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The Ubyssey Jan 17, 1969

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 'ikMr&i'J/
■■■y*-**-*,*      .
*   1 *
— dick button photo
MORE TROUBLE for Cece Bennett. First there was Ken  Hare's resignation, then there was the Burnaby byelection, now the department of highways loses
a truck in a confrontation with its own snowplow on Chancellor Boulevard. Where is Phil Gagfardi when you need him?
We're not
thursdoy
tuwmm
we re hungry
for funds
Vol. L, No. 35
VANCOUVER,  B.C.,  FRIDAY, JANUARY   17,   1969
228-2305
You star in show   New president: BoG
Involvement.
That's the new display opening today in the art
gallery.
The SUB workshop, an anonymous (as they desire) group
is attempting something new in art for Vancouver.
The mattresses, loose paper and foam rubber forms
encased in netting are to involve the audiences to the
gallery.
So it's people who come that are the show, not the
objects and exhibits.
The group wishes to establish object-person relations.
People are free to do whatever they want within the gallery, provided their actions are not destructive.
forming committee
Moncton students hold
building, stop classes
MONCTON (CUP)—Students at the University of Moncton
have forced their administration to stop classes as they continue
to hold the science and administration building.
About  125  of the  school's   1600 students moved into the
building with food and bedding at midnight Saturday night (Jan.
13), vowing to stay until the federal or provincial government
increases grants to their French-speaking school.
r The students, armed with the building's fire hoses, patrol
the centre in 25-man shifts. They say arrangements have been
made to replenish their food supplies when necessary and they
will hold the building until their demands are granted.
A spokesman said the group is demanding $32,000,000 from
the federal government over a two-year period.
"The university received only $1,002,000 during its first
five years, and we'll only $2,000,000 in the next two years," he
said.
■..*■*
"The University of New Brunswick (at Fredericton) received
about $22,000,000 in assistance last year."
By JACK EMBERLY
Board of governors chairman Walter
Koerner says the board will meet within the
next two weeks to decide if students will be
represented on the committee to pick a new
administration president.
In an interview Tuesday Koerner declined
to predict how the committee would be made
up until after he has met with the board to
discuss the matter.
He did say the selection committee should
be as widely spaced as possible and he was
willing to invite the students onto it.
"The student body is a very important part
of the community," he said.
PARITY  ASKED
Student council Monday night asked the
board to appoint an equal number of students,
faculty and board members to the committee.
"It is essential students be on the committee
because the president has to deal with us and
we are affected by the selection of the president," Alma Mater Society president Dave
Zirnhelt commented.
He said students would not like being excluded from the committee and some might
react angrily.
Koerner answered that he hoped students,
The Ubyssey, and the whole university would
co-operate with one another.
"What I would like is to create a spirit of
co-operation and constructive work in every
respect," he said.
"This university should be an example to
others. If you want my enthusiasm, you must
allow me to work in this spirit."
Earlier this week, Dean Walter Gage, acting
administration president, said he thought inclusion of students in the advisory committee
was "advisable in view of what has happened
in the last two years."
"I see no reason why students should not
be on it," he said.
NO STUDENTS CHOSE HARE
There were no students on the committee
which proposed the recent choice of Kenneth
Hare over 110 other administration president
candidates.
It was a four-man committee headed by
Justice Nathan Nemetz, then chairman of the
board of governors. The others were board
members Donovan Miller, Stuarte Keate, and
chancellor John Buchanan.
The students of three Canadian universities
have been offered seats on committees selecting
administration presidents.
At the University of Waterloo, students
rejected the seats as the committee proceedings
were to be kept secret.
Simon Fraser University students rejected
an offer by their administrators of three seats
on a committee of fifteen. The students complained they were not given enough seats.
"Tokenism," they cried.
University of Alberta students are expected
to accept the offer of three of the 10 seats on
the committee to pick their new boss.
Teeniest grant in Canada,
or, why two a week? — page 4 Page 2
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, January 17, 1969
O. J>1ojlv&l i/L thsL QonchsdsL (plant
This column starts today as a service for
students who find themselves in any kind of a
jam.
Any question is reasonable, from trying to
find out how to check out a library book, join
some club or run for student council president,
to asking where the cans are in SUB, and so on.
All inquiries should be sent to A Flower in the
Concrete Plant, Ubyssey office, SUB.
Q: In last Friday's issue of The Ubyssey, an
article was published stating that students were
wanted to work on senate committees. I was
wondering what this work entailed, and how
I could go about joining these committees?
A: In response to this inquiry, we asked
Alma Mater Society president Dave Zirnhelt
what the procedure was. He said that any interested students should leave their name at
the AMS executive office, 2nd floor of SUB
for the attention of the selection committee.
Qualifications consist of an interest in the
particular committe, and enough knowledge to
be able to work constructively on it.
Applicants should preferably be in second
year, or higher, and intending to be at UBC
next year.
The committees meet about three times a
month, and the amount of work done between
meetings depends largely on the individual.
Everyone out
Everybody out of SUB at
1 a.m.
That is, unless you make a
deal with the night watchman.
Some 16 per cent of students
turned out Wednesday to
defeat 2,321 to 821 the referendum on the question of
keeping SUB open unconditionally 24 hours a day.
Building hours are 7 a.m. to
1 a.m. but arrangements can
be made with turnkeys for
students who wish to stay
later.
EDITORS:
Co-ordinating    Al   Birnie
News       John   Twigg
City   Alex Volkoff, Peter Ladner
Managing     Bruce  Curtis
Wire       Irene   Wasilewski
Page Friday   Andrew Horvat
Sports   Jim Maddin
Ass't News   John Gibbs
"My dog's aborting," cried Valley
in the mijst of chaos. Laurie Roff.
John Anderson and Elaine Tarzwell
supplied the rhythmic tapping background for catastrophe, and Erik B*s
soulful dancing. Charlie Hulton strove
in vain for ink, but Bruce Curtis forbade us to go into the red. Undaunted
by Frank Flynn's faffing, Nate Smith
worked to the end, disgusted tho he
may have been at John Gibbs* earthy
and cultural contacts with Irene Waser-
nameski's wire service. Alex, meanwhile
won the Dick Button for avoiding Nik's
Orchard and Maurice (Pretty Petal's)
Bridge, only to careen down Bert's
Hill into quit a dodge. "I koernered
the chairman," piped up Jack Emberly.
"So watt?" chortled Bruce Stephenson
and Dave Walford, adjusting their
flashes. Mike Finlay fiddled while Paul
Knox worked his asses and mules off,
sources said. "And the top priority in
my book," quoth Dizzy Izzy, "is to
have a beer." Staff meeting at noon
for all. Doorprize: Lightfootetc. tickets.
Papa Bear's Medicine Show
Mother Tucker's Yellow Duck
Five Man Cargo
Seeds of Time
Tomorrow's Eyes - Spring
Yellow Brique Road
Kelly James
Black Snake Blue's Band
CAMPUS
FESTIVAL
Classical Ragas
Electronic Music
Underground Movies
Folk Singers - Poetry Reading
Art Displays - Body Painting
Boutiques
CAMPUS
FESTIVAL
Friday, January  77
8:00 p.m.  to 2:00 a.m.
In SUB and Hebb Theatre
Advance Ticket at A.M.S.
($2.00)
Tickets Available at  Door
Free Hootenanny-Mwiday
Jon. 20 - 12:30 Noon - SUB Ballroom
with PAT TRUDELL
FREE DANCE - WEDNESDAY, JAN. 22
with TOMORROW'S EYES
12:30 Noon - Ballroom
Can     BENNETT     Beat
TOM BERGER?
WE DON'T THINK SO!
FIND OUT WHY!
SUB PARTY ROOM (2nd Floor)
BESIDE THE BALLROOM
12:30 JAN. 17 (FRIDAY)
Tom will face a panel of UBC profs and students
who will ask penetrating questions. Then meet him
personally.
Over Free Coffee & Donuts
Meet his supporters; Ernie Hall and Ray Parkinson,
MLAs, Clive Lytle, B.C. Fed. of Labour, Dennis
Cocke, businessman, etc. etc. etc.
Submitted by Campus Berger for Premier Student Committee
'THE AWAKENING LAND"
SUB AUDITORIUM
Monday, Wednesday, Friday, Jan. 20-22-24—10:30 a.m.
An   original  film   about   native  cultures
in Australia and New Guinea.
ADMISSION 50c
YOU ARE
tVe/co/rie
TO BE OUR GUEST AT
A PREVIEW MEETING
OF THE
DALE CARNEGIE COURSE
SEE
• The amazing power of a trained memory
• How to quickly develop more poise and self-confidence
• How to get along even better with people
• How to communicate more effectively when speaking to
individuals, groups, using the telephone or writing letters
BOTH MEN AND WOMEN INVITED
NO COST OR OBLIGATION
Tues.—Jan. 21st—7:30 p.m.
Eldorado Motor Hotel
2330 Kingsway
Thurs.—Jan. 23rd—7:30 p.m.
Holiday Inn  -   1110 Howe St.
Presented by "Thorfie" Thorfinnson ^oundemr)'*
LEADERSHIP   TRAINING   COURSE
No. 212-535 W. Georgia St.
Ph. 685-1945 (24 hrs.)
CAPTIVATE  HER   with m
&&. Jffi&WDIAMOND
$250.00
$20.00
r"-\
.*
BUDGET TERMS AVAILABLE
LIMITED
Granville at Pender Since 1904
REGISTERED JEWELLER, AMERICAN GEM SOCIETY
OFFICIAL  NOTICES
Alma  Mater  Society
Order of Elections
SLATE I — Nominations open Jan. 29; nominations
close at 12 noon Feb. 6; election is Feb. 12.
1. President — who shall have sucessfully completed
his second year or its equivalent, and who has attended
the University of British Columbia for at least two years.
2. Internal Affairs Officer — who shall have successfully completed his first year or its equivalent.
3. Secretary — who shall have successfully completed
his first year or its equivalent.
4. Co-ordinator of Activities — who shall have successfully completed his first year or its equivalent.
SLATE II — Nominations open Feb. 5; nominations
close Feb.   13;  election  is  Feb.   19.
1. Vice President — who shall have successfully completed his second year or its equivalent and who has
attended the University of British Columbia for at least
two years.
2. Treasurer — who shall have successfully completed
his second year or its equivalent.
3. Internal Affairs Officer — who shall have successfully completed his first year or its equivalent.
Nomination and eligibility forms and election rules and
procedures can be obtained from the AMS offices in
SUB and are to be returned to the Secretary's Office.
Room 248, SUB, before 12 noon on days of closing of
nominations.
Graduating Class  1969
Any person in this year's graduating class may suggest
candidates for the following positions:
Honorary President
Honorary Vice-President
Class Valedictorian
Class Poet
Class Prophet
Class Will Writer
Class Historian
The  first  two   positions  are  usually  chosen   from  the
faculty and the remaining five positions from the graduating class.   Candidates nominated should have suitable
qualifications.
Please send nominations by Feb. 21 to:
E. R. Wightman
Vice-President, Graduating Class
Box 44
Student Union Building, U.B.C. Friday, January 17,  1969
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 3
Reformers
organize
"The Reform Union believes
that a good university is essential."
So begins the policy statement of a newly formed campus political party.
Sixty students were present
at the Reform Union's founding meeting Tuesday noon in
SUB 230.
The purpose of the union is
to endorse candidates for student's council and to "provide
a forum for creative ideas."
CHANGE IN SOCIETY
Grad student Bob McKee
proposed an amendment stating that change in the univer-
• sity is impossible without
change in society and condemning the board of governors as
part of the controlling corpor- *
ate structure.
The amendment was defeat-
ad by a vote of 26 to 22.
Meeting chairman Les Horswill, a member of the union's
steering committee, said the
meeting was clearly a success
although some "undesirables"
- were present.
AMS SLATE
The union will hold two
meetings next week to name
its slate of candidates in the
next Alma Mater Society
election.
Horswill told The Ubyssey
that the executive and steering
committee have already pre-
~ pared a list of proposed candidates to be nominated at the
meetings.
The list includes Horswill
and Brian Burke, a defeated
candidate for treasurer in last
year's election.
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— gordi* long feto
FLAMING COIFFURES and fantasy boyfriends decorate the
door of a frustrated woman's room in abandoned Acadia
Camp. Oldtimers Simp the pimp, Jo Burns, and Mary O'Locke
have signed the door since its erection during the second
world whore.
Student report
shortens Bi lab
The report of a student revision committee has resulted in
at least one major change in Bi. 101.
Botany and Biology prof Gilbert Hughes said Thursday that
labs have been shortened by an hour for this term.
"In effect, students will now have two hours of work to
complete in a three-hour lab period," he said.
Zoology pros H. C. Nordan and Iain Taylor are currently
revising the content of the labs for next year.
"It will be a very thorough revision," said Nordan, "I
don't think they'll recognize the lab next year."
The change in structure and content of the labs was the
major recommendation of a student committee formed as a result of the Oct. 30 teach-in.
A questionaire was distributed, filled out and collected in
all Bi. 101 sections Dec. 3. Seventy-one per cent of students
responded.
In addition to the lab changes, which were their main concern, the majority of students responding also favored:
O    A separate course for students not intending to take further biology courses,
O     Division of biology 101 into seperate zoology, botany and
microbiology courses,
#     Establishment of a nine unit Science I program.
Charles Seudomore, Science I, said these questions course
are currently under study by the Science faculty.
Trustees would gag faculty'
PRINCETON, N.J. (UNS) — Some 27 per cent of American
university trustees would not allow their faculty members the
right to free expression of their opinions.
This was the result of a survey of 5,000 trustees at 536
institutions throughout the United States.
The survey also showed that:
O    well over one third of the trustees considered it reasonable to require loyalty oaths from faculty members and that
universities should discipline students for off-campus behavior;
O    one-quarter want all campus speakers screened;
O    more than half do not believe students and faculty should
have authority over major decisions and almost two-thirds feel
the choosing of academic deans is a matter for trustees and
administration alone; and
O    and more than half want administration control over the
content of student newspapers.
The complete study will be available later this month from
Educational testing Services, Princeton, N.J.
Bursar White:
man of mystery
By MIKE FINLAY
All right kiddies, here begins lesson number one in
university government, student - administration dialogue
(great word, that) and newspaper work.
Star of the lesson — by accident only — is one William
White. I can see your eyes light up at the name.
Yes, the celebrated William White — deputy president
of UBC, bursar of the university, UBC treasurer, senior
administrative official in charge of non-academic affairs.
White is what the administration terms a "housekeeper". He provides the "backbone" of the university's
functioning.
White is in charge of financing (non-academic, payrolls), purchasing (UBC supplies, office equipment), data
processing (computer tracking of students, their numbers,
etc.), physical plant (buildings and grounds), personnel and
ancillary services (hiring and firing of non-academics, operation of bookstore, post office, traffic and parking, food
services).
White also does not talk to the press.
This is not to say that even though he will not speak
to The Ubyssey and the downtown press has no information
on him and he has been bursar since 1962 that he is trying
to evade the public.
White is an interesting figure soely because of the
mystery that he exudes and the impression he gives callers
of deliberately evading: their questions.
This is often the case with university administrators.
Certainly they are extremely busy men, but it does not
seem rational that they cannot find the time to tell the
university population how their mundane tasks are accomplished.
Also, it's frustrating to newspapermen who are sometimes forced to turn to yellow journalism tactics to bring
the truth to the reader.
Yes, we know you all laughed at the word "truth".
Which means, when all the bumpf is scraped off, that
important people in the university are bound by their position and responsibility to open themselves to question. Dig?
Lack of quorum stymies
constitutional revisions
By JOHN GIBBS
"Where does one go from here?"
It was a discouraged Alma Mater Society
president, Dave Zirnhelt, speaking after Thursday's general meeting failed to ge«t a quorum
needed to vote on the constitutional revisions.
The meeting, held in the War Memorial
gym, needed 2,000 but got only 748 and a few
score snow balls.
The latter were supplied by about a hundred
engineers who dragged their catapault into
the meeting and fired snow balls into the
stands.
They also presented the AMS with a fifty
pound, three and a half foot wide, hot cross bun.
WANTED QUORUM
Speaking to the largely empty gym after
opening the meeting, Zirnhelt said he would
not presume to try to pass the controversial
parts of the revisions without a clear quorum.
(The revisions, in three main sections propose basically: the redefinition of AMS executive offices into commissions of several councillors to back them up, representation by
population, and provision for undergrad societies to levy funds and carry out their own
projects.)
"However, for the purposes of getting the
routine change of names out of the way, I
think we can consider ourselves a quorum,"
he said.
He was referring to the first section of four
by-law changes in constitutional wording that
were considered  "non-controversial".
These bylaws were duly passed and the
meeting declared adjourned.
Zirnhelt then spoke about the implications
of the general failure of the meeting.
"For good  government, you need  a  good
constitution," he said. "It is now too late for the
changes, if passed, to take effect this year."
He urged the gathering to talk up the
changes among students with a view to getting
them passed at a referendum later in the year.
ZIRNHELT CONFIDENT
Zirnhelt later told The Ubyssey that he was
confident such a referendum would pass the
revisions.
He cited three main reasons for the lack
of turnout as being "certain faculties" in
opposition to the changes, the resignation Friday of internal affairs officer Ruth Dworkin,
and a lack of co-operation from The Ubyssey.
He said the latter two were responsible for
a lack of adequate publicity for the meeting.
"And I think the students have failed us,"
he concluded.
Carey Linde, former vice-president and the
major author of the revisions, said that the
apathy was to be expected.
Linde repudiated the idea that poor public
relations was responsible. "They wouldn't come
anyway."
VOLUNTARY UNION
Stan Persky, the only one to address the
meeting other than Zirnhelt, called for a
voluntary student union that would include
only interested students.
Persky confronted Zirnhelt and several
other AMS council members after the meeting
in what amounted to a minor debate over the
council's record this year.
Persky challenged Zirnhelt with the idea
that since the government, in effect, had been
defeated, the president should resign.
"If I thought it would do any good, I would
resign," Zirnhelt said. Page 4
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, January 17, 1969
Troubles*. it3s not our fault
As you can see, we are changing.
We are always the first to admit there is room
for improvement.
But not all the changes are for the better.
Most students in the past 50 years have looked
forward to receiving their copies of The Ubyssey,
knowing it would inevitably appear. But things
aren't that simple.
By now you must have noticed that we only
publish two copies per week, instead of the three
per week we have for the past ten years.
We have had to cut back because of financial
problems — the major problem being that we get far
too little money from the students. We get the lowest
per capita grant in Canada.
We get 85 cents per student per year to publish
close to 60 issues a year. Students at Simon Fraser
pay $1.60 per year and students at Waterloo $2.00—
for weekly papers.
STUDENTS' COUNCIL GRANT DECREASING
Even though we raise 75 % of our budget through
advertising, we are being slowly bled to death
because of a decreasing student council grant which
lacks the extra few thousand dollars which can
make a difference (and did this year, forcing us to
cut back our publication).
Mainly due to a rise in printing costs, our expenses for this year rose $6,000. Even by putting
up advertising rates, we calculated advertising
revenue would increase by only $2,000.
We asked students' council for $4,000 more than
last year, and they gave us the same as last year —
$17,000.
Because we are tied to a discretionary grant (up
to the discretion of students' council) we have no
way of determining from year to year what our
revenues will be. Our grant is not even tied to the
population increase of UBC.
In fact, our grant over the last six years has
dropped drastically both in per capita figures and
in total.
PER CAPITA GRANT" NEEDED
In 1963-64, with 14,700 students at UBC, we
received a grant of $19,081, or $1.30 per student.
This year with 20,000 students, we get $17,000 or
84 cents per student. Over these six years printing
costs have risen substantially—as have the number
of copies per issue, and the quality of the paper.
We would like to see the student grant to The
Ubyssey a non-discretionary, per capita one, so that
as the population of the university grows, and our
costs rise, we have more money coming in.
We would be able to make long-range plans over
several years, and not be forced to do things again
like cutting down on publication halfway through
a year when we should be increasing the number
of issues.
For example, this year, with one dollar per
student, we could have continued at three issues
per week. With $1.25 per student, we could have
begun to cut down on our exceedingly high advertising percentage of 40% in the paper, and considered
moving to four or even five issues a week.
We feel, naturally, that students, since they pay
for The Ubyssey out of their student fees, should
make their feelings known  about the amount of
money they want to give us.
We approached students' council with a request
for a referendum on the question of a per capita
grant for The Ubyssey, and they refused to consider
it-
So what we are faced with doing is getting up
a 500-name petition asking that The Ubyssey grant
be made per capita and non-discretionary and suggesting figures.
This article is to let the students know our
predicament and our plans to do this.
UBC REPORTS IS GROWING
Why should you support The Ubyssey? The main
reason is to ensure an independent student press^
in the face of a serious administration challenge in
the form of UBC PReports, which has sprung up for
the express purpose of combatting The Ubyssey's
critical views of the pressing problems at this
university.
UBC PReports has grown from nothing two years
ago to a weekly, even twice a week on occasion.
That puts it in direct competition with The Ubyssey.
But UBC PReports costs $4,000 per issue, just for
printing costs, let alone salaries for the full-time
public relations men who write for it. This compared
to  about $1,000  per  issue for us,  for  everything.
This is more than $120,000 per year of the taxpayers' money to present the administration's viewpoint. Is $20,000 a year too much to pay for a
student viewpoint?
We'll have more to say about this in later issues,-
as well as reports on how the petition is going.
— THE STAFF
OUR BRIEFS...
...TO THE COMMISSION
The recommendations
By BERT HILL
Withjunst 15 per cent more students, the University of Toronto receives almost twice the annual
grant from the Ontario provincial gavernment that
UBC receives from B.C.'s Social Credit government.
This is what the financial crisis is all about.
President John B. Macdonald in his study of
higher education released in 1963 suggested a system where the government set up a formula for
allocating and distributing tax money to higher
education. Bennett ignored the formulas and firmly
kept control in his hands. But he let the universities
divide up this figure among themselves. This represents a refinement on the old maxim of 'divide
and conquer.' They didn't even have to do the
dividing, for the' financial cricis that would follow
would force the universities to fight hard among
themselves for the small grant he gave them.
In continuing its policy of doing everything
possible to keep the universities off their back, the
provincial government last year introduced a new
tactic to put them on the defensive.
Provincial Education Minister Les Peterson
established an Advisory Committee on Inter-University Relations—the Perry Committee—to ensure
that in the future there will be a minimum of
overlapping of programs and no undue competition
between the three public institutioins in B.C.
THE GAME GOES ON
Since then Peterson has been replaced by
Donald Brothers as minister of education but the
game is still on. Deputy minister of education
Dr. G. Neil Perry, former vice-president and dean
of commerce at UBC, is chairman of this committee.
Four UBC groups have made submission to the
commission and all of them are unhappy with the
present system of fighting over grants from the
provincial government.
In the place of the present financial advisory
board, made up of members of the board of governors who divides np the annual grant from the
provincial government, they suggest different systems.
The report of the senate as set out in the fourth
column above emphasizes a bi-cameral system with
a council of university affairs responsible for the
universities and a commission on universities responsible for the other post—secondary educaiontal
bodies.
Both bodies would be responsible for both the
academic and financial affairs of the institutions
under their jurisdiction. Thus the Senate ehanged
the name of the commission on university finance
as recommended by the committee of deans to the
commission on universities. The Senate emphasized
that the commission in its compostion should not
be specifically representative of any specific B.C.
education institutions.
Thus the three full-time commissioners would
be given leaves of absence if they were presently
involved directly in some capacity with a B.C.
higher educational institution. The commission
being responsible for the broader scheme of things,
would have the last say if the various council representatives of the universities were unable to cooperate on academic and financial problems and
resolve problems of unnecessary duplication and
competitioin.
The Senate accepted this report to be presented
to the Perry Commission, however it deleted a paragraph that noted that in all the briefs there was no
case made for a single board of governors, president and senate to govern the affairs of every
institution of higher education in the province.
ONE PRESIDENT FOR ALL B.C.
Senator Cyril' Belshaw, head of the anthropology and sociology department, made a case for
the single federated system when he suggested there
would be . . .
• no dichotomy between academic and financial affairs;
• no possible dispute between universities
when presenting briefs to the provincial government;
• more aid for new institutions from older
institutions;
• a better basis for the rationalization of" the
distribution of supporting services such as the library.
Speaking for the committee that had written
the report commissioned by administration president
Hare, acting dean of arts John Young said the committee, chaired by Dr. Noel Hall, had sought interim
solutions and that they lacked time to consider
alternatives.
THEUBYSSEY
Publish.-*! Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout th. unhranttf yean
by th. Alma Mater Soci.ty of th. University of B.C Editorial opinions are
those of th. editor and not of th. AMS or th. university. M»mb«r,
Canadian University Pran. Th. Ubyswty subscribes to th. press servieM
of Pacific Stud-tnt Prass, of which it is founding nwrnbe-r, and Underground
Pran Syndicate. Authorized second dass mail by Post Office Department,
Ottawa, and for payment of postage in cash. Th. Ubyssoy publishes Page
Friday, a waekly commentary and review. City editor, 228-2305. Other
calls, 228-2301 editor; Pag. Friday 228-2309; sports 228-2308; advw-Kalng
228-3977. Tef.x 04-5843.
JANUARY 17, 1969
S£g*„<**     "%%'. T'nWZg'*'.
There is no guarantee that the government will
accept the structure as suggested by the senate or
any of the other submissions even if the Perry cora-
mission accepts them wholesale. If past experience
is of any value the chances are that the provincial
government will continue to keep financing of
higher  education as its  own  preserve.
PUBLIC REACTION TO UNREST
There seems to be a trend now elsewhere  in~
Canada to control university financing more tightly.
This is based on equal parts of public reaction to
unrest in the universities and desire to keep mounting university costs under control.
In response to skyrocketing costs Ontario has
established a system of financing based on student
course units. A student in a first year general arts
course is worth $1,450 to the university, up to a
PhD candidate who would be worth six units (six
times $1,450) per course. Annual increases in financing will be based on this unit. For example
$1,450 represents a 10 per cent increase over 1967-68.
To meet the cost of constructing and improving
the physical plant but limit annual increases, t£e
Ontario government is also planning to develop a
similar formula system for these capital expenditures.
WHAT ABOUT THE  STUDENTS?
Working through the structures as set out in
the senate report, a similar system of financing
might be developed for B.C. But this assumes the
Social Credit government is prepared to hand over
much of the initiative as in the Ontario system.
And it assumes that the Senate report if implemented would function properly — the names of the
two bodies are close enough to cause confusion;
what other things could go wrong? All the briefs
have found that there cannot be a meaningful separation between academic and financial affairs; can"
there be a line drawn between the internal and the
external in the affairs of the higher educational institutes of this province?
Finally there is no provision made for any
student voice in any of the briefs. Student fees
represent a flexible twenty per cent of the university's budgt and subject to increase whenever the
administration has trouble making its books balance.
If the university is sincere in wanting to make the
Council on University Affairs a sounding board for
all the major bodies of the university community
then it is seriously overlooking students.
(AMS president Dave Zirnhelt said that the
AMS is preparing a brief which will be ready for
ratification at Wednesday's council meeting. 1&fe
brief will then be presented to the Perry Committee). r pf 2WO
Along the beach, the sand had turned to snow.
Driftwood  dripped icicles, streamers of fog
dangled upwards from the sea. More solid,
high-rises grew, as if from the beach,
white in the pale remaining sun,
like tall, impossibly rectangular snowmen,
winter sandcastles.
IWw****^*"*"**' 3**** "*"
text & photos
by
Stephen scobie
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THE     UBYSSEY
Friday, January 17, 1969 .>-v
pt Shree
■svsrae/        I
Perverse Nymphomania
or the confessions of a young man
who enjoyed nothing but good
.music until he came across
Deep Purple....
By MICHAEL QUIGLEY
In a column last year I speculated as to whether the British
rock group Deep Purple would
be able to "withstand the rock-
group birth-pangs and use their
"undoubted good musicianship
to good advantage in future
albums."
With The Book of Taliesyn
(Ptolydor 543.016), this British
rock group proves at least that
it can survive. As well, with
the royalties from their first
album, someone in the group
bought a set of tympani which
are used in the song "Hard
^0£d," with about as much
; as that in "Randy Scouse
The  Monkees'   Head-
h The Book of Taliesyn
what disappointing, the
has a few good points,
j£%f.them being almost forty-
five minutes of music. There's
also some classical talent evident in "Exposition" which is
made up of snippets of Beethoven's 7th and Tchaikovsky's
Romeo and Juliet, though I
guess I could say "So what?"
to that. (In their version of
"Hey, Joe" on their first album, one melody sounded like
a dance from de Falla's ballet
The Three Cornered Hat. Bet
you didn't notice thai.) This
rock-classicism gets a bit out
of hand in "River Deep,
Mountain High", an arrangement of the former Ike and
Tina Turner hit. Here almost
half of the ten-minute song is
made up of a prelude sounding
suspiciously like the beginning
of Richard Strauss' Also Sprach
Zarathusira (the trumpet and
kettledrum motif from 2001:
A Space Odyssey). Fooling
around  with   this   theme   has
been done more effectively by
the Ars Nova, and then there's
always the piece itself conducted by Fritz Reiner on th©
cheap Camden Classics label.
However, what mainly
draws my interest in Deep
Purple is the powerful organ
playing of Jon Lord, who at
times uses a fantastically fast
right hand technique as well
as chord clusters. This is
especially evident in the
group's version of "Kentucky
Woman", and also in '"Aji-
them", where Lord plays
gentle Bach-like phrases for a
change.
My main complaint about
Deep Purple is that the
the group would be that the
vocals at times sound as if
they were recorded in the*
Carlsbad Caverns. Probably a
sloppy engineering job. "We
Can Work It Out" also suffers
from over-engineering, sounding raw and gutsy like Step-
penwolf's first album. With
Deep Purple this sound isn't
so impressive since the raw
effect is more attuned to
Steppenwolf's bluesy material.
With this second album, it will
be interesting to speculate as
to what Deep Purple's next
album will be like (hope-fully
it'll be better than this one).
Perhaps a couple of suites in
the tradition of The Collectors
or The Crome S!yrcus? The
Doors faced a similar situation
and came up with Wailing for
the Sun, which many people
(myself not included) consider
an insignificant album.
Speaking for myself, however,
I wouldn't particularly recommend that you rush down to
the nearest discount record
store and buy The Book of
Taliesyn. With all the little
imperfections on the album,
both technical and musical,
there's only three songs —
"Kentucky Woman", "Anthem"
and "The Shield"—that I'll be
listening to after the initial
effect of the album wears off.
It would probably be best for
you to preview it in the SUB
listening room along with their
first album (if they don't have
them, complain fortissimo).
And in the meantime, wait for
Deep Purple to come to Vancouver later this year and go
to the Pop Festival in SUB tonight and enjoy yourself.
e>ft '■
J*.
^ssaiajs*
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FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE—
LOOT
by JOE ORTON
An Irreverent Farce About Death
Jack Ammon    •    Alan Scarfe    •    Anni Scarfe
Directed by Klaus Strassmann
Designed by Richard Kent Wilcox
JANUARY 17-25
STUDENT TICKETS $1.00
(available for all performances)
SPECIAL STUDENT PERFORMANCES
^
MONDAY, JANUARY 20th	
THURSDAY,  JANUARY 23rd .
 .   _    7:30 p.m.
.-    __  12:30 noon
Tickets: FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE - Room 207
Support Your Campus Theatre I
——FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE
Friday, January 17,  1969
TrfE     UBYSSEY
M
Half hippies heinous
By NORBERT RUEBSAAT
"Well you see, it's about this English guy—general or something
—who comes home from the war and his two kids have sort
of gone hip, you know, the generation-gap thing. Ya, well the
old general kinda plays it cool but his woman is really up-tight
about her daughter having been knocked up a few times and her
son has long hair and stuff and lives with a wierd bi-sexual
chick. (Like they're supposed to be a bourgeois family.)
"Well right off, the son, Bob, starts blasting away at the old
man how there's 'no way' he can understand him—stuff like
'freedom from convention and self-discipline' and why hadn't
dad screwed around more like he really wanted to, constancy
was a drag. Like you don't believe this freak . . . what a come-on,
they really talk!
"Then the old man plays kind of a little game, and comes back
dressed like some cool tramp—like this is how the cats in his
day were. Then lots more talk, Bob gets up tight—the father-
image bag—and they start to do each other's thing. Like dad
sort of starts explaining that nobody really makes it and everybody's only half-way up the tree and let's learn from each other.
Like it's not what you do but how you do it that's important.
"The general gets knocked around a bit too 'cause then we see
the old lady's been having her jollies with this freak Tiny for
twenty-six years, and Bob's really a bastard. And they all play
around with this minister for a while 'til he freaks out and1 then
everybody gets married and is happy and together and like that.
"Like how many times have I seen this?"
• • •
Every now and again this type of "contemporary" play or film
or novel is squeezed from the self-conscious mind of a middle-aged
writer who fears he is no longer quite with it. Usually these
efforts only confirm the validity of these fears and come out
either as cliche representations with formula endings or as
sensation-oriented exposes of an envisioned sub-culture.
Pamela Hawthorne's staging of Peter Ustinov's "Half Way Up
the Tree", currently running at the Arts Club Theatre, is a good
example of the former category. The hip scene is portrayed
exactly like one who reads about it in the papers would present
it—in technicolor—and the concilliatory ending barely surpasses
"Father Knows Best". Lengthy dialogues say nothing about
the problem, characters mouth yesterday's noodles—ofted badly
—and we are left with a very shallow fight for laughs.
EATON'S
(100 yeors young)
offers
Employment opportunities to graduates in—
• Commerce
Marketing Option Preferred
• Arts • Economics
And we will welcome graduates of other faculties
who have a career interest plus work experience
in retailing.
Successful applicants will be eligible for—
• Participation on a 3 phase
Management Development* Program.
• Comprehensive on-the-job training.
• Competitive salary levels.
• Opportunities for advancement
based on individual performance.
Interviews on your campus will be held
January 21 st and 22nd at the STUDENT
PLACEMENT CENTRE.
For further information please contact
Mr. W. L. Davis, Personnel Supervisor,
Local 230, Eaton's Downtown Store. SCIENTIFIC GRAPHICS
For
Theses,    Publications,    Advertising
Graphs,    Illustrations,    Drawings,
Formulations &  Technical   Layout!
PHONE  733-4506
(Evenings)
For Action I
Coma to
JOSEPH for
Personalized Service
bi
HAIRCUTTING
and STYLING
UNIQUE
BARBERS
3144  WESTERN PARKWAY -
behind Boulevard
willy van yperen
4410w. 10th avenue
Vancouver 8, b.c.
224-5412
contemporary
jewelry
design
Papa Bear's Medicine Show
Mother Tucker's Yellow Duck
Five Man Cargo
Seeds of Time
Tomorrow's Eyes - Spring
Yellow Brique Road
Kelly James
Black Snake Blue's Band
CAMPUS
FESTIVAL
Classical Ragas
Electronic Music
Underground Movies
Folk Singers - Poetry Reading
Art Displays - Body Painting
Boutiques
CAMPUS
FESTIVAL
Friday, January  77
8:00  p.m.  to 2:00 a.m.
In SUB and Hebb Theatre
Advance Ticket at A.M.S.
($2.00)
Tickets Available at Door
pf 4our
By FRED CAWSEY
Plays about the Bomb or the
aftermath of nuclear war
often seem melodramatic or
trite under the harsh glare of
cynicism created by world
events.
So much has been said in the
last ten years about "total
destruction and the end of
civilization as we know it",
that there is a tendency nowadays to yawn at any suggestion of such an event.
Once in a while, however,
along comes a story that reduces even hard-boiled cynics to whimpering paranoids.
(I'm not paranoid, it's just that
those goddam paranoids are
after me.)
That may be overstating the
case a little, but some plays
have been written that deal
with nuclear mushrooms very
effectively. One such play is
Marghanita Laski's Offshore
Island, which rims tonight
and Saturday and next Thursday through Saturday at the
York Theatre.
Offshore Island is a powerful
and gnawing drama. It is set
in England supposedly 10
years after the U.S. and Russia have had a nuclear fling
PLAY
DEALS
WELL
WITH
BOMB
at each other. There are very
few survivors, and those who
have made it live in pockets
of land that somehow missed
the ensuing radioactive contamination.
All the scenes are set in the
home of Rachel Verney who
lives very simply with her
teenage kids James and Mary.
The only other survivor in
the area who we see is Martin, a middle aged fisherman
who lives a few miles downstream by the ocean.
What do atomic blast survivors  do  for  food?   How  do
they get by without the conveniences and comfort provided by civilization ?
Although the play sometimes
tends to be a little preachy,
Laski generally handles the
subject very well. The problems facing a family after a
catastrophe are all explored
with honesty, and, most
times, with enough objectivity to avoid corniness. One interesting question raised is
that of future generations of
survivors. The possibilty of
incest, (James and Mary;
James and his mother) looms
as a very real probability if
there are to be more people.
It is a shocking play, and a
demanding one from a director's or actor's point of view.
Keeping this in mind, the
Vancouver Little Theatre
cast, and director Stuart
Baker, are to be praised for a
worthy production.
Baker never allows the play
to become maudlin or melodramatic, which it could do
if tight reins are not held on
the movement and interpretation of it.
Alma Thery and Harry Sanders turned in excellent performances on opening night.
Husband and wife in real life,
Alma and Harry work well
together as Rachel and the
American Captain Charles
who comes to "rescue" the
family.
Sandra Smith and Don Maxwell, as Mary and James, recovered from a shaky first
scene and did a good job of
two extremely difficult parts
in the rest of the production.
Here again, Baker must be
commended for tightness of
direction.
He was aided, no doubt, by
the strong supporting cast he
chose. Among these, Mike
Haslam as Martin and Jerry
Zawerucha are worthy of
mention.
The set was adequate but uninspired, and the lighting
could have been much more
effective considering the subject matter. These, however,
are minor criticisms not
meant to detract from a fine
production.
Curtain time is 8:30 p.m. and
tickets are available at the
Vancouver Ticket centre.
They are $2 and $1.50 regular, and half price for students.
r
God, America tic the Fraser Arms
By DALE WIK
I'm afraid it's disillusionment.
I've felt this thing gangrening me since
January 6 and now I realize what it is—
disillusionment. This is not to write that
my faith has been totally struck asunder.
We live, after all, in the best of all
possible worlds, and only the very cynical and very stupid refute this. But I
must admit that small elements of doubt
have been  infiltrating my mind.
I had always thought that the university
was a scene of increasing political awareness. This simple belief was shattered by
an extremely erudite radio program a
few weeks ago. I hadn't planned to listen
to it, I had merely twisted the dial to
escape the tin blasts of CKLG. And then
the voice blared at me, ". . . the insidious
growth of the left wing creeping into all
facets of life, spreading even to the
campus newspaper. We cannot afford the
luxury of simply being against Communism, we must organize our front as they
have organized theirs, and crush them to
uphold the freedom of God."
At this his voice rose to splended heights,
each word with its own crescendo. And
I began to feel agitated. Was the univer
sity in fact a culture for the growth of
the fungus-like left wing? The thought
appalled me. And yet the voice continued:
"The situation, as hopeless as it sounds,
is slowly being rectified by the Voice of
Americanism. All across the nation we
are conducting intensive seminars to unite
right wing supporters. The propaganda
of the left wing must not be allowed to
corrupt the minds of the impressionable."
Had my mind been corrupted? Perhaps
without being aware of it I had become
the victim of left wing literature. The
voice pressed on,, delving into the advantages of left wing ideology. How could
one fail to be impressed?
"What is to be feared most is the totalitarian ideal of the left wing, concentrating all power in the hands of a tiny clique.
Do you want this on your campus?" The
voice closed its address with quotes from
a pamphlet, "Immorality of the New
Left" which can be obtained by writing
to the Voice of Americanism:
Box 90
Glendale, California
Write and discover how organized Americanism can change the university.
Writing of disillusionment, why is it that
the Fraser Arms remains one of the
sacred cows in this new year of enlightenment and analysis? Students who scorn
tradition, or who pretend to scorn it, still-
remain enamoured of this squalid beer
parlour. All that sustains it is its glorified image. The beer is stale, the salt and
vinegar potato chips are soggy and tbe
cheezie and potato chip girl is elusive.
Pipes in the washrooms show through
holes in the walls, the juke box speakers
are almost ineffectual, the tables are
small and cramped. The customer is but
a unit in this vastly impersonal plant.
Yet students crowd into this murkjr
because they are blinded by the tra
of the thing. Not being a full-fledged,
noisseur of the beer parlour I wou.
tate  to  offer  an  alternative,  but
students are  sufficiently adventun
explore the wealth of beer parlour*^
Vancouver offers. Even the myth, of,
imity is negated when you consider
it takes twenty minutes to drive to; j
Arms and the same time to drive
town. The proprietor of the Arms,
ing that he no longer has a near
poly on student business, will thei*".
prove  the atmosphere to the benefit
everyone. It's capitalism in action.
Shakespeare
SUNDAY MATINEE, 2 pjn. only
Sunday 2 p.m.
January 19th
Sunday 2 pjn.
February 16th
Varsity
224-3730 V
4375 W. 10th
LAURENCE OLIVIER
||amjcl
LAURENCE OLIVIER
HeiiipY
THIS  COAT
... IS  DIFFERENT!
Great for Students.
Perfect for the Vancouver climate.
An authentic, durable Kechibia, exclusive to Ohl
Originals, from North Africa.
Men's sizes and patterns arriving soon.
Also, just arrived—a shipment of handwoven shoulder
bags in rich vibrant colours.
Always something new
and original at . . .
Oh! DhiahwlA
070*;   Rs-Mrliunu W . TiO-TiOO
2705 Broadway
Opposite DeYong's Sound
732-7322
THE     UBYSSEY
Friday, January 17, 1969 «▼•
Bull-
most cops aren't fascist pigs.
In fact, the movie goes so far
as to make a relentless Nixonlike senator look more villainous (in his attempt to retain a
secret underworld witness for
a subcommittee investigation)
than the mob.
The film is more or loss standard detective fare, the Hollywood attempt at realism that
still requires a box-office star
Irregardloss of some vague
attempts to present Bullitt seriously, as a man involved in
the realities of the present.
Steve McQueen as the vapid
non-conformist hero, is no
• ■very-day cop. and does not
have the presence to fill the
role complete with substandard script. Understanding
glances exchanged with a
Negro doctor or his conversations with his girlfriend in
which he scarcely speaks do in
fc. M *** •
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moments of the real world, but
generally the script tends to
degenerate to awkward connective filler between three
action sequences. Any true
characterization remains non*
existent. And so, Robert
Vaughn as the pushy senator
is a caricature, and Jaqueline
Bisset with her highway-side
place.
Bullill does have some nice
things in it: action. When a
man is fired on point-blank
with a shotgun, he actually
flies backwards, the blood
jumping from his body at the
moment of impact. Cut to a
shot with most of his head and
shoulder sticking to the wall
. . . Then there's a hospital
corridor pursuit of a skewer-
wielding killer, which warms
you up for the next performance. McQueen does his thing
with a Shelby modified Mustang —. more smoke than rear
tires, more patches than street,
and a quick tour of the streets,
hills, intersections and one way
streets of San Francisco, at 110
m.p.h. . . . This sequence alone
is worth the price of admission.
After an endless build-up, the
big   action-chase   through   San
By  K.   TOUGAS
Bullill desperately attempts to
say that power and authority
can be exercised by a policeman without resulting in moral
corruption . . . which is OK,
because I'm quite willing to admit that many lawmen aren't
bastards, and, despite the formidable displays of  1968, that
Francisco':
international    air
port amongst the jets whining
off the airstrips. While the
labyrinth of the hospital and
the street effectively served
he two previous chase scenes
here the wide expanse detracts
from what should have been
an exciting finale. For two men
'it*
V*
*
***** -*
on foot, armed, tension is always more effective in tight,
restrictive settings; only Hitchcock's Norlh by Northwest
manages the open field ambush
with effect.
Finally, Bullill is worth seeing
for its colour photography,
which outclasses by far all but
the Mustang scene.
FILM SOCIETY PRESENTS
PHILIP de BROCA'S
"KING   OF   HEARTS"
WITH
Alan Bates & Genevieve Bujold
Today and Tomorrow
TODAY-12-30, 3:30, 6:30, 9:00
SATURDAY-7-00, 9:00
SUB THEATRE
ADMISSION 50c
Friday, January 17,  1969
OPENING SPECIAL
SAMPLE DRESSES
AT COST OR LESS
$5 - $25
PARTY DRESSES - Reg. $45 NOW $18
Sph Prix Routique
548 Robson (near Seymour) 685-4924
FILM SOC presents
K1 of HIIS
In Color and Pa na vision With
Alan Bates
Genevieve Bujold
Today
12:30      3:30      6:30      9:00
Saturday
7:00      9:00
SUB   THEATRE
Admission 50c
COMING NEXT WEEK-"PRIVILEGE"
DR. RUDOLF DREIKURS,
Professor Emeritus of Psychiatry,
Chicago Medical School
will lecture and demonstrate Adler-
ian theory and technique, January
31 and February 1, at U.B.C.
Student of Adler, graduate of the Neuro-
Psychiatric Institute of Vienna, Profess Drei-
kurs has lectured and published extensively
on Adlerian psychology, psyche-dynamics of
personality, child guidance psychotherapy,
human interrelationships and group psychotherapy.
Special rates for full-time students:
Admission to all sessions   $5.00
Friday evening only $ 1.50
(AMS Card Required)
Contact:
U.B.C. EXTENSION DEPARTMENT
East Mall - Phone 228-2181
THE     U BYSSEY con  fusion
A Series of Informal Dialogues
for Faculty and Students
JANUARY 23:
Red   Power
Gerry  Larkin, Lee Carter,  Roy Robb of the  Native
Alliance for Red  Power
JANUARY 30:
"ENCOUNTER AT KWACHA HOUSE"-a 20-minute film
on a project in a Negro Ghetto in Halifax.
Peter Stein of the Company of Young Canadian who
worked  in the project.
FEBRUARY 6:
International  House and the White Man's Con Game.
Everybody is a special resource person!
FEBRUARY 13:
Black,  White,   Red,  Yellow.  "The  Woos   and  Woes  of
Interracial Dating and Marriage"
Any Experts?
INTERNATIONAL HOUSE
UPPER LOUNGE
THURSDAYS 12:30 P.M.
little Ja-ppy cowers
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oftbiHon-UJ
ta-ntalifcafaon,.
vidoiKus vitamins aa
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Mimic speaks
by DEAN FOGAL
A statement for the press? Yes. Hmm, a difficult thing
to ask of a mime troupe. Or a basically mime troupe.
It's something . . . that reaches out to a large number
of people in a single expression, something that feels
very good to all of us. Something we're actively working  towards.
What are we doing at the moment? At the moment we
are realizing things. Things like how damned hard it is
to hold together and sustain this kind of theatre. A kind
of theatre defined in terms of indefinite things. By
definition, we are a living theatre, a mobile, covered
wagon kind of theatre, that takes its ware wherever
there are people. By definition, our wagon roads are
undefined. Sometimes we try to make a point, sometimes our point is simply our being in the street. Or in
the sentence—wanted: native guides, all the bread you
can eat. apply within. For the bread we distribute during each 'involvement' (as opposed to the word performance), there is no charge.
There should be free theatre around for people who
never go to the 'theatre', and for people who think that
theatrical events and life events should only be held
in socially correct and socially sterile places. We'd like
to entertain cops, and lineups and people that sweep
out alleys, people that you don't see unless you're not
looking for them. We'd like to show a lineup what else
there is to do with a space besides standing in it, looking at someone else's back. It's art dissolving into life.
We want to show a lineup something, then take part
in that lineup experience and in some way change the
tone from that of a military formation to that of a group
of people, waiting. We propose to counter almost all
of the cities' many walls and border lines and to build
imaginary central squares where there are lots of open
spaces in which people can see each other, can parade
up and down before each other in the ways of a celebration.
There is a chance we'll meet. That chance is the Festival
of the Contemporary Arts, January 29 - February 5.
2
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plugs
By FRED & VALLEY
Old pornographers never die.
They just come clean or  cop
out.
There is a benefit Monday
night at the Bistro for Kelly
(hardcore) James who is leaving for England and fame at
the end of the month. For more
news of Kelly's departure, see
Backsides.
Meanwhile, Sleepy John do
their thing at the Bistro
through Sunday.
• •    •
Across town at the Big Mother,
the Cast of Thousands are the
feature band, with house band
Yellow Brique Road 'backing
them up. They will be there
until Sunday, and tonight and
Saturday night the ever-popular Tomorrow's Eyes will also
do late sets.
Next week the Big Mother has
Mother Tucker's Yellow Duck
for your entertainment.
Down at the Cave Theatre
Restaurant Al Martino (Mary
in the Morning) provides
smooth vocals until Jan. 25.
Good strong stuff that, and a
nice change from the hard
rock all over town.
• *    •
Starting  tonight  at  the  UBC
Frederic Wood Theetre is the
play Loot, by Joe Orton. It is
directed by Klaus Strassman
with set design by Richard
Kent Wilcox. It runs until Jan.
25.
B.C. HYDRO and POWER AUTHORITY
requires an
INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS OPTION GRADUATE
for hs
Industrial Relations
Graduate-In-Training Programme
The trainee is given assignments or projects in various
Industrial Relations functions such as recruitment, employment,
job evaluation, salary administration, labour relations, manpower planning, etc. This offers the young graduate excellent
opportunities to show his qualifications or interests for different
Industrial Relations jobs within B.C. Hydro. This basic training
usually lasts 2 to 3 years, after which the graduate-in-training
is placed in a field of activity which best meets his requirements
and the needs of B.Q Hydro.
CAMPUS INTERVIEWS:
JANUARY 23
PLEASE ARRANGE APPOINTMENTS THROUGH YOUR
STUDENT PLACEMENT OFFICE.
THE     UBYSSEY
Friday, January 17, 1969 pf 7even
Chicago echoes
By BERT HILL
Rights in Conflict: The
Walker Report, Special
Introduction by Max Bran-
kel, Bantam Books. $1.00.
This official report to the
National Commission on the
Causes and Prevention of Violence is the story of what
happened in Chicago last
August when the Democratic
Party nominated Hubert Humphrey and the Chicago police
evened scores with those hippy
radical creeps and any newsmen who got in the way.
Now it seems so long later we
can set back and see Nixon is
in the saddle; Johnson is headed back to the Pedernales and
we can listen to the mellow
tones of Eric Sevaried on CBS
or in the Saturday review
assuring us that things are just
fine and the political temperature of the country to the south
is getting back down to normal. Nixon is even going to get
the U.S. out of Vietnam we
are told.
The most depressing thing is
remembering the public outcry at the television networks
for telling what really happened in Chicago—letters ran
ten to one against the networks
it was reported and there were
a lot of letters.
Max Frankel of the New York
Times points out that  Daniel
Walker, the author of this
comprehensive report, is a corporation counsel and civic
leader in Chicago.
Walker gets a little uptight
early and goes through some
overblown agonizing for the
benefit of all the nervous
nellies in the bleachers on his
inclusion of the obscenities
brought straight from the
mouths of protestors and cops
alike on the street.
But then Walker settles down
to an extensive examination of
both sides and a complete description of everything from
the smallest exchange to the
biggest battles in front of the
Conrad Hilton Hotel.
Walker concludes that though
the police were pushed very
far by the young street fighters
they too often went on violence-binges and too often got
out of the complete control of
their commanding officers.
Walker later went on to underline the fact that very little
had been done about disciplining these policemen.
Norman Mailer may write
more interesting accounts in
his Siege of Chicago and flesh
it out with some brilliant
writing but Walker does a
good job.
In fact as one writer has noted
that as the U.S. gets worse,
these reports get better.
LOOKING FOR A
MEANINGFUL CHALLENGE ?
SHERUT LA'AM
DURATION: ONE YEAR
If you are a professional, college
graduate or undergraduate, you
are needed as a teacher, instructor, tutor, technician, nurse, social worker, etc.
For an experience in communal
living you may join the full year
Kibbutz program on a border
Kibbutz or elsewhere.
Knowledge of Hebrew not essential. Before departure there is on
orientation seminar followed by
a three-month Ulpan, intensive
Hebrew study in Israel.
COST  U.S.
$670 ROUND-TRIP
(incl. air fare and orientation cost)
NEXT DEPARTURES
July 1969—Professional & Semi-
Professional
Sept. 1969—Kibbutz
Participation
Limited    number   of   partial    loans,
available to  professionals only.
VOLUNTEERS FOR ISRAEL
PROGRAM
DURATION: SIX MONTHS
Any assignment upon arrival in
Israel, living and working in a
Kibbutz or Moshav with the possibility of Special Work projects
including Hebrew, lectures and
seminars available.
COST  U.S.
$570 ROUND-TRIP
AIR FARE
NEXT DEPARTURE
May/June 1969
SHERUT LA'AM
Special New Project
DURATION: TWO YEARS
If you are a professional, college
graduate or undergraduate entering your junior year, you can
participate in one year of work
followed by one year of study at
an institute of higher learning in
Israel. Year of study will be
covered by adequate scholarship;
same cost as one-year program-
same departure dates.
COST  U.S.
$670 ROUND-TRIP
(incl.  air fare and  orientation  cost)
NEXT DEPARTURES
July 1969—Professional & Semi-
Professional
Sept. 1969—Kibbutz
Participation
Limited   number   of   partial   loans,
available to  professionals only.
ISRAEL SUMMER
INSTITUTE
DURATION:  7  WEEKS
SENIOR  DIVISION:
Field  trips  of   all   types   include
camping   and   hiking  excursions.
Seminars   and    lectures    on    all
aspects of Israeli life. Two-week
Kibbutz work period is a special
feature. Participants meet Israeli
youth in variety of settings. Open
to   students   and   young   adults
ages 18 to 25.
JUNIOR DIVISION:
For students ages 15 to 18. Participants     may    travel     with     a
group of their organizational affiliation  or  join  the  Israel  Tour
for Teenagers, which is designed
for non-affiliated youngsters.
COST  U.S.
$920 ROUND-TRIP
NEXT DEPARTURE
July,  1969
FOR  INFORMATION  CONTACT:
ISRAEL PROGRAMS
950 West 41st Avenue, Vancouver, B.C. Phone: 266-5366
ANNUAL JANUARY
CLEAR-OUT
SELECTED DIAMONDS 40% OFF!
Includes Engagement — Solitaires —3-5-7 Stone
Clusters — Dinner & Gents Rings — All Insured Free For One Year
WATCHES 40% OFF!
Selection from ALL manufacturers—DONT MISS THIS ONCE-A-YEAB
OPPORTUNTTSl
JEWELRY UP 50% OFF!
All Jewellery On Sale — Shop early!
CHINA AND GIFTS 40% OFF!
Dresden — Giftware — Dinner-ware — Irish porcelain mugs, cups
and saucers, mugs, etc.
TIMEX WATCHES
20% OFF
All models
WINNER OF MILLERS
WEDDING and HONEYMOON CONTEST
HEATHER DONALD
206-1267 Foster St., White Rock, B.C.
Personal Shopping Only
Open Fri. 9-9
Easy Terms Available
655 GRANVILLE ST., VANCOUVER-683-5561
47 W. HASTINGS ST., VANCOUVER-682-3801
622 COLUMBIA ST.,  NEW WESTMINSTER - 526-3371
SUB OPENING WEEK
SERIES OF
SEMINARS
MONDAY, JAN. 20
7:30 P.M.
SUB Ballroom
TUESDAY, JAN. 21
7:30 P.M.
SUB Auditorium
WEDNESDAY, JAN. 22
7:30 P.M.
SUB Auditorium
"THE CULTURAL RELEVANCE OF THE  UNIVERSITY"
Robin Riddington
Steven Chitty
Jack Stathers
Stan Persky
"THE IMAGE OF THE UNIVERSITY"
Carey Linde
Gabor Male
Al Fotheringham
"THE UNIVERSITY AS A TRAINING GROUND"
Dr. H. P. Oberlander
Barrie Lindsay
Jim McFarlan
Russ Grierson
"HOW SUB RELATES TO THE ABOVE TOPICS"
Ken Snider
Roger McAfee
Al Birnie
NO ADMISSION CHARGE
DEBATE
FRIDAY, JAN. 24-12:30 NOON - SUB BALLROOM
NORMAN DEPOE-Of CBC
HARRY RANKIN Alderman and Lawyer
MALCOLM McGREGOR-Head of Classics at UBC
And a Medical Authority
Hear All The Issues On The Legalization of Marijuana
ADMISSION 25c
FRIDAY, JAN. 24
7:30 P.M.
SUB Auditorium
FWday, January 17,  1969
THE     UBYSSEY pf sight
Bach'
sides
COLLECTORS
sweet nothing
happened.
Not a creak
Not a groan.
Nothing
by VALERIE
Things will be POPin this weekend with the
Campus Pop Festival which will multa-mediate
you to distraction if you dig that sort of thing.
So dig out your summer supply of beads and
bangles, ferret out your festive no-doze, don
your leather snow-shoes and head for SUB,
tonight, 8-2.
The Festival advertises dancing girls in bawdy
paint, but back in Paris some hundred odd
years ago it was the Can-Can that got eyeballs
bleeping. Mussoc undertakes this lively Cole
Porter musical as their annual production for
'69, opening Feb. 6 in the old Auditorium. Anyone can Can-Can.
A man who's become a name in Vancouver
will be leaving soon, depriving our kaleido
scope of local colour of one of its liveliest
shades. Kelly James is already an almost mythical character on the Vancouver Scene; anyone who
has met him or seen him perform must acknowledge that
he is an artist in his own
rite. Kelly caused his first
public commotion at the Village Bistro shortly after it
was opened by Mark Derrick.
Soon he was drawing large
VALLEY crowds  who   came   to   gawk,
guffaw and belly-laugh at the burly performer
with his outrageous clothes and unprecedented
frankness of approach to life. Since his ignom-
ious debut, Kelly has performed at festivals
and concerts throughout the lower mainland
and Vancouver Island. Through a style of presentation unique unto himself he has endeared
and outraged the masses, singing, miming,
parodying life as he sees it, and simply enjoying himself.
At the end of the month Kelly is leaving for
London to study at the School of Theatre Arts.
The Village Bistro is holding a benefit for him
Monday night, -which is bound to be more of
a farewell party cum jam session, though proceeds will go to Kelly and hisr travel fund.
Spring, Mother Tucker's, Black Snake Blues
Band. Melon Farmers, and Sleepy John will
supply music, the great James will emcee. The
merriment kicks off at 8:30, continues forever.
Admission is $1.
Meanwhile, a sale of Kelly James* priceless
collection of beads, antiques, and other miscellany continues at his home at 2517 Vine
(across from Jersey Farms on Broadway). Drop
by to scavange or say a few words. He moves
out Jan. 31.
You can still catch Kelly's last performance
before he evacuates. He's in on the Pop Festival
tonight and will be doing his thing nightly at
the Bistro till the end of the month.
A change of pace was provided by the New
Folk Rock who did a concert in SUB Thursday afternoon. This nine-member group has
been on tour for more than a year, hitting
campuses across America. Their material, which
they have obviously performed often, is varied
but hardly as slick a$d professionally presented
as might be expected. At the beginning of the
concert they seemed stiff and somewhat cardboard, but as they went on they relaxed somewhat and even managed an occasional unrehearsed smile from time to time. Their most
alive moments came during a Pepsi un-cola
commercial and a Ban-won't-wear-off-operatic
spoof. I must admit I have heard three and
four-piece groups come across more audibly
and with greater volume. All the members of
New Folk have pleasant voices but they seemed
a little afraid to really use them. The same
applies  to  their  multiversity   of  instruments.
HENNELL
On a folk level they are good, but the rock
part of their repertoire is slightly lacking.
Sponsored by Campus Crusade, they sing a
good song unto the Lord, and were received
well by the 500-person audience. The variety
of lighting effects added greatly to the performance, and hopefully such will be continued
for rock and other concerts up and coming.
The New Folk Rock certainly was worth the
50c admission price, and must be given credit
for musical ability and potential. Nine people
are a lot for any stage, even without contrived
choreography. The whole show is a musical
methodology of spiritual enquiry, and as such,
is admirable.
SUB opening starts Monday with a variety of
celebrations for students and UBC Reports-
oriented parents alike. It's hard to get really
WJWTED:
KELLY JAMES
excited about an opening which is only "official" and hardly actual. Any excuse for a celebration—don't miss it.
Wednesday of next week, Tomorrow's Eyes return to concert in the SUB Ballroom. If you
have not seen this group perform since their
fourth member rejoined them in December,
this will be a good chance to peruse their new
sound. They were loud as a trio, Lord help us
now they're a quartet.
Festival of Contemporary Arts starts January
29, featuring theatre, poetry, film, painters,
sculptors, artists' models, and mud splatters in
the snow. More information in Page Friday next
week.
PFROLETARIAT
Editor-in-chief
Editor-in-bed
Music
Drama
Art
Photo
Girl Friday
Horvat Andras
Szkobi IstvJ?n
Kvigli MihIly
R^bsz/t Norbert
dolszen br^sz
KJfzi Frederich
Hennell Valeria
AND   POPPY
FAMILY
NOON CONCERT - THURSDAY, JAN. 23
SUB BALLROOM
Advance "B" Ticket — $2.50
includes  Marathon  Dance Friday, Jan. 24 and  Coffee House Jan. 20, 21,  22
in   SUB   Cafeteria.
Admission Thursdcy Concert Only
At The Door $1.00
Your faculty
advisor asks you
(or advice?
Think it over, over coffee
TheThink Drink, *(§tk
For your own Think Drink Mus, send75Candyournameand address tc
Think Drink Mug, Dept. N, P.O. Box 1000, Willowdale, Ontario. The I
PROBLEMS
Increase Your Reading Speed, Comprehension
Study Skills
UBC Reading Improvement Course
• Six weeks - Starts Jan. 20
• Two classes per week
Use of reading lab all year -
No additional charge
Special Student Rate $35
Non-Students $55
Contact
EXTENSION DEPARTMENT
East Mall Opposite of Wesbrook Hospital
Or Phone 228-2181
THE     UBYSSEY
Friday, January 17, 1969 Friday, January 17,  1969
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 13
YOUR PRESCRIPTION . . .
. . . For Glasses
for that smart look in glasses ...
look to
Plesclibtion Optical
Student Discount Given
WE HAVE AN OFFICE NEAR YOU
PAYMENT OF FEES
A late payment fee of $2*0.00 additional to all other fees
will be assessed after January 15, 1969, this fee will be
increased to $30.00 after January 31, 1969.
If fees are not paid in full by February 14, 1969,
the registration of students concerned will be cancelled and they will be excluded from classes.
If a student whose registration has been cancelled for nonpayment of fees applies for reinstatement and his application
is approved by the Registrar, he will be required to pay a
reinstatement fee of $10.00, the late fee of $30.00, and
all other outstanding fees before he is permitted to resume
classes.
things g()
better,!
wwith
Loke
mm
Once more unto the fridge, dear friends. Take time
out for the unmistakable taste of ice-cold Coca-Cola.
Lifts your spirits, boosts your energy...
«     Both Coca-Cola and Coke are registered trade marks which identify only the product of Coca-Cola Ltd.    .
Authorized bottler of Coca-Cola under contract with Coca-Cola Ltd.
WOMETCO (B.C.) LIMITED
Ad No. 65-128
Japan, Canada swap culture
By FRANK FLYNN
Japan is a land where "good" girls wear
skirts that go below their knees, use no makeup, and are in the house by eight at night.
The Japanese youth lives with his parents
until marriage, and more often than not his
mate is chosen for him by his parents.
But Japan is also a modern and thriving
industrial nation, being swept up into the
modern world.
Next summer ten students from UBC will
visit this land in a cultural exchange with three
Japanese universities.
They will go first to one of the three
Japanese universities, Tokyo University or
Keio University in Tokyo, or Doshisha in
Kyoto, where they will undergo a week of
orientation on Japanese life.
After this they will travel through Japan
for six weeks, living with Japanese families,
visiting Japanese students, and absorbing the
culture of the people.
Students at UBC who want more information should consult th© Asian studies office in
the Buchanan building.
Ten students from Japan will be coming
to UBC this summer for the same period of
time.
People are needed to help plan and implement a program for these students.
Those who help in this program will be
given first consideration for scholarships to
Japan in the summer of 1970, when Expo 70
is being held in Osaka.
Those interested in helping should call
Carlene Swartz at 733-0155 or Laurene Temoin
at 922-7829.
BETTER BUY BOOKS
UNIVERSITY TEXT BOOKS
NON-FICTION PAPERBACKS
Specializing in Review Notes
and Study Guides
4393 W.  10th Ave.
224-4144
SUMMER JOB INTERVIEWS
For Students Who Intend To Become Actuaries
Mathematics students in first, second or third year, who
intend to become actuaries, are invited to make appointments now at the Placement Office for interviews on
January 23 with a representative of
THE EXCELSIOR LIFE INSURANCE COMPANY
The summer job is in the Actuarial Department at the Head
Office in Toronto.
VOLKSWAGEN
SPECIALISTS
Large Stock of Parts on Hand
CERTIFIED MECHANICS
UNIVERSITY SHELL SERVICE
4314 W. 10th
224-0828
HLOUETTA
VOLKSWAGEN REBUILDERS
-   AND
A Complete Stock of New and Used
Replacement Parts for Volkswagens
20% Discount to U.B.C. Students & Faculty
On New Parts (Except items that are on Special)
Guaranteed Mechanic Service
Open 8 a.m. to 9 p.m. Weekdays —
8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturdays
CLOSED SUNDAY & MONDAY
200 Victoria Drive - 255-7431
2 Blocks N. of Hastings Ask for Tyrone or Linda
Smile, you!
A CBC Toronto film crew is
coming to UBC to shoot pictures of you Monday.
Five University of Toronto
students are producing the
show, to be entitled "Production Day on Campus."
"The show will portray the
more ridiculous aspects of university life," said one.
It will be broadcast on a
Sunday in late February or
early March on the program
Through the Eyes of Tomorrow.
NEW YORK
COSTUME SALON
RENTALS
WHITE DINNER JACKETS
TUEXDOS,   DARK   SUITS,  TAILS
COLORED JACKETS
SPECIAL   STUDENT   RATES
224-0034 __ 4397 W. 10th
Papa Bear's Medicine Show
Mother Tucker's Yellow Duck
Five Man Cargo
Seeds of Time
Tomorrow's Eyes - Spring
Yellow Brique Road
Kelly James
Black Snake Blue's Band
CAMPUS
FESTIVAL
Classical Ragas
Electronic Music
Underground Movies
Folk Singers - Poetry Reading
Art Displays - Body Painting
Boutiques
CAMPUS
FESTIVAL
Friday, January  17
8:00 p.m. to 2:00 a.m.
In SUB and Hebb Theatre
Advance Ticket at A.M.S.
($2.00)
Tickets Available at Door Page 14
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, January 17, 1969
PANGO-FANCK>—From the
island capital, informed
sources learned the Senior
Capital and District Badminton Championships were to be
held. It was also reliably reported that the university
would have male and female
blorg teams competing.
U.B.C. THUNDERBIRD
WINTER SPORTS CENTRE
SKATING - JANUARY
FRIDAY
SATURDAY
TUESDAY
WEDNESDAY
3:00-5:00
•3:00-5:00
SUNDAY
12:45-2:45
2:00-3:30
*7:30-9:30
7:30-9:30
12:45-2:45
7:30-9:30
*Except
Jan. 10 & 24
•Except
Jan. 11 &..18
7:30-9:30
Tues. Wed.
Aft. Aft.
STUDENTS   15c 25c
ADULTS       15c 25c
Fri., Sat.
& Sun.
Aft.
35c
60c
SKATE RENTAL OR
Even. SHARPENING — 35c
50c  For information phone
75c     224-3205 — 228-3197
U.B.C.  THUNDERBIRDS
ICE HOCKEY JANUARY HOME GAMES
(Fri., 8 p.m.) (Sat., 2 p.m.)
UNIVERSITY OF CALGARY - JANUARY 24    JANUARY 25
 —    FREE ADMISSION   FOR  UBC  STUDENTS    —	
FREE  — The  Arena  &  Curling   Rinks  are  available  FREE  through  the  P.E.
programme  4  hours  per day,  Monday-Friday  inclusive   (U.B.C.  students).
SENSATIONAL!!
UBC MEMBERSHIP DISCOUNT PLAN
FOR STUDENTS AND FACULTY ONLY
APPLY NOW AT YOUR
UBC ASSOCIATED TIRE CENTRE:
3601 West 4th Ave. (at Dunbar)
732-7241
NO COST - NO OBLIGATION!
YOUR BENEFITS ARE:
40% Discount on New Tires
(Summer, premium, wide ovals, winter tires)
25% Discount on all Recaps
(Summer & Winter)
70% Discount on Front End Alignments
Parts (Shocks, Ball Joints, etc.). Labour and Wheel Balancing
70% Discount on Mags, Chromes & Accessories
SAVE NOW !
Drive in to ASSOCIATED —
— Ask For Your Exclusive Discount Card —
OUR NINE ASSOCIATED TIRE CENTRES
TO SERVE YOU BETTER:
6791 Kingsway, Bby.
524-2255
275 Kingsway, Van.
874-4543
3765 Canada Way, Bby.
433-1432
712 Marine Drive, N. Van.
985-8265
4811 Main St., Van.
874-8131
607 Victoria, New West.
524-2264
13654-104th Ave., Surrey
588-1266
805 Wesfstr Hwy., Richmond
278-5171
UBC RALLYISTS Stu Sommerville and Al Robitallie practising
for this year's Thunderbird rally. The rally will start in three
different centers in B.C. and will finish in Penticton. Points
are awarded for both regional and national championships,
which means that it is one of the best rallies around.
SKI SALE
Commences Jan. 18th
Ski Boots — Sweaters
Ski Slacks — After-Ski Boots
Skis (Wood - Metal - Epoxy)
Ski Poles - Ski f arkas
•wp^iMn:
Car - Top
Carriers
and   all    Skiing
Accessories
North Western Sporting Goods
10th & Alma (Open till 9 Fridays)
LTD.
224-5040
STUDENTS TOURS
SPECIAL TOUR
Leave London Early July
60 Days of Travel Through
EUROPE and the MIDDLE EAST
PRICE CA. $345
For detailed itinerary & reservations
please call
LINDA WATSON
BEN BELEN
LINA ROGERS
WORLD-WIDE
INTERNATIONAL TRAVEL
on campus
5700 University Boulevard
224-4391
T'Birds vs
Falcons
The UBC Thunderbirds play
host to the Seattle Pacific
College Falcons Friday and
Saturday nights and they do
so without the services of
guards Phil Langley and Ron
Thorsen.
Langley still has pulled
groin muscles and Thorsen,
who is just now recovering
from his arm injury, started
running on Tuesday and is
expected to start practising
next week.
The spots will be filled by
stand-in guard Ken Shields
and the forward turned guard,
Bob Molinski.
The Falcons come into town
sporting an 8-4 record including impressive performances
against Santa Clara and St.
Mary's but took consecutive
defeats at the hands of Puget
Sound.
They are led by former Oak
Bay great Bob Burrows who
is a starting forward with an
18 point average.
The games are the last ones
to be played in War Memorial
gym as the Birds have only
two remaining home games;
both against Simon Fraser in
the Pacific  Coliseum.
Game starts at 8 p.m. —
Jayvees at 6 etc.
Splashy win
by swim team
In their first swim meet the
UBC Thunderbirds came out
ahead of Western Washington
State College by a 65-39 score.
The Birds took eight of the
eleven events and took second
place in the other three. Winners for UBC were Phil Dockerill, Ted Dorchester, Frank
Dorchester, Bob Menzies, Jim
Maddin (2), Terry Lyons and
the UBC 400 yd. medlay relay
team of Maddin, Dockerill,
Dorchester,  and  Chris  Hanna.
FUN KEY
SCUBA CLASS
Begins Tues., Jan. 21
Only $40
Including   use  of   equipment.
N.A.U.I.   Instructor
CALL
WESTERN AQUATICS
376-8641 New  Loc.  2150  Main
m «*
*•'  RENT
A-CAR Friday, January 17,   1969
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 15
Ice hockey JV's win again
The ice hockey Braves continued on their
merry winning ways as they defeated the
Hornets 6-2 on Monday and humiliated Richmond 12-4 on Wednesday.
In the Hornet game Larry Watts was the
big gun with 3 goals while against Richmond
Warwick Reid and Ken Lemmon came through
with 3 goals apiece.
Coach   Andy   Bakogeorge    was   generally
pleased with his team's performance but stated
"that the team will have to continue to work
even harder if they are to keep their hold on
first place." He felt that Frank Lanzarotta and
Jack Beech had made the greatest improvements during the season.
Meanwhile the Birds play their most important games to date as they travel to Winnipeg this weekend for two conference games
against the University of Manitoba "Bisons".
UBC skier dies
after accident
El wood Arthur Peskett
Elwood, in his final year
24, an outstanding student
and athlete, died on Christmas Day, following a ski
accident on December 20 al
Apex Mountain, Penticton.
Elwood, in his final year
in mechanical engineering,
was a first class student and
was the leading alpine skier
on the Thunderbird Ski
Team.
am *$
Xflfwr
ACAR
Formal
Wear
Rentals and Sales
TUXEDOS  - DINNER JACKETS
MORNING COATS - TAILS
ACCESSORIES
Complete Six**- Range
Latest Styles
10% UBC Discount
JIM ABERNETHY, MANAGER
2046 W. 41st 263-3610
MAX DEXALL
OFFERS
10% Discount
to UBC Students
2609 Granville at 10th
A complete stock of all the popular makes
of shoes for the college student, as well as
hosiery, handbags, slippers, rubbers.
Whatever your need in footwear you'll find it at
Dexall's. Pay them a visit — see the exciting new
styles — and ask for the 10% discount.
Better Shoes for less
DEXALL'S - GRANVILLE AT 10th - 738-9833
"TUUM EST"
UBC AT PRAYER
JANUARY 18-25
FACULTY & GRAD STUDENTS
Monday. 12:30 Noon, SUB 215
RELIGIOUS CLUBS
Tuesday, Jan. 21, 12:30 Noon, SUB Room F
Visual Meditation entitled,  "CREDO".  Original slide-
showing by Newman Centre students.
Wednesday, Jan. 22, 12:30 Noon, SUB Room M
Excerpts from Folksong Mass, prayer classics, other prayer.
Guitar, string bass. Lutheran Student Movement.
Thursday, Jan. 23. 12:30 Noon, SUB
Prayer Service led by Varsity Christian Fellowship.
Friday, Jan. 24. 12:30 Noon, SUB Room F
Panel: "A VISION OF THE CHURCH AS ONE". Participants in an ecumenical experiment speak out. Rev. McKay
(University Hill United), Fr. Zsigmond (St. Ignatius R.C.),
Rev. Kimmit (St. Anselm's Anglican).
Displays:
Deseret Club: photographic exhibit, SUB
Associated Full-Gospel Students: special exhibit, SUB
WORSHIP CENTRES
On - Campus
Anglican  Theological   College:   Daily  Chapel,   7:20  a.m.;
Evensong, 4 p.m.
Carey Hall: Thursday. 6:30 p.m., Ecumenical prayers.
St. Andrew's Hall: Sunday. 11:00 a.m.. Ecumenical service
for students.
St. Mark's College: Daily Mass, 12:30 Noon; Wednesday,
7 p.m., Mass and discussion, Music Room.
Union College: Thursday, 9 p.m., Service of Prayer,
Chapel.
University Endowment Lands:
Lutheran Campus Centre: Sunday,  10:30 a.m., Folksong
Mass; Wednesday, 9 p.m. Ecumenical service of prayer.
St. Anselm's Church: Sunday, 11:00 a.m., Worship.
St. Ignatius Church: Sunday, Mass, 9:30 a.m.
University Hill United: Sunday, 11:00 a.m., Worship.
West Point Grey District:
Our Lady of Perpetual Help: Church Unity Octave, Sunday
Mass, 8 a.m. and 5 p.m.; Tuesday, 7:15 p.m.; Daily Mass,
8 a.m.
West Point Grey Baptist: Sunday, 11 a.m. and 7:30 p.m.,
Worship.
West Point Grey United: Sunday, 11 a.m., Worship.
The University Religious Council
COMPLETE
SKI CENTER/
il^ *■
Featuring
All Ski Equipment
And Accessories
By Well-Known Makers
TO COMPLETE
YOUR ENJOYMENT
OP YOUR FAVORITE
WINTER SPORT
VARSITY SRI SHOP
— IVOR WILLIAMS SPORTING GOODS —
4510 West 10th Ave.       (Open Till 9 p.m. Fri.)       224-6414
Last year
Road Test Magazine
chose the Renault 10 as
the number one import
under $2,000.
They haven't changed their minds.
Each year Road Test Magazine rates imported
cars in the $2,000 price range. Eight of the top selling
imports were compared this year. They were judged
in 5 categories: engineering, roadability, performance, comfort and economy. When the points were
added up, the Renault 10 came out on top again.
Take the Renault 10 on a test drive and you'll
probably end up picking the same winner.
FROM
1798.00
January Sale Days Save $$$$
USEDCARSli
'68 Datsun 2000
This is the top of the line sports car, equipped with 150 h.p.
engine. Complete with full instrumentation, tachometer, etc.
Finished in ermine white with luxurious black contour bucket
seats with headrests; and a hardtop. This car is also equipped
with a quality A.M. radio. This is a one-owner car which has
been driven only 8900 miles, and fully guaranteed.
'61 Vauxhall Cresta
This is a deluxe model, equipped with a 6-cylihder engine and
a fine example of a car that has been pampered by the previous owner. We have no hesitation in recommending this
automobile.
Deal  with   Confidence
Deal with VILLAGE
VILLAGE
Known for After Sales & Service
in  Quality Sports &  Import Cars
2880 Arbutus at 12th
MOTOR
CO.  LTD.
Phone-736-9781
*
SH* Page 16
THE     UBYSSEY
Friday, January 17, 1969
Relativity man talks
Dr. Banesh Hoffman, mathematics professor and former
colleague of Albert Einstein, will speak on The Tyranny of
Testing   Wednesday   noon   in   Angus   110.
He will give a second lecture on the theory of relativity
at 4 p.m. Thursday in Hennings 201,
Hoffman is the author of The Tyranny of Testing, a work
critical of multiple choice testing, and The Strange Story of the
Quantum,  on modern physics.
Tween classes
TODAY
PHRATERERS
All PHI today noon, Bu.  104.
PERFORMING   ARTS   COMM.
Meeting of interested persons working
for committee, noon today, SUB 224 B.
WUS
Meeting noon  today,  SUB 213.
FILM  SOC
"King  of  Hearts",   today   12:30,   3:30,
6:30, 9:30 p.m.; Sat. 7, 9 p.m. Admission 50 cents.
FRENCH   US
Meeting   noon   today,  Bu.   219.
ALLIANCE  FRANCAIS
Meeting    noon    today,    I.H.     Upper
Lounge.
VARSITY  DEMOLAY
Meeting  noon  today, SUB  215.
COMMERCE,   SCIENCE
Pop   Festival   today,   SUB   and   HEBB
Theatre.
CIRCLE   K   CLUB
Meeting noon today, SUB 211.
NEXT WEEK
EXPERIMENTAL   COLLEGE
University    reform,    Mon.,    Jan.    20,
noon,  Bu.  100.
UKRANIAN   VARSITY
General   meeting,   Mon.    noon,    SUB
213.
ASIAN   STUDIES
Dr. J. D. Frodsham lectures on "The
First   Chinese   Embassy   to   England",
noon Tues, Jan   20   Bu   218
HELLENIC   CULTURAL   SOC
A **lide show on the Argolid and lecture on Peloponnese. Mon.. Jan. 20,
7:30 p.m.. I.H. Refreshments and
dancing.
FILM  SOC
General meeting noon, Mon., Jan. 20,
SUB 247.
SLAVONIC    CIRCLE
Meeting noon Tues., Jan. 21, in SUB
205.
FILM  SOC
Privilege, Tues., Jan. 31, Thurs., Jan.
23,   Fri.,  Jan.   24.
GERMAN    CLUB
Polka party Sat. night. German band
and   refreshments.   $1.25   per   person.
SKYDIVING CLUB
Meeting in Bu.  210  Mon.   at  noon.
UBSCC
Gymkhana,  10 a.m. on "D" lot, Sun.,
club  members $1.
NEWMAN   CENTRE
Members   invited   by  LSM   to   dinner
6   p.m.   and   discussion   at   Lutheran
Centre,  Sun.,  Jan.  19.
UBC LIBERAL CLUB
CLUF Convention delegates to be
elected at general meeting, Feb. 6.
Candidates please submit notice of
intention to run to Box 117, SUB before  Jan.   31   (5  to  be  elected).
COMMERCE   U.S.
Annual Commerce banquet Mon., Jan.
20, Hotel Vancouver. Tickets on sale
in  HA
Every Fri., Sat. & Sun. - 6-8 p.m.
ROAST BEEF DINNER
FRENCH ONION SOUP
Prime Roast Beef, Peas, Potatoes, Cole
Slaw, Garnish, Onion Ring
ICE CREAM SPECIAL — BEVERAGE
THE    FRIAR
4423  W.  10th
$1.95
DUTHIE BOOKS
is back on Robson Street
At 919 ROBSON - 684-4496
OUR  U.B.C  BRANCH
4560 W.  10th Ave.   -   224-7012
and
670 Seymour St. — 685-3627
DUTHIE BOOKS
WANTED
DONATION OF EYES
AT THE CIRCLE K
EYE BANK IN THE
NORTH END OF S.U.B.
January 20 Zl ZZ
PANGO-PANGO (UNS) —
The Asses and Mules Society
ceased   to    exist    Wednesday,
TUXEDO
RENTAL & SALES
3000   GARMENTS
TO  CHOOSE   FROM
• Full Dress (Tails)
• Morning Coats
• Directors' Coats
• White & Colored Coats
• Shirts & Accessories
E. A. Lee Formal Wear
623  Howe 688-2481
Field Supervisors for
RED CROSS WATER SAFETY SERVICE
•k Ability to organize and work with volunteers essential
~k Background in Red Cross and Royal Lifesaving necessary
* Senior or graduate students preferred
-*Y Minimum age: 21 years
Apply   stating   age,   details   of   education    and   expedience,   and   other
qualifications to:
Gerald  W.  Cook,  director  of  Water  Safety  Services,  The  Canadian   Red
"■"•ss, *4750 Oak St., Vancouver 9 on or bef?re Janucrv *25,  1969.
CLASSIFIED
RATES:  Students, Faculty 8s Clubs—3 lines, 1 day 750, 3 days $2.00.
Commercial—3 lines, 1 day $1.00, 3 days $2.50.
Rates for larger ads on request
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone and
are payable in advance.
Closing Deadline is 11:30 a.m. the day before publication.
Publication Office: 241 STUDENT UNION BUILDING,
UNIVERSITY OF B.C., Vancouver 8, B.C.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Dances
11
CAMPUS POP FESTIVAL
Papa Beara, Mother Tuckers, Five
Man Cargo, Seeds of Time, Tomorrow's Byes and Spring as Well as
Kelly James and Greydon Moore.
Also Underground movies, electronic
music, folk singing, poetry reading,
art displays, boutiques, body painted
dancers, and much, much more. Friday, January 17, 8:00 p.m. til 2:00
a.m. Advance tickets $2.00 at A.M.S.
office.
SUB SEMI FORMAL DANCE IN
SUB Cafeteria Saturday, Jan. 25.
$3 per couple. Dance to The Silver
Chalice Revue. It's the dance of
the  year!   Full  facilities!
SWING TO THE FABULOUS SOUND
of the Wiggy Symphony from 9:00-
12:00 at Place Vanier; residents
$1.00, non-residents $1.25 — Sat.
Jan.   18.
SWING WITH THE GERMAN CLUB!
Saturday, Jan. 18, 9 p.m. - 1 a.m.
I.H., $1.25. Live band, refreshments,
prizes.
Greetings
12
Lost  &  Found
13
LOST:   PAIR   BLACK   SKI   GLOVES
in   Angus   104   or   Chem   200,   noon,
 Jan.   8.   Phone   Mike   224-0277.
LOST PAIR MAN'S GLASSES BE-
tween Eng. and Hennings. Fri. 10.
Phone   224-5155.
FOUND: KEY AT INTERNATIONAL
House in parking lot. Contact Miss
Field  in Buchanan Rm. 265.
ANYONE FINDING A PAIR OF
wooden framed glasses, black case,
please phone Blair 988-3568,  reward.
FOUND — GREEN TOOL BOX AND
hammer in Publications Office. 241
SUB,   228-3977.
Rides  &  Car Pools
14
RIDE WANTED — CAMBIE AKD
Marine area. Phone Ed or Lloyd,
327-2705  after  7  p.m.
HELP! !     FAIRLY     FINE FELLOW
with   car   needs   carpool from   17th
and     Lonsdale.     Phone Sandy    at
987-9286.
Special  Notices
15
NO APPOINTMENT NECESSARY
at the UBC Barber Shop & Beauty
Salon. "It pays to look your best."
5736   University   Blvd.   228-8942.
THE CAMPUS POP FESTIVAL IS
for split personalities. You can
choose from six bands, folk singers,
electronic music, underground movies, body painting, art displays and
Much much more at the Campus
Pop Festival, Friday, January 13
at S.U.B. Advance tickets at the
A.M.S.   office   ($2.00).
WHY PAY HIGH AUTO INSUR-
ance premiums? If you are age 20
or over you may qualify. Phone
Ted   Elliott   299-9422.
SWING WITH THE GERMAN CLUB
Saturday, Jan. 18, 9p.m. - 1a.m. I.H.
$1.25. Live band, refreshments, and
prizes.
KING OF HEARTS TODAY AND
Sat. in SUB Aud. Alan Bates and
Genevieve Bujold star.
WHO WOULD BE WILLING TO
translate an Italian text into English? No highly technical material
involved. Will pay reasonable rates.
Call   228-2092,   afternoon.
AUTOMOTIVE
Automobiles For Sale
21
'63 CHEV. V8 STD., 4 DR. NEW
trans., clutch, muffler, battery,
seat   belts.   $525,   733-3638   evenings.
IDEAL COMMUTER CAR, UBC
traffic. Mercedes 220S. 1959. Excel,
condition. Diognostic Car Clinic
eval. rep. incl. $700-$900 depending
on offers.  733-6827 after 6 p.m.
1966 DODGE MONACO, 2-DR. H-TOP
Automatic 383, 4-bbl. bucket seats,
wide  ovals,   best  offer  738-0984.
'59  VAUXHALL;  GOOD  TRANSPOR-
tation,  $95.  263-3398  after  6  p.m.
Rentals—Miscellaneous
36
DUNBAR    COSTUME   RENTALS
Costumes   for   all   occasions.
3567  W.  41st Ph. 263-9011
Scandals
37
WILL THE TWO HITCHIKERS
picked-up Nov. 23 by a '64 Chev.
which was subsequently stopped by
the police on Marine Drive. Please
call   261-6623.	
SEE THE DANCING GIRLS WITH
their bawdy paint at the Campus
Pop Festival. Friday, January 13th
at 8:00 p.m. Not advised for the
weak-willed  males.
NORMAN DEPOE AND HARRY
Rankin vs. Malcolm McGregor and
??? on the legalization of marijuana. In SUB Ballroom Friday,
Jan. 24, hear all the arguments.
Admission   25c.	
LIGHTFOOT IS COMING. NO, NOT
Jim   .   .   .   Russ.
READING IMPROVEMENT COURSE
— speed, comprehension, study,
skills. Special student rate, $35.
UBC   Extension   Dept.    228-2181.
GET TO THE HEART OF THE
matter in SUB Aud. today at 12:30,
3:30,   6:30,   9:00.   Adm.   50c.	
FREE HOOTENANNY WITH PAT
Trudell, Monday noon in Ballroom;
next Wednesday noon with tomorrow's   eyes.  Ballroom.	
LIGHTFOOT TICKETS ON SALE
now at AMS Office and Information
Desk. Lightfoot, Thursday evening.
Ballroom.
SEE "THE AWAKENING LAND"
in SUB Auditorium, Monday, Wednesday, Friday, 10:30 a.m. Unique
film  in  colour.  Admission  50c.
MEET 'N EAT PARTY
The Fifth Day Club for Swinging
Singles, Marco Polo, 90 E. Pender
every Wednesday starting Jan. 22.
With A.M.S. Card, admission $1.00,
with smorgasbord Scoff all you
eat $3.00, includes admission. Scoff
starts  6 p.m.  Music 8:30 p.m.
Typing
40
EXPERT   IBM   SELECTRIC   TYPIST
Experienced essay and thesis typist.
Reasonable   Rates —  TR  4-9253
TYPING  —   PHONE   731-7511   —   9:00
to   5:00,   after   6:00.    266-6662.
Help  Wanted—Female
51
URGENT . . . MONDAY 20th DAY
care in home needed. Chancellor
and Acadia. 3-month baby. 224-7394
after   5   p.m.
Help Wanted—Male
52
DRUMMER WANTED WHO CAN
fit in a mixed bag: Soul, Blues,
Bossa-Nova.   Phone   988-4564.
MISC. FOR SALE (Conld.)     71
MUST SELL! 1968 PROOF COIN
sets from Royal Mint. Call Paul,
263-9947.
RENTALS  &  REAL ESTATE
Rooms
81
FULLY FURNISHED ROOMS.
Other facilities available. Male student preferred. Convenient location.
Phone   after   6   p.m.   733-5255.	
FURNISHED UPSTAIRS ROOM.
Kitchen priv. or board. 3 blocks
gates.   228-9460. '
LARGE NEWLY DECORATED FUR-
nished room, 12th/Highbury. Kitchen facilities, separate entrance.
Day,   291-3141;   evening   228-9597.
SINGLE SLEEPING ROOM FOR
rent to male student. Near Bianca
Loop.   Phone  224-3504.
Room & Board
82
LIVE ON CAMPUS AT THE DELTA
Upsilon Fraternity House, good
food, short walk to classes, quiet
hour-*., enforced for study, phone
228-9389  or  224-9841.	
LIVE ON CAMPUS. ENFORCED
quiet hours. Good food and congenial atmosphere. All available by
calling Jim at 224-9986 or stopping
in  at   2280   Wesbrook   Cres.
WIDOWER, TWO CHILDREN, WANT
board with child daycare. Jeremy
McCall,   261-1987.	
LIVE AT THE DEKE HOUSE.
Quiet study accommodations, complete facilities, best meals on
campus.   Call  Jamie,   224-9691.
WANTED: ONE MALE BOARDER
to live one block of Campus. Room
and board, no booze, no broads.
Phone   224-0413.
Furn.  Houses  &  Apts.
83
Help Wanted—
Male or Female
53
STUDENT TO LIVE IN. FREE
room and board in exchange for
babysitting. Granville & 25th. Ph.
733-4849.
INSTRUCTION
Music
62
Special Classes
63
SPECIAL CLASSES OF ENTER-
tainment at the Campus Pop Festival Friday, January 17. Advanced
tickets available at the AMS office
for  $2.00.
Tutoring
64
LAW   STUDENTS  BY   EX-LECTUR-
er.   Practicing   Barrister.   224-0443.
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR  SALE
71
300 MM L E N T A R LENSE 1.5.5
screw of bayonet mount and case.
$40.   224-9017,   room   424.
2 GREEN-CHEEKED AMAZON PAR-
rots; 1 male, 1 female, $300 with
cages or will trade for second-hand
car.   Call   Ken   732-8074.
WARM RACOON SKIN COAT. LIKE
new. Medium size, silk lined. Worth
$175.00,   sell   $55.00   . 224-4597.
MUNTZ 4 & 8 TRACK TAPE PLAY-
er. Davis reverb, 9 tapes, sacrifice
— all   for   $120.   Phone   988-3067.
HEAD COMPETITION GS SKIS,
215C Stroltz deluxe racer boots, 8%,
excellent condition. Must sell. Ph.
263-9188.
PAIR LeERAPEUR ELITE PRO SKI
boots, good shape, $60.00 or offer.
Hagstrom semi-acoustic guitar, 3
mo. old, new $235.00, sell $200.00 or
offer. Yamaha, 40 watt amp, 5 mo.
old, $150.00 with est.  pkt.    738-7462.
MALE STUDENT WANTED TO
share furnished apartment in Wes'
End   with   two  of   same.   688-9190.
LEGAL SUITE — SELF-CONTAIN-
ed. Great view. Sen. or Grad. Male
to share with 2 others. 3rd & Tolmie.
224-1935.	
COMFORTABLE SELF-CONTAINED
basement suite available immediately. All facilities. South Granville.
Suit two sharing. $75 monthly.
Phone   266-6668.	
WANTED, GIRL TO SHARE FURN-
ished apt. Senior student preferred,
please.   Call  733-5132.	
FEMALE STUDENT WANTED TO
share furnished home, 5 min. from
UBC. Own bedroom $65 month.
Available   Jan.   20,   228-9105.	
COUPLE WOULD LIKE TO SHARE
apartment or house with same.
Phone  Terry or Barbl,  522-0400.
2 MALE SENIOR STUDENTS, PRE-
ferably Law II, wanted to share
my  house.   731-4441,   685-4924.
MALE OVER 21 TO SHARE WITH
4 others, warm beautiful 5-bedroom
house, w.w. etc. No restrictions.
Priv. ent. All found except food,
$75.    228-8040.
UBC STUDENT WITH WIFE AND
5-month-old baby needs modest
furnished suite. Wife is a registered nurse and will babysit. Call
to Mr. Kim at 224-9662, between
5:00-7:00  p.m.         	
FURNISHED ROOM. SHARE KIT-
chen, bathroom with another student. Grad. senior student preferred.   Call   738-2850.
SHARE HOUSE WITH 3 OTHER
students until June. Own bedroom.
Female   over   21.   Phone   876-6652.
WANTED: RESPONSIBLE MALE
student over 21 to share furnished
hi-rise apartment on English Bay.
Ph.   682-6536.
BUY — SELL — RENT
WITH UBYSSEY
CLASSIFIED

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