease apathy by terrorizing and intimidating
other students.
DECLARATION MAKES SENSE
The recent declaration of the arts council
should be acceptable to all sides:
"We agree that stunts like the engineers'
statue stunt of a couple years ago was a good
and amusing thing to do; we also agree that
'stunts' that are actually attacks on a particular
group of students or an effort at intimidation
or simply vandalism are bad things."
A new atmosphere is needed on this campus. To begin with, engineers should realize
that other students resent being manhandled or
intimidated, and artsmen — and in particular
The Ubyssey — should stop referring to engineers as Neanderthals and fascists.
Furthermore, on what differences do exist,
open and sincere dialogue should begin between
the students of the various faculties. After all,
our aim is a common aim: to make UBC into a
better university.
s ■«_. ■ ■    ■       I    ■   VM 3
BUTTON
z. INSTRUCTIONS FOH ASSEMBLAGS ;
ilKUT OUT ON DOTTED UNE. \
IZ) PASTE ON HEAWa*D6&4RD. \
§ OVRERJL THE INK DOES^T BLUR.r
13) FfcORE OUT HOJ JO PIN (T OH. \
l^EVERVBOOy 4JEAR ONElSTMDi
I UP FOR WUR RkSrtrs! \
|   ANOTHER UBVSSEr1 ORQANISEO     I
PR0T&S7.'
KmuUMHIIiiiiiiiiuiiwiiMliiiliUiiiiitifUiiiMtuimiiiiTutfiuti
Violence vs. violence
By AL BIRNIE
Ubyssey Associate Editor
Vancouver's anti-Vietnam war demonstrators
should be able to learn something from Saturday's events in Washington, D.C.
In Vancouver Saturday, a group of peaceful
:itizens went on a nice peaceful peace march
with a legal permit, were protected from the
See Page 6 —
Ex-special events man jailed
xaffic by nice peaceful cops, listened to nice
speakers, and went home.
In Washington, flamboyant Vancouverite
Brian Plummer went on a march too, but it
wasn't peaceful.
Hie people there were tired of going on nice
marches to which the government pays no atten-
;ion to, and which bring the Vietnam war no
.loser to ending.
They thought that perhaps destroying the
operations of the Pentagon would be a positive
measure. They seem to be right for when they
attempted to do this they were beaten, arrested,
and dispersed.
The facts are that the American government
will allow protest only up to the point where it
has some effect.
The demonstrators in Washington, by getting
their heads beaten on, perhaps learned what the
South Americans, South-East Asians, Africans,
and American blacks already know—that a reasonable appeal to The Man will not work, for The
Man is not reasonable.
War and violence are not nice, but they are
inevitable under the American economic system.
Non-violent means do not work against a
violent system because in the last analysis, when
the system is forced to choose between the lives
of people and protecting its property, it will kill
and maim people.
To end the violence in the world, it is necessary to destroy the sources of violence by the
only means which will be effective against them,
and that is superior violence.
This does not mean, however, that there will
always be violence, for man has, and always will
have, in his arms and legs, the means necessary
to inflict violence upon his fellow man.
If people are allowed to be free and given the
means to fully understand one another, they do
not use violence.
If the Americans, or Canadians, wish to eliminate the Pentagon, the troops, the draft, and the
violence inherent in their society, they will have
to take guns to the Pentagon next time around.
FILMSOC PRESENTS
LEE MARVIN
JANE FONDA
CAT BALLOU
THURS., OCT. 26 — AUD.
12:30 — 3:30 — 6:00 — 8:30
Adm. 50c
Notice to Graduating Students in
ARTS
A meeting will be  held  in  Room  104, Buchanan  Building
WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 25 at 12:30 p.m.
to hear a representative from the Placement Office
(Office of Student Services)
on the subject
GRADUATE EMPLOYMENT
• _—
GRADUATE  STUDENT  ASSOCIATION
OFFICIAL
NOTICE
WW-___-«
FALL GENERAL MEETING
Thursday
October 26,1967
12:45  p.m.
GRADUATE STUDENT CENTRE
LOWER LOUNGE
SPECIAL BUSINESS:
CENTRE EXPANSION
FEE INCREASE
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THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, October 24, 1967
—george hollo photo
MOTHER TUCKERS Yellow Ducks soothed and quaked their way into the hearts of some 200
spectators in Brock Friday afternoon. The watchers tuned in to the turned on music in another
of the free arts council programs.
IN  WASHINGTON  TO  DEMONSTRATE
Ex-special events man jailed
PLUMMER
more and more
By AL  BIRNIE
Ubyssey Associate Editor
Last year's UBC Special Events chairman
Brian Plummer was arrested Saturday along
with about 450 other participants in an attack
on the Pentagon in Washington, D.C.
The attack, by about 10,000 of the 200,000
marchers in a massive peace rally protesting the
Vietnam war was repulsed by soldiers and police
using tear gas, clubs, rifle butts, and boots,
Plummer said.
He called me in Vancouver
on his one allowed phone call,
as he spent the weekend with
the others in the Occoquan
Workhouse in Virginia, about
25 miles from Washington.
He was due to appear in
court Monday morning.
The mood of Saturday's
demonstration was much more
violent than that of a normal
peace march, Plummer said.
"People here are realizing
that the government pays no attention to peaceful anti-war demonstrations and that a government which exists by violence can only understand violence.
"The attack on the Pentagon was more a
riot than a demonstration, but still it was unarmed people against well-trained and armed
troops.
"A lot of people being beaten and kicked by
soldiers and police must have thought that it
would be a good idea to bring a gun along next
time."
Saturday's demonstration, the culmination
of a week of anti-war rallies and sit-ins throughout the U.S., began with a rally at the Lincoln
Memorial and the march by a reported 200,000,
the largest in Washington history, to the Pentagon.
Plummer said the marchers, 90 per cent
white, ranged the entire social spectrum from
love hippies and students to lawyers and businessmen with their families.
After a short rally outside the five-sided
nerve centre of the American war machine,
about 10,000 marchers, mostly young people,
decided to attempt to gain entry to the building
as a gesture of their desire to curtail the operations of this office.
The federal government, expecting such a
move, airlifted into Washington more than 3,500
counter-insurgency troops, who along with police
blocked all entrances to the building.
"It was really frightening, a mob of unarmed
people charging against the lines of stone-faced
troops pointing loaded machine guns and rifles
down at them," said Plummer.
"This time they were ready to do something
— like the Vietnamese people, battle the American military establishment which they hate."
Plummer said that as the first wave of the
demonstrators, himself included, surged into the
waiting troops, the soldiers struck back with
boots, clubs, and rifle butts, and others lobbed
tear gas cannisters into the main body of the
crowd.
The U.S. Defence Department denies any use
of tear gas against the demonstrators.
"Luckily, and I say luckily because I didn't
get my head beaten in, I was thrown against a
cop in the general melee, and he and several
others dragged me away immediately," said
Plummer.
To his knowledge, said Plummer, no shots
were fired in the brief battle.
He said press reports of only 47 demonstrators injured were ridiculous.
"I saw that many beaten up just in my small
area."
Plummer said his cell-mate at Occoquan is
the son of Defence Secretary Robert McNamara' s liaison officer with the Central Intelligence Agency.
Faction rioting
sees bloodshed
SAN JUAN, Puerto Rico (CUPI) — Serious
rioting recently took place here between police
and students of the University of Puerto Rico.
The outbreak last Wednesday resulted in one
death and 42 wounded including 21 policemen,
following shots and bottle-throwing.
The incidents began Sept. 28 when members of the pro-statehood university students
accused bystanding members of the federation of
pro-independent university students of peddling
narcotics in line with a carefully developed plan
of lieutenants of Communist Chinese dictator
Mao Tse-Tung, to weaken and destroy western
youth.
When the pro-independence students denied the
charge, the statehood advocates threw bottles at
them from their building. The pro-independence
side tossed back stones. Soon 20 policemen
arrived and arrested five pro-independence students.
In the evening about 1,000 pro-independence
students met policemen with a shower of rocks
and bottles in front of the campus. Police reciprocated.
Later, some students began a bonfire on
campus. They were shot at.
Pagoda Restaurant
Chinese Food
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738-3104
or
2946 W. Broadway     731-4721
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Hairpieces
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Leather  and  wool  jackets,
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Cow,  sheep,  wolf  skin  vests.
Wedding   dresses,   dresses.
Blou.es,   bathing   suits   and
jumping   suits.
All  garments tailored for
self measurements.
MEHMET'S TAILORS
540 Granville St. - 684-0811
In Arnold & Quigley's Shop
CO-ED Footwear Fashions
• NEW TOES AND HEELS
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RESEARCH
PAPERS?
Federal Government services can
benefit most members of Canadian
society in either their work or their
recreation. Official research in
Canada is now done in every area
which can improve the living
standards or enrich the leisure time
of its citizens.
In printing the results, the Queens
Printer informs his readers of
Canada's contributions to agriculture,
industry,. economics, art, science,
education and health. Oj the
thousands of titles printed during
a year, every one is authoritative.
Incjuire today from tht
Queen's Printer
Bookshop,
657 Granville St. Vancouver 2, B.C.
Telephone 68i-729i. Tuesday, October 24,  1967
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 7
— kurt hilger photo
BORIS, IVAN and Vladimir of the Roosky Three provided the
background music for the Russian smorgasbord dinner in
Brock Monday noon. Brock goes Hawaiian today from 2:30
p.m. to 4 p.m. as part of the Pacific Rim homecoming theme.
War curtails arts grants
Funds for graduate education in the arts and humanities
are vanishing as the U.S. gears its economy to the war effort,
Woodrow Wilson fellowship candidates were told Monday.
Henry Ross, national representative of the Woodrow Wilson
foundation, told 30 nominees in the UBC faculty club that only
150 fellowships will be awarded this year.
Last year 1,000 were awarded by the foundation, which
aids prospective university teachers entering grad studies.
The Ford Foundation, which has backed the project since
its inception at Princeton university, has withdrawn the support
following the appointment of McGeorge Bundy, former U.S.
presidential advisor, as director of the F.F.
Meanwhile, the Canada Council has made comparable cuts
in its grad student scholarship fund.
FILMSOC PRESENTS
CAT  BALLOU
STARRING
LEE MARVIN JANE FONDA
THURS., OCT. 26  — AUDITORIUM
Adm. 50c
Alma Mater Society
OFFICIAL NOTICES
Charter Flight Director
Applications are now being accepted for the position of
A.M.S. Charter Flight Director. The appointee will be
responsible for arrangement of flight. He or she will
co-ordinate promotion for the flight and be responsible
for the sale of seats. Letters of application should be
addressed to Penny Ann Cairns, A.M.S. Secretary,
A.M.S. mailbox number 54. Applicants will appear at
a meeting of Students Council, Monday, October 30,
1967, at 7:00 p.m., at which time the appointment will
be made.
Committee Appointments
Applications are now being accepted for the following
committees:
Constitutional Revisions
Student Housing
Constitutional Revisions Committee and Student Housing Committee applications should be addressed to Don
Munton,  1st Vice-President, AMS mailbox number 51.
Prof cops
cool cash
A UBC electrical engineer
has been awarded a $9,660
contract to develop a portable
device to record the physiological effects of cold.
The contract, from the Pacific Biomedical Research Council in Hawaii, is the result of
Dr. F. K. Bowers' participation
in February in a 100-mile trek
through sub-zero temperatures
in rugged country near Fairbanks, Alaska.
Apple green ?
PANGO PANGO (UNS) —
"Why bother?" was the cry as
thousands of apple green husky
voiced green blorgs marched
against the sacred Mt. Fuji Og-
nap, home of opalescent blorg
leader Great Ringed Forno.
They were protesting the
sudden drop on the world market of the price of esnilia, this
island's staple commodity.
;W*m&~'1'
•4
*
4
By VLADIMIR VASCHEK
It's a small point, Miss
Blair.
It's not that students don't
like the idea of food services
selling ice cream bars. Nay,
rream bars are all that keep
some of us going on those
rainy evenings.
No, it's not the bars themselves, it's thea bsurd price
which you and your homey
taff have placed upon them.
Eleven cents is a bit thick,
wouldn't you say?
Now we 18,000 plus realize
there is a profit motive in
what you do.
The ice cream company
must get its pound of flesh,
and your homey staff must receive their justly deserved pittance, and you must pay for
the light and heat and phone
and cash register paper.
But the administration repeatedly tells us ancilliary
services are run to break even,
not to make money (and definitely not to lose it).
Why is it then that you
must charge 11 cents for an
ice cream bar which hundreds
of drug stores and corner
groceries throughout this city
sell for one thin (very thin)
dime?
An interesting problem, no?
Does the university administration structure require an
extra cent per ice cream bar
which the capitalist system,
even with its wretched little
profit margin, does not.
It's a small point, Miss
Blair.
EFFECTIVE
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READING
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FREE DEMONSTRATION  OF
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TUESDAY, OCT. 31  - 8:00  p.m.
GROSVENOR HOTEL - Douglas room
WEDNESDAY, NOV. 1-8:00 p.m.
GROSVENOR HOTEL - Douglas room
THURSDAY, Nov. 2 - 8:00 p.m.
CAPILANO GARDENS - Copper room
SATURDAY, NOV. 4 - 8:00 p.m.
GROSVENOR HOTEL - Douglas room
MONDAY,   Nov.   6 - 8:00   p.m.
GROSVENOR HOTEL - Douglas room
Contact one of our
U.B.C. Campus
Representatves
PERRY SEIDELMAN
Phone 267-7809 or
leave a message in
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Law Building
MIKE MENARD
Phone 266-5574
JIM RUST
Phone 266-0403
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ubcd Page 8
ADVERTISEMENT
THE     UBYSSEY
Tuesday, October 24, 1967
HOMECOMING EDITION
Vol. LXLII ,No. 1
UBC, October 23 to 28, 1967
224-3242, loc. 58, 59
Homecoming  goes  international
The 67 Pacific Rim theme
guides a full weeks events
VANCOUVER GROUP, the United Empire Loyalists will perform at Saturday's dance in the armory. Tickets are available from the AMS office, Brock Hall.
--•-----_--—_--|--___v—-_-_-■--->-----—----——---—-••--———--_——»--_■—^———a
Dance your heart out
They're coming in twos and threes.
This year's Homecoming dances on Saturday will feature five bands — two in the fieldhouse and three in the
armory.
Playing in the fieldhouse will be Don Fraser's orchestra
and the Accents.
Papa Bear's Medicine Show, the United Empire Loyalists
and John Reirforth's orchestra will all play in the armory.
The Homecoming Queen, chosen from 16 residence and
faculty representatives will be crowned by last year's winner
Johanna Rees, Miss Medicine.
The crowning will take place at 10 p.m. in the armory
and at 10:30 p.m. in the fieldhouse. Students will be able to move
from one dance to the other during the evening.
Tickets for the dances are available in the Alma Mater
Society office and tickets for all other Homecoming events
can be bought at the door.
Fat  faces  fed  foreignly
Feed your face for 49 cents.
Homecoming offers students all the food they can eat at the
four Homecoming luncheons which started Monday at noon in
Brock Hall.
Following Homecoming's "Pacific Rim" theme, each day
of the week, except Thursday, will be devoted to a different area.
More than 200 students crowded into Brock on Monday
to gorge from the Russian smorgasbord.
Today, following the noon-hour fashion show, Homecoming
wil offer an Hawaiian Luau from 2:30' to 4:00 p.m.
Wednesday's luncheon will feature a Mexican fiesta, complete with a traditional Mexican brass band.
On Thursday, the Homecoming Pep Meet with the Phabu—
lous sound of a Phrisco group, the Ph Phactor, will replace
the Homecoming luncheon.
On Friday the final luncheon will offer a large spread of
Oriental delicacies.
Each luncheon will feature different entertainment and for
49 cents a day students can eat all they want.
UBC's Homecoming, Oct. 23 to 28 goes international this year, offering students and alumni
more than ever before.
This year's Pacific Rim theme highlights five
major areas — the orient, Mexico, the USSR,
Autralia-New Zealand, and HawaiinPolynesia.
Each day of Homecoming week, except Thursday, features the food and entertainment of a
a different one of these Pacific Rim areas.
For only 49 cents a meal, Homecoming '67
gives students a wide variety of international food
and entertainment.
Also Monday afternoon, students listened to
a free jazz session from 3 p.m. to 4 p.m. in
Brock cafetreia. Another hour jazz session will
be held at the same time Wednesday.
Today at noon all 16 of this year's Homecoming Queen contestants will model clothes from
Brigitte Mode of Vancouver..
These girls represent most of UBC's faculties
and residences and this year's Queen, chosen
partly by non-student judges and partly from the
student vote at the Pep Meet, will be crowned on
Saturday at iboth student dances.
Following the fashionl_iow~at noon In Brock
Homecoming will present an Hawaiian Luau
complete with Polynesian Hula Dancer.
All the Queen contestants will eat dinner
tonight in Place Vanier and will meet residence
students again over dinner on Wednesday night
at Totem Park.
Wednesday's noon-hour luncheon in Brock
will take the form of a Mexican Fiesta and Wednesday night both Varsity Outdoor Club and
UBC's sororities will hold reunions with their
alumni on campus.
On Thursday morning women students tee
off against alumni in the Homecoming tournament at the University Golf Course.
At noon Thursday, Homecoming presents the
annual Pep Meet in the War Memorial Gym.
Featured entertainment this year will be the
PH PHACTOR, an electronic jug band from San
Francisco.
All of the Homecoming Queen contestants and
the Thunderbird Football team will ibe presented
to students.
Ballots will also be passed out at the Pep
Meet which count toward the choosing of this
year's Homecoming Queen, and the five winners
of the Homecoming raffle will be drawn.
Twenty-five cents buys a chance on all five
of the motorcycles Homecoming is raffling this
year. Raffle tickets are available from faculty
societies or from the Homecoming office in
south Brock basement.
Friday's men's golf tournament, also at the
University Golf Course is followed by the Homecoming Rally at noon.
The Rally which begins in front of Brock
is sponored by the UBC Sports Car club and is
open to all students.
Also at noon on Friday in Brock, Homecoming
presents a wide range of Oriental food.
Saturday, the final big day of Homecoming
week, begins with a parade of floats through the
streets of downtown Vancouver.
. _Thej3arade, with entries from faculties, residences, student clubs, fraternities and sororities
begins at 10 a.m.
Floats, cars, bands and Walking entries will
follow   Homecoming's   Pacific  Rim  theme.
The Homecomoing game begins at 2 p.m. in
the new Thunderbird Stadium. This year UBC's
football team will play the University of Saskatchewan.
This year's great Trekker, Dr. Hugh Keenley-
side will receive his award at half-time of the
the football game.
Following the game UBC's fraternities will
hold reunions with their alumni.
Homecoming ends Saturday night with the
student dances in the armory and the fieldhouse.
This year's Homecoming Queen will receive
her crown at 10 p.m. in the armory and be
crowned again at 10:30 in the fieldhouse.
MASTER CHEF PREPARING food for one of Homecoming's four international  luncheons,  while
greedy students wait for their 49 cent meal. The feed is every day in Brock. Tuesday, October 24,  1967
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 9
QUEEN HOPEFULS LINE  UP FOR TITLE
DIANE DAVIE
Mis* Music
CAROL MATTES
Miss Place Vanier Page  10
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, October 24, 1967
Mystery bikes Homecoming raffle prize
The motorbike mystery has been solved.
The five bikes, which were parked on Brock
terrace last week, are prizes in the Homecoming
raffle.
. "These bikes will be raffled off at 25 cents
a ticket to students at Thursday's pep meet,"
said Dick Reid, student homcomeing chairman.
By WIGGY
Gaping black umbrellas and
abysmal campus puddles . . .
I didn't wear my boots today and so it had to rain. I
used to wonder who is watching up there, thwarting my
efforts to stay dry by sending
sun when I am booted, torrents when I'm not.
But now I know ... it was
the threat of Precipitus, far-
showering god of rain. From
Mount Rainier he reigns without ruth (she went south for
the winter), throwing water
by the bucketful and cat and
dog, they say, down into the
valleys of clog-pouring mud.
Clarentia Drybottom - Gluck,
eminent authority on precipitous deities, said Wednesday:
"The gods are angered by the
erection of the artificial oasis
in downtown Vancouver. They
have been storing their wrath
to expend at some horrendous
hour, and our hour has come."
No more shall we trip
through the tulips," he said
acidly. "Now we must muddle
through the mire."
Mayor Tim Campbull took
exception to his statements,
labelling them immoral and
endangering to the health and
happiness of the hippie fosterlings, whose feet would suffer
from exposure to such stick-
in-the-mud- threats. Mayor
Campbull suggested a citywide
'Get the Rabble Rubbers' campaign'.
But I, having slushed my
way through many miriad
maddening mudholes in this
fair city, know that it will all
be to no avail. The days that
they don't wear them it will
rain. And then the ■whole idea
will prove to be all-wet.
UBC nursing grads
grab  fellowships
Nurse's foundation fellowships have been awarded to
three UBC graduates.
They are Miss Dorothy Ker-
gin of New Westminster,
$4,500; Miss Beverly J. Mitchell of North Vancouver,
$3,500; and Miss Norma M. M.
Dick of Langley, $3,000.
TRIBUTE TO
CHE
GUEVARA
SPEAKERS:
Milton   Acorn—Poet
Bryan Belfont—Fair Play fox
Cuba Committee
Paul Friedman — Chemical
Engineering, UBC.
Allan Harris — League for
Socialist Action
Paul Ivory — PSA Department,  SFU.
Gary Porter — Young Socialists.
Dorothy G. Sleeves—former
CCF M.L.A.
WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 25, 1967
8 P.M.
FISHERMAN'S HAU-138 E. CORDOVA
(near Main & Hastings)
Auspices: Vancouver Fair   Play far
Cuba Committee
Bex 2818, Vancouver. B.C.
Telephone: 7384303
Students can purchase their chances from
their faculties or from homecoming office in
South Brock basement.
"I never, ever ride motorbikes," said Irving
Fetish, grad studies Swahili. "Motorbikes are
dangerous, unweildly, and conductive to wetness when it rains, which is with regularity in
Vancouver."
PANGO-PANGO (UNS) —
Famed blorg preacher Rick
Shaw said this: "Yay, come
unto thee — way fare? — fare
way? — but never falter —
yay, yay, yay."
After he said it, some looked
blank. Others, knowing the
cheese sandwiches were stale,
retreated into the mud flats,
there to muck about.
General Foods
offers you more than
just Sanka"
This is the moment of truth. Here in the check-out area
of a local supermarket — when the shopper unloads a GF
product (or a competitor's) from her shopping-cart — our
sales management and product management people will
know whether they have succeeded in meeting the GF challenge: to develop a needed product and sell it at a profit.
Overly dramatic? Perhaps. Yet this silent "battle of
the brands", which is responsible for the continuous
creation of better and better products, contributes to a
stronger Canadian economy and is the very core of our
free enterprise system.
Start, Minute Breakfast and Great Shakes are GF's
latest entries to the market place: three new products
developed to make mealtimes more of a pleasure and
less of a chore. Start, a flavour crystal product in cans,
offers a good-tasting alternative to the task of defrost
ing frozen orange juice; Minute Breakfast, a dry mix
added to milk, provides a nutritious breakfast for the
50% of Canadians who don't take the time to eat a
regular, sit-down breakfast; Great Shakes brings soda-
fountain milk-shakes right into the home. Strong new
weapons for the battle of the brands, yet if GF's marketing men fail to get the maximum effect from advertising,
merchandising and selling techniques, they could lose
the battle.
As you can see, GF offers you more than just Sanka.
We offer a stimulating, mind-stretching challenge, one which can be met only by exceptional people with a wide range of talents.
If you like challenges, you too can enjoy ...
A career with a future from General Foods
Interesting opportunities await you in our Marketing,
Finance and Operations areas. A General Foods recruiting
team will visit your university on:
OCT.  30,  31 -  NOV. 1, 2
See your placement office. Tuesday, October 24,  1967
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 11
Touring CUS field workers
aim at effective action
OTTAWA (CUP) — Every campus in the Canadian
Union of Students will be visited by a field worker this year.
CUS president Hugh Armstrong said last week this
policy will help student government do more effective work
on the problems of education.
He said at least four of the eight members of the secretariat will be working on campuses throughout the year.
This new emphasis on field work reflects a demand by
members for concentration by CUS on programs which are
more relevant to campus problems.
CUS field work will concentrate on the priorities set
down by the London Congress of CUS this September:
• Student awareness of their rights and responsibilities,
• Quality of education at all levels,
• Universal accessibility of education,
• Democratization of university government.
Other priorities such as CUS services, human rights
(which includes international affairs), relations with other
student and youth organizations, and taxation receive lower
priority.
He said some campuses have the basic resources to carry
out educational reform but others, mainly the smaller institutions, do not. This is where the field worker will help.
So far members of the secretariat have visited student
governments in the Maritimes, Ontario, (Manitoba, Alberta
and British Columbia.
Cutback troubles UofC
CALGARY (CUP) — Future expansion will be severely curtailed at the University of Calgary if the Alberta Universities
Commission has its way.
According to The Gauntlet, Uiversity of Calgary student
newspaper, the biggest budget debate in the university's history
was held Friday when officials met with the universities commission.
In a brief to the commission U of C officials estimated the
university's needs at $130 million. The brief says the commission
calculates the university's needs at $58 million, a difference of
$72 million.
Such a severe cutback on the $130 estimate would curtail
much of the university's ambitious expansion program .
The brief states: "It seems apparent that the University of
Calgary cannot in any way fulfill the responsibilities it has taken
on ... if it is limited to a capital expenditure of $59 million."
The $59 million figure is what is required to maintain basic
university programs. The provincial committee estimates this at
$58 million.
The $71 million difference represents projects officials say
are essential to the future of the university. Projects slated for
possible cuts or shelving include:
• lA $7.5 million library extension,
• Additional residences and dining facilities,
• A student health building,
• An addition to the physical education building,
• Planned expenses of $14.3 million over the next five years
for the faculty of medicine.
In discussing possible cuts, the brief states that while the
least advanced projects would have to be abandoned, the above
items are essential to the operation of the university.
The university's estimate is based on projects to which they
are already committed, totaling slightly over $59 million, and
projects being planned, estimated at $71 million.
Mixed reaction meets
Acadia CUS pull out
OTTAWA (CUP )— The Canadian Union of Students reacted
to the withdrawal of Acadia University with a mixture of disappointment and mystification.
Acadia students Oct. 16 voted to withdraw from CUS following a council resolution advocating withdrawal.
CUS president Hugh Armstrong last week claimed not to
understand the reasoning of Acadia president Bob Levy in opposing CUS membership.
Levy made it clear before the referendum that a vote for
CUS was a vote against him.
Armstrong said that Levy was not at the congress, and he
was unsure how much he knew about the organization.
"I wish he had contacted us for information," Armstrong said.
"I wish he had been at the congress."
He said Greg Warner, Acadia vice-president who did attend
the congress, argued during the campaign that while CUS is a
good organization, Acadia at this time is unable to take advantage
of CUS's resources.
Red power pushed silently
By PETER WEBSTER
Special lo Canadian University Press
PARADISE LAKE, Ont. (CUP) — The young
Indians may be rebelling, but unlike the American Negroes their rebellion will be a silent one.
A four-day Indian relations conference opened
here near Kitchener-Waterloo Wednesday. Red
Power could well develop into the main theme.
The conference is designed to help promote
relations between Canadian Indians and Whites.
Over 40 delegates, Indians and Whites, attended.
The conference , sponsored by the native Canadian affairs committee, opened in a relaxed
atmosphere, but from the first speech the phrase
Red Power kept cropping up.
Red Powerists Duke Redbird, Carol Wabigijig
and Lloyd Caboirari spent most of Wednesday
morning explaining the concept to delegates.
The Indians do not advocate violence as do
the black power leaders in the U.S., he said.
He told delegates the Canadian Indian is now
at the stage the American Negro was 15 years
ago.
Leading members of the Canadian Indian
Youth Council, among them Redbird and Narda-
min, claim the only way the Indian will survive
is by contributing to White Canadian society.
"Most Indians feel they have nothing to contribute to society," said Redbird. "But they do."
He said the Indian has the only true culture
in Canada. The Indian knows himself, he said,
while obviously White youth doesn't. The hippie
generation shows how White youth is searching
for this cultural identity.
Caiboiarai and Wabigijig said the young Indian
is caught between two societies — that of his
forefathers and that of the Whites.
"This situation has come about because of
more travel and education among the younger
Indians," Wabigijig said.
Republished from Men's Wear of Canada, May, 1967
Jim Abbott (right) shows a customer a swatch from store's table of fabric selections for made-
to-measure suits.
ABBOTTS OF VANCOUVER
Store aims for varsity customers
By HAL SMALLMAN
"I REALIZE FROM the start that I had to
apply new understanding and new merchandising techniques to cope with customers who
have different buying habits and varying
spending cycles for clothing needs."
Jim Abbott was talking about his new
men's wear store located close to Vancouver's
University of British Columbia.
Mr. Abbott said his new store's market potential includes about 18,000 students and
12,000 university staffers and personnel, plus
other residents in the district. The store's
policy aims to provide men's wear that is distinctive and different without being radical.
Effective merchandise displays feature relatively conservative offerings for older customer, as well as a lot of variety in color and
pattern for all age groups.
"I'm cutting down my stock of ready-made
suites," said Mr. Abbott, who prefers not to
compete with the department stores. Instead,
he has a centre table showing swatches for
made-to-measure selections and also has 20
suit lengths hanging behind the cash register
desk.
Mr .Abbott believes in attractive and unusual window displays, which he likes to design himself. Recently, the store achieved a
silhouette effect with a cutout seamless paper.
What type of customer accounts for the
biggest sales volume? "It depends on the time
of the year," Mr. Abbott said. In the Fall,
when students who've worked during the vacation return to the campus, Abbott's does
most of its advertising in the university's publication, Ubyssey.
The student market lasts seven to eight
months in the year. Each year, new enrollments pose new challenges in selling to out-
of-town undergraduates and students from
other countries.
Cabinets  on  the  cash  register  desk  also
contain cards bearing not only the customer's
name, address and phone number but also
what he bought at the store, date of purchase,
size, color, pattern, price paid, etc.
"These records pay off well," said Mr. Abbott. "When the ladies come in to buy a gift
for their husbands, fathers or brothers, we
can refer to our filed information and recommend something that will harmonize with the
earlier purchase."
The store's personnel devote a good deal ol
attention to personalized service. "We do not
try to rush a sale. Time is money. The extra
dollars that go into our cash register come
from personalized service."
Recently, Abbott's underwent a renovation
move. Teak fibrewood was used to reach under th3 ceiling shelving and the pillars were
done up in simulated brick. The pastel shades
on walls and the ceiling are complemented by
bright fluorescent lighting. Spot lights placed
above wall shelves help highlight various
areas.
All in all, it seems that the move to the
UBC campus area by Abbott's Men's Wear is
going to turn out to be a blessing in disguise.
Mr. Abbott and his wife have just moved to
a newly bought house two blocks from the
varsity store. Glancing at the fixtures in the
new store, Jim said, "I guess the family is
going to ibe a fixture in this district."
/M6*ti*
MEN'S WEAR
4445 West 10th near Sasamat        224-4722 Page  12
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, October 24, 1967
AP&G
Brand Manager
Calls It
"My" Brand
Here's Why
Each P&G product has a Brand Manager, responsible for creating, planning, and directing the
entire consumer marketing effort for that product
. . . The Brand Manager operates much as if
he were managing his own business, with such
complete involvement the product becomes "My"
brand in his thought and action . . . Since consumer marketing must constantly change to be
effective, a P&G Brand Manager practices the
exciting profession of managing ideas that create
change in the marketing of his brand!
# Out of your total budget for daytime TV,
should you divert a hundred thousand dollars to nighttime television . . . and if you
do, what changes will you make in your
pattern of daytime TV?
# Results of a new promotion in test market
are satisfactory, but not outstanding.
What ideas will increase its effectiveness
and how will you test the changes by the
time the promotion is introduced nationally
a year from now?
# You expect to have an improved product
ready for distribution in 6 months. What
copy ideas should you be developing now
in order to generate a strong positive consumer reaction to the product change?
As a Proctor & Gamble Brand Manager, you
make the decisions on questions like these, and
many, many others as you create, plan, and
direct an effective consumer marketing program
for one of the Company's products.
There  are  more  than   30  such  products:   Ivory
soap. Tide detergent, Duncan Hines cake mix.
Crest toothpaste, Head & Shoulders shampoo,
to name a few. For each, there is a separate
Brand Group—typically 3 people—headed by a
creative business leader, the Brand Manager.
A P&G PRODUCT, BUT HE CALLS IT "MY" BRAND
The Brand Manager, as leader of his Brand
Group, carries the entire consumer marketing
responsibility for a product.
He is expected to know more about the marketing of that product than anyone else in the
Company, and his management looks to him to
generate the decisions and action that will increase the consumer acceptance of the product,
even in the face of intense competition.
In accepting this leadership, a Brand Manager
becomes very deeply and personally involved
in his work, and he approaches his responsibilities much as if he were managing his own business and marketing his own product.
It is little wonder than, that he speaks and thinks
of the product as "my" brand . . . and is encouraged to do so by the Company!
CONSUMER MARKETING MEANS
CHANGE, CHANGE CHANGE
The P&G kind of Brand Management is a tremendously exciting area of work, challenging
to even the most creative marketer because consumer preferences, wants, and needs change
continually. Note the word "change" appears in
each of the problem questions that began this
article!
r
i
i
~i
WE WOULD LIKE TO TALK WITH YOU
If you are interested in a Brand Management career at Proctor & Gamble we
suggest that you obtain our brochure from your Placement Service and sign
up for
INTERVIEWS ON NOV. 2, 3, 6, 7.
PROCTER & GAMBLE WILL ALSO BE INTERVIEWING FOR POSITIONS IN SALES
MANAGEMENT, FINANCE, PURCHASING AND TRANSPORTATION AT THIS TIME.
L
J
To serve the consumer better, P&G is constantly
improving current products and introducing new
ones. Even such well-known brands as Crest
toothpaste and Tide detergent are improved
about once a year, and over 80% of our present
domestic consumer sales is in products introduced within your lifetime! In addition, competitors introduce new products and make
changes in the marketing of their brands from
time to time.
All of this means that changes are frequently
made in key marketing elements of P&G brands:
package design, product, media mix, copy, TV
production techniques, consumer promotions.
These changes must grow from sound thinking
and planning, and fresh new ideas.
MANAGING IDEAS THAT CREATE CHANGE
Where do the ideas that create change come
from? Everywhere. From the Brand Manager.
From the other two members of his team, the
Assistant Brand Manager, and the Brand Assistant. From the advertising agency. From company experts on art and packaging, copy,
media, television production, and many other
specialties.
It often requires a high degree of skill to reach
a final "best" decision on the basis of many facts
and many different points of view and shades
of opinion. At P&G the Brand Manager provides
the leadership in this difficult role, and in so
doing demonstrates the key reason for his right
to say "My" brand!
DOES P&G BRAND MANAGEMENT
INTEREST YOU?
Each year, because of continued growth and
diversification, we hire a limited number of new
college graduates for beginning positions in
Brand Management. It isn't easy work, and it
requires an unusual combination of creativity,
intelligence, resourcefulness and leadership
ability, but if you have confidence in yourself
and an interest in consumer marketing, we'd
be interested in hearing from you.
You would begin as Brand Assistant in a Brand
Group. Advancement is on merit only, and you
would determine your own rate of advancement
by the quality of your work. Promotion to Brand
Manager will come while you are still in your
twenties; it takes about three years on the
average. Tuesday, October 24,  1967
THE      UBYSSEY
ADVERTISEMENT
Page 13
be hip . . .
THE WAYFARER
on God
A. H. MJORUD, second from left, discusses the claims of Christ with some fellows after an
evening meeting he conducted recently. "An i mportant part of my work is getting next to
people in an informal time of talk and prayer," Mjorud said during his September visit.
Jesus—a revolutionary
In this age when man is
searching for truth and freedom, there is One who guarantees both in a personal relationship with Himself. In addition, He promises to give forgiveness, love, and purpose to
those who come to Him.
He is history's greatest revolutionary. Everything about
Him is revolutionary: His
birth, His life, His teachings,
His death, His resurrection.
He advocates non-conformity in that He said,  "Be not
conformed to this world but
be transformed by the renewing of yOur mind."
He stated, "I am the way,
the truth, and the life; no man
cometh unto the Father but
by me." And knowing Him,
he said, makes you free.
He claims to be alive today
and to have power to forgive
sins. He claims to have power
to perform a revolutionary
change in a man's inner environment enabling him to face
reality and to have peace with
God, himself and others.
Enslaved freedom
I know a man who grew up in a stuffy atmosphere of
Victorian piety, and who rebelled at an early age. He is
now 50 years old and still rebelling.
His old family home was cluttered; so his own home is
starkly simple. His parents were fanatically devout; so he
is fanatically irreligious. His relatives were dogmatically
conservative; so he is dogmatically radical.
This man thinks himself a "free soul". He thinks he
has burst the bonds of his enslavement to the past. But he
is wrong — for he is over-reacting to the past, and is still
chained to it by his hostility.
To do exactly the opposite is a form of bondage. The
young man who rebels from Babbittry to Bohemianism because it is exactly the opposite of what his father tried to
cram down his throat is allowing his decisions to be made by
somebody else.
To be free, in the fullest sense, does not mean to reject
what our fathers believed; it means to discriminate, to
select, to take on the difficult task of separating our principles from our passions.
Each generation, in some measure, rebels against the
last. It is normal and natural and healthy. But it is necessary
to know that the aim of rebellion is peace within the soul,
and not perpetual revolt.
s*
Retreat ... to reality
You are cordially invited to attend the Full Gospel Students'
Second Annual Retreat, Nov. 11-12 weekend.
This retreat promises to be a time of thought-provoking discussions, spiritual refreshing and good food (for the benefit of
those of you who live in residence).
The Rev. Ed Gregory of Inter-Church Team Ministries, who
spoke to us with such conviction last year on campus, will be
speaking at two of the sessions. Leave those books, and have yourself a spiritual trip for only five dollars.
For further information phone Bernice Gerard 266-9275 or
Rick Bowering 266-8523 or write Box 12, Brock Hall.
HERE'S HOW
God is alive and active but
man, because of his sin (which
may be characterized by indifference to God) is dead to
God—unresponsive and unap-
preciative of Him.
Sin is an offence to God's
holiness. Therefore, the sinner
is separated from God by an
insurmountable barrier. Man
cannot remove this barrier by
his own effort. "For by grace
(unmerited favour) are your
saved through faith; and that
not of yourselves; it is the gift
of God; not of works, lest my
of God; not of works, lest any
man should boast."
Man cannot approach God
through his own human philosophies because his thoughts
will not coordinate with divine thought. As the Scripture
says, "the carnal mind is at
enmity with God."
Moreover, man's attempt to
keep the law will not convert;
the law, acting as a moral mirror, condemns.
Nevertheless, God in His
love provided a way whereby
man's sin could be remitted
and removed. Jesus Christ
(God manifest in flesh) came
into the world as the sinner's
substitute to purchase man's
redemption by the shedding of
His blood. In doing so, He vindicated the righteousness of
God. His death and resurrection made a lasting covenant
between God and man.
Once a man by an act involving his mind, his will, and
his emotions, accepts God's
way of atonement for sin, God
will come into his life and
make him a new creature. This
is the New Birth.
When God comes into a
man's life, he becomes "alive"
unto God — conscious and
aware of His presence. He begins to~ understand God's
thoughts, to feel His emotions
and to share in the exceeding
greatness of His power—truly
a wonderful, thrilling and
real  experience!
Lawyer Mjorud
witnesses of
Holy Spirit
The Rev. A. Herbert Mjorud, formerly a lawyer of Seattle,
more recently a Lutheran pastor in Minneapolis and Anchorage,
will speak today, Wednesday and Thursday at noon in Bu. 202.
Sponsored by the Associated Full Gospel Students, Mjorud
will speak of the "charismatic renewal"
as it affects the section of the church
he knows best — Lutheranism.
Prior to his present free-lance ministry which involves him in Inter-Church
ministries, Herbert Mjorud served six
years as an evangelist with the American Lutheran Church.
Herbert Mjorud took his college
training at the University of Washington where he served on the university's
rowing team.
It was when he was practising law
in Seattle, that his sister drew his attention to Nicodemus, the lawyer of New
Testament times, and his confrontation
with Jesus Christ. In due time Mjorud was impelled through his
own revolutionizing Christian experience to leave the practice of
law and enter the Lutheran ministry.
Equally revolutionizing, only this time with reference to
direction and scope of ministry, was Mjorud's experience with
the Holy Spirit. He at once began the New Testament ministry
of the laying-on-of-hands and prayer for the sick.
After his own experience with the Holy Spirit, he saw a
large number of his former parishoners receive the same experience during a brief return visit to Anchorage.
Lawyer-Pastor Herbert Mjorud, who was recently sponsored
in New Westminster by the Christian Businessmen in an inter-
faith series in the Centennial Pavilion, will be taking part in a
number of inter-denominational gatherings while at UBC.
Following the noon-hour lecture each day Herbert Mjorud
will participate with the Full Gospel Students in a specially
scheduled prayer service (1:45 p.m.) at St. Andrew's Chapel.
Ghosts...    anyone
MJORUD
Challenging counterfeit by
Raphael Gasson published by-
Lagos International 1966
ESP, levitation, seance . . .
familiar words, are they not?
Indicative of men's increasing
interest in the inexplicable, the
supernatural. And we hear
strange reports from within
the Christian church, of a
"charismatic" renewal; an increased interest in and knowledge of the person of the Holy
Spirit, who through various
supernatural gifts makes Jesus
Christ real to the believer.
Is there any relationship between these phenomena?
Rahpel Gasson> in his unusual
book, The Challenging Counterfeit, compares the work of
the Holy Spirit with the psychic phenomena evidenced in
Spiritualism. He speaks from
personal experience, having
previously been a spiritualist
medium.
His story will surprise and
even    shock    many    people,
Christians included, who have
given little consideration to
this realm of experience.
Gasson saw and participated
in many fascinating psychic
experiences, assuming they
were evidences of God. However they left him "somehow
dissatisfied and empty."
Upon becoming a Christian,
he discovered that these phenomena were only counterfeits
of the gifts of God's Holy
Spirit, their ultimate purpose
being to persuade people that
death does not exist.
Rev. Michael Harper, Church
of England minister, very
aptly comments:
"There is a desperate need
for discernment in the spiritual
realm as the churches move
more adventurously into it . . .
I hope that the publication of
this book will act as a warning ... to discern the real
from the counterfeit and to be
delivered from all the tragic
accompaniments of contacts
with it."
REV.  H. MJORUD
speaks on
CHARISMATIC LIVING IN THE
TWENTIETH CENTURY
TOPICS     —Lawyer finds Christ
—Lutheranism and the Charismatic Renewal
—Healing Ministry
Monday through Thursday Bu 202
Full Gospel Students  invite all. Page   14
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, October 24, 1967
<  ... * ». •»
Totem rally now history;
Homecoming rally is next
ftDlTOR. MSStte JEKHBV
Homecoming
Football Game
liversity of Saskatchewan
SATURDAY, OCT. 28th
2:00 P.M. Thunderbird Stadium
2,500 FREE covered seats
are  available,   on  first   come   first  serve   basis,   to   U.B.C.
Students, on presentation of A.M.S. Card.
Tickets must be picked up between
Monday, Oct. 23rd and Friday, Oct. 27th
at
A.M.S. Office or Memorial Gym
You may purchase additional general admission tickets
for 50c each.
500 RESERVED SEATS WILL BE SOLD AT THE GAME FOR
$1.50 EACH.
Your A.M.S.  Cards must be shown when  the free student
ticket is presented at the Stadium Pass Gate.
By JIM MADDIN
The UBC Sports Car Club
ran a successful rally on Sunday.
The Totem Rally ran for 200
miles into and out of the
Fraser Valley.
I was a route control, that
is, I was a person watching
for people who were not following the proper route.
It was a lot of fun and 64
lost cars out of the  100  that
score of 22 points in a competition where least points wins.
Second place overall with
35 points was the Datsun of
Saundra Briester—Mike Alexander who finished with one
point less than the third place
Volkswagen Karmann Ghia of
Diana Alexander — Wolf Ber-
gelt.
The first place two cars
combined with the Volvo of
Terry   Strong—Gary   Wikjord
■  -iS* ■_ ■,:.
■   "■» •   '    r*"   3-E.
— norm daniel photo
Brian Birk drives his Volkswagen over the Canfor road.
left Brentwood passed my control.
Some of the people I did not
see won the rally. First overall
was the Mustang of Ray Mid-
dlemiss (driver) — Jim Lightfoot   (navigator).   They  had  a
Careen Oppopbunibies
Employment and career opportunities in widely diversified fields
are offered by Cominco Ltd. to engineering and science graduates
and post-graduates, and to graduating technologists.
The main functions in which these opportunities are available include research, development, geology, mining, ore dressing,
design and construction, production and technical services.
Cominco is a Canadian company engaged in mining, refining, the
production of chemical fertilizers and other diversified activities.
Its operations and interests extend across Canada, into the United
States and other countries. Progressive and expanding, Cominco
needs progressively-minded men who seek a challenging, satisfying and rewarding future.
Starting salaries are in line with the national level and opportunities
for advancement are excellent.
Plan Now to Meet with our Interviewers When They Visit Your
Campus
Tcominco
to take the team, prize under
the highly patriotic name of
Team Dogwood, with a point
total of 106.
First prize in the ladies division went to the Honda of
Bette Turner—Donelda Hobbis
who amassed a total of 53
points.
The official results are posted in the Sports Car Club's
clubroom and will be sent out
to all competitors post haste,
say the rallymasters.
The next rally to hit campus
comes on Friday when the
Sports Car Club sponsors the
annual Homecoming Rally.
This year it will toe a one
hour affair leaving from in
front of Brock at noon and
finishing  somewhere else.
Besides having a car all competitors are strongly advised
to take a good map of the city,
it will help when you get lost.
There is a nominal charge of
50 cents which will be collected at the starting point.
Ice hockey JV's
shoot Ladner up
The UBC hockey Jayvees
had 57 shots on. the Ladner
goal during their game last
night at the Winter Sports
Center.
Only five of the shots went
into the net and accounted for
a 5-2 win for the Jayvees.
UBC carried most of the
play, doubling their shots on
goal with each succeeding
period.
TJhey doubled their eight
shots on goal of the first period
to 16 during the second frame.
In the third period, the Jayvees had a fantastic 33 shots
as the Ladner team fell apart.
Wayne G'Froerer( Stan
Stewart, F. Lanzarotta, Mike
Darnbrough and Ernie Lawson
scored for UBC.
BANNO'S
EYE VIEW
OF BIRDS
By BOB BANNO
News item: Frank Gnup
likes to win as much as anyone else.
It's heartening to know that
despite being a loser, Gnup
no more enjoys his role than,
say, Richard Nixon, the New
York Mets or any other normal loser.
From what the downtown
press tells us, one can picture
Gnup high in the air clicking
his heels each time the opposition scores.
Simon Fraser plays to win,
they tell us, while Frank Gnup
plays for fun.
1967 would go down as a
very good year for any perverted loser.
With a combined score so
far of OPPOSITION 165-UBC
26, Gnup and his staff will be
the envy of every glutton for
pain and heartbreak.
And last week would have
been especially enjoyable for
a masochistic Gnup. At 61-0,
that's a lot of orgasms.
But, alas, we now know that
Gnup is a normal loser.
We now know that Gnup is
merely the victim of what has
to be the most ridiculous athletic policy in the world.
He must mold a team without the aid of athletic scholarships.
Up to this year he has managed to get by with players
not good enough to play U.S.
college football but good
enough to play with Canadian
prairie schools and U.S. small
colleges.
Considering the odds, Gnup
has done a commendable job.
But with the inception of
Simon Fraser University and
its vigorous recruiting program, UBC's half-baked and
hypocritical policies have
caught up to him.
And hoop coach Peter Mullins  knows he  is  next.
Without scholarships neither
can recruit effectively.
Without scholarships neither
can maintain any semblance
of discipline over their teams
in sports that demand discipline.
They are forced to treat
their players with kid gloves
for fear the players may quit.
And without scholarships,
who can blame the players
who put in endless hours of
practice only to be laughed at
and berated.
Let's either pull out of intercollegiate sport altogether
or else play the game properly. For if we continue with
our present system we will
be playing bush junior colleges or even high schools, not
to win, but for the fun of it.
Alumni rule on waves
The Student-Alumni Frostbite Regatta sailed on Sunday.
The event took place under
less than perfect conditions
which caused the demise of
four boats off the Kitsilano
Yacht Club.
Winning alumni skippers
Dave Miller, Steve Gill, Steve
Tupper and Rick Helmer all
had their names engraved on
the perpetual trophy. Tuesday, October 24,  1967
THE      UBYSSEY
*- ■■"*
Page 15
Grid Birds help set record
By JOHN TWIGG
PORTLAND, Oregon — The UBC football
Thunderbirds helped set a record in their game
against Portland State College on Saturday.
PSC set a record for most points scored in
a game in the history of their team, and the
UBC offense was their biggest help.
A crowd of 652 watched UBC make a total
of 24 yards offensively. They made three first
downs, one by a penalty, and two against the
second string defense.
The Birds fumbled five times and lost five
fumbles. UBC had only one pass intercepted,
but it was returned for an easy TD.
Perhaps the game can be summed up in this
statistic, UBC ran 41 offensive plays, while
PSC ran 91.
The UBC defense played a good game, especially the interior linemen, Ian Jukes, Fuzzy
Smith, Sam Kravinchuk and Bob Fitzpatrick.
UBC's deepest penetration was a punt to
PSC's 27 yard line, but the best progress was
made by the defense.
With PSC first and goal on the UBC ten,
PSC was pushed back to the 48 by two big
penalties and a trapping of the quarterback
behind the line of scrimmage.
Coach Frank Gnup said, "Defense played a
hell of a good game, would'a been a hundred
if it wasn't for them."
The defense was just on the field too much,
usually with poor field position. Tackle Fuzzy
Smith said, "Seemed like nine years to me!",
and Gnup said, "One thing I can say, we didn't
quit. That defense was still slugging in the
fourth quarter."
The team appeared to lack speed, especially
in the backfield. Assistant coach Bill Reeske
said, "There is absolutely no substitute for
quickness and speed."
But there is hope. The last play of the game
was a 20 yard pass from Hardy to Sedgewick
off the shotgun formation. Gnup said, "We
looked better today than we did against SFU."
I wonder though? After the game, a flock
of seagulls descended upon the torn field, as
though they were picking up the Thunderbirds'
remains . . . the score was 61 to 0.
^-T^ife*-'-^**
Douglas Cup won by UBC sailors
after Long Beach sloop races
The UBC sailing crew won the 1967 Douglas
Cup at Long Beach Yacht Club on Oct. 16 over
five other college teams.
The Douglas Cup Series, a total of 15 two-
boat races, is a one-design event, that is, all
boats used are identical. The Columbia 28 was
the boat selected this year.
In the top photo, the UBC team (right)
battles it out with Long Beach State, the only
team to which they lost a race.
Other crews competing were from the University of Southern California, Tulane of New
Orleans, Stanford University and the University
of Southern California.
In the bottom photo, the UBC sailing team,
(from left) Peter Wood, Maynard Marceau, Robbie Black, Huntly Gordon and Don Martin
(skipper) receive the take-home and perpetual
trophy from Paul Smith of McDonnell-Douglas
Missile and Space Systems Division.
UBC SPRINTERS RUN OVER SFU
"We have," said UBC track coach Lionel Pugh, "confirmed our complete supremacy over Simon Fraser in at
least one sport."
He was speaking about his cross country team's second
place finish in the B.C. Senior Championships at Stanley
Park on Saturday.
"What makes it all the better," he added, "is that all
five of our runners came in before the first Simon Fraser
runner."
Vancouver Olympic Club came in first in the meet
with 23 points (the least number of points wins). UBC was
second with 73, Western Washington State College third
with 89, VOC "B" fourth with 106, University of Calgary
fifth with 174, and last and certainly least, SFU with a
big 234 points.
Jack Burnett was the first competitor to finish for the
Birds, placing third behind winner Jim Freeman of VOC.
Eighth spot was taken by Gerry Glyde, while three juniors,
Ken French, Tom Howard, and Dave Greening took 12th,
17th, and 23 rd places respectively.
The first Clansman runner trudged in, in 35th spot.
"Beating VOC would be too much to hope for," said
Pugh. "They've got a sort of international team, with good
runners from many countries. However, I'm very pleased
with the result."
Burnett, and possibly Glyde, will represent B.C. in the
Canadian Championships in Calgary on Nov. 4.
*S
The victorious UBC crew is presented with their trophy.
Game tied on last kick
That last kick was certainly a dilly.
It was also perfectly timed as it enabled UBC's soccer
Thunderbirds to tie Vancouver Columbus in a Sunday game at
Callister Park.
Scoring on the last kick in the last minute of play in the
game was John Haar, from a scramble in front of the net.
In the first half, the Italians were going full tilt as they
walked over the Birds. Cheered on by the few thousand fans
they seem to pull out of their pocket every game, Columbus
banged in two goals, both by Sergio Zanatta.
The first came on a penalty kick as someone accidently
nudged Carlos Franco in the ribs.
Zanatta scored his second goal when he intercepted a stray
pass in front of the UBC net and easily beat goalie Bruce Ballam.
However, the Italians were too confident in the second
half and seemed to play a little sloppy.
Ash Valdai scored at the 21-minute mark and the Birds
kept pressing from then on until that final score.
The tie puts UBC in second place, behind Columbus and
New Westminster.
In other weekend soccer action, the UBC Tomahawks were
edged 4-3 by Burdettes.
SpoJdA ShoJdA
The UBC rugby Thunderbirds improved their play in their
Saturday game with Meralomas but still lost by a 16-6 score.
"I was impressed with their play," said rugby coach Donn
Spence, "it was much improved."
The game was the first in a round-robin tournament for
the Miller Cup.
"Our team had a chance to score nine or 10 more points but
our place kicking was lousy," said Spence.
Mike Bird and Don Crompton kicked the Birds' points.
On Saturday the Birds meet the Kats, first place finishers
in the league last year, at Wolfson Field beginning at 12:30 p.m.
Also on the weekend, UBC Tomahawks walked over Royal
Roads 22-3 in intercollegiate play.
In Carmichael Cup action, the Meralomas trounced UBC
Totems 12-3..
UBC Braves were 9-3 winners over Pocomo in the Bell
Irving Cup tournament.
• •        •
The UBC football Jayvees scored their first touchdown of
the season on Saturday as they beat Brandon College 7-0 in
Thunderbird Stadium.
Roy Carey intercepted a Brandon pass on their 35-yard line
and ran untouched into the end zone.
• •        •
The UBC women's field hockey team, after leading the first
day of play, finished last in the Western Intercollegiate Athletic
Association championships held in Saskatoon on Saturday and v*
Sunday.
The Thunderettes had three wins, two losses and one tie for
six points.
The University of Saskatchewan, with a record of five wins
and one tie, was the winner.
• •        * %
The UBC gymnastics team attended the Olympic Development meet in Issawah, Washington, on Saturday and coach Bruno
Klaus was happy with the early season form of his group.
Bill Mackie, who scored 48 points at the National Championships in July, ran up a total of 47.40 points out of 60 in the weekend meet.
Leslie Bird also did well with 29.25 points out of 40. ^
UBC placed second in the meet between the winner, University of Washington, and Seattle YMCA. ■" -'-»"
Page 16
THE     UBYSSEY
Tuesday, October 24, 1967
'TWEEN CLASSES
Housing crisis debated
LIBERAL CLUB
Ray Perrault and Social
Creditor Dan Campbell debate
on housing, Wednesday, noon,
Ang. 110.
Council meet
leftovers
At a request from the Fort
Camp residents' association,
the AMS council will hold its
weekly meeting Monday in the
Fort Camp dining room.
"I don't expect 10,000 people
to be there cheering us on but
I think council should move
around a little," said AMS residence rep Blaize Horner.
At the end of the meeting,
engineering president Lynn
Spraggs requested the honor of
council's presence in the civil
engineering building Nov. 6,
when it meets in two weeks.
Dirty joke of the evening
was by Sullivan.
Second vice-president Kim
Campbell was waving her arms
to be noticed by Sullivan, because she wanted to speak.
"You've got a couple of
points there, Kim?" grinned
Sullivan.
STUDENT ZIONISTS
Rene Goldman discusses the
Chinese Jewish community,
Thursday, noon, Hillel hut.
ESTATE  MANAGEMENT
CLUB
Film on housing in six countries,, today, noon, Ang. 207.
PRE MED SOC
Dr. H. Klonoff discusses the
correlation of psychology and
medicine,    Wednesday,    noon,
Wes. 201.
ARCHEOLOGY CLUB
Meeting   today,   noon,   Bu.
204. Bring dues.
PRE LAW SOC
Meeting   today,   noon,   Ang.
410.  Guest   speaker   I.  Davis,
LLB.
IL CAFFE
Italian   day   at   IH  Wednesday  —   slides,   comments   on
Amalfi and southern Italy.
SUS
Campus    placement   officer
discusses grad employment, today, noon, chem. 250.
MUSSOC
Singing    auditions   tonight,
7:30,   auditorium.   Have   song
prepared and sign list in clubroom.
GERMAN CLUB
Um Heute  mittag,  IH 402,
um deutsch zu sprechen.
PSYCHOLOGY CLUB
Dr. Conrad Schwarz discus-
We've Arrived
CM.LS
1967-19«t
THE UNIVERSITY OF BRfTtSH COLUMBIA STUMNT TELEPHONE DIRECTORY
NOW ON SALE $1.00
PUBLICATIONS OFFICE, BROCK HALL
OR UBC BOOKSTORE
Pre-Sale Ticket Holders Must Claim Their Books
at Publications Office.
ses    drugs,    Thursday,    noon,
Ang. 207.
ONTOLOGY
Discussion   of   creative
thought, Wednesday, noon, Bu.
223.
VOC
Homecoming alumni reunion
Wednesday, 7 to 11 p.m.,
Brock lounge.
PRE LIBRARIANSHIP
Basil Stuart - Stubbs speaks
on school librarians Wednesday, noon, Bu. 225.
ARTS US
Campus placement officer
speaks on grad employment
Wednesday,   noon,   Bu.   104.
FULL GOSPEL STUDENTS
H. Mjorud speaks today,
Wednesday and Thursday noon
in Bu. 202 on how God works
through Holy  Spirit  renewal.
PRESENT THIS COUPON
and receive from
PETERS
ICE CREAM PARLOR
3204 W. Broadway and Park Royal
ONE SUNDAE OF YOUR CHOICE
at half price
Good Until December 3, 1967 — For UBC Students Only
Phi Gamma Delta (Fiji) Fraternity
regretfully announces that their
Homecoming Party at their House
will be restricted to members (both
Active and Alumni) only.
CLASSIFIED
Rates: Students, Faculty & Clubs—3 lines, 1 day 75*. 3 days $2-00.
Commercial—3 lines. 1 day $1.00. 3 days $2.50.
Rates for larger ads on request.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone.
Non-Commercial Classified Ads are payable in advance.
Publications Office, BROCK HALL, UNIV. OF B.C., Vancouver 8, B.C.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Dances
11
PRISCO'S P.H. PHACTOR PLACE
in the Retinal Circus. Friday and
Saturday — Vancouver's only light
show dance — Strobes, the Painted
Shin and Seeds of Time. 9 p.m. -
2  a.m.  Be there  early.
Greetings
12
SPECIAL SUPPER MEETING FOR
a 11 interested in International
House and its programmes, Supper .50c or .25c with meal oass. 5:30
p.m.,  Tues.,   Oct.  24 at I.H.
Losi & Found
13
LOST MAN'S UMBRELLA: LEFT
with driver of Firebird giving me a
lift out Chancellor.  Phone  936-5643.
ONE LEATHER JACKET — ONE
pair of glasses — one ring — one
purse — all found at Undercut —
Please contact Forestry Undergrad
Office
LOST — ONE SUEDE JACKET AT
Undercut. Please contact Forestry
Undergrad Office.
WILL PERSON WHO TOOK MT
black briefcase from Brock North,
please return contents to Brock 254
or phone Ken,  266-6898.
YELLOW METALLIC SLIDE RULE.
Would finder please return to Publication  Office.
FOUND PAIR OF BLACK MEN'S
(?) Glasses outside Chem. Bldg.
Found 13th October. Phone Peter
number five, AM 1-8737.
SUPERNATURAL UMBRELLA
left by hitchhiker. Friday, Oct. 13.
Return by telekinesis or phone
Myer,   731-2418.
LOST IN LIBRARY TUESDAY,
French Book ''Bonjour" urgently
required.  Phone  261-2440.
LOST: IN H.jA., BROWN BOOK,
"Retail Locations", R. A. Ratcliff,
phone  Sharon,  327-6621.
Rides 8c Car Pools
14
WANTED RIDERS FOR 9:30's VICINITY OF 41st or 49th. West of
Granville. Phone Pat after 6:30. AM
1-6430.
CARPOOL FROM RENFREW DOWN
Broadway or 12th Ave. for 8:30
classes. Phone Lon at 433-8513.
Special Notices
15
GSA WILL HOLD ITS GENERAL
meeting for fall on Thursday, October 26, 1967, at 12:45 p.m., in the
Lower Lounge of the Graduate Student Centre. Plans for Centre expansion and consequent fee increase
will be discussed.
Travel Opportunities
16
FILLMORE OR PHILLMORE?
That's what the P.H. Phactor did
to San Francisco, (or is it San
Phrancisco?) Anyway, turn your
»r>ind ins'de out and take a short
trip to Retinal Circus on Friday or
Saturday. The P.H. Phactor will be
on stage with the Seeds of Time and
the Painted   Ship — be  there!
Wanted—Miscellaneous
18
AUTOMOTIVE & MARINE
Automobiles For Sale
21
1956 ZEPHYR SIX CYL. PREFECT
mechanical order with radio. Best
offer. Phone 261-2904 after 5:30 p.m.
HUNTER-SKIER SPECIAL VW VAN
Insulated,  propane  heater,   224-3190.
Automobile Parts
23
4—14" CHROME REVERSE RIMS.
Chev./Pontiac. 4 knockoffs, 261-
6153.   $80.   No   exchange   needed.
Miscellaneous
32
WHOLESALE  PRICES TO ALL UBC
students on trans, radios, tape recorders, record players, watches,
jewelery, etc., at THE DISCOUNT
HOUSE,   3235 West  Broadway,  Tel.
732-6811.
STATIONERY - ART SUPPLIES -
Gift & Party Shop. See Walter's
Stationery, 2910 W. Broadway. Ph.
733-4516.
GETTING ENGAGED: SAVE BE-
tween 30% and 50% on Engagement
Rings. For appointment call 261-
6671  anytime.
DUNBAR COSTUME RENTALS,
costumes for all occasions, 5620
Dunbar  St.   Phone   263-9011.
Orchestras
33
BUSINESS SERVICES
Scandals
37
CAT BALLOU RIDES INTO THE
Aud. on Oct. 26. 12.:30, 3:30, 6:00,
8:30.  Adm.   50c.
BURKE TAYLOR IS "MAN OF THE
Women" for this week. Lower Mall
congratulates  you   Burke!
LIP AND ROSCO: I CAN'T JUST
stand here and let you defile my
very body. May the Bird of Paradise   fangle   your   do-dad.    Mother.
TOM JONES STARRING ALBERT
Finney in the Aud. Nov. 9, 12:30,
3:30,   6:00,   8:30.   50c.
U.B.C. BARBER SHOP IN THE
Village. Now 3 barbers. Open Weekdays 8:30 - 6 p.m., Saturday .'til
5:30.
PETULA CLARK — 2 TICKETS TO
Fri., Oct. 27 show. Lower Orch.
Phone   Steve  736-9466 after  6:30.
2000 PEOPLE LOVED THE RETI-
nal Circus this weekend. P.H.
Phactor jug band will have 2000
more friends this Friday and Saturday. Dance from 9 p.m. - 2 a.m.
with the Seeds of Time, Painted
Ship, Strobes, Late Show — have
fun!
GUESS WHAT ELSE YOUR AMS-
CUS card does for you? With it
and the CUS Student Discount Service you get 10-25% off at several
Vancouver firms. See lists up on
Campus, in Bird Calls, or phone
CUS Office for infor.— 224-3242,
local 43.
CONGRATULATIONS       LIT
tie  Electric Moya on  her  first  trip
to   the   LCB,   Friday,   Oct.   13   from
the world.
GIBBS     COULDN'T     CUT     THE
honey    action   at   Comox.   Had   to
dump   him    in    Kelsey    Bay.    T.A.
B.S.,   J.M.
P.H. PHACTOR I S PHREAKY!
Fourstuds and one sexy broaddo the
thing at Retinal Circus. Grab a
friend and gallivant on down on
Friday or Saturday night. You'll
thank  your lucky  stars.
Typewriter Repairs
39
ANDERSON  TYPEWRITER
SERVICE
TYPEWRITERS
ADDING  MACHINES
NEW    AND    RECONDITIONED
REPAIRS TO ALL MAKES
Free  Estimates        Reasonable Rates
ALL WORK GUARANTEED
185  West   Broadway 879-7815
Across  from  Zephyr Motors
Service Centre
Typing
40
EXPERIENCED   TYPIST   —   ELEC-
tric.  Phone 228-8384 or 224-6129.
EXPERIENCED TYPIST WILL DO
essays & thesis at home. 25c per
page. Hay, 3963 Bond St., Burnaby.
433-6565   after   5:30  p.m.
"EXPERT    TYPEWRITING
Fast professional service
738-7756"
Essay  and  thesis  typing,   electric
Campus   pick-up
Mrs.   Hall 434-9558
INSTRUCTION
Special Classes
63
Tutoring
Maths. Tutors, 4th year or graduates,
GRADES  7  to  13
736-6923  —  4:30  -  7:30  P.M.
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
THE FINEST MEN'S HAIRSTYI_CNQ
at the Upper Tenth Barber. 4674 W.
10th  Avenue.   1   block  from  Kate*.
LOOKING
For clean, used, guaranteed appliances.
Also  complete  repair  service  for all
makes and models.
McIVER Appliances Ltd.
3215 W  Broadway—738-7181
UBC TEXTS BOUGHT AND SOLD.
Busy B Books, 146 W. Hastings.
681-4931.
303 SAVAGE: LEVER ACTION,
amo. A good big game gun. 2nd
hand.   Cheap.   Ph.   261-9568.
CAMPING EQUIPMENT, SKIS,
portable stereo and radio. Phone
224-3190.
5" DUAL TRACE CRT. WITH
spares, fencing foil & mask, 6 watt
stereo amplifier for sale or trade
for camping gear or? Bob 277-0976
after 9.
1964   MORRIS  OXFORD.   2   OWNERS
$550  O.N.O.  Ph.  224-7593.	
CHESTERFIELD/DOUBLE BED 1
yr. old. $95'. 5 piece dinette $50. Ph.
224-7593.
RENTALS & REAL ESTATE
Rooms
■1
ROOM FOR 2 MEN, POINT GREY
single beds. Study facilities, breakfast.   Call  733-0632   evenings.	
ACCOMMODATION FOR ONE MALE
student. Share facilities with other
s'udent. 2241 West 7th. Phone 733-
6873. 	
SLEEPING ROOMS FOR TWO GIRLS
near campus. Private facilities $35
ea.  CA 4-6389.
Room 8c Board
82
Furn. Houses 8c Apts.
83

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