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The Ubyssey Feb 6, 1968

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Array THE UBYSSEY
On Wednesday,
vote.
Vol. XLIX, NO. 43
VANCOUVER, B.C., TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 1968
224-3916
m
—  Icurt hilger photo
THE  CONTEMPORARY ARTS FESTIVAL  committee  erected   a   gigantic  phallic  symbol   on   the
library lawn Monday, to signify the start of  the  annual   week   devoted   to   culture.    Fleshy
pictures from   skin   magazines,   an   umbrella   and  balloons  decorted   the  you - know - what.
Engineers return SFU's mace
Simon Fraser University president Dr. Patrick McTaggart-Cowan got the last laugh at the
weekend — on UBC's engineers.
The chuckles began last week when SFU's
Preferential
balloting used
Alma Mater Society first slate elections
Wednesday will be held under a preferential
ballot system.
This means that your second and third
choices count when there are more than two
candidates for a position.
Thus, in voting for senator and internal affairs officer, students will mark their ballots
for first, second and third choice. Ballots
will not be considered spoiled if voters mark
only their first choice.
Advance polls will be held today in south
Brock and the education building from 11:30
a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Other advance polls are
in residences and Woodward, Sedgewick and
main libraries from 5 p.m. to 9 p.m.
Polling Wednesday will be from 10 a.m.
to 4 p.m. in north and south Brock, the auditorium, bus stop, and Ponderosa cafes; all
three major libraries and all main faculty
buildings.
Second-slate elections, including vice-
president, treasurer, co-ordinator of activities and student ombudsman, will be held
Feb. 14. Nominations for these positions will
close Thursday.
jade-topped, five-foot ceremonial mace vanished
from its locked glass case in the hilltop university's library.
Presented to SFU by designers Erickson-
Massey in 1964, the $400 mace is used at formal
ceremonial functions.
It was officially returned to McTaggart-
Cowan Friday at the annual UBC engineers
ball in the Showmart building in the Pacific
National Exhibition grounds.
However, the SFU head said he wasn't too
surprised to have the mace returned at the
ball.
"My colleagues assumed it was the engineers," he said. "For one thing, they called my
secretary to confirm that I was coming to the
ball.   They'd   never   done   that   before".
So McTaggart-Cowan commissioned a SFU
carpenter to make a miniature mace.
"A very good one it was too," he said. "After
presented with our mace, I returned the honor."
To make sure the SFU mace got back home
safely, SFU security chief Fred Hope posed as
a fire marshal at the ball.
When the mace was presented to McTaggart-
Cowan, Hope promptly handcuffed it to his
wrist and walked out.
"I told the engineers that I was sure, with
their confidence, that the smaller mace would
soon grow to five feet," the president said.
"Now we are offering to rent the original
mace on a daily basis to UBC."
"We are very pleased that the engineers,
who have showed before their appreciation of
SFU excellence in such endeavors as sports,
also   recognize   our  superiority  in   academics."
Presidential
candidates
cut to a pair
Two candidates Monday dropped out of the Alma Mater
Society presidential race, leaving arts president Stan Persky
and law student Brian Abraham to battle it out.
Russell Grierson, commerce 3, and Harry Clare, science 4,
former Social Credit club president, gave no reason for dropping
out.
Persky, arts 3, was declared eligible by the AMS eligibility
committee last week. The committee decided he had been at
UBC for two years as required by AMS constitution.
A final decision on Persky's eligibility will be made Monday
by student court (see Page 3).
A total of 12 candidates for president, external and internal
affairs officers, secretary, and student senator debated issues of
senate secrecy, student activism, enrolment cutbacks and academic reform before 800 students at noon Monday in Brock.
At the meeting, Abraham, law 1, criticized what he termed
"negative, undirected activism".
"One central issue is the means of action students propose,"
Abraham said. "No strikes, no sit-ins unless it's absolutely necessary."
In answer to charges of negative undirected activism, Persky
said he spent two weeks negotiating the senate secrecy issue,
talking to 20 senators and acting UBC president Walter Gage.
He talked to new UBC president Dr. Kenneth Hare for two hours.
"I'm in favor of a direct personal style of human government," Persky said. Student government hasn't done too much
this year, he added.
Abraham said he favored responsible students lobbying the
provincial government, a student-run housing authority, more
anti-calendars and more student faculty committees.
PEOPLE SHOULD BE CONSULTED
"People affected by decisions should be consulted,'' Persky
said. He was against enrolment cutbacks and the cancellation
of pre-registration.
"We've got more work to do on the bookstore and food
services," Abraham said. "We also need lower interest rates
on residence construction.
Persky favored more academic reform and students selling
textbooks during registration.
Candidate for external affairs officer, Paul Dampier, arts 2,
said an attack on two fronts was necessary if universities were
to get more money.
External affairs is a new position on council which involves
liaison with the federal and provincial governments on education
policy.
"It's clear we've been sold down the river by the governments," Dampier said.
Dampier said his duties would be to keep the public well-
informed  and to exert pressure on the provincial government.
External affairs candidate, Tobin Robins, arts 3, proposed
reform in the bookstore and administration housing policy.
AROUSE STUDENT INTEREST
"Why should a university bookstore be run on a profit
basis? Why should women in residence be tucked in every
night by the housing authority?" he asked.
Robins also suggested holding every second council meeting
at noon Thursday in the new student union building theatre to
arouse student interest in AMS.
Senate candidates, vying for a seat left vacant by former
student senator Kirsten Emmott, talked about senate secrecy.
The senate term ends in two months.
"The whole issue of senate secrecy is a farce," said candidate Jane Fulton, home ec 3.
"It's the exaggerated result of a propaganda issue."
Miss Fulton said students needed a senator from the non-
arts bloc, and that it was a small minority who had voted for a
senate sit-in.   "They should picket food services instead."
Don Munton, grad studies 1, also running for senator, said
senate should become a source of ideas and discussion.
"At present, senate is an over-sized, undernourished rubber
stamp for the ideas that come before it," he said.
He said he was for a long range academic plan, a public
gallery and a residential college.
Senate candidate Mark Warrior, arts 2, said a student
senator is in no real position to do anything.
"He can try and push projects like the abolition of compulsory language requirement and the sixth pass-fail programme
and other faculty programmes similar to Arts I but has really
no chance to decide on broad issues," Warrior said.
to page 3
see: MORE ELECTION Page 2
THE     UBYSSEY
Tuesday, February 6, 1968
CANDIDATES' STATEMENTS
The following statements
appear with all their original grammatical errors.
BRIAN  ABRAHAM
There is one central issue
iin this campaign. It is the
MEANS of action that students
are advocating. Do YOU want
a negative, undirected activism
that can only meet problems by
calling demonstrations or sit-
ins? Would YOU support the
Senate sit-in that my opponent
proposed a few weeks ago ? Or
do YOU want a student government that will work constructively and positively for you,
a student government that will
communicate and not alienate ?
If elected AMS President,
my goals will be the following:
1—Communicate and work
with the Faculty, our new
President, and Senate in dealing with student problems.
2—Find a solution to the current housing crisis by pressuring the University for more on-
campus accommodation and
lobbying the Provincial Government for permission to
build a student housing complex on the Endowment
Lands.
3—Push for increased academic reform including anti-
calendars, student-faculty departmental committees, and
more symposia.
4—Strong support for all undergraduate society and club
activities.
5—A restructuring and
strengthening of the present
6tudent-iaculty- adminisration
advisory committees on the
bookstore, food services, residences, and the library to involve students meaningfully in
the decision-making process.
6—Pressure the Federal and
Provincial Governments for
more funds and lower interest
rates for student residences.
7—Pursue a strong campaign
for public support aimed at
obtaining money for higher education in B.C.
I have attended UBC for
five years and graduated with
a degree in geology. At the
present time I am studying in
the Faculty of Law. The success of my campaign depends
bn whether student government should provide constructive and positive leadership.
This is the direction I would
pursue next year. I would appreciate your support on
Wednesday.
STAN PERSKY
This is what I stand for:
A direct personal style of
human government that actually involves itself with the
needs of people; that doesn't
think its job ends when the
money is split up and the committees are appointed.
I think student government
has accomplished very little
recently. I hope there will be
a real change.
The principle of negotiation
—that students have a direct
say in all matters that concern
us.
The right of people whose
lives are affected by decisions
to make those decisions for
themselves. Specifically:
I'm against enrollment cutback.
I'm against the registration
lines we're going to have to
stand in next September.
Especially discouraging is the
fact that students weren't consulted on this matter.
I'm in favor of academic reform: a variety of proposals
that meets the needs of indifferent faculties.
I believe we must establish
emergency study space areas
now.
I'm for much more student
participation in the housing
question, but even more immediate, the right of students in
residences to negotiate improvement of their living conditions.
And the obvious.
A more democratic student
government through constitutional change.Yes, more money
Ifrom   the   provincial   govern
ment. Yes, SUB as a new center of student activity. And
yes, immediate help to end the
library crisis.
Finally, answering phoney
charges:
"Undirected activism," says
Mr. X about me.
Instead of accusations why
don't we look at what really
happened ? After the student
meeting that called for an
open senate, those of us involved just didn't sit back and
do nothing. We went out and
began immediate negotiations.
I talked to 20 senators, Dean
Gage and Dr. Hare. The senate
responded honestly. The sleepy
student council woke up. The
result: a friendly meeting between senators and students,
and a senate promise to re-examine the open senate question.,
Does this constitute negative
action or are these allegations
simply a scare ?
People who make such
claims should back them up
by telling how they participated in the issue.
to page 4
see: MORE CANDIDATES
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Wednesday, Feb. 14
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Thursday,   Feb.   15
7:00 p.m.
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Saturday,   Feb.   17
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Mail this application now to reserve the class of, your choice, to:
EVELYN WOOD READING DYNAMICS INSTITUTE,
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Alma  Mater  Society
OFFICIAL  NOTICES
A.M.S.  Elections
First Slate — VOTE WED.. FEB. 7
Second  Slate
Wednesday, Feb.  14, 1968
Vice-President
Treasurer
Co-ordinator of Activities
Ombudsman
Nominations for the first slate are closed. Nominations
for second slate are now open and will close at 12 noon
on February 8, 1968. Nomination forms, certificates of
eligibility and copies of the election rules and procedures are available from the A.M.S. Office.
Committee Appointments
Wanted! A Homecoming Chairman!! All those interested
please submit letters of application to Penny Cairns,
A.M.S. Secretary, Box 54, Brock.
EYE-CATCHING EYE WEAR
Better visipn can mean better marks! Start the new
year right with a visit to
you eye physician. Even if
your prescription is unchanged, a fashionable
new frame can do wonders
for the  disposition.
HrfoOptuxA
1701  W. Broadway
731-3021
3195 Gramrifte
7334772
GLASSES - CONTACT LENS
"A COMPLETE OPTICAL SERVICE"
SPECIAL STUDENT DISCOUNT Tuesday, February 6, 1968
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 3
BY-ELECTION?
i£$***?■•^f^r^^s^^&k*'■"■■■ r ■■■'-■' ""•'-■   ■ ■■;  '
THE SKY CLEARS, and lovely bright sunshine descends on UBC. It's a sight seldom seen
during dreary January and February. The tower of Union College provided an excellent
vantage point for Ubyssey photo chief Kurt Hilger to picture the campus, complete with SUB.
MORE ELECTION CANDIDATES
from page 1
He said faculty are much more prepared than
students to accept radical academic reform.
The position of internal affairs—public relations for AMS is contested by three students.
Ruth Dworkin, science 3, favored more student faculty committees, more on-campus symposia and a weekly column in The Ubyssey to
inform students of AMS  goings-on.
Charles Hulton, science 2, wanted to work
with undergraduate societies to gain academic
reform and working with deans' committees.
Barry Milavsky, commerce 2, said he would
30-operate with undergraduate societies when
they brought problems to him. He also favored
anti-calendars, an open senate and a student on
the board of governors.
Heather Soles and Sally Coleman, both arts
2, are running for secretary. Miss Soles proposed
decentralization of the AMS, emergency study
space and better communications.
(Miss Coleman said she enjoyed talking to
people and would use  individual discussion to
air beefs.   She also cited her experience as university clubs committee secretary this year.
Penny Cairns dropped out Monday as a candidate for secretary.
'Moralman
shall return'
"Moralman will never die."
That was the reaction Monday of artist
Arnold Saba, creator of Moralman, to reports that the comic strip will be terminated after the present episode is completed. It has run in 60 editions over 13
months.
A mob of indignant students appeared
at The Ubyssey office at 7 a.m. Monday to
demand  that the  strip be  continued.
Saba told ths seething crowd that the
first instalment of a brand new espisode
will appear in Thursday's Ubyssey.
Eligibility decision
coming after election
By  MIKE  FINLAY
Ubyssey Council Reporter
Student Council Monday night referred to student court
the question of arts president Stan Persky's eligibility in running
for the Alma Mater Society presidency.
But the first slate AMS elections go ahead Wednesday as
planned, council decided.
Student court will meet at noon Monday.
If Persky wins and is then found ineligible, the election will
be declared void and a by-election will be called.
Also in the presidential race is Brian Abraham, law 1.
Council reached agreement on the procedure in a two-hour
debate in its Monday night meeting.
The AMS constitution says the president shall be a person
"who shall be a senior or entering his senior year, and who has
attended the University of British Columbia for at least two
years and who has not previously held the position of presidency
of the society."
Persky has attended UBC during the 1966-67 winter session,
the 1967 summer session and all of the present session.
An eligibility committee chaired by AMS secretary Penny
Cairns decided last week th intention of the rule was to ensure
the candidate knew the campus, and agreed Persky knew UBC.
In the light of this, and the fact that he had attended summer school, the committee declared Persky to be eligible, subject to the approval of student council.
"He'll be found eligible," university clubs committee chairman Mike Coleman said Monday night. Coleman sat on the
eligibility committee.
The call for a meeting of student court arose largely from
the alleged ambiguity of  the AMS constitution.
The article concerned does not, councillors said, clearly
indicate what is meant by "two years."
Persky was ill in bed Monday night and could not be reached for comment.
it    -w-    #
Students   Court
Notice  of  Constitutional  Reference
Take notice that Students' Court has been directed by
Students' Council to interpret By-Law 4 (3) (a) of the Alma Mater
Society constitution regarding qualifications generally for the
AMS presidency and in particular the candidacy of Stan Persky.
The Court sits in determination of this issue at 12:30 p.m.,
Monday, February 12, 1968 in the Students' Council Chambers,
Brock Hall.
R. B. WEBSTER
Clerk  of the Court.
Shoplifters  literary
Books are vanishing daily from the UBC bookstore.
Manager John Hunter said Monday the store's exact losses
to thieves were not known because the inventory is being
changed.
"But I'm sure a lot of it goes on."
He can do little to stop thefts, he said.
"Our present protective measures make those of downtown
stores look pale. *
Mirrors and other devices usually used to stop shoplifting
not only offended honest customers, but also required people
to watch them, he said.
"I think most shoplifting is done as a game."
Hunter was  walking down an aisle of the store recently
when he caught a student shoving a textbook under his sweater.
"I told him I would rather give him the book than have him
steal it. The student put back the book and walked out.
"We usually let first offenders off with a warning."
CL near vjitmk $
ftpOLESCENLACfcV 3I
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AKGNORUM" XI ?%;
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MWSSEY
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the university year
by the Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C. Editorial opinions are
those of the editor and not of the AMS or the university. Member,
Canadian University Press. Proprietor, Ubyssey News Services (UNS). The
Ubyssey subscribes to the press service's of Pacific Student Press, of which
it is founding member, and Underground Press Syndicate. Authorized second
class mail by Post Office Department, Ottawa, and for payment of postage
in cash. The Ubyssey publishes Page Friday, a weekly commentary and
review. City editor, 224-3916. Other calls, 224-3242: editor, local 25; photo.
Page   Friday,   loc.   24;   sports,  loc.  23;  advertising,   loc.   26.  Telex  04-5224.
FEBRUARY 6, 1968
iilTlM;;li;siiiIIil^to:
Hot tip
Faced with a battery of election candidates many of
whom are unknown and politically inexperienced, you're
probably as baffled as we are.
We've got a hot tip for you: study the language and
tone of the campaign statements which appear in today's
Ubyssey. If you look carefully, you might find out something important about various candidates.
Look hard for phrases like "responsible government," "constructive leadership," "good communication,"
and the like. When you find them, if nothing else, you'll
know who NOT to vote for. You'll know because such
phrases, having been worked to death in dozens of student elections, no longer have any meaning. Use of them
in campaign statements is an indication that their
authors have no election platforms of any substance.
It should be remembered that there is no conceivable candidate for any AMS office, who would not, if he
found it necessary, strongly insist that qualities like
"constructive leadership" and "responsibility" applied to
him.
So, we repeat our hot tip: study those campaign statements. And if you can't find a candidate running in one
of the five contests to be decided Wednesday who doesn't
use trite gibberish, we suggest you don't vote for anyone
for that office. Not voting, despite the claims of those
over-obsessed with the importance of student politics,
can be a sign of intelligence.
MORE CANDIDATES
PAUL DAMPIER
Being a new office I can only
anticipate and speculate on my
objectives.
Two such goals already seem
clear. The first is to insure that
UBC and higher education in
general receives the support it
needs from all government
levels. This would be achieved
by working with CUS, BCAS,
and other organizations as well
as a well informed public.
The second goal is aimed at
insuring that there is equal opportunity for everyone in this
province to benefit from higher education.
My major desire is the effective use of the students council
and the student rsources at
our disposal.
TOBIN ROBBINS
If you're hung-up or fed-up
with student government we're
on the same wave length. As
External Affairs Officer, my
areas of concentration will include: (1) Widespread publicizing of CUS (Canadian
Union of Students) activities
and responsibilities. The CUS
information monopoly will be
utilized not simply as wallpaper. (2) Effective lobbying
channels must be established
with the provincial government. (3) Efforts must be made
to end bookstore feather-bedding. A student co-op may be
will be placed on the importance of SUB as a focal point
for student action.
If you agree with the preceding points, then we're communicating. Once the lines of
communication     are     open,
from page 2
changes can be made. Demonstrate your desire for change.
Vote ROBBINS for External
Affairs Officer.
RUTH DWORKIN
Students have the right and
the responsibility to participate
in the decision-making process
of the university.
As Internal Affairs officer
I would like to see these policies implemented:
—students on departmental
curricula committees.
—closer co-operation between AMS and student
senators.
—a weekly column in The
Ubyssey to inform students
Of progress in academic
affairs.
—the investigation of a
Science I and Education I
program.
—a small-scale (at first) co-op
bookstore handling books
for about 50 courses and
selling them at cost.
—the honest persentation to
the public of the aims of
university.
AMS representatives should
make progress, not mark time !
CHARLES HULTON
There are two prime jobs for
the Internal Affairs Officer.
Firstly, he must act as a liason
between the undergraduate
societies and the AMS regarding academic changes. I advocate more attempts at getting
the students opinion for curri-
cular reforms. The opinion
can be collected by the use of
"anti-calendars," which are
formed from questionnaires
which students fill out evaluating both their courses and
profs. These provide a critique
Pulling strings
Editor, The Ubyssey:
We wish to communicate our
dismay at the same old phoney
tactics being demonstrated by
the people pulling the strings
behind the presidential campaign. The same statement that
has been passed around the
campus by one of the candidates was issued last year by
Shaun Sullivan, which leads us
to believe that the same people
or person is behind his candidacy.
How long are students going
to be seduced by the phoney
promises and the trite political
cliches?
We're  voting for a  change.
DAVID A. ROBERTSON,
law 1
CHARLES KUX,
law 1
STEWART RUSH.
law 1
'Nice  boy
Editor, The Ubyssey:
If there is one thing that I
have been very disappointed in
this year, than it must be in
our illustrious AMS council and
executive. (I realize that I am
a member of this council).
Many of the students on this
campus believed that we made
a wise decision in our last election for the AMS   presidency.
for both student and professor
to work from, and help in deciding which courses should
be revised or disregarded. Also
I advocate a closer liason between faculty and students
through the use of "Dean's
Committees," where students
sit on faculty and course committees meetings. Secondly, the
Internal Officer must maintain UBC public relations. I
would strive to improve the
image of UBC both in Vancouver and the rest of Canada.
UBC is not an apathetic campus, but rather a young, growing university, with far greater
possibilities for the future.
Above all I am interested in
seeing some concrete work
accomplished on Council this
year!
BARRY MILAVESKY
The position of internal affairs officer is an important
one, affecting both the students
on campus and people outside
the university. Because of this,
a person in the position should
have a basic knowledge of the
news media and an understanding of the undergraduate societies on campus. I feel I meet
the requirements for Internal
Affairs Officer as I have two
years experience on radio,
four years experience running
promotional campaigns, and
contacts with the undergraduate societies.
Anyone can make idle promises about what they can do;
experience speaks for itself.
The issue was right or left; and
the outcome was right. What
did we gain by this decision?
Were any important issues settled? Was anything done that
showed outstanding leadership?
I am not trying to put Shaun
Sullivan in a bad spot. He is a
very nice boy. But that is just
about all. He sure has not
shown us any type of leadership qualities.
We have to realize of course
that the rest of the august AMS
executive is not much better.
(My humble apologies to Kim
and Penny). But what have
they done this year that we
shall remember them for? Absolutely nothing. Housing? Did
we solve the housing problems?
We have fallen far behind SFU,
that has more co-ops than UBC
has ever had and will have, if
we continue to elect the present type of executives.
What about academic activities? The Kelsey Report was a
one-time appearance and than
it was put on the famous shelf
where all these type of reports
go. Oblivion is blessed with the
possession of many of the potential worthwhile endeavours
of our council.
The undergraduate societies
are blamed for only being able
to organize dances. However I
believe that the undergraduate
societies do more for academic
I recognize three major
areas of concern for the AMS:
(1) Academic reform (2) Student Participation in Administration, (3) Less Bureaucracy
— More Action. If elected,
these will be the problems with
which I will involve myself.
HEATHER SOLES
I disagree with Shaun Sullivan that UBC students are
hopelessly apathetic. I feel that
all they need to become involved in campus affairs is a
vital AMS Executive that will
keep them informed of issues
and alternatives facing them.
I want to make SECRETARY
an active role in student government rather than an honorary position whose work is
done by hired secretaries. As
a voting voice on Executive
Council I will represent your
needs and wishes in a meaningful and effective way.
With a personal style of government by people who are
aware of student needs and
committed to action on them,
the platitudes usually emanating from the AMS offices
will be replaced by progress.
SECRETARY
SALLY COLEMAN
I seek your support in Wednesday's election to face the
challenge of student leadership.
The position of secretary
should involve close communication with students so that
the problems which face our
campus can be dealt with on
a truly representative basis.
SENATOR
JANE FULTON
The world is changing, so are
we, so must the Senate — but
not by the radical methods of
EDITOR:   Danny   Stoffman
City       Stuart Gray
News          Susan  Gransby
Managing       Murray   McMillan
Photo      Kurt  Hilger
Senior      Pat Hrushowy
Sports         Mike   Jessen
Wire       Norman Gidney
Page  Friday      Judy  Bing
Ass't.  City    Boni Lee
Other than sailing in a sloop,, mourning his hullow existence and then keeling over in a flap, Irving Fetish had
a calm day. "You sea," said Lin Tse-
Hsu to the ocean," You're all washed
up." Paul Knox climbed aboard a
balloon   and   was   blown   sky-high   by
reforms  than the  excutJve is
aware of, and more autonomy
to them can only work for the
improvement of student government.
Council seems to be afraid of
taking any action. None of the
members, seems to be aware
that writing reports, and talking, does not get us any further in this life. If I think
back what was the most outstanding thing that took place
on this campus, than I feel that
I should mention The Ubyssey.
I cannot say that I have always
been in agreement with the
paper, but at least I can say
that we had something on this
campus that was critical enough
to keep most of us aware of
the problems.
If I think of the leaders that
exist on this campus than I
can only think of two: Jim Taylor (law) and Stan Persky (arts)
both of whom resigned from
council. Let us hope that the
next elections bring us the type
of people with the leadership
qualities, and not the people
that call themselves student-
leaders mostly because no one
else will. Let us make sure that
this campus does not go without direction. Let us elect the
leaders we need and not the
"political playboys" we do not
need.
PETER UITDENBOSCH
Commerce president
Mr. Mate and Mr. Larsen. I
want to show the Senate that
there are responsible students
at UBC and that we are capable
of making decisions that determine the quality and content
of our education. The responsible students are NOT represented on Senate — I think
I can do that better than any
other candidate.
DON  MUNTON
Senate must become more
than a rubber stamp for miscellaneous ideas. It must be a
source of academic reform
rather than merely an approver.
As a Senator, my goals
would be:
1. to activate Senate to
formulate a much-needed,
long-range academic plan
for UBC.
2. to initiate Senate discussion and action on curriculum reform in all faculties.
3. to improve communication
with an open gallery and
regular Senate-student
meetings.
4. to establish a residential
college at UBC.
MARK WARRIOR
The  job of  student  senator
is to open communication with
to page 5
see: MORE STATEMENTS
a puffing Charles Laughton. Judy
Young tried to eat six cases of frog's
legs, but couldn't. "I toad you so,"
croacked   Mark   DeCoursey.   Linda
Gransby plunged into her first prose
journalism with vinegar, while Steve
Jackson ground his teeth on ass't city
desk and had his filling. Mike Finlay
curses loudly at council, although it
was not allowed.
"What's grey and comes in quarts?"
asked Lawrence Woodd of George Hollo
and Bob Brown in the darkroom.
Neither could answer, having ele-
phantitis.
Bob Banno, Jim Maddin ad Reg Run-
er worked deafly and deftly in the
jock shop.
No-shows for the day included, Betty
Crocker, Mati Hari, Julie Christie, Fanny Hill, Gypsy Rose Lee and Shaun
Sullivan. Tuesday, February 6, 1968
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 5
Forestry grabs
Gobulin Goblet
Forestry has won the Gobulin Goblet for bleeding above
and beyond the call of duty.
The tree-choppers earned the trophy, awarded each blood
drive to the faculty whose members bleed the most, because
53 per cent of its 226 students gave.
Second in the competition was nursing with a 27 per cent
turnout. Third was science with 21 per cent. Last was UBC
faculty and staff members, of whom only four per cent bled.
The UBC campaign, one of B.C.'s largest blood drives, attracted a total of 3,077  students, faculty and staff.
"It was quite a success," said drive co-ordinator Chris Andersen, forestry 3. "We were really aiming for 3,000 donors, and
we got them."
He complimented Fort Camp as being one of the best
sources of givers, with 90 per cent of the huts residents giving.
"But only 15 per cent of all students gave blood," Anderson
said.   Let's hope we can do better next time."
Sorry about that, Kassis
In Friday's paper, the Ubyssey incorrectly referred to Dr.
Hanna Kassis, UBC associate professor in religious studies, as
a Moslem.
Kassis said Monday that the announcement of his lecture
mistakenly referred to him as an "oriental Moslem."
"I am not a Moslem, but I would hesitate to call myself
a Christian," he said.
"But the question of what faith I follow is in one of those
areas where a person has to define his own terms, to himself
and not to the public."
MORE STATEMENTS
from page 4
the senate. For instance: at the
moment, language requirements and a sixth pass-fail
course are under review and
the student senator's task is to
win support for these measures.
As for an open senate, the
senate is listening to students
(viz. Wednesday night's meeting) and a new committee on
open senate is being formed.
Students should present a brief
to this committee on the matter.
Underexposed
PANGO PANGO (UNS) —
Police in this island capital
today arrested 187 16-year-old
virgin female opalescent puce
blorgs for being seen in public with their delicate boobies
covered.
Under the law of this island
kingdom, non-exposure of
boobies is an indictable
offence.
"faUAA
w\o
JAN 18
to
FEB 16
In The New MUSIC BUILDING Recital Hall
FEB. 7 - 8 p.m. - FACULTY PIANO RECITAL
Kathryn  Bailey—Music of John  Cage
FEB. 8 -12:30 - COLLEGIUM MUSICUM
presented  by   Elliot  Weisgarber
"Western  Music,  Japanese  Tradition   in  the   Early   20th   Century"
FEB. 9-8 P.M. - SAME PROGRAM AS ABOVE
NO ADMISSION CHARGE
Liberal Leadership Candidate
eric kieiais
BROCK
12:30
WED.
ZETA BETA TAU
HOCKEY TEAM
Sincerely expresses its condolences for any
injuries, emotional or physical, suffered by
Zeta Psi in their recent 3-0 defeat.
Bridge  buffs
battle  it  out
on   Thursday
There'll be lots of shuffling in the UBC graduate student centre Thursday.
But nobody will be
dragging their feet; the
occasion is the annual
UBC open pairs bridge
championship.
Open to both faculty
members and students, the
competition is sponsored
by the university bridge
and chess club. Entry fee
is $1.50.
Winning pairs, after receiving trophies, will compete in the intercollegiate
regional tournament in
Cornvallis, Oregon.
Winner of the latter will
be sent to Chicago to compete for the North American championships.
Details of the UBC competition are available from
Robin Booth, 224-9088.
HELD OVER 2nd
RECORD SMASHING WEEK
,aVS
Adult Ent.
NORTH AMERICAN PREMIERE
Times Sunday door
12:10,   1:45,   3:20,  4:41 1:30  psm.
6:30,  8:05,  9:40.
Students $1.00
Adults $2.00
imc
Do YOU require assistance
in 1st & 2nd-Year English
for the oncoming examinations?
If so, HUBERMAN'S can help you
We also offer assistance in language study
GERMAN - FRENCH - SPANISH
For further information or an appointment, phone
HUBERMAN EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTE LTD.
732-5535 or 263-4808
2158 W. 12 Ave.
PRE-DENTAL  SOCIETY  PRESENTS
Questions About Dentistry
ANSWERED BY
Dr. Yeo, Faculty of Dentistry
Noon, Feb. 7, BU 205
ALL WELCOME
68 GRAD CLASS
Nominations are now being called for candidates for
the following honourary student positions for the Graduating class of 1968:
1. Historian
2. Class Poet
3. Class Prophet
4. Class Will Writer
Nominations sent in by Grad Class members in good
standing or by members of the faculty will be received
up to and including February 14, 1968. Replies should
be sent to Box 44, Brock Hall.
MUSSOC PRESENTS THE COCKNEY MUSICAL
HALF A SIMM
with KEN IRWIN
ANN MORTIFEE
PENI MARTEL
AUD.-FEB. 8-10.13-17
Student Performances 75c
FEB. 8, 13, 14       8:30 p.m.
FEB. 15      NOON
Tickets at Aud. Box office - 228-3176
SCIENCE
UNDERGRADUATE
SOCIETY
NOMINATIONS OPEN
Untjl Feb.  12, for Council  Positions:
President
1st Vice-President
2nd  Vice-President (A.M.S.   Rep)
Secretary
Treasurer
3 Executive Members
PRO
Men's   Sports   Rep
Women's   Rep
Apply Science Common  Room, Math Annex.
Elections will be held Tues., Feb. 20 & Wed., Feb. 21 Page 6
THE     U BYSSEY
Tuesday, February 6,  1968
To aid the common man,
here is an outline of what the
heck the festival is, anyway.
All times and places to be
found in the Official program,
available everywhere.
theatre
Doktor Weerd. by UBC
author Brian Shein, even has
a surrealistic press release.
From off-off Broadway comes
Daddy Violet, the much acclaimed, impr ovisational
"thing" by George Birimisa
(that naked gent over there).
Charlie is a one-act play,
supposedly a "grotesque" social satire, as is At Sea; both
from Poland.
^ufif
Orison, by Fernando Arra-
bel, a Spaniard, concerns morality, religion, and goodness,
played over a coffin containing a murdered child.
Also ran: Birdbath, possibly
another UBC effort.
music
Items are the John Cage recital and the lecture-demonstration on Electronic music.
Also comes The New Music Ensemble from California to improvise and things. There is a
student composers' hour, an
electronic concert, and- a few
contemporary recitals. Don't
expect much Tschaikovsky.
exhibitions
Iain Baxter has his Piles on
exhibit. At the same time,
Arnold Rockman's random
display of randomly selected
objects. But is it art ? Probably.
In the Lasserre building, Bob
Flick explores Laser Beam
Photography, whatever that is.
environment
A super-special environment
sponsorship,   some
reruns (don't miss
NiFB   shorts,   Al
and experiments'
Art School wox
Filmsoc pri
brothers,   A
creepy film
goodies as
poids, and
undergrou;
Two poe
UBC durini
festival.
Robert
chief    an
American
has     "the
measure to
where exo
Ezra Pound
Also   visit
will be b. p
of Vancouver^ni
onto.
Nichol   has   exp
areas    of   language.    He™nas
worked   with    "concrete"    or
e£rffl and with "sound
t in the en-
uver's   poets
iej^works.
on Valen-
ass Harp
dings by
reading
reads   for
later  the
(hyone who
ry reading
otem" will
ally by the
ion band.
a part of the
10th, In the
r e e   bands
ill play, with
Is by Inter-
;hree more
rock, with In-
Vancouver
'oollfJ^JSfjr visuals. Also,
Expo explodes, a multi-projection Expo presentation.
in the armoury, created by Intermedia and many UBC students will be the setting of
many festival events.
In it, students can see several dance troups, two audience-participation satires, and a
Tri-media conglomerate thinga-
majig.
On two days the environment conies alive with sound
and lights that revolve around
the spectator, utilizing a bank
of speakers, a battery of projectors, and a battalion of
multimedia gnomes.
A comprehensive program of
films from the Vancouver area
will be presented in the environment.
These include Vancouver
filmakers before and after CBC
All Students, Faculty, and Staff are Invited to
THE
OfUXNAIMNII
BflUr
The Pacific Ballroom, Hotel Vancouver
FRIDAY, FEBRUARY NINTH, NINE P.M.
-t, . SEMI-FORMAL  OR
J'lODA&nOlV^ • NATIONAL DRESS
Tickets from A.M.S. or International House
Careers in Computer Science
The University of Waterloo
will conduct Campus Interviews
in February
Students will be interviewed for employment in the Computing Centre.
The interviewer will also be prepared to discuss Graduate Programmes in
Computer Science and other areas of study in the Faculty of Mathematics
with interested students. Students in Mathematics, Engineering, Computer
Science, Psychology, Physics, Chemistry and Business Administration may
apply.
Write for an appointment to:
J. P. Sprung, Research Analyst, Computing Centre,
University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario.
w
DEPARTMENT OF THEATRE
presents
«£
S\
Witty Comedy of Manners
by  RICHARD   B.  SHERIDAN
ANNUAL STUDENT PRODUCTION
Directed  by John  Brockington
Designed by Richard Kent Wilcox
FEBRUARY 20 ■ 24, 8:30 p.m.
Student Tickets $1.00
(available   for   all   performances)
SPECIAL STUDENT PERFORMANCE
Thursday, February 22 — 12:30 p.m.
Tickets: Frederic Wood  Theatre  Rm.  207  or 222-2678
Support Your Campus Theatre
FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE*
w Tuesday, February 6, 1968
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 7
'TWEEN CLASSES
Hear hopefuls today
COMMERCE US
AMS candidates meeting today, noon, Angus lounge.
ENGLISH LECTURE
Prof. Morton Bloomfield of
Harvard discusses Epic and
(Romance: A structural comparison, Thursday, 3:30 p.m., Bu.
102.
PRE DENTAL SOC
Dr.   Yeo   answers   questions
about    dentistry,    Wednesday,
noon, Bu. 205.
MUSSOC
See Half a Sixpence free by
ushering Feb. 8 to 16. Sign up
at auditorium box office.
PRE SOCIAL WORK
Field  trip to  Haney leaves
East   Mall    (by   Buchanan),
Thursday, 12 noon. Sign up in
Bu. ext. 361.
ECONOMICS SOC
Dr. Scott speaks on the brain
drain, today, noon, Aug. 213.
Student-faculty social tonight,
Koerner fund
giving  out grants
Leon and Thea Koerner
Foundation grants are up for
grabs.
Dr. G. Welton Marquis, UBC
music head and projects committee secretary, said applications for the grants must be in
by March 1.
Last year the foundation
made 67 grants totalling $84,-
100.
The grantsl are chosen to stimulate projects in the fields of
higher education, cultural activities and health and welfare
in Canada.
Application forms are available from Marquis, c/o secretary of the projects committee,
UBC.
Librarianship
keeps its head
The head of UBC's school of
librarianship has withdrawn
his decision to withdraw.
Prof. Samuel Rothstein's resignation was announced in January, but he was asked to continue as head of the school by
acting UBC president, Walter
Gage and the board of governors.
8 p.m., Deke fraternity house.
AAC
Bill Willmott discusses Cambodia and the war in Vietnam,
today, noon, Ang. 110.
HISTORY DEPT.  •
Prof. Samson Knoll lectures
on Germany — East and West,
Wednesday, noon, Bu. 102.
EXPERIMENTAL COLLEGE
Karl Burau discusses the constitutional   conference,   today,
noon, Bu. 203.
PRE LAW SOC
Discussion with law prof and
students,    Thursday,    1    p.m.,
Cecil Green park. Beer available.
CONSERVATIVE CLUB
General meeting Wednesday,
noon, Bu. 214 to elect delegates
to Ottawa convention.
NDP CLUBS
Prof. Caroline Airey speaks
on political experiences in
South Africa, today, noon, Bu.
212.
HISTORY 206
POLITICAL SCIENCE 204
Two films on international
relations, today, noon, Bu. 106.
FRENCH STUDENTS
Noon conversation groups today and Wednesday, Bu. 3248;
Thursday Bu. 3252.
INTERNATIONAL HOUSE
Coffee party today,  3 p.m.,
IH upper lounge.
PRE LIBRARIANSHIP
Visit   to   special   collections
Wednesday, noon. Meet at main
card catalogue.
ARCHEOLOGY CLUB
Meeting today, noon, Bu. 205.
A talk with slides.  Lab open
Thursday noon to 3:30 p.m.
IL CAFFE
Conversation Wed n e s d a y,
noon, IH.
FOLK SONG SOC
General   meeting  Thursday,
noon, Bu. 202. Find out where
the party is.
WUS
Meeting today, noon, Brock
council chambers.
EDUCATION US
All students who do not have
a    seminar,    meet    Thursday,
noon, ed. 100.
PRE MED SOC
Dr. Hamish 'Mchol speaks on
child   psychiatry,   Wednesday,
noon, Wes. 201.
JRAIC
Slides of Expo, Thursday,
noon, MacMillan building.
All Students, Faculty, and Staff are Invited to
THE
msumm
Mir
The Pacific Ballroom, Hotel Vancouver
FRIDAY, FEBRUARY NINTH, NINE P.M
ni L —. SEMI-FORMAL  OR
J>JODAdJWJUL • NATIONAL DRESS
Tickets from A.M.S. or International House
LIBERAL CLUB
Leadership    candidate    Eric
Kierans will participate  in a
panel   discussion   Wednesday,
noon, Brock lounge.
STUDENT WIVES ASS'N
Meeting   for   all   interested,
Wednesday, 8 p.m., Cecil Green
Park.
AAC
Peter Bell of economics dept.
speaks on Thailand — another
Vietnam?, Wednesday, noon,
Ang. 110.
VOTE
ELECTIONS FEBRUARY 7, 1968
You only get the Representatives that you elect.
If you want something to say about student government put
your X on the ballot.
Submitted by Circle K Club of U.B.C.
CLASSIFIED
Rates: Students, Faculty & Clubs—3 lines, 1 day 75*, 3 days $2.00.
Commercial—3 lines, 1 day $1.00, 3 days $2.50.
Publications Office, BROCK HALL, UNIV. OF B.C., Vancouver 8, B.C.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Dances
11
CONTEMPORARY ARTS FESTIVAL
dance, lightshow. 3 great bands,
Saturday, Armouries, 9-2; $1.50.
Don't  miss  it.
DANCE TO THE EXCITING SOUND
of "The Bittersweets" at the Pre-
Med. Ball. Feb. 10th. Avalon Motor
Hotel. Semi - formal, $3.50/couple,
Bar.  Tickets at A.M.S.
Greetings
12
HAVE AN INTERNATIONAL BALL
on February ninth at the 3rd Annual International Ball at the Hotel
Vancouver. Moonlighters Steel
Band, George Cuba Quartet, floor-
show. Tickets from AMS or International   House.
Valentine Greetings
12A
BE ORIGINAL — SAVE MAILING A
card.    Send   Valentine   Greeting's   to
your friends with a Classified ad.
(in Feb. 13th issue). Make arrangements in the Publications office,
Brock Hall. "Deadline 11 a.m. Monday   Feb.   12.
Lost & Found
13
BROWN DOG W/WHITE NECK,
foot, tail tip, big ears, med. size.
Reward,   738-5942.   Lost  23   Jan.
FOUND: ENGAGEMENT RING ON
parking lot near Forestry Building.
Phone  261-0947  and  ask  for  Ron.
FOUND: WATCH WITH ENID
White found on back. Pick up at
2130   Westbrook   Crescent.
LOST: GOLD NURSE'S WATCH,
black band, Monday, January 29.
Women's   gym,   contact   731-7645.
LOST: GOLD LADIES WATCH
Wed., on campus. If found phone
Gail,   410-224-9077.     	
FOUND: ONE FRENCH TEXT
called "Contes Modernes in E.M.A.
Owner please phone 228-8876 after
5:00   p.m.	
LOST: LADY'S GOLD WATCH FEB.
1st. near South East Corner Education building, reward, office 222D
Education   or  988-9518.
FOUND: MAN'S WATCH, ALSO
cufflink, claim Pub. Off., Brock
Hall.
LOST: BLACK WALLET AND I.D.
Woodward or 'B' lot. Thurs. night.
Phono   738-7368.
LOST O N CAMPUS: WOMAN'S
sold pocket-watch on Feb. 2, of
sentimental value, reward is offered,   266-7032.
FOUND: BLACK WALLET "A"
parking lot. Driver's licence inside.
Owner claim from Physical plant
dept. 	
JANE FULTON FOR SENATE '68.
Rides & Car Pools
14
2   DRIVERS   NEEDED   FOR   NORTH
Van  car pool.  Call Sharon,  988-3835.
BRITISH PROPERTIES CARPOOL
needs one more driver. Please ph.
Les,   922-4843.
Special Notices
15
WHY PAY HIGH AUTO INSURANCE
rates? If you have a valid driver's
license and good driving habits you
may qualify. Phone Ted Elliott,
321-6442.
ALL STUDENTS, FACULTY AND
staff are invited to the 3rd Annual
International Ball, Friday, Feb. 9th
at 9:00 p.m. in the Hotel Vancouver,
Trinidad Moonlighters, George Cuba,
Flamenco    Dancers,    Tickets    from
A.M.S.  or I.H.
CANADIAN ARMED FORCES? A
role in Canada? BU 102, 12:30 p.m.,
Tuesday,   6  Feb.	
NEW MAGNETIC TAPES FOR SALE
at International House, lmil. My-
lan Acetate. 5" reel for $1.25. Hurry
while   they   last.	
UBC BARBER SHOP, OPEN WEEK-
days 8:30 till 6 p.m., Sat. until 5:30
p.m.,   5736   University   Boulevard.
BIGGEST DANCE OF THE YEAR
Saturday, Armouries, 9-2, three
bands,   $1.50,  everybody's  going  up!
ARTHUR KIPPS: INQUIRE AT
Aud. re: Inheritance, Thurs., 8:30
p.m.,  Half A Sixpence.
Special Notices (Coni.)
15
CHARTER FLIGHT TO LONDON,
for UBC faculty and staff, May 28-
June 19. $310. For information call
Mrs. J. Paul, 732-6429 after 6 and
weekends. 	
JANE FULTON IS BIG ENOUGH TO
represent the majority 95-60-85(cm)
38-24-34(in.). 	
COFFEE PARTY AT INTERNA-
tional House at 3 p.m. today.
Everyone welcome.     	
TICKETS STILL AVAILABLE FOR
the International Ball this Friday.
At the Hotel Vancouver. Tickets
from A.M.S. office or International
House.
COME TO A CHRISTIAN SKI CAMP
at the Firs. Feb. 9-11. Three openings are left for guys. For information, contact Tom Aicken:  731-4084.
Travel Opportunities
16
Wanted—Miscellaneous
18
USED MICROSCOPE URGENTLY
required. Please phone, 433-3831,
evenings.
WANTED ATTRACTIVE HOME.  EC
student for Senate, offers by Feb. 7.
AUTOMOTIVE 8c MARINE
Automobiles For Sale
ai
1955 DODGE 2 DOOR HARDTOP.
Cheap transportation. $100 or best
offer. Phone Norm 224-7298 after
7:00 p.m. 	
HELP—BUY MY '59 CHEV. GOOD
rubber, body and motor excellent.
Call Fred, 945-4754 aft 6 p.m. please.
1961   HILLMAN   FOR   SALE.   DON'T
miss this one.  As new,  make offer,
Cliff   732-5588.  ■
1956 BUICK 4 DR HT POWER
brakes, mech. sound, $295. Call
Stan,  224-9060 after  6.
Automobile Parts
23
SEE OUR COMPLETE RANGE OF
Sports Car Accessories. 10% discount with AMS card. Overseas
Auto Parts. 12th and Alma. 736-
9805.
COMPLETE SET OF FULTON
Spark Plugs for 68 Senate. Must
sell   by   Feb.   7.
Motorcycles
26
HONDA-FIAT
Motorcycles -  Cars
Generators - Utility Units
New and Used
SPORT  CARS
N T
O     Motors     S
R E
T      W
14S Robaon H 688-12(4
BUSINESS SERVICES
Miscellaneous
32
UBC BEAUTY SALON EXPERT
styling and cutting. Reasonable
rates 5736 University Blvd.  228-8942.
JANE FULTON OFFERS THE BEST
professional services to Senate for
68.
Scandals
37
SELLING YOUR TEXTBOOKS? TRY
The Bookfinder. 4444 West 10th
Ave. 228-8933.
HELEN: STAY AWAY FROM
Artie. I have the Half A Sixpence.
Meet  me   in   Aud.  Ann.
ARTIE: LAST CHANCE, HALF A
Sixpence or else. Aud. Today at
Noon.  Ann.
TOMORROW IS THE DAY — V.W.
owners beware of a card on your
windshield—we guarantee to save
you money. Auto-Henneken Service
Oak  &   S.W.  Marine,  263-8121.
JANE FULTON CAN DO WHAT
nobody else can—for Senate '68,
and  you.
Typewriters 8e Repairs
39
Typing
40
EXPERT   TYPIST   -   ELECTRIC   —
224-6129   -   228-8384.
UNIVERSITY TYPING SERVICES,
2109 Allison Rd., 228-8414, around
the corner from World Wide Travel
next to RCMP open 9 a.m. - 5 p.m.
Monday to Friday.
Typing  (Cont.)
40
EXPERT   ELECTRIC   TYPIST
Experienced   essay   and   thesis  typist
Reasonable Rates TR. 4-9253
TYPING—ESSAYS,    THESIS,   STEN-
cils,   etc.   Close   to   University.   224-
0244.
EXPERIENCED TYPIST (in West
End), neat, accurate. Reasonable
rates,   essays,   etc.   Telephone   681-
6878.
'GOOD EXPERIENCED TYPIST
available for home typing, please
call 277-5640".
ESSAYS, MASTERS & PH.D.'s EX-
pertly typed in form and style as
recommended by Campbell. RE 1-
3700  —  3478 W.   19th  Ave.
SECRETARIAL SERVICES — SPE-
cializing in Thesis typing. Highest
quality. Reasonable rates. Accuracy
and   production   guaranteed.   Phone
731-1804.
TYPING: PHONE 731-7551 — 9:00 TO
5:00.    266-6662—after   6   o'clock.
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted—Male
S3
THE ACADIA CAMP GENERAL
Council requires a manager for Its
canteen. Duties to start Sept. 1, '68
include all aspects of managing the
operation. This is an excellent opportunity for a married man to gain
experience in management and administration while attending university. Housing is supplied. Applicants are asked to send a confidential complete resume of qualifications and experience, before Feb.
15, '68 to: Vice-President, Acadia
Camp General Council, Acadia
Camp,  U.B.C,  Vancouver 8,  B.C.
INSTRUCTION
Instruction  Wanted
61
Tutoring
64
MATH, PHYSICS, CHEMISTRY, Biology lessons given by competent
tutors. First year only, 736-6923.	
FRENCH, ENGLISH, HISTORY, RUS-
sian, Library Science tutoring given
by  B.A.,   M.A.,   B.L.S.  736-6923.
PIANO AND THEORY LESSONS
Dawne Milligan, B.A., A.R.T.C.
3258 East 45th Avenue, 3878 West
38th   Avenue.   Phone  434-1189.
ENGLISH TUTORING BY M.A. Experienced in teaching. Undergradu-
ates  only.   Phone  682-5127.	
EXP.   TUTORING   IN   1ST   OR   2ND-
year math & chemistry ph. 263-4005.
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
NEW MAGNETIC TAPES FOR SALE
at International House. 1 mil. My-
lan Acetate. 5" reel for $1.25. Hurry
while they last.	
—  OLD  TOTEMS  FOR SALE  —
1963,  1965 & 1966 issues  50c.
Campus  Life's   25c.   Publications  Off.,
Brock   Hall
RENTALS & REAL ESTATE
Rooms
61
MOVE ONTO CAMPUS — ROOMS
available (M) 224-9662, $40.00 mo.
2250 Wesbrook. Meal Services close
at hand.
Room 8c Board
63
COMFORTABLE PRIVATE ROOM
and board for 2 male students in
good home. Single or sharing, 261-
1191.
TIRED OF RESIDENCE GARBAGE?
Climb to the height of good eating
at Phi Kappa Pi. Free trial dinner
for prospective boarders, phone
house   ragr.,    224-9667.
Furn. Houses 8c Aprs. 63
ONE, POSSIBLY TWO, GIRLS TO
share newly - decorated furnished
apt., 4400 blk. W. 10th, $45 one. $30
with two, avail, immed. Call 224-
9159.
SUITE SUITABLE FOR ONE, TWO,
three or four girls sharing, phone
327-6933.
FEMALE TO SHARE 2-BDRM. APT.
with 2 4th-year girls in Kitsilano,
phone 738-4283. Page 8
THt     UBYSSEY
Tuesday, February 6, 1968
REID OWEN, UBC rugby Thunderbird, looked as if he
was being kicked in the stomach as he tried to block a
kick by a University of Oregon player in a game contested
Saturday in Thunderbird Stadium. Birds lost 8-6. Birds
won on Friday 27-11 over Oregon State to give them a
Northwest Conference record of one win, one loss and one
tie.
Disappointing Ball
gives Birds victory
To the UBC basketball Thunderbirds it didn't make any
difference which way the Ball bounced.
UBC guard Phil Langley held Manitoba's usually prolific
Terry Ball to six points Friday and the Birds won 78-53.
The following night, Ball broke loose for 26 points but the
Birds triumphed again, 94-64.
The two UBC victories surged the Birds into sole possession
of first place in Western Intercollegiate Conference standings.
Manitoba was tied with UBC for the league lead with 18 points
each prior to the two games.
The Birds have now won their last five contests.
"We played well in both games," chirped UBC coach Peter
Mullins.
The Birds' Neil Murray led UBC Friday scoring 23 points.
Sophomore center Frank Rotering added 15 points for the Birds
and plucked numerous rebounds.
Rotering paced Mullins' crew Saturday, wrecking the Bisons'
defence with 22 points.
Penalties costly
as ice Birds lose
The UBC hockey Thunderbirds lost two games in weekend
action in Manitoba, despite scoring first in both games against
the University of Manitoba Bisons.
In Friday night's game, the Birds once led 3-1 but bowed
to the rampaging Bisons 6-5 in overtime. Storing in the game
for UBC were Blaine Pollock, Bob Tambellini, Laurie Vanzella
and Jackie James with two goals.
The Birds also scored first in Saturday's game, but couldn't
stay out of the penalty box. They got nine penalties to Manitoba's one.
The bitterly fought contest was close all the way but Manitoba scored late in the third period to take the game 5-4.
Bird scorers were Maurice Lambert, Mickey McDowell, Tom
Koretchuck and Miles Desharnais.
The Birds now have a 6-6 won-lost record and only a slight
chance to capture first place in the western conference. Their
remaining four games are all against the University of Alberta
Golden Bears who are leading the league with an 8-2 record.
The UBC Braves Monday night defeated Steveston Fishermen 8-3 in a Richmond Intermediate Hockey League game played
at the Winter Sports Center.
ICE CHIPS
• OLes Johannesen picked up eight stitches over his right
eye in the rugged Friday night game. He will probably be ready
to see action against UVic this weekend in Victoria.
UBC-SFU HOOPLA  . . .
Site bouncing about
By MIKE JESSEN and RICK MANSELL
Will the UBC-SFU basketball game be played
in the Pacific Coliseum or War Memorial Gym?
An emergency meeting of the Men's Athletic
Committee will be held at 12:30 p.m. today in
the Faculty Club to decide whether or not to
hold the Feb. 10 game in the coliseum instead
of in the gym.
War Memorial Gym seats 3,500 while Pacific
Coliseum seats 15,000.
The UBC-SFU football game on Oct. 16, 1967
drew over 16,000 spectators so The Ubyssey
thought there was sufficient reason to believe
that at least 10,000 or more people would be
interested in seeing the basketball game.
The Ubyssey learned late Monday afternoon
that a proposal to play the game in the coliseum
had been made by UBC's athletic director, Bus
Phillips, at the Nov. 8, 1967 meeting of the MAC
but that it was turned down by majority rule
of the committee at the time.
Thinking that it was a mistake to turn this
down, The Ubyssey immediately began exploring
the possibility of reversing the Nov. 8 decision
and we found that many members of the MAC
were willing to say that they had been mistaken
in their estimates of the number of students
who would attend the basketball game between
the rival universities.
The upcoming basketball contest between
UBC and Simon Fraser University will represent
the first time that the two teams have met and
as such should warrant a large turnout by the
students of both universities.
The Ubyssey contacted the Pacific National
Exhibition late Monday and it was confirmed
that the Feb. 10 date was still available. The
PNE said that the basketball floor for an upcoming NBA game in the coliseum was in Regina
and could probably be brought to Vancouver in
time for this game.
Robert Osborne, director of the school of
physical education, and Dick Penn, a downtown
insurance broker, were the main opposition on
the 'MAC to scheduling the game for the coliseum.
Osborne voted no because he didn't think a
UBC sporting event should be held off campus
if it could be held on campus.
"I would like to see students turned away
at this game," said Osborne. "A full house is
good publicity."
Osborne added that he would like to see only
the true basketball fans get the tickets to the
game. He felt confident that only enough true
fans to fill War Memorial Gym would show up
on Feb. 10.
Penn voted no to the idea because he also
thought that no one would be turned away from
the game.
He also believed that the series should be a
home and home campus series. "Students should
get in free, so the games should be played on
campus," said Penn.
Students from both universities will probably
have to pay $1 admission to the game if it is
played in the Pacific Coliseum. Only UBC students will get in free if the contest is played
at the UBC gym.
Since these same students paid $1 to see the
SFU-UBC football game, we're sure that they
won't mind paying for the hoop game since the
facilities would have to be rented.
Shaun Sullivan, AMS president and another
member of the MAC, also voted no to the idea
but he has now changed his mind along with
some other committee members.
Dave Hoye, AMS treasurer, who voted like
Sullivan, has ajso seen the error of his judgement.
Dr. F. Webster, another MAC member, has
also changed his mind about the site for the
game. Member Dr. B. Burke could not be reached
for comment.
Andy McConkey, one of the four student representatives on the MAC, was originally in favor
of the coliseum site.
Jim Berry and the MAC's usual chairman,
Dr. P. Lusztig were absent from the Nov. S
meeting.
If the special MAC meeting decides to reverse its earlier decision and if the floor arrives
in time from Regina, then it could be SFU versus
UBC in the Pacific Coliseum on Feb. 10.
And if the game goes in the coliseum, it is
the students' chance to put UBC athletics on a
paying basis.
Arts & Contemporary Arts Festival
PRESENTS
THE NMGK CARPET
A Multi-Media DANCE - Lightshow
PAPA BEARS MEDICINE SHOW
MY INDOLE RING
TOMORROW'S EYES
EVERYONE WELCOME
Saturday, February 10
9-2      $1.50
ARMOURIES

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