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The Ubyssey Nov 27, 2014

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Array THE
UBYSSEY
CANADA'S
SMARTEST
KM
Braden Lauer outperformed other finalists
in order to win the CBC television series // Page 2
EVENTS        V THISWEEK, CHECK!
THURSDAY '   27
BETHECHANGE
4:30 - 6:00 P.M. @ LARGE ASSEMBLY HALL, HILLEL HOUSE
Join UBC president Arvind Gupta and chair ofthe non-profit organization
VIDYAin a discussion ofthe empowerment of women and youth in India
through mentorship with UBC students. Free
FRIDAY     /     28
LAST DAY OF CLASSES
POLAR BEAR SWIM!
x^Prf^Ssf^-
»^m
m-
POLAR BEAR SWIM
3:00 P.M. ©WRECK BEACH
Take part in UBC's (unofficial) annual polar bear swim. It's a great and chilly
way to celebrate the last day of classes and (hopefully) a short respite before
exams. Free
FRIDAY    '    28
THE CALENDERS ANNUAL CHRISTMAS PARTY
9:00 P.M. @ MANCHESTER PUBLIC EATERY
The Calendar is hosting its annual Christmas party at the Manchester this Friday. Dress up, bring your friends and celebrate the beginning ofthe holiday
season and with a live band and a DJ. $5 Early Bird, $10~$15
ON
THE
COVER
I felt my IQ was either getting
higher or lower. I'm not sure
which. Photo -Cherihan Hassun
Want to see your events listed here?
Email your events listings to
ourcampus@ubyssey.ca.
^THEUBYSSEY
NOVEMBER 27, 2014 | VOLUMEXCVI | ISSUEXXV
BUSINESS CONTACT
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:u lture@ubyssey.es
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OUR CAMPUS//
ONE ON ONE WITH THE PEOPLE AND BUILDINGSTHAT
PHOTO CHERIHAN HASSUN/THE UBYSSEY
Kull has lived alone in the wilderness and was recently arrested for protesting the Kinder Morgan pipeline expansion.
Prof Bob Kull is a naturalist, activist and nonconformist
Austen Erhardt
Opinions & Blog Editor
Bob Kull is a UBC professor of
interdisciplinary studies who
flunked out of Berkeley, lived in
complete solitude on a Chilean island for a year, and, as of Saturday,
has an arrest record.
Kull grew up in California, in
an academically minded family.
After taking a year off to hitchhike
around the USA following high
school, Kull enrolled in University
of California - Berkeley — and
found himself completely ill at ease
with the atmosphere.
"The only two courses I passed
were fencing and modern dance,"
Kull said.
After dropping out, Kull moved
to Canada to avoid conscription
in the Vietnam War. He studied
photography in Edmonton, for a
time, and eventually ended up in
B.C., where he worked as a maintenance worker, logger, tree planter
and firefighter.
My whole focus shifted
— the animal whose
behaviour I'm really
interested in studying
is myself. What are
the effects of long
wilderness solitude on
a human being?"
Bob Kull
UBC interdisciplinary studies prof
and pipeline protester
When he was 28, Kull lived in
isolation in Tweedsmuir Park for
three months. After he returned,
he signed up to volunteer in the
Dominican Republic, teaching
organic vegetable gardening.
"In having avoided the draft, I
felt as if I'd avoided a really important social obligation. Not to go kill
people, but to participate in our
common world — and not just for
my own life."
He spent nine years in the Dominican Republic, teaching vegetable gardening and conducting
first aid after a hurricane hit the
area. He then became involved
with water sports, and taught
diving for a time on the coast, until
a serious motorcycle accident led to
him being hospitalized in Montreal
for nearly a year. After his release
from the hospital and the loss of
both his leg and his livelihood, Kull
began his studies at McGill.
Kull graduated with a dual
degree in psychology and biology,
with a minor in environmental
science and won an NSERC fellowship to go on in biology.
"By this time I had really shifted
the way I was looking at the world.
It started with my first long retreat
into solitude when I was in my late
20s. The world wasn't just a collection of separate things and times
— it was really a transformation of
consciousness. There's this underlying unity of which all organisms
are a manifestation."
Kull put his studies on hold and
travelled to South America, eventually deciding to study interdisciplinary studies at UBC.
Though he started his research
by studying organisms in the
conventional way, Kull eventually
came to the realization that he
wanted to bring himself into the
research he was conducting.
I was resisting what
is so often counselled:
It's just a dissertation'
... just write it and get
on with your life...
then you'll do your real
work!' And I said, 'no —
this is my real work...
this is my life.'"
Bob Kull
"My whole focus shifted — the
animal whose behaviour I'm
really interested in studying is
myself. What are the effects of long
wilderness solitude on a human
being?"
Kull had passed by the isolated
coast of Chile on a ferry during
his travels and was struck by
its natural beauty. Once he had
determined that he would go into
the wilderness, he thought back to
Chile, and decided to spend a year
on the island there — 100 miles
from other people.
"Whether you're there a month
or a year, you have to deal with
what comes up day by day. There
was a lot of physical pain — I hurt
myself badly, several times... had
to pull a tooth. A lot of spiritual and
emotional challenges," Kull said.
When he returned to Vancouver
with 900 pages of notes, Kull found
himself at a standstill in his thesis,
for a time.
"I was resisting what is so often
counselled: 'it's just a dissertation,'
or 'it's just a master's thesis' — just
write it and get on with your life...
then you'll do your real work!' And
I said, 'no — this is my real work...
this is my life.'"
Eventually, the media caught
wind of his experiences and Kull's
generally solitary life became inundated with newspaper interviews
and TV and radio appearances.
After receiving his PhD, he
started teaching systems thinking
at Royal Roads University and,
four years ago, UBC invited him to
teach a course in interdisciplinary
studies. Kull has always worked
part time, and currently lives in a
250 square foot Kitsilano basement
suite.
"My time is more valuable to
me than money.... Nice things just
don't matter to me. If you ask the
question, 'how much do you need?'
The answer seems to be... 'we need
more.'"
Over the past few weeks, Kull
has been a frequent visitor of Burnaby Mountain, protesting Kinder
Morgan's proposed pipeline expansion. On Nov. 22, Kull crossed
into the injunction zone and was
arrested by the RCMP.
"I've felt for a considerable
length of time now, that given what
I know... about climate change, I
don't live and I don't see very many
people living as if it were real. We
just keep doing what we're doing,"
Kull said. "When the police did
show up [on the mountain], there
was a sense that this was just not
right, and that I needed to stand up
somehow."
Kull was released from jail the
same day as his arrest — his court
date set for January — and has
already resumed protesting. He
wrote a letter to the Vancouver
Observer detailing the courteous
behaviour ofthe RCMP during his
arrest and the generally cordial relationship that he and many other
protesters have had with the police
on Burnaby Mountain.
"My sense is that, finally, there
are no angels or demons. We're all
embedded in a really dysfunctional system. A system that allows
Kinder Morgan to exist," Kull said.
"The way the system is set up, we
all need petroleum to survive. It's
not that 'these guys are good and
these guys are bad'. It's that we
all need to wake up... and make
long-term, fundamental changes in
our relationship with the environment and with ourselves. That's
the fundamental reason I go up to
the mountain: the sense ofthe long
process of standing up for my own
vision of wakingup. Maybe I'm
right, maybe I'm wrong — it's
just what I feel called to do." 31 // News
EDITORS JOVANAVRANIC +VERONIKA BONDARENKO
STUDENTS»
Canada's smartest person is a UBC Law student
Despite tough competition Braden Lauer won the first season of CBC's new game show
Lyra Fok
Contributor
On the night of Sunday, Nov. 23,
golden sparks showered upon
UBC Law student Braden Lauer
to mark his victory in the season
finale of CBC television series
Canada's Smartest Person.
Lauer outperformed other
finalists including a fighter pilot,
home-schooled orthopedic surgery
resident and a spoken word poet.
Currently in his second year
at UBC Law, Lauer applied to be
a contestant on the show on a
whim, following a bad final exam
in Constitutional Law, he said.
After being selected as one of
the top 32 contestants, he joined
the program production in Toronto over the summer and kept
quiet about the results until the
final broadcast.
According to Lauer, he thought
being on television would be easy,
but he turned out to be wrong.
"It was much more stressful
[than school and work]. The host
would say the same things four
times in a roll so they could take
the same shot from different angles, and you had to answer all the
questions four times," he said.
It was a strange "stop and start
feeling," having to repeat himself
in front of the cameras, Lauer
said; especially in contrast to the
Wfc-lf
Braden Lauer was the very first winner of the CBC's new television series, Canada's Smartest Person.
=HOTO CHERIHAN HASSUN/THE UBYSSEY
one-take challenges that were
also shot as part ofthe show.
The series, which aims to redefine what it means to be smart,
pits contestants against each
other in a series of games to test
six types of intelligence: musical,
physical, social, logical, visual
and linguistic. This categorization of intelligence is based
on the Multiple Intelligences
Theory of Harvard University
professor Howard Gardner.
This set of unconventional criteria led to contestants improvising songs using randomly shown
lyrics, advocating for cities to
become Canada's new capital
and stacking cups into towers.
In the finale, Lauer raced past
his fellow contestant, Johnny
McRae, a Vancouver spoken word
poet, in a giant gauntlet before
claiming the title.
Lauer said his experience
with the show was an exciting
and positive one. He expressed
appreciation for how the competition was able to showcase the
diversity of people's intelligence.
"You can apply yourself in
different ways, not just in logical
means," he said.
He was also impressed by the
diversity ofthe contestants.
"It's something CBC sometimes
maybe struggle to do, but they
really found 32 people across Canada from different walks of life ...
and brought them together," said
Lauer. "It's kinda cool showcase
for anyone who watched to see
what's out there in Canada, how
many special people we have and
how proud we can be of having
these people in the country."
Off-screen, getting to know
the contestants and the producers was another perk ofthe
show for Lauer, who said he is
doing his best to stay in touch
with many ofthe contestants and
production crew.
Since Sunday's season finale,
Lauer has been busy looking at
feedback from the show's audience, which he claims has been
80 to 90 per cent positive so far.
"I'm excited about the whole
show," he said. "I hope it sticks
around. I would totally love to
watch it again."
Lauer is now back at school,
studying for finals just like any
other UBC student, only now, he
has the title of "Canada's smartest
person" to serve as motivation. Xi
NEWS BRIEFS
Fire alarms force students
to evacuate
Two fire alarms went off this
week, causing evacuations of two
major UBC spaces.
At 11 a.m. on November 24, the
SUB was evacuated after a fire
alarm went off due to a minor
accident in the construction area
in the building's basement.
Two days later, on November
26, another alarm went off around
10:30 a.m. in the Henry Angus
building, causing hundreds of
students and staff to evacuate.
The fire department was not
available to comment by press
time.
UNA community centre robbed
The University Neighbourhoods
Association's (UNA) Old Barn
Community Centre on Thunderbird Blvd. was broken into on the
night of Sunday, Nov. 23.
According to a media release,
some $20,000 worth of equipment
was stolen from the centre.
The UNA is asking the public
to send in any tips they have that
may help determine the suspect
ofthe break-in.
UBC searches for new VP Finance
A broadcast email was sent out on
November 26 informing university
students and staff of UBC's search
for a VP Finance candidate.
Former VP Finance Pierre Ouillet
left UBC in September. Since then,
administration has been planning
to reform the position to separate it
from the Resources and Operations
sector "to ensure that the next VP
Finance focuses fully on the financial affairs [of UBC]," accordingto
the broadcast message.
A committee has been put
together to sift through nominations, which may be submitted by
anyone around the world. tJ
ALUMNI»
Businesspeople, humanitarians and leaders honoured with alumni awards
Veronika Bondarenko
News Editor
UBC recently held an awards
ceremony to honour achievements
of seven influential alumni and
community members.
Alumni UBC, which brings
together UBC graduates and the
university, organized its annual alumni UBC Achievement
Awards ceremony on November
17. This year's recipients included
doctors, social justice advocates
and computer programmers.
Karolin Konig, alumni relations coordinator at alumni UBC,
said that the awards are a way to
celebrate and recognize some of
the most interesting and inspiring people at UBC.
"We honour seven members
ofthe UBC community who
have done extraordinary things
through different activities and
have connected to the university,
as well as tying up to the larger
local, global and international
community to create positive
change and affect people in inspiring ways," said Konig.
This year, the UBC alumni who
were recognized at the ceremony
included Leona Sparrow, the
Director of Treaty, Lands and Resources for the Musqueam Indian
Band, and John Demco, the creator
ofthe original .CA domain name.
The award winners are selected from public nominations to
categories for alumni as well as
current students and faculty.
Once nominations close in January, an awards selection committee chooses the winner for each
ofthe seven categories.
"[The awards are] honouring
people who are connected to the
UBC community in a meaningful
way, really honouring not only
their commitment to the UBC
community but also celebrating
the positive change that they have
made in the world," said Konig.
Alumni UBC holds an awards ceremony each year to honour its most notable alumni.
Alumnus Videsh Kapoor and
current Faculty of Surgery Clinical
Instructor Kimit Rai both received
awards for establishing health organizations that aim to bring medical aid to remote and poverty-stricken areas in developing countries.
Recent UBC Law graduate Emily McKinnon received the Young
Alumnus Award for her research
and volunteer work with people
who are living with HIV/AIDS.
The remaining two awards
went out to Randall Findlay,
=HOTO WILL MCDONALD/THE UBYSSEY
the co-founder ofthe Provident
Energy Trust, and Matt Husain,
a current PhD student who has
spent six years working at the
World Bank Group and started
up numerous humanitarian and
poverty-reduciton initiatives. Xi NEWS    I   THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 27, 2014
MEDICINE »
Erasing Alzheimer's with millions in munitions
HFE PHOTO JOSH CURRAN/THE UBYSSEY
Over $4 million in funding was awarded to UBC professors for Alzheimer's research.
Veronika Bondarenko
News Editor
Degeneration of the brain is
about to become the focus of
much more research.
Three UBC professors will
receive more than $4 million in
grant funding to continue their
study of Alzheimer's disease.
The grant has been made with
the aim of supporting research
on Alzheimer's disease, a form of
dementia that affects over 70,000
people in B.C.
Organizations that have contributed include Brain Canada,
the Michael Smith Foundation
for Health Research, Genome
B.C. and The Pacific Alzheimer
Research Foundation.
B.C. Health Minister Terry Lake
said that this research will be an important step in researching and possibly developing an eventual cure.
"Government is committed to supporting those living
with dementia and recognizes
the importance of research
and working collaboratively in
finding a cure," Lake said in a
news release.
James Johnson, an associate
professor in the department of
cellular and psychological sciences, will receive $1.05 million
in funding to study the ways that
insulin production affects Alzheimer's patients.
Christian Naus, also a professor in the department of cellular
and psychological sciences, will
receive $1.5 million to develop
drugs that can help preserve
neurons that are responsible for
brain degeneration.
Neurology professor Neil
Cashman will also receive $1.5
million to develop better diagnostic and treatment options for
Alzheimer's patients.
Along with two more Alzheimer's researchers from SFU,
these professors will use the
money from the grant to help the
medical community develop a better understanding of Alzheimer's.
Alzheimer's advocate Jim
Mann said the research that will
be generated by these professor
is expected to make a lasting difference in the lives of people who
are affected by the disease.
"These research projects are
key to advancing therapies and
diagnostic tools for people with
Alzheimer's disease and other
forms of dementia," said Mann.
"Investment into research is
critical to our struggle and offers
us greater hope than before." Xi
DIVERSITY »
Really? campaign hopes to encourage students to speak up against discrimination
being a member of any of these
groups," said Rowe.
The campaign is meant to
encourage students to be active bystanders who speak up when they
encounter situations when people
make discriminatory comments.
On a larger scale, the campaign
hopes to open up conversation
on how discrimination against
someone's race, gender, sexual
orientation or ethnicity can be
perpetuated in small ways.
"We've all witnessed related toxic
behaviours both on and off campus,
but it's hard for people to respond to
them because they don't think they
know how or they're afraid ofthe
possible repercussions," said Rowe.
The campaign's primary focus
involves holding interactive workshops where participants learn how
to speak up in a safe and effective
way when they encounter these
types of situations.
"Participants will learn what
they, as bystanders, can do when
they witness these types of scenarios and the skills required to intervene with them," said Rowe.
Rowe also said that the name
of the campaign was meant to
reflect a phrase that could be
used to call out a problematic
comment or behaviour.
"Since the program emphasizes
questioning negative behaviours,
we wanted our name to reflect
that," said Rowe. "'Really?' in
itself can be used as a phrase to
help bystanders point out prejudicial situations," said Rowe.
Access & Diversity also
recruits student leaders who
lead and organize these types of
workshops throughout the year
and, in doing so, teach their peers
how to speak up against instances of prejudice and inequality in
everyday situations. tJ
=HOTOVERONIQUEDEBORD-FAZARO/FFICKR
The Really? campaign aims to teach students how to be active bystanders.
Vicki Chow
Contributor
Access & Diversity's Really? campaign hopes to encourage students
to speak up about the discrimination
that they see in their everyday lives.
The campaign is devoted to
promoting respect for UBC's
diverse community by teaching individuals to respond to
discrimination that they witness
instead of walking away.
CJ Rowe, diversity advisor-women for UBC Access &
Diversity, said that program had its
beginnings in January 2011 when
guest speaker Jackson Katz gave
a talk on how people can begin to
break the cycle of silence when it
comes to violence against women.
Accordingto Rowe, the
campaign started with the idea
that small and seemingly benign
behaviours such as sexist jokes
can all contribute to a culture of
violence and discrimination.
"The idea ofthe campaign
was sparked by those issues but
expanded to incorporate all types
of diversity, including race and
sexual orientation, and the discrimination that goes along with
BOARD OF GOVERNORS »
BoG briefs: sports medicine, life
sciences and quantum matter
Jovana Vranic &
Veronika Bondarenko
News Editors
On Tuesday, Nov. 25, UBC's Board
of Governors met for their last
standing committee meeting of
2014. The majority ofthe meeting
was held in camera.
Here is a summary ofthe three
motions that were passed during
the brief open session.
ADVANCED MATERIALS
& PROCESS ENGINEERING
LABORATORY
The Quantum Matter Institute
(QMI) is expanding to open a new,
state-of-the-art, research lab.
The project will be contributing to the university's goals to
strengthen and expand research
opportunities, and, as the Board
documents state, "make UBC one
of — if not the — world leaders in
quantum materials research."
AMPEL has a final budget of
$27.2 million, with construction
costs coming in $2 million above
the previous proposal presented
to the Board.
It is being developed in partnership with the Max Planck
Society and the Canada Excellence Research Chair (CERC) in
Quantum Materials and Devices,
held by Harvard materials scientist Jenny Hoffman.
Designs and tender documents
have recently been completed,
and the majority ofthe project is ready to head into the
construction phase.
The site ofthe addition will
stretch the Brimacombe building
to the end ofthe Engineering
Lane block, to East Mall.
UBC is planning to have construction of AMPEL completed
by July 2016.
LIFE SCIENCES TEACHING
LABS RENEWAL
UBC will be spending $80 million on renewing and expanding
the Biological Sciences complex
to open new, better equipped
teaching labs to replace the ones
in the BioSciences centre, North
wing, Wesbrook and D.H. Copp
buildings. It will also address
seismic risk associated with the
three buildings.
At the November meeting, the
Board approved a funding release
of $5.5 million to finish up design
drawings and tender documents,
after which final plans for construction will be brought to the
standing committee.
The provincial government
has pledged $21.25 million
toward the project through the
Ministry of Advanced Education.
The remainder of funding is
slated to come out of UBC's Central Operating Budget and Trek
Endowment Fund.
As part ofthe project, the General Services and Administraion
(GSAB) building is also going to
be demolished to provide a site
for further development in the
Wesbrook Mall area.
The GSAB and Copp sites will
serve to generate development
revenue by shifting two university housing projects from
Wesbrook Place to the academic
lands of centre campus. The new
buildings in place of GSAB and
Copp are expected to take the
form of mixed use complexes.
These developments will provide revenue for the endowment
funds and the Trek spending
account, which will, in turn, fund
the teaching labs loan.
CHAN GUNN SPORTS
MEDICINE PAVILION
The Board also approved the initial plans for a new Sports Medicine Centre, to be located between
the Doug Mitchell Thunderbird
Sports Centre and Robert F. Osborne Centre, by the Thunderbird
fields.
The new centre will replace
the current building, which is
scheduled to be torn down in June
2015 to make room for the centre
that will become a joint training
facility between UBC and the
Vancouver Whitecaps.
The new space will house
offices, research labs and clinical
facilities for sports injuries.
The Board also approved an
initial funding release of $500,000
in order to hire a consultant who
will begin working on the initial
designs for the building.
Thanks to a $5 million naming
donation, the centre is proposed
to be named the 'Chan Gunn
Pavillion,' after the president of
the Institute for the Study and
Treatment of Pain and member of
the Order of Canada. Xi
c
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4t counse ingatvanwest.com II Culture I
JENICA MONTGOMERY
ART»
#westcoastbestcoast questions representations of west coast landscapes
PHOTO CHERIHAN HASSUN/THE UBYSSEY
One of the paintings on exhibit in the #westcoastbestcoast collection is Molly Lam Bobak's Fishboatsatthe Mouth ofthe Fraser.
Olivia Law
Senior StaffWriter
Search the hashtag #westcoast-
bestcoast on almost any social
media platform — Instagram,
Tumblr, Twitter, Pinterest — and
you'll be bombarded with a swarm
of photos promoting the beauty of
our edge ofthe continent.
And why not? All of us living
in Vancouver know how blessed
we are — where else in the world
can you be within an hour of the
beach, the mountains and the
city? The celebratory hat tip we
use to revel in the privilege of
living in such a naturally beautiful, sublime landscape is used to
accompany landscape pictures of
the west coast of British Columbia, Washington, Oregon and
California, as a teasing nudge to
our more eastern fellow Canadians as they battle snow, ice
and storms.
The AMS Permanent Collection in the SUB's Art Gallery is
entitled just this: #westcoast-
bestcoast. The cheeky nod to the
materialism of our time is effect
ively used to show the changes in
our landscape and the portrayal
ofthe increased industrialization
over time.
Curated by UBC's Erin
Watkins, #westcoastbestcoast
is a case study exploring the
increasingly problematic issues
surrounding the idealistic
representation ofthe west coast
landscape through progression
of time, technology and popular style. The famous 'Group of
Seven' artists, known for their
iconic landscape paintings are
criticized for the reinforcement
of 'terra nullius' — presenting the
nation as an area of untouched
nature, pristine and unseen
by human eyes — when in fact
the areas of land depicted in
their works have been dominated and changed by humans
for centuries.
One work in the #westcoast-
bestcoast exhibition is entitled
"Development #1", by Vancouver
artist Roy Arden. His work featured all over the world, Arden
is focused largely on industrialization ofthe natural environment. His work which is featured
in #westcoastbestcoast shows
human development completely
annihilating the once beautiful
natural landscape. The emotional
message is strengthened by the
intense realism of his work. It
could be suggested that Arden
wanted the title of his work, "Development #1", to highlight the
fact that there is no end to the
destruction ofthe earth — this
site is just one of many.
Another work in the collection again makes the viewer
ponder the 'naturalization' of
a landscape. Ron Tran's "It
Knows Not What It Is" piece is
not a landscape, it is an applique
stick on a banner. The removal
of this stick from its natural
world is a subtle reminder ofthe
destruction of our earth. This
certainly provokes thought into
the concept of #westcoastbest-
coast — how can something be
'the best' when we are changing
it, adapting it, taking everything
natural and making our sublime
landscape artificial. The title of
this work also places blame ofthe
natural world onto the viewer,
or the people, which perhaps
brings about a reflection into
the new generations. If the stick
is removed from the landscape,
changing the natural beauty,
what will be left for the children
of the future? The stick may not
know what it is, but neither will
the next generation.
There is one First Nations
piece in the exhibition, an untitled work by Lawrence Paul
Yuxweluptun, an internationally
renowned political, environmental and cultural documenter.
His work revokes a traditional
Salish style, but is broken up
with large, imposing numbers
and patterns, suggesting the
intrusive presence ofthe western
colonizers. The juxtaposing colours and patterns is suggested,
as per the accompanying plaque,
to be a 'jab' at the construction of
UBC, a place of learning, on the
Musqueam territories.
Lawren S. Harris's "Mountain
Spirit" evokes a strong sense of
spirituality in the viewer. Based
upon the Northern Lights, Harris
fuses elements of earth, water
and sky into a unified depiction
of the world. Contrasted with
strong, geometric motifs, however, there is a definite underlying tone of futurism which
contrasts from the traditional
sublimity ofthe west coast.
Although many ofthe pieces in
the #westcoastbestcoast collection demonstrate an approach
akin to the realism of the 'Group
of Seven', several ofthe works
are moving towards abstraction
— highlighting the abstract view
we have of this popular hashtag.
Coming away from the exhibit,
one is filled with thoughts of a
conscious nature — why are we
so keen to change this beautiful
landscape of which we appear to
be so proud? tJ
BOOK»
Hooked leaves readers fishing for realistic characters
UBC alum Michael Hetherington's new thriller is about main character Adrian as he falls in passionless love with Mandy.
Gabriel Germaix
Senior StaffWriter
It is a common trait of revered
novels for the characters to feel real
and alive to the reader. However
UBC alumnus Michael Hetherington's thriller Hooked — released in
October — fails to achieve this key
literary device.
Adrian, an accomplished
outdoorsy vancouverite, meets similarly outdoorsy Mandy when the
young woman rescues him as he is
entangled in a fish line whose hook
lodged itself under his skin. From
there evolves a passionless romance
that spans over a handful of days
where the not-so-happy couple
hikes, sails and swims almost without talking to each other. All the
while he is followed and threatened
by Mandy's ex and two mysterious
oarsmen in a rowboat, Adrian's
future is cloudy at best.
Hetherington fails to make his
characters endearing to readers,
they lack redeeming features to
compensate for their flaws, and
the reader is left unsympathetic to
their cause.
Adrian is too little developed
for the reader to bond and start
taking an interest in his endeavours. Hetherington himself found
no connection between his own
personality and any of his characters.
"No, I do not [feel close to the
characters], I made them up," said
Hetherington. Adrian's overall
personality seems to lack coherence, missing something that we
can relate to in order to turn him
from a product of words into a
product of flesh.
=HOTO CHERIHAN HASSUN /THE UBYSSEY
Hooked appears to leave aside
the potential interest that character
development could arouse in the
reader, and instead trades it for
action scenes that follow each other
at a reasonable pace. The book
throws its main characters into
realistic scenes of tension while
they are still sketches, not taking
advantage ofthe pressure exerted
on a reader who fears something
bad will happen to their favourite
hero.
Hetherington created the background of his character while writ
ing. "It kind of came up as I went
along," the author said. Hetherington opted to create the characters as
he wrote the story rather than develop them and reveal the character
throughout the story.
The book was written in less
than two months, a short time if we
consider the complexity of setting
up a plot and its characters. "The
story all poured it out of me in about
seven and a half weeks," said Hetherington, adding "I wrote at a daily
quota of about 3,000 words a day."
This impressive rhythm reassured
the coherence ofthe novel's action
scenes.
Editors' cuts nonetheless
prevented Hetherington from
tying together the plot. "When I
first wrote the book... the final
scene was about at least twice as
long, if not three times as long,
and it was a lot more gruesome,"
said Hetherington.
It also had the consequence of
gathering characters that seemed to
have almost no relation to one another. Once edited, the climax ofthe
thriller simply leaves a number of
questions, as secondary characters
who hover around Adrian end up
never stepping fully into the story.
One could say this adds to the
mystery, it could also push the reader to shrug their shoulders without
looking for an explanation they
know cannot be guessed anywhere
in the book.
With lacklustre characters and
an anticlimactic ending, Hooked is
a pleasant read past the oddness of
some of its scenes, but does not immerse the reader due to a depiction
of action and characters. tJ CULTURE    I    THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 27, 2014
BOARDGAMES»
UBC alumni create zombie apocalypse board game Escape from Sunset Island
Ubyssey editors and writers had an opportunity to try out the game with one of its creators, Robert Straker.
Lawrence Neal Garcia
Senior StaffWriter
WARNING: Will push human nature to its limits.
It's the cautionary notice on Escape from Sunset Island, a board
game — a zombie apocalypse
simulator to be exact — created
by two brothers and UBC alumni,
Robert and Daniel Straker.
The game has one objective: get
off the island before you become
a zombie. And although the
gameplay is simple — it uses basic
tokens, intuitive mechanics and
a straightforward layout -- the
interplay is much more complex.
The idea for the game came to
Robert Straker while he was working at a before-and-after school care
center, where he would routinely
think up games for the kids to
play. Although not a board game
junkie himself — though by his own
admission, he probably plays more
than the average person -- Straker
thought of making a simple zom-
bie-themed one that the kids could
play on Halloween.
Two years later, with the help
of his brother Daniel, he turned
that initial idea into what is now
Escape from Sunset Island —
doing everything from learning
Photoshop, finding a manufacturer and starting a small
Kickstarter project, to make it a
reality.
The game is currently in
its first production run of
500 units.
With six character cards (plus
a zombie card), resource items
(food, water, gas), weapons and
more, the game — which can be
learned in just a few minutes —
quickly comes together in a race
for survival.
=HOTO CHERIHAN HASSUN/THE UBYSSEY
Unlike in most games however,
the focus of Escape from Sunset
Island is more about avoiding the
zombies than it is about killing
them (though there are opportunities to do so, with chainsaws,
guns and the like). In that sense,
the zombie angle — in itself not a
novel idea — is somewhat peripheral to the game itself.
"It's just a good game whether
they are zombies are not. Lots
of games rely on the zombies
to carry it. But... you could call
them coyotes if you wanted," said
Straker.
The game is also what Straker
describes as "co-petitive," a blend
of cooperative and competitive
gameplay rather than strictly one
or the other. Beyond the zombie
setup, it's the group dynamics
that result from this approach
that liven the game, ensuring a
different experience each time.
"You're not told whether to cooperate or compete ...
Some people just assume it's
cooperative; some people don't,"
said Straker. "You're just trying to
get off the island, so you can do it
however you want."
It's also why the game, while simple in framework, is more complex
than it would seem.
"It's always different. And that's
what makes it interesting for me
to play with people still, I get to
see how people approach it," said
Straker, who recounted games
with people who simply shot each
other and where no one survived, or others where the players
counted it a victory if even just one
person escaped.
In that respect, the game is less
about the zombies, and more about
how people react to them.
And like the best of games, it's
harder to win than one might think,
requiring a good mix of strategy
and luck. It also often requires some
form of cooperation for success —
whether players realize it or not.
This element also speaks to the
underlying philosophy ofthe game,
which Straker summed up with a
line from Robert Frost's The Tuft of
Flowers: "'Men work together,' I told
him from the heart, / Whether they
work together or apart.'"
Escape from Sunset Island is certain to delight gamers and non-gamers alike. Whether they'll actually
escape or not is a different question
entirely. Xi
BEER»
Campus has a new
watering hole: BierCraft
Jenica Montgomery
Culture Editor
A new pub opened on campus —
and it wants you to know it's not
just a drinking joint. BierCraft
has been an anticipated new
addition to campus since last
April. They opened their doors to
the public in early November.
Joining the ranks of Koerners
pub, Mahony & Sons and — of
course — the Pit pub, BierCraft
offers a comfortable environment
that's not just for getting your
Friday night drink on. From the
separate dining rooms to the
menu, BierCraft makes it known
that it is restaurant, not a pub
or bar.
Staying true to its name,
BierCraft offers a wide array of
beers, both on tap and bottled,
for patrons to try. For those who
are adventurous beer drinkers,
the restaurant has both bottled
domestic craft beer and imported
craft beer — mostly from Belgium
and Germany. Though not the
largest international beer collection, the restaurant provides a
good starting point for beginner
beer connoisseurs.
The spirits drink menu, as
expected from a beer-centric
restaurant, is sparse but has the
basics: mojitos, caesars, etc. So
if beer isn't your drink of choice
BierCraft still has you covered.
The restaurant is divided into
two sections — a separate dining
section for all ages and a bier
house themed section where
minors must be accompanied by
an adult. Both sections serve the
same food and drinks, making
the only real difference the
aesthetic ambiance ofthe two
segments. The bier house themed
section ofthe restaurant has
high ceilings, wood pillars and
stained glass lining the top ofthe
bar, catering to the Belgium bier
house aesthetic.
BierCraft has a surprisingly
large menu. From burgers to
muscles to charcuterie platters;
Biercraft doesn't lack in culinary
options. However, beer and wing
lovers beware — BierCraft does
not offer the wing selection that
many other pubs do. Hot wing
and beer lovers will find better
deals elsewhere.
It comes as no surprise that
the feel of BierCraft is warm and
inviting, however, it is slightly
expensive for what a student
would reasonably spend on a beer
and some poutine.
Whether you're looking for
an international beer or a casual
dinner with friends, BierCraft
will most likely have something
suitable for a hungry and thirsty
university student. tJ
Notice of Development Permit Application - DP 14036
Public Open House
National Soccer Development Centre
You are invited to attend an Open House on Wednesday, December 3 to view and comment on
the proposed new National Soccer Development Centre located within Thunderbird Park in the
Athletics Precinct.
Date:
Place:
Wednesday, December3,2014 4:30 - 6:00 PM
Commons Room, MBA House, 3385 Wesbrook Mall
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Plans will be displayed for the proposed new
3,400m2 National Soccer Development Centre,
a joint project between UBC Athletics and the
Vancouver Whitecaps Football Club.
Representatives from the project team and
Campus + Community Planning will be available
to provide information and respond to inquiries
about this project.
An update will also be provided on the Thunderbird Park Precinct Plan.
For more information on this project, please visit:
plannine.ubc.ca/vancouver/projects-consultations
For further information: i-i
Please direct questions to Karen Russell •—'
Manager Development Services
karen.russell@ubc.ca   604-822-1586
This event is wheelchair accessible.
This notice contains important information which may affect you. Please ask someone to translate it for you.
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a place of mind
THE  UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
campus+community planning // Opinions
LAST WORDS »
EDITORIAL »
LAST WORDS//
BOG MAY NOT BE
ELECTED, BUT THEY
SHOULD STILL BE
REPRESENTATIVE
On Tuesday morning, our news
editor made her way on over to
the Isabel Maclnnes room in
the Gage commonsblock to sit in
on the last Board of Governors
standing committee meeting
of 2014.
However, she had to put the
live-tweeting on hold as guests
to the meeting were shooed
out while the Board discussed
the first two motions on their
agenda, including one on
international tuition.
The meeting wasn't open to
the public until 10:30 a.m., nearly
an hour after its scheduled start
time. Once everyone settled in,
administrators chatted about new
development proposals on campus for a half hour before moving
into closed session once again.
While it's true that the Board
does have the power to change
their meeting agendas whenever
necessary, this isn't exactly the
best policy.
Transparency should be, and
is, one of UBC's top priorities.
But with the massive tides of
criticism crashing administration in light of their recent fee
increase proposals, students
are making clear their need for
more openness.
Being able to adjust to circumstances through methods
like altering agendas at the last
minute is an important power for
the BoG to have — but it also is a
power that has the potential to
be abused. Especially in regard
to controversial topics like fee
increases.
Government transparency is
a fundamental aspect of democracy, and when the federal government of a country seems to be
more open than a government of
a university of 50,000 (relatively)
politically engaged, or at least
informed, people there's a problem. Representative democracy
is a point that Canada and many
other developed nations pride
themselves on. One would hope
that the BoG would at least try to
appear to live up to this standard
of representation by openly discussing issues that their constituents care about.
RIDICULOUS ASSERTIONS
OF REVERSE RACISM
A UBC history professor has
become another target of Brad
Saltzberg, a man who has gained
quite a reputation for sending out
anti-Chinese and anti-immigration letters to various Vancouver
organizations. A few days ago,
Saltzberg started a petition that
demands that Henry Yu, who
teaches Asian-Canadian history,
B.C. immigration patterns and
social theory at UBC, be fired
from his job. In the petition,
Saltzberg accuses Yu of 'reverse
racism' against people of European descent for talking about
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the discrimination that Asian
Canadians have historically
faced in B.C.
We deliberated whether to
write about this situation in an
article, but ultimately decided that covering it without the
necessary context (that, unfortunately, a news article cannot
always provide) would give the
petition a platform that it does
not deserve and should never
have. Instead, we thought it was
important to point out just how
truly warped the situation is:
merely talking about the history of minority groups and the
difficulties that they face can put
one at risk of being accused of
'reverse racism'. What's more, it
is completely unacceptable that a
professor doing scholarly work on
Asian-Canadian history can spur
the kind of hate and malice that
we have seen with this petition.
And some people think that
racism is a thing of the past? Xi
Coyotes aren't pets:
scare Carter off for
his sake and yours
JOVANAVRANIC
NEWS EDITOR
While it's been a very slow couple
of weeks in the news section,
our blog seems to have a bustling
audience made up of folks with
one common passion — Carter
the coyote.
Sure, I get it, Carter is adorable,
and he's a great model for candid
snapshots, but his growing fame
just isn't doing him any good. Actually, it could get him killed.
The dozens, or at this point,
probably hundreds, of social media
posts about Carter make him out
to be a menace to the squirrel
populace, but I can hardly take
him seriously when a student isn't
afraid to stand only a few metres
away to take a picture of him. We
shouldn't be so comfortable with
him, and he definitely shouldn't be
comfortable with us.
Carter should be out wandering
around the woods, terrorizing critters and startling individuals brave
enough to venture into Pacific
Spirit Park, where I suppose he
may call home. He's a predator and
a scavenger — but changing his address to UBC's campus is making
him more ofthe latter.
Though there are plenty of
squirrels around for Carter to
chase and chew on, he has a hard
time hunting when campus is
constantly flooded with students.
He's clearly not afraid of us, but
he's been smart enough to keep his
distance thus far. And this divide
means having to wait until nightfall to ease his munchies.
When the squirrels are tucked
away to sleep, Carter has no choice
but to rummage through our
garbage to feed himself. Not a lot
of UBC's trash is very accessible to
him, what with all ofthe bins only
being accessible through small
holes at the top made for human
arms, not grasp-less coyote paws.
Really, there's not much here for
Carter at all. I'm sure he's getting
sick of eating little scraps of trash
and waiting for class hours to
terrorize the squirrels. And as he
gets more and more used to all the
human folk around, he's going to
start coming to us for dinner.
No, that doesn't mean he's going
to start hunting students or bullying them for their lunch money.
He will, however, schmooze his
furry little self into our hearts
and souls, and more importantly,
our tupperware.
Folks need to give Carter his
space, and if they're not afraid,
shoo him away. Don't let his puppy
dog eyes fool you — feeding him or
letting him get too comfortable on
campus is no good for him.
The sad reality is that if we
don't help him find his way back
home soon, Carter may very well
grow dependent onus, or may simply become too accustomed to the
presence of humans and become
unable to reintegrate himself into
the wild. At that point, if and when
animal control services need to
intervene, he will likely need to be
put down.
It's okay to love Carter, but the
relationship just has to be long
distance. Humans and coyotes can
definitely coexist — just not necessarily in such close quarters. Xi
Notice of Development Permit Application - DP 14027
Public Open House
University Boulevard - Site B
You are invited to attend an Open House on Wednesday, January 7 to view and comment on a
mixed-use development proposal for University Boulevard - Site B. Plans will be displayed for a
new 6-storey mixed use building with retail/commercial uses on the ground floor and 5 storeys
of residential rental accommodation for students, faculty and employees at UBC.
Date:
Place:
"ednesday, January7,2015 11:30 AM -1:30 PM
r Memorial Gymnasium Lobby, 6081 University Boulevard
Representatives from the project team and Campus +
Community Planning will be available to provide
information and respond to inquiries about this
project.
The public is also invited to attend the Development
Permit Board Meeting for this project to be held on
January 21st from 5:00-7:00pm, at the Centre for
Interactive Research on Sustainability (CIRS) Policy
Labs A+B, 2260 West Mall.
For more information on this project, please visit:
planning, ubc. ca/vancouver/projects-consultations
For further information:
Please direct questions to Karen Russell,
Manager Development Services
karen.russell@ubc.ca   604-822-1586
This notice contains important information which may affect you. Please ask someone to translate it for you.
o| «*lfeStfc»n|i!^5UfegS&Sfi7hS0l Sli&M^.
a place of mind
THE  UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
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A Plan for your everyday adventures // Sports + Rec
EDITOR JACKHAUEN
SWIMMING »
UBC swimming sweeps Canada West — again
Women and men finish 409,360 points in front of second place teams, respectively
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Natalie Scadden
Senior StaffWriter
When the UBC Thunderbirds
swim team stormed the Max Bell
Aquatic Centre in Lethbridge
this weekend and took home
both Canada West Championship
banners, it almost seemed like
deja vu.
It was another dominant performance where T-Bird swimmers
missed the podium in just one of
38 races. UBC again picked up
awards for best male and female
swimmers and rookies. Head
coach Steve Price was again coach
ofthe year for both teams.
And, due to scheduling changes
within the conference that moved
the championships to November,
this was actually the second time
UBC has done all of this in 2014.
Back in January, UBC had
taken its swimming dominance at
Canada West Championships to a
whole new level: the women's side
put up a whopping 1,071 points
with a 497-point margin of victory — both conference records.
Now it seems those kind of num
bers are just par for the course
with this team. Competing with
one fewer swimmer this time
around, the UBC women managed
1,049 points and were 409 ahead
of second-place Calgary, while the
UBC men gave themselves a much
bigger cushion than they did last
time, finishing 360 points ahead
of Alberta and becoming the first
men's team in Canada West history to break the 1000-point mark.
A team operating at such a high
level almost needs another way of
measuring its performance than
banners — its success is about
more than just winning.
It's about consistency and
leadership. Take King for example. In five years as a Thunderbird, the two-time Olympian has
collected 20 gold, two silver and
two bronze medals at Canada
West along with four conference Swimmer ofthe Year nods.
She's never lost the 400- and
800-metre freestyle.
But it hasn't always been
easy. King's coach doesn't think
she was enjoying swimming
very much last year. "To see her
come back this year with a great
attitude and much more positive
and enjoying the sport a lot more
has had a really big impact on
the girls' team and for herself as
well," said Price.
It's about the team effort. All
32 swimmers scored points —
awarded to the top 16 swimmers
in each event, from 20 points for
first place to a single point for
16th. In fact, everyone cracked
the top eight in at least one event.
UBC won all six relays, swept
the podium in six events and 20
different T-Birds won multiple
individual medals.
And, of course, in a sport measured in hundredths of a second,
it's about swimming fast. UBC
swimmers broke 12 Canada West
records this weekend, including
three new marks set by Allen in
the 100- and 200-metre butterfly
and 100-metre backstroke, and
two by Strydom in the 100- and
200-metre butterfly.
"Coleman is maturing and just
rounding out the kind of athlete
that he can be," said Price of the
three-time Canada West Swim
mer ofthe Year. "He's a very fiery
and emotional guy, and sometimes that gets the best of him as
an athlete. I think he learned a lot
about that this summer, and he's
really settled down and taking
one swim at a time. And obviously
winning a world cup medal boosted his confidence a lot. It's just
good to see a young man maturing
and showing some leadership and
being a real positive influence on
the team."
To top it off, in the last individual event ofthe weekend,
Keegan Zanatta erased the oldest
record in the book by more than
three seconds, winning the men's
400-metre freestyle in 3:46.82
to replace Mark Johnston's time
from 2001.
With a convincing Canada
West Championship behind them,
the focus now shifts towards
the 2015 CIS Championships in
Victoria in February. The UBC
women are seeking their fourth-
straight national title, while the
men will have to get past the two-
time defending champions from
the University of Toronto. Xi
The
Women
Total foinb
1,049
Swimmer
ofthe year:
Savannah King
Heckle
ofthe year:
Jacomie Strydom
Sixth Straight
CanWest title
(26th all-time)
Total foinU
1,007
Swimmer
of the year:
Coleman Allen
Heckle
ofthe year:
Yuri Kisil
Second Straight
CanWest title
(15th all-time)
PHOTOS COURTESY STEVE PRICE/UBC SWIM TEAM 10    I   SPORTS   I    THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 27,2014
RECREATION »
Ciaran goes clubbing: Quidditch
The Ubyssey's copy editor endures a few hours of broomstick-based sporting
Upper body strength is integral to antigravity sport.
Ciaran Dougherty
Copy Editor
In this new column I will be
visiting different UBC athletic clubs each week; I plan to
recount my experiences to show
exactly what we have on offer at
the university.
The Quidditch pitch was the
locale for my first outing so I
laced up my cleats and headed
over with my housemate, who
happens to be a club member. On
the way there he assured me that
I would be, at some point, brutally assaulted. While this did make
me a little nervous, I took solace
in the fact that my pain might at
least provide some entertaining
footage for our Weekly Show.
Despite my friend's warning, the team was immediately
welcoming; one ofthe execs was
quick to make jokes about my
suitability for the game, largely
due to me being from England.
I had assumed that my accent
would function in the same way
as it does in everyday life; that is,
making it easier to score.
Surprisingly, being English
gives you no natural advantage at
the sport.
We started with some comfortable warm up drills before
mounting our brooms. All players
in this sport must remain on
their brooms at all times unless
they are knocked off, in which
case they have to run back and
touch their own hoops before
they rejoin the action.
The sport is played with extreme similarity to how it is seen
in the Harry Potter films. There
are 'Chasers' who try to score
with the 'Quaff le' through the
opposition hoops and also defend
their own hoops from opposition
chasers. 'Beaters' try to knock
'Chasers' off their brooms using
the 'Bludgers' and 'Seekers' chase
after a human 'Snitch.'
However, I was disappointed to discover that those of the
Quidditch persuasion are yet to
find an effective way to combat
gravity, meaning the whole game
is played on the ground. While
I considered this a big setback,
it does mean you get a solid
workout from the running; this,
combined with the skill required
to throw the balls and tackle
other players, makes the sport
quite difficult.
Our own team is increasingly successful, I spoke to UBC
Quidditch's President, Alexa
Rowe, about the club's performance. "I'm actually very pleased
... we had our first tournament
with nine teams a couple weekends ago, and the A team came
first and B came second, so it was
super awesome," she said.
The club has 77 members and
they compete in major competitions five times a year, including
the Harry Potter inspired World
Cup, which functions as the US
national tournament, where
hundreds of teams come together
for the title.
After some drills we started a
scrimmage, and a burly 'Chaser'
from the other team immediately
floored me. I initially felt like
this was a little bit aggressive for
someone new to the sport, but I
later discovered that our hilarious sports editor arranged that
to happen.
The team and its members
were in fact warm and friendly with a great attitude to new
players.
"You can never have too many
people come out to play Quidditch, because it's kind of a niche
market. Not a lot of people are
brave enough to come and try it
out, so as many people as we can
get, we'll take them," said Rowe.
The game is quite straightforward and the team was excellent at making me feel welcome,
explaining little complexities and
telling me where to stand. Despite
the lack of flight and even though
I was a bit rubbish, the whole
experience was thoroughly en
joyable. The club is inclusive, has
good spirit and a genuine sense of
humour.
If you like Harry Potter, or
even if you just fancy trying your
=HOTO PETERSIEMENSFTHE UBYSSEY
hand at a new sport, I'd thoroughly recommend Quidditch.
Check out the UBC Quidditch
Team's Facebook Page for more
information. Xi
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STUDIES
at OCAD University
At OCAD U, we attract curious and
creative students who expect something
more from their education and are
willing to challenge themselves to
achieve it.
Grounded in practice, theory, research
and professionalism, with an eye on
experimentation and change, we
deliver advanced experiential learning.
Our graduate students enjoy unrivalled
opportunities to practice with expert
art and design faculty, in studios, labs
and through exceptional internships.
For more information & to apply:
Website: ocadu.ca/gradstudies
Email: gradstudies@ocadu.ca
Phone: +1 416 977 6000 ext. 423
Twitter: @OCADUgrad
Programs Offered:
• Contemporary Art, Design
and New Media Art Histories (MA)
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MA and Graduate Diploma)
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Application deadline:
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MASTER of PUBLIC POLICY 12    I    GAMES    I    THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 27,2014
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Beat exam stress with a tranquil weekend getaway to Lake Garibaldi.
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1- Rum cakes
6-Corn covering
10- Permanent army post
14-Exodus origin
15-Abominable Snowman
16-Manipulator
17- Narrow mountain ridge
18-That's !
19-In land
20-PBS benefactor
21- Surrounded by ocean
24-Attendant
Rebuke
Period of history
Yoga posture
Marry again
You right!
Engine part
37- Eye drop
38-4th letter ofthe Greekalphabet
39-Linguist Chomsky
40- Naval rank, briefly
41-Takes on
42-Uptight
43- Band's sample tapes
44-Test site
Adventurous expedition
Flightless bird
Easily decided
Neptune's realm
Hairless
Bit
nclined
Earth Daysubj.
Box
Beethoven dedicatee
Actor Auberjonois
Roll call call
Travels on
45
48
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55
56
57-
58
60
61-
62-
63
64
65
1- Legumes
2-Come to terms
3-One way to play
4-Suitable
5-Manciple
6- Hilton competitor
7- Rivertothe Ubangi
8-Agitate
9- Polish sausage
10-Supports for a lever
11-City near Kobe
12-Sublease
13-Commerce
22- Gasteyer of "Saturday Night
Live"
23-Vintner's prefix
25-Change direction
28-Cityon the Rhone
29-Hardens
30- Numbered rd.
31-Bard's nightfall
32- Has been
33-Dynamic start
34-Jailbird
35-Small batteries
36-Marseille Mrs.
38-Abate
39-Wyo. neighbor
41-Mother of Ares
42- N a re
43-Pamper
44-Baton Rougesch.
45-Clear-headed
46- Expeditiously
47-Criminal
48-Chicago hub
49- Let me repeat...
50-Perfume the air
51-Can't stand
53-Narcotic
54- The closest one to us is the sun
59-Biblical high priest
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