UBC Publications

UBC Publications

UBC Publications

The Ubyssey Sep 14, 1979

Item Metadata

Download

Media
ubysseynews-1.0127869.pdf
Metadata
JSON: ubysseynews-1.0127869.json
JSON-LD: ubysseynews-1.0127869-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): ubysseynews-1.0127869-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: ubysseynews-1.0127869-rdf.json
Turtle: ubysseynews-1.0127869-turtle.txt
N-Triples: ubysseynews-1.0127869-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: ubysseynews-1.0127869-source.json
Full Text
ubysseynews-1.0127869-fulltext.txt
Citation
ubysseynews-1.0127869.ris

Full Text

Array Kenny to plough south 58
By GEOF WHEELWRIGHT
UBC student leaders are angry
and disappointed with administration plans for a research
park on campus.
Alma Mater Society president
Brian Short says UBC is too small
for an effective research park and
adds that he is opposed to further
expansion of acreage allotted for it.
"If a research park is going to go
it needs a lot of area, and we just
don't have it. It's not going to make
a really good research park."
Administration president Doug
Kenny announced plans for the
establishment of a 46-acre park
Wednesday, but yesterday revealed
that it would actually be a 58-acre
park.
He said the additional 12 acres
would be made up by absorbing the
B.C. Research facility already
operating on the proposed site.
Valgeet Johl, AMS external
affairs officer, said she was
disappointed with the expansion of
the proposed park acreage from 16
acres up to 58, and skeptical about
the services it will provide.
"Even having to give up 16 acres
of forest is quite a lot," she added.
Johl said Kenny had assured her
the park would provide expanded
job opportunities for students in
research, but added she was not
convinced.
"In terms of the acreage we're
giving up and the businesses getting
involved, I don't see too many
students getting involved."
But Kenny said he will try to
ensure student opportunities at the
research facilities by screening
those companies who want to come
into the research park.
He said the university might not
"look favorably" on those companies that were not willing to hire
students.
Kenny said the university would
definitely be in charge of running
the park and would have veto
power over any decision made by its
management committee.
"They would have to conform to
all  our  environmental  standards,
pollution, radiation and biological
standards," he added.
The research park would also be
a good tax write-off for companies
investing in it, and would encourage
research at all levels, said Kenny.
But Johl said she was concerned
how the university will spend the
money it receives from the leasing
of land within the research park.
But Kenny said the terms of the
lease are still being worked out and
refused to speculate on how the
lease money will be spent.
Johl charged that the university
had been irresponsible in not consulting the university community
and the public before it announced
plans for the park.
"It's a public institution, they
should have held public hearings on
it, with the students and the community."
And Paul Trussel, director of
B.C. Research, said he wasn't
aware of plans to incorporate his
organization into the park until informed by The Ubyssey.
ut he said he was not concern-
as long as B.C. Research is
allowed to continue its work.
Trussel said it just means a new
landlord and new neighbors.
THE UBYSSEY
Vol. LXII, No. 3
Vancouver, B.C. Friday, September 14,1979
Visa student
fights back
SLUG LESS DOUG MAKES POINT of meeting the Sticks. AMS Celebrity barbecue held Thursday attracted wide range of superstars, from
bureaucrats to anarchists. But opposites can attract, and Kenny and
— glen sanf ord photo
Pointed Sticks held amiable discussion. Result was signing of UBC president for upcoming Sticks tour as lead vocalist in exchange for Verbal
Abuse 100 course taught by punks.
'Being strapped' is dollar problem
By GEOF WHEELWRIGHT
Provincial government cutbacks and an
unexpected rise in enrolment has left UBC
"more strapped for cash than ever" this year,
UBC administration president Doug Kenny
said last night.
Kenny said the Universities Council of
B.C. had not expected what has so far been a
six per cent rise in student enrolment.
Although he predicts enrolment will level off
to a 3.1 per cent increase by December, Kenny
said the university will still be left several
million dollars short of funds necessary to
operate.
The provincial government gave UBC a nine
per cent increase in its operating grant this
year, but Kenny said the university's inflation
rate is about 14 per cent, three per cent above
the national average.
"Governments are budgeting at less than the
inflation rate. They don't put a high priority
on a university education. It's a tragedy for the
nation."
Kenny said the devalued Canadian dollar
also hurts UBC because many supplies must be
bought from outside the country.
He said the library is particularly hard hit by
inflation as well as dollar devaluations, which
are not accounted for in the provincial grants.
"Every penny the Canadian dollar sinks means
less purchasing power for the library."
Kenny said the government does not realize
that when budgeting for universities "you
don't look at what Ottawa says (about the na
tional inflation rate), you look at your supply
costs."
He said the only way to get more money for
post-secondary education is to educate the
public as to the values of the university and get
them to pressure the government.
"The government thinks they are reflecting
the public view so we're going to have to convince the public."
He said if underfunding of universities continues it will seriously erode the quality of post-
secondary education, because the university
cannot afford to continually cut back its programs.
"Those dollars have to be stretched more
and more."
Canadian University Press
At least one of 16 foreign
students evicted Sept. 1 from a
Simon Fraser University residence
thinks the eviction is unjust and is
appealing   her case.
Wendy Leong,19,a first-year student from Malaysia, said she was
told when she moved into the
residence in early summer that she
would have to leave by September.
ieong received an eviction notice
Aug. 1 but said university officials
refused to discuss the situation or
supply any information to her.
"When I first got the notice I
went to the residence office,"
Leong said. "I was refused any explanation and was asked to leave
the office as they were very busy."
Leong filed for an appeal Aug. 29
but said the university threatened to
call the sheriff's office if she hadn't
moved by Sept. 4.
"I said that I was staying since
there was no point in moving before
the appeal." Leong's appeal will be
heard Sept. 17.
Student services director Bill
Stewart said he expects the appeals
committee to be "sympathetic" in
Leong's case.
Stewart also said the students in
the residence were to be told their
tenure would be up at the end of
August.
But residence manager Joan
Mason said she was told she did not
even have to give the students
notice. "I gave them a month's
notice anyways," she said. Mason
said she was given no instructions
about telling the students how long
they could live in the residence.
SFU has recently implemented a
quota system for foreign students in
the residence. Twenty-two of the
152 students are allowed to be from
outside Canada but there are currently only 12 foreign students in
the residence.
UBC has a 5 per cent limit on
the number of foreign students
allowed to live in residence. Page 2
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, September 14, 1979
RHODES presents a...
STEREO PACKAGE FEATURING
TECHNICS SA200 AM/FM STEREO RECEIVER,
A SONY PS-T15 TURNTABLE AND JBL L19 SPEAKERS
Technics
25 watts per channel ^Minimum continuous
"RMS" into 8 ohms, both channels driven, from
20-20,000 Hz, with no more than 0.04% total
harmonic distortion.
SA200   AM/FM
STEREO
RECEIVER
With the SA-200, Technics continues its tradition of offering
outstanding receivers in the
budget price range. Note that its
0.04% total harmonic distortion is
about l/10th the amount usually
found in comparably-priced
receivers. It is an excellent choice
for a component system where
high power is not required.
CLEAN POWER
Measured in compliance with FTC
standards, the SA-200 puts out 25
watts per channel, continuous
"RMS" power into 8 ohms, from
20-20000 Hz, with no more than
0.04% total harmonic distortion.
At less than full power, and
throughout most of the audible
frequence bandwidth, this THD
figure is even lower.
L19
The L19 was designed to meet the
need for a small, highly accurate
loudspeaker system capable of
delivering substantial sound output from a moderately powered
amplifier.
SONY PS-T15
FEATURES
• Automatic arm return
• Direct drive
• Linear BSL servo motor
• Magne-disc and multi-gap head speed sensor
• Pitch control
• Tonearm safety latching mechanism
• Viscous damped manual cueing
• Machine finished aluminum platter
• Thick vibration-damping rubber mat
• Spring loaded removable dust cover
• Main functions accessible with dust cover closed
COMPLETE WITH CARTRIDGE
RHODES
PACKAGE
PRICE
$849
00
One Clean Investment Saves Many
Playing dirty records — even if they
look clean —
can permanently ruin your large investment.
So make a single, clean investment.
Discwasher   the    Superior    Record
Cleaner.
SPECIAL
$15
88 Friday, September 14,1979
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 3
TARZAN  IN CONCRETE JUNGLE bears down on Jane,  secure in
knowledge this vine has brakes. After a noon hour demonstration of roller-
— ross burnett photo
skate safety outside SUB Thursday, pair rolled off into sunset leaving
jealous but unscarred two-wheel fanatics.
Foreign
students
shafted
MONTREAL (CUP) — Tentative quotas have been imposed
this term on the number of foreign
students admitted to certain
programs at Concordia University.
The engineering and commerce
faculties set the quotas after the
release of projections predicting
that the number of community
college graduates would be
markedly increased.
Foreign students have already
been denied entry into the first year
of the computer science program
due to the growing number of
graduates.
"The taxpayers don't take too
kindly to their taxes going tq
educate foreigners,'' said assistant
engineering dean James Lindsay.
But the administration says the
quotas are not intended to restrict
the population of foreign students.
They are necessary to give priority
to Canadian students, says assistant
admissions rector Gerald Tait.
The quotas are tentative because
definite maximum figures have not
been set. The faculties have decided
to "accept only the cream of the
cream" of foreign students, leaving
the other applicants in an unsure
position.
And Lindsay says education
funding cutbacks are the root of the
problem. He says other universities
are doing the same as Concordia.
"I'm certainly aware that every
university being faced with budget
problems is doing the same thing.
It's evident that across the country
the number of places available to
foreign students is quite limited."
Unclaimed heritage lost in Alberta oil fields
A truly huge fortune. Four billion
dollars has the capacity to wield a
tremendous economic wallop.
Yet, what is being done with the
capacity of the Alberta Heritage Savings
Trust Fund? Few Albertans really know.
Alberta premier Peter Lougheed admitted on the campaign trail in March
that his government has done a poor job
of informing Albertans about the application of their fortune.
Few realize that nearly half the fund is
"in the bank" or that the fund's major
industrial project is Syncrude.
Although other Alberta parties tried to
make the planning of the trust fund a
major campaign issue, Lougheed's party
shied away from discussing the future of
the province's wealth.
He has preferred to stand on his record
in government, but what has he really
done with the trust fund?
Over $2 billion is invested in safe
marketable securities, "in the bank."
Nearly half a billion is tied into Syncrude,
the tar sands project run by Imperial Oil,
Gulf and Canada Cities Services.
A relatively small $171 million is being
spent on non-profit projects such as
parks, hospitals, agriculture, and oil
sands research. Another $96 million is in
Newfoundland and New Brunswick
bonds, and a wopping $725 million is in
the profitable Alberta housing corporations.
Just what is the strategy being employed here? Although the fund was
supposedly set up to strengthen and
diversify the Alberta economy against the
future when the non-renewable resources
run out, by far its biggest industrial investment is in the oil sands.
Besides the $200 million directly invested in Syncrude, the Trust Fund has
loaned $220 million to Gulf and Canada
Cities Services. The fund is also providing
money to build a pipeline to take the
synthetic crude oil to the oil company
refineries in Edmonton and has built the
power plant for the Syncrude project.
One of the Trust Fund priorities is quite
plainly the Syncrude project. Even the
component of the fund applied to housing
has put nearly $60 million into housing
for Syncrude employees at Fort Mac-
Murray.
The only other industrial strategy
investment is the Alberta Energy Corporation, and its biggest projects are the
Syncrude power plant and pipeline. Of
the energy company's $2,356 million
dollar total, $23 million is in coal (another
non-renewable resource) and $11 million
in forestry.
The other apparent objective of the
trust fund is to make money to put back
into the fund. But the interest the fund is
making barely keeps up to inflation. "In
the bank" savings include short-term
investments, half a billion dollars worth,
that are earning only an average 7.7 per
cent. The fund is even doing better on its
housing corporations, which the annual
report says has the purpose of providing
"housing for Albertans."
The housing corporations are making
one of the fund's highest profits, over 9.4
percent. The only investments which beats
that are the loans to Newfoundland and
New Brunswick. They're hauling in 10.1
and 9.16 per cent respectively.
The large energy
firms discover . .
Canada Cities
Services
that the Heritage
Fund means . . .
great profit at
half the gamble.
Canada's business newspaper, the
Financial Post, quotes a businessman as
saying: "If Lougheed is just looking for
risk-free investments, we'll never put the
Heritage Fund to good use."
While the opposition parties in Alberta
have clamoured for an economic
development strategy Lougheed has made
election promises that total more than $3
billion. The big promise is to bail the
municipal governments out of debt. That
will cost $1 billion.
Other election plans include $750
million for urban transportation, $500
million for housing and land programs
and $500 million for schools. Still no plan
for economic development.
While schools are closing across
Alberta because of dropping enrolment at
the elementary level, Lougheed promises
more money for schools. At the same
time, the province's universities and
colleges are being forced to cut faculty,
staff and programs although Statistics
Canada says the drop in college-aged
people won't begin until 1982.
Tight government funding has hurt the
university and college libraries to the
point where they are falling below
academic standards. Entreaties from the
libraries brought $3 million out of the
Trust Fund pocket.
Stuffing money into the Trust Fund
sock where inflation eats at it does not
build an economy.
Under present legialation, only four per
cent of the Trust Fund spending is under
the direct control of the legislature. That's
the amount ($71 million) spent on the
non-profit projects (oil and research,
hospitals, or parks).
The remaining 96 per cent is under the
control of the cabinet. Page 4
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, September 14, 1979
Bouncing baby bastard born
It's baby boom time for big business
at UBC.
The provincial goverment and university administration have proudly announced the birth of a 58-acre baby — a
long-awaited research park.
The industrial development, first
christened by doting Godfather Pat
McGeer, is a hefty addition to the corporate family.  It will help wean high-
technology industry, pharmaceuticals
and forestry. It will bring private companies into the university community,
encourage financial investments and
strengthen a profit image at UBC.
But there's not enough room for all of
us in the same crib.
Students, as the forgotten siblings to
this glaring parental error are seriously
short-changed.  We weren't consulted
about the new mouth to feed, the
potential of this spoiled child. We
weren't even told its true size; at
premature birth it was proposed for 16
acres — now it's blossomed into a bouncing 58 acres.
The birth's taken its toll on all of us.
We must sacrifice 46 acres of forest to
grow up alongside the 12 acres of B.C.
research facility already operating on
university land. The private business
sector, not students, will be reaping
benefits from the new facility, to be
located south of 16th Avenue and
Wesbrook Mall near the TRIUMF
research facility.
After all, that's what the university is
all about — to serve the students, right?
Businesses can invest, expand and
develop at our expense.
It wasn't a clean birth, either; a lot of
people got their hands messy in the
delivery. The UBC administration, which
originally opposed the park's conception
on campus land and vowed to keep it
stillborn, decided to offer a landswap
deal; they offered up 16 acres of campus
land in hopes that they'd get a hefty site
for research in return. And they did.
One wonders about the next step. It
would be undeniably naive to believe
that money made from the leasing of the
land will be used to benefit students. Instead, it will likely be spent to further
reinforce the presence of private com
panies on this campus.
Kenny says the university will be in
charge of running the park and can veto
decisions over those made by its
management committee. But actions
speak louder than words, big daddy
Doug, and your past record shows few
decisions leaning favorably to students.
We all know that money talks.
Nevertheless, he still tries to appease
the uneasy masses. He claims the industrial companies will have to conform
to all pollution, radiation and environmental standards. But the existence of short cuts, escape routes in
the industrial world when it comes to
government regulations is a well-known
fact.
Let's not kid ourselves. If this new life
begins unhampered, growth spurts will
inevitably be stretched into the University Endowment Lands. After all, sire
McGeer himself originally proposed the
development of a research park for the
UEL way back in 1972.
He called it expansion and growth.
But there's another word for it.
Liebenstraum.
For the provincial government and
university administration, there's
something untapped, and unapplied
about natural campus land. If it doesn't
reap profits, then it doesn't deserve to
exist, they say.
Just look at Wreck Beach.
Letters
New pit stop works
r
We the undersigned would like to
commend the manager of the Pit
and Lethe, the student representative assembly, the student administrative commission, and the
Alma   Mater   Society   orientation
Freedom
is far away
I am an inmate at the S.O.C.F. in
Lucasville, Ohio. I'm writing this
letter to you for myself and a friend
of mine. We happen to be very
lonely here behind bars, and would
like to hear from all friends of any
race. (They're needed here). We will
answer all letters with satisfaction,
so will you please forward our
names and addresses.
We admit that crime doesn't pay
— now we're paying for it. But we
are awfully lonely and want letters
from the nice society we once lived
in. We thank you and all who read
this truthful and sincere letter.
Again, we say thank you very
much.
Ernie Pyle, No. 151-011
P.O. Box 45699
Lucasville, Ohio
Richard Moran, No. 151-017
P.O. Box 45699
Lucasville, Ohio
P.S. We were once free and need
to be free by hearing from free people.
We welcome letters from all
readers. They should be signed and
typed. Pen names will be used when
the writer's real name is included
for our information but valid
reasons for anonymity are given.
Letters should be addressed to
the paper care of campus mail or
dropped off at The Ubyssey office,
SUB 241K.
week committee for providing an
excellent alternative to the overcrowded, beer-parlor atmosphere
of the Pit during the first week of
classes.
The conversion of the AMS art
gallery to a student lounge was
nothing short of brilliant.
After standing in line many
nights at the Pit, it was a pleasant
change to come to the relaxing and
stimulating environment  that  was
provided. This type of facility has
been desperately needed on campus
for many years. It is unfortunate
that the facility will be closed as of
Sept. 14. We strongly urge the
return of this unique establishment
to the UBC campus as soon as
possible.
Pat Kelly
commerce 3
and 44 others
Suds, duds
The Pit management ought to be
reminded that the price of a draft
beer in other local pubs is 50 to 75
cents, which is somewhat cheaper
than what is charged here now for
the bottled stuff. Therefore, I suggest that the price of draft remain
the same if the Pit doesn't want to
lose cash ordinarily gained from
those who are on tight budgets.
On another subject — I
sometimes wonder why the SUB
vending machines seem to be
chronically out of order for days on
end. Cannot this inconvenience be
terminated faster?
On yet another subject — In past
years we, the readers have seen a
number of articles on political
refugees. It was shocking to see
nothing about the boat people in
your paper. Are they not political
also?
Duff Malkin
arts 4
THE UBYSSEY
September 14, 1979
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the university year by the Alma Mater
Society of the University of B.C. Editorial opinions are those of the staff and not of the AMS or
the university administration. Member, Canadian University Press. The Ubyssey publishes Page
Friday, a weekly commentary and review. The Ubyssey's editorial offices is in room 241K of the
Student Union Building. Editorial departments, 228-2301; Advertising, 228-3977.
Co-Editors: Heather Conn and Tom Hawthorn
As the king of Ihe little kingdom had decided to hold a great teast for his sujects the staffers thought they d |om in the merry making. Torn Hawthorn
and Heather Conn brought along the beer and Peter Menyasz brought a delicacy; roasted salmon. Orson Yee, Ken Swartz, Joan Markland and Jane Shackel
brought their pet slugs, who performed as Rory Munro, Maxine Shevack and Bill Romaine listened in and caught the beat. Wendy Hunt, Steve McClure and
Larry Green brought the Kings favorite game, 'discover the park', and Shard Mammernick, Cheryl Brown and Ross Burnett thought it would be an educational
experience The Wheelwright triplets, Geof, Julie and Mandy along with old friends Gary Brookfield and Greg Strong had visions ot burgers dancing in their
heads. Derry Regier, Kevin Finnegan and Ingrid Matson had convinced a stranger to the land. Keith Baldry, that their king really welcomed vismrs, especially
the kind with charge cards. Salty old seadog Verne McDonald was the last to leave, muttering to himself about the days of old
-
English times not a good time
It was with the greatest of sorrow
that 1 read the Sept. 11 issue of The
Ubyssey, the first of this academic
year. My grief was engendered by a
serious break with tradition that I
observed in the otherwise admirable
first effort of this year's staff.
As an official, card-carrying
Ubyssey grey eminence, as one who
has spilt considerable blood, sweat,
tears and other substances on its
pages, I feel it is my responsibility
to point out these mistakes to the
present ink-stained toilers so that
they may see the error of their ways.
It was with shock, nay, horror,
that I opened Tuesday's rag to see
the old Letters section headline
face, the elegant, urbane Bodoni
Bold Italic, replaced by an unfamiliar one, which I am told, is
named English Times.
Now, I have never been one to reject a fresh new face at first glance.
But this one, frankly, is not my
type.
Not only is this face unfamiliar
but it wears several expressions, all
of them unattractive (that is to say,
ugly). There is English Times Bold,
English Times Light and English
Times Italic.
These may be bad times, hard
times, inflationary times, introspective times, but they are decidedly
not English times.
Moreover, what will happen now
to that familiar curse that has
echoed through the print-shop on
so many bleary-eyed press nights:
"Bite my Bodoni Extra Bold!"
If this is the new wave, let me stay
on the beach.
Marcus Gee
Ubyssey news editor
(1977-78)
Nudists don't matter
Regarding Peter Menyasz' article
titled Nude beach is under assault
and the issue in general:
What people do or don't wear on
Wreck Beach is irrelevant.
The point is — which is more important, the beach or UBC? Mr.
Meyasz neatly failed to mention in
his article that Cecil Green park is
destined to fall within 10 years
unless something is done.
If the environmentalists don't like
Swan Wooster's proposal, then why
the hell don't they come up with a
better one.
Finally, it is my opinion that
every student and professor on this
campus should be ready to support
any steps necessary to preserve our
university for as long as possible.
Connie E. Elder
engineering 3 Friday, September 14,1979
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 5
Death to sickoids   _
By VERNE
Picture Vancouver 10 years ago.
A park under the upthrusting
towers of the west end. West coast
rain, always indecisive, alternately
baptizes a crowd of people and
draws back into the cold clouds
above.
(f reestyle)
They are strangely dressed and
oblivious to the occasional showers.
Their attention is focussed on a
stage where an equally strangely-
dressed band is playing. The music
is too loud, it echoes and re-echoes
among the towers around:
Freedom, got to keep talking, got
to keep singing, 'bout freedom . . .
But that's gone, you say. They
stopped talking, stopped singing
about freedom. The revolution is
dead.
Mcdonald
Wrong. Some of the same people, and many new ones, returned
to the park last Saturday. The dress
was different, but it was still
strange. The music was different,
but it was still too loud.
Death to the sickoids, they got
the armies, they got the
guns. . . destroy them they bug
me. . .
The revolution isn't dead, it is
only laid low by a stake of wooden
apathy through its heart. The punks
alone are unafraid to defy the good
doctors of authority and enter the
sepulchre to tug at that stake. It's
coming out, inch by inch.
This time the revolution will not
wake up full of love, but rather full
of hate. It will still be the vessel of
hope.
Verne McDonald is a Ubyssey
staffer and cartoonist.
® KENWOOD
Special Offer
KA-3700 amplifier
20 wans per channel minimum, RMS at 8 ohms from 20 Hz to 20,000
Hz with no more than 0.08% total harmonic distortion.
Consumer Guide "Best Buy"
Our
Price
9
129
95
^ STEREO
AWARENESS
"You Deserve The Difference"
mmmy^mmm^    2053 W. 41st Ave. (Near Arbutus)     <h\k(.k\
263-0878
Closed Wednesday
VISA
LSAT
GMAT
WEEKEND REVIEW
SEMINARS
We offer for each of the LSAT and
GMAT:
• 200 page copyrighted curriculum
• 70 page Math Primer (sent to
each registrant)
• seminar-sized classes
• specialized instructors
• Guarantee: repeat the course for
no extra charge if your score is
unsatisfactory
Why not give us a call and find out
how you can really do the preparation you keep thinking you'll
get around to on your own?
National Testing Centre, Inc
330- 1152 Mainland St.,
Vancouver, B.C.  V6B 2T9
(604) 689-9000 or
call us toll free at
1-800-663-3381
HILLEL HOUSE
FILM NIGHT
Cheese St Refreshments
9:00 PM
MIDNIGHT
INFORMAL SELIHOT SERVICE
SATURDAY SEPT 15th
AT HILLEL HOUSE
„P MOVING AND b,
[11 TRAN!
1STORAGE
MOVING AND TS5=
TRANSFER LTD. I—
Big or
Small Jobs
Reasonable
Rates
2060 W. 10th
Vancouver
734-5535
Eve. and Holidays 732-9898
Also Garages, Basements, Yards
CLEAN-UPS
CampusBank
"The Little Bank That's Always Open!"
At U.B.C.
We are pleased to announce the placement of
an "INSTABANK" cash dispenser at our
Student Union Building Branch. You may
now withdraw cash from your chequing
account on a 24-hour-a-day basis. There will
be no additional charge for use of the
dispenser and the CampusBank card is free!
With CampusBank
you con . . .
• withdraw     cash     from     your
personal chequing account
• avoid line ups
• make deposits
• have 24 hour a day — 7 day a
week service
• obtain up to $25 cash a day
Remember Your CampusBank Card is free... free ... free.
J^k   The First Canadian Bank
Bank of Montreal Page 6
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, September 14, 1979
Tween classes
TODAY
OEBATING SOCIETY
General meeting, noon, SUB 215.
LSM
Lutheran student movement introductory
barbecue for $1, 6 p.m., Lutheran Campus Centre.
UBC FINE ARTS GALLERY
Degikup: Washoo Fancy Basketry, 1895-1935,
from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. until Sept. 22, fine arts
gallery of the main library.
INTERNATIONAL HOUSE
Canada night with free admission, 7:30 p.m.. International House upper lounge.
satur6ay
LUTHERAN STUDENT MOVEMENT
Rummage sale,  10 a.m. to 6 p.m., Lutheran
Campus Centre.
m
Hot flashes
JMOff yOUl" VOflfIS   wave sounds of Bram Tchaikovsky,
who are performing tonight at 8 in
the SUB ballroom. Tickets are
$4.99 and are available in the Alma
Mater Society business office,
which just happens to be the right
place to get tickets for the Mr.
Natural dance. No tickets will be
sold at the door.
If you want to do something
bureaucratic without the line-ups,
head to your nearest campus mail
slot and pop in your student activity
form addressed to SUB 256.
Bop fo Brain 7.
SUB will be rockin' to the new
Lutheran Campus Ministry
5885 University Blvd.
Friday Sept. 14 — L.S.M. Bar-B-Q at 6:00 p.m.
Saturday Sept. 15 — Thrift Sale for
students, 10:00 a.m.-6:00 p.m.
Sunday Sept. 16 — Worship at 9:00 & 11:00 a.m.
Sunday Sept. 16 — Amory Lovins...
Energy and the
Moral Dilemma
*    INTRAMURALS
FALL TERM IS
OFF AND RUNNING!
Next Week's Schedule
Event
Joggers 3 Km Run
Mclnnes Field
Joggers 3 Km Run
Mclnnes Field
Volleyball League
War Memorial Gym
Novelty Swim Meet
Aquatic Centre
Event
Joggers 3 Km Run
Mclnnes Field
Swim Meet
Aquatic Centre
Joggers 3 Km Run
Mclnnes Field
Outdoor Tennis Tournament
Memorial Gym & TWSC
Courts
Golf Tournament
University Golf Course
Soccer League
Thunderbird Park
CO-REC
Event
I Volleyball
War Memorial Gym
Event Date
Fri. Sept. 14
12:30
Fri. Sept. 21
12:30
Sept. 25 - Nov.
Tue. 7:30-9:30
Thur. Sept. 27
12:30
Event Date
Fri. Sept. 14
12:30
Sept. 18, 19
Tue. Wed. 12:30
Fri. Sept. 21
12:30
Sept. 22, 23
Dial Inter-Action
228-2401
Register In
WMG 210 By
n/a
n/a
13
Tue. Sept. 18
(Teams)
Fri. Sept. 21
(Teams)
Register In
WMG 210 By
n/a
n/a
n/a
Wed. Sept. 19
Sat. Sun. 10:00-6:00 (Individual)
Sat. Sept. 29
11:00-6:00
Oct. - Nov. 30
Mon. thru Fri.
noon & evenings
Fri. Sept. 21
(Individual)
Fri. Sept. 21
(Teams)
  Register In
Event Date WMG 210 By
Sept. 20 - Nov. 29 Drop-in
Thur. 7:30-9:30
SUNDAY
LUTHERAN CAMPUS MINISTRY
Celebration of Holy Cross Sunday with Holy
Communion, 9 to 11 a.m., Lutheran Campus
Centre.
Amory  Levins speaks on Moral dilemmas in
energy, 8 p.m., Lutheran Campus Centre.
MONDAY
UBC COALITION FOR A SAFER CAMPUS
Organizational meeting, noon, SUB 130.
UBC FENCING CLUB
Executive meeting, 7:30 p.m,, gym E.
ART OF LIVING CLUB
Lindsay Rawlings speaks on Freeing the magnificent you, noon, Buch. 205.
AMS SPEAKERS FORUM
William F. Buckley lectures on Some of the problems of freedom, noon, SUB ballroom.
TUESDAY
UBC BALLET CLUB
Organizational meeting, noon, SUB 211.
UBC CANOE CLUB
General meeting, noon, SUB 215.
UBC MEN'S VARSITY TENNIS TEAM
Organizational meeting, experienced tournament
players   are   invited   to   attend,   noon.   War
Memorial gym room 213.
1        ARE YOU I
i    ASTHMATIC?     i
= Inhalers   for   Asthma   have =
= recently  become  available  in =
= Canada. We require asthmatics =
E interested in assessing the ef- =
= fectiveness of these inhalers; =
5 volunteers will be remunerated. =
= The study consists of breathing =
5 tests done before and after use S
= of five different inhalers on five 5
s different days. =
= If interested please call =
5 Dr. K. Elwood or =
= Or. R. Abboud E
E        at 873-5441, Local 3336. =
ART GALLERY
PRESENTS
JAZZ VOCALS
Melinda Whitaker
JAZZ PIANIST
Bob Murphy
Saturday, Sept. 15
9 p.m.-11 p.m.
Doors 5 p.m.-11:30 p.m.,
Refreshments
in conjunction with the
Brock Collection
LAST   NIGHT
THE TOUCH OF SPIRIT
A Christian Science Lecture
Sponsored by the
CHRISTIAN SCIENCE ORG.
on campus
LECTURER:
Gordon R. Clarke, C.S.B.
of Milwaukee, Wisconsin
MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 24,
12:30 p.m. in Buchanan,
Room 106
10th ANNIVERSARY
CHRISTMAS CHARTERS
TORONTO $Z&.qo Return & Tax
From Vancouver on
DEC 15  -
DEC 20
DEC 21
DEC 22
Return fi$m
JAN 3
JANS
JAN 6
EDMONTON $90.00 Return & Tax
From Vancouver
DEC 21     *
Return from Edmonton
JAN 4
3
BOOK EARLY WITH CUTS
(Subject to government approval!
Canadian Universities
Travel Service
limited
MAIN FLOOR. STUDENT UNION BLDG.
224-2344
THE CLASSIFIEDS
RATES: Student - 3 lines, 1 day $1.50; additional lines 35c.
Commercial — 3 lines, 1 day $2.75; additional lines 50c. Additional days $2.50 and 45c.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone and are payable in advance.
Deadline is 11:30 a. m., the day before publication.
Publications Office, Room 241, S.U.B., UBC, Van., B.C. V6T 1W5.
Coming Events
FOR    SALE.    T1  58    CALC.    $100.00
2249956 and ask for Steve in Rm. 645.
40 — Messages
JAZZ
DANCE
CLASSES
Thursday,
12:30-1:30 p.m.
Gym E starting
Sept. 20
Register Rm. 203
War Memorial Gym
20 — Housing
Retired elementary teacher needs pleasant
home in exchange for sec./typist,
tutoring. Modern, active, driver's
license. 685-6867.
SINCERE,refined grad student, of Scottish
origin, 24, 5'10", wishers to meet mature, attractive, single female student 20-25, preferably in
Arts, Commerce or Education who is a good conversationalist and a non-smoker, for outings and
companionship. 988-3408.
30 - Jobs
MEDICAL OFFICE
Part-time receptionist position in
Vancouver physician's office.
Approx. 20-30 hrs. per week,
mainly mornings. Send resume
to: 812 Millbank, Vancouver,
B.C., V5Z3Z4.
70 — Services
READING SKILLS, reading comprehension, retention and speed. Plus note-taking/study techniques. 1 day course. Ideal for students. 266-6119.
PIANO LESSONS by Judy Alexander graduate of
Juilliard School of Music. Member of B.C.
Registered Music Teachers Ass'n. 731-0601.
85 — Typing
Abundance and
Prosperity
A seminar which increases your
ability to create wealth in your life.
Sept. 14-16. $95.00.
Phone AAS 437-3334
THE NATIONAL TESTING CENTRE is seeking a
highly motivated student with an interest in
business or law to serve as national co-ordinator
for its LSAT and GMAT Review courses across
Canada. The part-time position offers an excellent
opportunity for substantial income. For further information call 689-9000.
PART TIME babysitter needed for two active boys.
Full and half-days. Kerrisdale area. 263-7667.
SECRETARIAL SERVICES. Theses, manuscripts
and resumes professionally and efficiently typed.
References. Phone 594-9383.
TYPING 80c per page. Fast and
accurate. Experienced typist. Phone Gordon,
873-8032.
TYPING: Essays, Thesis, Manuscripts, Reports, etc.
Fast and accurate service. Bilingual. Clemy
324-9414.
35 - Lost
10 — For Sale — Commercial
COMMUNITY SPORTS. Excellent prices for ice
skates, hockey, soccer, jogging and racqjet
sports equipment. 733-1612. 3615 West Broadway, Vancouver, B.C.
POSTERS, reproductions, photo blowups, largest
selection. The Grin Bin. 3209 West Broadway,
Van. 738-2311. Opposite Super Valu.
11 — For Sale — Private	
MICROSCOPE FOR SALE. Cad Zeiss standard 14.
A-1 condition. Phone 437-4103. 324-7725 after 4
p.m.
BROWN    LEATHER    BAG.6 "x12 "x2",    zipper
closing. One side has flap with zipper under it,
ohter side has large pocket with smap closing.
Last seen in Armouries, 4 p.m. Tues., Sept. 11.
Reward Laura-Lee 987-6574.
90 - Wanted
CARS tickets desparatety needed! Othewise will commit suicide! Save a student — spare a ticketfsl.
Please phone Scott at No. 410-224-9704 or
687-0619. Will pay dividend.
USE   UBYSSEY CLASSIFIED
To Sell -
Buy —
Inform  The Residents
By SHARD MAMMERNICK
Jed talked to his friend in
the hallway, staring intently
at a piece of the green rug
immediately to the right of
him.
"Geezus. Mmmm. Mm-
mmm Jesus Christ anyway. I
think I understand that, I do.
Mmmm. Jesus Christ
anyway."
His friend made no reply.
Jed wiped at his long scraggly black beard with his left
hand, a though brushing at
some bug crawling in it."
"I tell you. Yes. It makes
some sort of sense, I suppose."
Still the imaginary friend
somewhere in the carpet did
not reply.
George, immaculate beard
whiting, bobbing up and
down with forward motions
of his head, walked down the
hallway with Bill, blubber-
over-the-belt friend.
"And that is all," Bill was
telling George, parroting his
friend's pet phrase.
"Yes. That is all," George
replied. "Yes. That is all. You
will meet me in your room
and gather your laundry.
And we will wash it at the
laundramat in the morning.
Yes. That is all."
"Huh? Okay," Bill said
abstractly, timidly to George.
Both men continued down
the carpeted hallway, past
Jed and his friend.
"Mmmm. Yes, I do say, I
do. I think I suppose," Jed
talked at the spot in the
carpet.
Barbara, long blondish hair
curved shiningly around
pock-pitted face hiding her
thick muscled nose and grey
glaring dope-tilted eyes sat
placidly in the nursing station
— sat puffing on her Player's
Filter atop a wooden crate
which was covered softly
with an embroidered
cushion. Rapt finger
movements tapped the
ashtray sitting on a night-
stand to her left.
"Got a cigarette?" she asked through puffs and tapping. Nurse Maureen ignored
her. She was busy making an
entry in the Log:
Barbara being very uncooperative tonight. I keep
telling her to go to bed. But
she won't listen, she just sits
in the office chain smoking
cigarettes. She was brought
back tonight in an ambulance. Apparently she was
following people on the
street and bumming cigarettes and demanding to see a
psychiatrist. She is a definite
nuisance . . .
Last night Barbara was terrified and wanted to draw a
strand of attention to herself,
wind  the  attention  around
herself like a long twisted
rope. Last night Barbara had
seen a huge two foot winged
black bat on her bed. she had
been told all the bats were
safely locked away in the bell
tower at St. James'
Cathedral and would not be
released until midnight for
their daily roast beef feeding.
She had been told that if she
wasn't good she would be
turned into a big frog and
fated to eating only flies until
a crow spotted her and ate
her up. She had left the nursing station last night in a
huff, feeling out-manouvred
and without the cigarette she
had originally come to bum.
She had returned to the nursing station ten minutes later,
left arm crooked at an
awkward angle across her
eyes.
taped-together glasses
wanted to debug me.
Two nights at midnight
ago David meek-manneredly
told me there should be
suicide booths on every corner. We had the right to
suicide ourselves. The
Church was stupid anyway.
I humoured David.
"Really," he continued,
"they should hook up
pushbutton atomizers in the
booths. And death pill
dispensers. Or if you wanted
to go in a kinky way, you
should be able to mail-order
a bottled viper which would
bite you if an American
quarter was put in the side; it
would be a flip-top bottle
over which you held your
hand for a bite, and the bottle would close automatically
for the police to find the
culprit."
I had excused myself and
went to the toilet to be sick. I
kid the milk will  make you
horny."
"Just a Jewish lady's?"
Roy   giggled   again.   And
rubbed    his   crotch    again.
Then he mood-changed and
yelled    indignantly    at    me
before leaving the office.
"No,   I  didn't know that,
Charlie "
"Did you know I'm a reincarnation of Christ?"
"No, I didn't know that,
Charlie."
"Well listen closely now.
I'm going to tell you the
truth."
"Please do," I said.
"Well, you wouldn't
believe it but I'm a warlock. I
lived three thousand years
before Christ. And one night
in Chicago I met the Devil
himself." Charlie paused.
"You want to know what I
did?"
"What's the matter now,
Barbara?"
"There's a great big yellow
spider on my arm," she had
replied.
"We have a delousing
facility."
"A what?"
"If you have bugs we
spray you," she said over
thick rimmed brown glasses.
"But you don't understand
why I'm here," ! tried to protest. I had gone for what I
thought was a job interview.
And  this fat old  lady with
was scared to open the seat
lest a viper lunge at me.
"So you believe in
astrology," Roy said. "Well,
I need a Libra with a moon in
Cancer. What do you need?"
"How about a woman
with six tits, no mouth, and a
purple Jaguar," I replied.
Roy giggled, grabbed
himself excitedly between
the legs crossed tightly.
"Wanna know a fact?"
"Sure, Roy. What's the
fact?"
"if you suck on a Jewish
Lady's tits after she's had the
"Sure, Charlie."
"I knew he was the Devil.
Now when he shook my
hand my hand shouldda
burned, right?"
"Right, Charlie."
"But mine didn't burn.
That's how I know I'm Jesus
Christ."
"Mmmmmm." I looked
suspiciously at Charlie.
"You don't believe me!
Well, I got proof! When I
knew he wuz the Devil an' I
didn't get burned, ya see I
knew   then   I   was   Jesus
Christ. Can't ya see that?"
"No, Charlie."
"Well yer a goddamned
idiot as far as I'm
concerned!"
Charlie stamped away with
his belief roaring like tidal
waves behind angry boiling
eyes. Spit had started slithering down the left side of his
mouth.
"Who are you? A patient
or a staff?" asked Gerry from
behind his attempted growth
of red beard — about fifty
hairs sprouted from his chin
curly and about an inch in
length. His breath, heavy,
pushed his chest against the
seven dollar, black silk, embroidered, Chinese shirt. His
squeaky, high-pitched voice
rose two decibels.
"Well. What are you?" he
spooned out of his mouth in
such demandingly grating
way that I wanted to punch
his buck teeth so they'd
break and clot the noise his
voice made on my nerves.
"They're harmless," the
Director had told me. "The
only rule is that staff are not
supposed to hit them."
I'd asked, "What about
the other way around?"
"Well, it happens so
seldom."
The bus was speeding us
up Hastings to my new job as
a part time cook-counsellor.
The green dragon embroidered on Gerry's shirt
started panting. "Huh. You
going t' answer me!" he
screamed.
"Shut up!"
"You can't talk t' me like
that! I'm a resident! And I
can slap you if I want! You
don't know how strong I
really am. Don't you tell me
shut up or I'll show you!"
•    ••••••
The bus trip had been
pleasantly short. Room and
board with few shackles in
my pocket each week hadn't
sounded bad to me. It had
seemed better than the prospects of U.I.C. or welfare.
My job was simple: set out
meals, do some side
counselling, relieve staff if
necessary.
Nick had gulped down two
plates of food, three glasses
of juice, five cups of milk until the jug was empty —
gulped it down like a seal
tossing back a herring. He
shuffled into the office,
stomach plumply before him.
"You . . . know . . .
the . . . Hoovers?" haltingly
he asked me, eyes shifting
up and down his front as
though looking for feet.
"You mean the people
with the vacuum cleaners?"
"Yes, They's the ones."
"What about them,
Nick?"
"They's my family. They's
very religious. They's very
SeePF 10
Page Friday 2
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, September 14, 1979 Pointed Sticks sharpen stand on nukes
By STEVE McCLURE
"Nuke is puke" is the rallying cry of anti-nuclear new
wave fans.
And 800 die-hard supporters braved the rain at the
Rock Against Radiation concert in Vanier Park Saturday.
To focus people's attention on the growing anti-
nuclear movement, concert
organizers assembled Vancouver's best new wave
talent for an afternoon of inspired degeneracy.
Due to a mixup with the
Vancouver parks board, the
music started at two-thirty
rather than noon. High spirits
and good fellings prevailed
as the entire West End could
be heard cheering across the
water as the Whitecaps won
the Soccer Bowl.
The K-Tels opened the
concert, appropriately advising everyone "to go to fucking Hawaii" if they didn't like
the rain. Their set was
typically loud, fast and articulate.
Art Bergmann, lead
vocalist and guitarist, is one
of those inspired maniacs
who make rock interesting.
"We like to be in the same
condition as our aduience."
The K-Tels (or X-Tels provisionally, pending the outcome of negotiations with
Winnipeg based hard-sell
specialists) have great potential, combining fast power
chording with imaginative
lyrics.
A brief message of
solidarity from American Indian activist John Trudell
preceded the Pointed Sticks,
Vancouver's answer to the
Small Faces. Laden with
hooks and catchy melodies,
the Sticks have evolved an
increasingly distinctive style
that still sounds rather affected and derivative of mid-
sixties British rock groups.
Their tight sound and driving energy easily qualify
them as the band in Vancouver with the most Obvious Commercial Potential,
and not mere lightweight
fluff as some have claimed.
A certain prejudice exists
against the Pointed Sticks in
the local new wave community, and it seems that
any financial success they
come to enjoy will be greeted
with as much bitterness as
congratulation. While most
new wave bands emphasize
pure violent energy, the
Sticks actually extoll the virtues of love, even if it is the
dreary pop-romance kind.
Greenpeacer Walrus
Oakenbough followed the
Sticks, and was pelted with
mud as he tried to bridge the
gap between punks and hippies by appealing to the
ecological sensibilities of the
crowd.
Then Reconstruction, a
reggae band, provided a
breathing space before the
Turn to PF 10
By HEATHER CONN
Rock Against Radiation was the
show that almost didn't go on.
The free outdoor concert was
delayed two-and-a-half hours after
complaints and hassles between
organizers, Vancouver parks board
and police.
After about 20 hard-core punk
fans and organizers arrived noon
Saturday in Vanier Park, a police
cruiser soon pulled up. The officers
produced a letter from the parks
board stating the concert permit
was revoked due to the questionable use of "high
amplification."
Concert organizers were told
they had been sent a copy of the
letter; concert organizers said it was
the first time they'd seen it.
"Police claim they sent letters
saying the concert was cancelled,"
said Joey Shithead, member of the
band D.O.A. performing in the concert. "The cops said, 'Fuck, we'd
better not have this going on.' "
"We're only an innocent party in
this," said B. Drab of the Vancouver Police Department. "We
only enforce what the law is."
But fans and organizers said it
was another incident of police
harassment.
"It's just the idea they don't like
the type of people involved," said
one organizer, who declined to be
identified. "They're more afraid of
punks than they are of nuclear
death and radioactive material."
Organizers' lawyer Pat Nichols
met with policemen, who acted as
spokesmen for the parks board.
Originally, the board, gave permis
sion for the concert Aug. 8 after requesting a diagram of the outdoor
stage and ensuring it was aimed
away from densely-populated areas
such as the West End.
But about three weeks later, they
changed their minds.
"I think they became nervous
about how big it was going to be,"
said Nichols. "They saw the
amplifiers, how the media were
picking it up and there'd be
thousands of people.
"It's a case of harassing people
who are trying to do something
here," she said after talking with
policemen.
Robin Inglis, spokesman for the
Vancouver planetarium beside
Vanier Park, said the board questioned the use of highly-amplified
music after receiving complaints
from people in neighboring areas
about potential noise, and so decided to cancel the concert.
But after learning of the permit
revocation for the first time in
negotiations with police, concert
representatives phoned Len Ryan
of the parks board and presented
their case. They then learned that a
letter notifying them of the
cancellation had indeed been sent,
but to a concert organizer who was
away on three weeks' vacation. So
he was unable to inform other concert organizers of the cancellation.
After they explained to Ryan the
misunderstandings, lack of communication between both sides and
$1,000 concert investment in
trucks, advertising and sound
systems, he relented and the show
went ahead.
Friday, September 14,1979
THE    UBYSSEY
Page Friday 3 Chuck feels so good at
SKr •&■'.*■>•'•• ••••'•:•••  .'  ••.■.•s
■ ,   • >i c   i      * ,    -i •
-» i P 4i{--V.
By GLENN BUHR
"How ya doin out there?" were
Chuck Mangione's first words to a
sellout audience at the Orpheum
Theatre Tuesday night. Well-
dressed in a t-shirt and the ruffled
hat that has come to be his
trademark, Mangione then proceeded to sway the audience . . .
completely.
Since the gradual fade-out of big
swing bands in the thirties and the
forties, jazz has lost popularity
among the general public.
Mangione is at the centre of a
dynamic force that is bringing jaz2
and its concepts of improvisation to
a wide music listening public including even AM radio. How does
he do it? Simple. He writes, arranges and plays good music.
Opening with Song of the New
Moon from the album Chase the
Clouds Away he proved his competency as both a composer and
performer. The tune began with
Mangione at the piano playing a
r n y t h m i c opening that was
developed by the rhythm section.
He 'hen took up his flugelhorn and
p'ayed the theme in duet with sax-
opnonist Chris Vadala.
The music was pure Mangione a
gentle blend of Spji.'sh, Latin, rock
and jazz topped with a sensitive and
appealing meiodic line And in ex
ecution Mangione is not only totally
devoted to the music but completely involved when hie performs it. It
was his involvement, his rhythmic
emotion, and most of all his high
quality of music and musical expression that won the audience
over from the outset.
Mangione was backed by Grant
Geissman on guitar, Charles Meeks
on bass and James Bradley Jr. on
drums.  As a rhythm section they
Human follies snatch
laughter from audience
By WENDY HUNT
La Cage aux Folles is sneaky for a
funny movie. It draws on all our
preconceptions of gay people and
then makes them unimportant.
The director, Edouard Molinaro,
uses outrageous gay stereotypes
for his two main characters. The
audience laughs easily and often at
people who are so different from
themselves, but they are so "sym-
pathique", it is impossible to dislike
them.
La Cage aux Folles
Directed by Edouard Molinaro
A Franco-Italian production
in French with English
subtitles
Playing at the Fine
Arts Cinema
Zaza reigns nightly as the star of
the transvestite review at La Cage
aux Folles. The rest of the time he
doffs his costumes and reverts to
being "plain" Albin. He and Renato
live above the night club they jointly
own and as gay men, inhabit a
fringe world outside of convention.
Their domestic routine is disturbed by the arrival of Laurent,
Renato's son, who announces he is
going to marry a woman. Worse
still the bride's father heads a society for moral order.
The young couple want the
blessing of the bride's parents, the
Charriers, but they can get it only if
the Charriers have met the groom's
family, the Balbis. From etiquette to
decor the flamboyant Balbi
household must be transformed into something akin to respectability
before the Charriers arrive for dinner.
Molinaro has a fine eye for balan
cing extremes and getting the most
laughs from an uneasy alliance.
The relationship between Albin
and Renato is a classic study of
how opposites attract. Albin is
given to histrionics, while Renato is
sedate. They have remained
together for twenty years, not
because they are lovers, but
because they are friends. As
Renato explains to Albin, he is still
with him because Albin makes him
laugh. And that's a better reason
than many.
Molinaro makes a surprising
comparison between the gays and
straights. Charrier, a blustery social
climber and Albin are highly
stereotyped. As both characters are
exaggerated, they do not overpower each other. Both the gays
and straights are pretentious, but
the Charriers are unpleasantly so.
Charrier, born the son of a gendarme, has risen high within the
French bureaucracy and wishes to
protect his social prestige. The
pretense of Albin and Renato springs from who they are and makes
no excuses. They possess the self-
respect and courage which Charrier
lacks.
The innocent, natural quality of
the young lovers makes an excellent contrast with the colorful
adult world. But they do not escape
unscathed from Molinaro's biting
comments. If young people are sensitive, it is only to their own feelings. Laurent asks Renato to asl<
Albin to leave for a few days so that
his "aunt" will not spoil his chances
for marriage. But Renato has barely
had time to broach the subject with
Albin when he comes upon Laurent
denuding the house of its trappings.
La Cage aux Folles is a rare combination of comedy and drama.
Laughter and sadness alternate
with lightning rapidity and it is what
the characters do, not say, which
controls the audience with such
ease.
A great deal of the credit for this
must go to Michel Serrault as Albin
and to'Ugo Tognazzi as Renato.
Through a thick overlay of gay
stereotyping they bring forth genuine feelings which reach out to
the audience. These are not social
outcasts but people whose feelings
are as valid as anyone's.
Serrault has a fine comic sense
which comes from understanding
human nature. He demonstrates
this in one small scene of pathos
and comedy. In preparation for the
Charriers' visit, Albin has dressed
conservatively in a black suit and no
make-up. He has a pained, naked
look on his face as he unsuccessfully tries to restrain the effeminate
gestures that betray him as gay. As
his pant cuff sneaks up his leg to
reveal nylons, he admits with a
shrug, "Toujours un peu de
couleur."
The scenes of the Charrier family
alone are less successful than those
with Albin and Renato. Madame
Charrier is not as good a foil for her
husband as is Renato for Albin.
And as Charrier is heterosexual, the
audience is less prompt to laugh at
him than at Albin.
La Cage aux Folles resurrects the
classical comedy and proves it to be
as enduring and endearing as ever.
By adding a twentieth century conundrum, Molinaro rejuvenates the ,%*.
ageless tale of love and marriage.        ys
Plus  ca   change,   plus  c'est  la      :.;.
meme chose.
were unbeatable and true to form in
the Mangione style. The 11th Commandment from the album Feel so
Good gave Meeks and Bradley a
chance to do some solo work.
Meeks was first, a unique soloist
able to maintain perfect time while
improvising fusion style bass
melodies. Bradley's solo was loud,
less in the tradition of jazz than
rock. The dense percussion was accompanied by an awesomely fast
pulse maintained on the high-hat.
The result was impressive
technically but generally too busy
and definitely too loud.
Grant Geissman on acoustic,
electric and classical guitars had
plenty of opportunity to display his
solo skills. Chase the Clouds Away
featured a Geissman solo on
acoustic guitar. His style is unique,
falling somewhere between jazz
and rock. His lines tended to be
rhapsodic and his articulation questionable at times, but there was
always some interest and direction
in each of his solos.
The soloist who stole the show
technically and musically was
saxophonist Chris Vadala. Completely at home with Mangione's
music, Vadala displayed incredible
rhythmic and melodic energy in his
improvised solos.
His intonation on soprano saxophone was flawless, his tone
biting but fluid, and his musical
ideas were effortlessly realized.
Doubling on alto flute, C flute and
piccolo for some of the arrangements certainly verified his
versatility. Anyone who has tried
switching from playing tenor sax to
piccolo in less than thirty seconds
will appreciate the incredible difficulty involved for a player's embouchure. Vadala pulled it off.
Mangione's own solos on
flugelhorn were complete and satisfying if not a dazzling display of virtuosity. His tone was stable and his
intonation right on every time.
And what would a Chuck
Mangione concert be without a per
formance of the tune that made him
famous' He closed with a lengthy
version    of    'Feel   so   Good'    and
Page Friday 4
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, September 14, 1979 Orpheum,
thanked the audience for coming to
appreciate his music.
His reflection before leaving the
stage that he was grateful for such
a turnout in 'times when bread is
scarce' is perhaps prophetic.
Money is becoming more and more
precious and people aren't buying
concert tickets haphazardly
anymore. They are more
discriminating about their concert-
going. They want to hear only the
best artists, like Chuck Mangione,
and only the best quality of music,
like Chuck Mangione's music.
Paper Wheat reaps
west coast applause
£^*>mXVV"
^-" '.IV , *   . * * «^    ,
iS^^l .<...
•".-"   *. .■'. -•■.„ y-' ii
^iiV
By HOLLY NATHAN
The 'paper wheat' of the commodity market is the life and blood
of the prairie farmer and the play
Paper Wheat running through Oct.
6 at the Vancouver East Cultural
Centre, is the story of them both.
The play is a collage of prairie
vignettes, that ingeniously captures
that staple of Canadian society, —
the prairie farmer.
Paper Wheat
25th Street House Theatre
At the Vancouver East
Cultural Centre
Until Oct. 6
The cast and director of Saskatchewan's 25th Street House
Theatre have collectively evolved '
Paper Wheat through their own
research and it is a strangely rich-
textured portrayal of prairie life. It's
'strange', because in two hours it
hardly seems possible to sketch a
hundred years — even Canadian
years — in more than skeleton
form. We are in fact whisked from
the old country to a new, from fear
and loneliness, to brotherhood and
political awakening, in what
amounts to no more than a few
brush strokes of an artist's pen.
But such are those strokes that
the intimate history of a marriage is
revealed when a couple unfolds a
blanket, where an entire courtship
develops over one meal and when a
character is most poignantly caught
through his slack-kneed, jut-jawed
way he sits in a chair. The audience
comes away from the six-member
cast production feeling that they
have known a whole prairie Saskatchewan community. The actors
themselves talked to actual prairie
old-timers in the researching and
creation of Paper Wheat.
It is the conversational,
sometimes corny distinctly down-
home presentation of 'Paper
Wheat' that makes it so comfortably familiar. One wonders if such
a cosy atmosphere is dependent on
the nature of the theatre itself; and
while the East Cultural Centre is
ideal, it is quite conceivable the
Queen Elizabeth Theatre, for instance, could reduce the play to an
awkward homeliness.
Opening with the fiddle music of
Saskatchewan-born Bill Prokop-
chuk, real-life Western Canadian
Fiddling Champion, the audience is
quickly spirited to the front porch of
a farmhouse where for the next two
hours it is painlessly enlightened
through skits, music and dance as
to the real man behind the loaf of
bread.
The entire cast displays a
remarkable versatility in portraying
a host of characters and the production is certainly a unique pooling of their various talents. For instance, Skai Leja and David Francis
draw upon their tap-dancing
abilities to perform a mini-act symbolizing the advantages of a farming co-operative while Luboniv
Mykytiuk expertly juggles a dinner
roll and baseballs to make an
economic illustration.
However, a collective production
such as this has a potential to incorporate too wide a sampling of ideas
and talent and Paper Wheat
becomes a little overcrammed with
variety — which is not to say it is
loosely constructed. On the contrary, two themes can be said to
tightly thread the patchword effect
of the play: in the first half, the
growing ability of the immigrants to
resist victimization by fickle
weather — to build windbreaks
against drought erosion; and in the
second half, the development of
farm co-operatives as the only form
of windbreak against 'economic
erosion'.
It is brotherhood — working
together — that is the driving force
behind Saskatchewan history, and
the formation of the biggest producer co-op in the world.
However, the end of the play
leaves one dangerously close to
despair by revealing how the co-op
degenerates into a corporation excepting the last line where an old
man reminisces about yester-year
and sighs, "I'd give it all to be a
young again and to feel I could
change the world".
As director of Paper Wheat, Guy
Sprung and the 25th Street House
Theatre have skillfully woven a
history of moods, fears, hopes and
feelings that are brimming with
energy. Cast member Sharon Bak-
ker, herself a 'Saskatchewanee',
capsulizes characters with extraordinary fullness and Lubomir
Mykytiuk displays a warm vitality;
and the entire cast with David Francis, Peter Meause and Skai Leja
communicate the joy and teamwork
which only a collective production
such as this could foster.
This is a play that 'dares to tell
the farmer's own story', and lest we
sophisticated west coast types dare
to scorn the prairie people as a
handful of 'hayseed'. Paper Wheat
reminds us that they 'can change
the world.'
V"
y>
*
■*.    -• •«■■». v» .V-...-   . ,.^.  .. .        ..    j3&Jw?g5
Page Friday 5
Friday, September 14,1979
THE    UBYSSEY Cinema-16 offers sci-fi
By LARRY GREEN
Science fiction fans and
anglophiles will have a good time at
the first term offerings of Cinema
16, which begins its twentieth
season next week. The two fall
series are entitled, appropriately
enough. Science Fiction and
Singularly British, and offer a wide
variety of viewing on each subject
for series members.
Science Fiction begins Monday
and Tuesday with a triple bill: the
original Invasion of the Body Snatchers (1955), with The Incredible
Shrinking Man (1957) and This
Island Earth (1955). Cult favorites of
the 1950s continue to be shown
Oct. 1 and 2 with The Day the Earth
Stood Still (1951) and Forbidden
Planet (1956).
On Oct. 15 Stanley Kramer's all-
star On the Beach (1959), about the
survivors of an imagined nuclear
disaster, will show, followed on
Oct. 29 by The War Game (1966),
and the haunting Lord of the Flies
(1963) on Nov. 13. Sean Connery is
features scantily clad in Zardoz
(1973),   a   controversial   SF   film
about efforts to repopulate a barren
future world. The series ends Nov.
26 with e college-made cult classic,
Dark Star (1974), a spoof of the
genre.
Cinema 16 comes down to earth,
on English soil to be exact, with the
British film showings beginning
Sept. 24. Sleuth (1972) is the
famous stage hit turned into an
award-winning and Oscar-
nominated thriller. Anything but an
average mystery, it features
Laurepce Olivier and Michael Caine.
The spectre of Ken Russell rises
again with The Devils (1971) on
Oct. 9, putting Vanessa Redgrave
and Oliver Reed into a 16th century
witchhunt.
The most recent of Peter
O'Toole's five Oscar nominations to
date was for The Ruling Class
(1972), shown Oct. 22, a film about
a-lord who considers himself to be
Jesus Christ. The Rocky Horror Picture Show (1975) is shown Nov. 5,
and it now boasts a huge cult success following a quiet initial release.
Kinky horror and raunchy rock are
the keynote to this increasingly
popular musical.
BICYCLE!
STUDENT SALE
LTD.    10 Speed
THE HOT NEW RALEIGH FOR FALL!
SALE 169.95
Look at the Raleigh Ltd. Compare the features, and then check
the price — it's simply the best way back to school!
POINT
reus
Est. 1930
3771 W. 10th
224-3536
Also The Peddler
620 E. Broadway 874-8611
4256 E. Hastings 298-4322
ARTS
BEAR GARDEN
Friday, Sept. 14
FREE BEARS
GREAT MUSIC
4:00 - 8:00 p.m.
Buchanan Lounge
O Lucky Man! (1973), shown
Nov. 19 and 20, is a fascinating
young man's journey through
society by Lindsay Anderson,
maker of If.... It is complete with
technical excellence, humor, satire,
and a super song score by Alan
Price. The final show Dec. 3 is a
filmed stage performance. Pleasure
At Her Majesty's, featuring Monty
Python, Peter Cook and Dudley
Moore, among others. Full of
British music hall humor, it takes an
unusual look at the performers who
make English humor come alive.
Admission to Cinema 16 is by
series pass only. One series sells to
students and staff for $5.50, two
for $10, and four (including next
term's showings) for $18. Admission to the general public is $1 extra
per person per series. Information
on showtimes and other ticket
outlets may be obtained from the
AMS in SUB 266 or the Cinema 16
office in SUB 247 (228-3698). Next
term Cinema 16 promises us a
series of Stanley Kubrick's work
and a fascinating Japanese series,
beginning in January and running
to the end of March.
CINEMA 16
steps into a new season
UBC
READING, WRITING AND
STUDY SKILLS CENTRE
COMMENCING THE WEEK OF SEPTEMBER 29, 1979 THE
UBC READING, WRITING AND STUDY SKILLS CENTRE
WILL OFFER SHORT COURSES IN GRAMMAR AND COMPOSITION, READING IMPROVEMENT, STUDY SKILLS
DEVELOPMENT, WRITING IMPROVEMENT AND
VOCABULARY DEVELOPMENT. ALL COURSES HAVE
LIMITED ENROLMENT AND PRE-REGKTRATION IS REQUIRED.
FOR REGISTRATION INFORMATION
CALL 228-2181, LOC 245
Page Friday 6
THE   UBYSSEY
Friday, September 14,1979 COTTON ... Mr. Southern Superb is high powered energy.
JOHNSON . . . eight years veteran gives blasting diverse drum solo.
Blues band sweet
as Cotton candy
His gold tooth gleamed as the
blues oozed from a warm harp cupped in rythmic hands.
James Cotton was Mr. Southern
Superb.
The Missippi-born blues master
gave a Commodore crowd on Tuesday two hours of well-polished
spectacular sounds. From the slow,
mellow notes of "One More Mile"
and B.B. King's "Sweet Sixteen"
to the uplifting, driving beat of "I
don't know," Cotton kept dancers
and listeners in constant motion
snapping fingers, clapping hands
and tapping feet.
It was impossible to sit still.
The smiling performer, in a black
T-shirt marked "100% cotton," ensured that no blues admirer stayed
immobile. He bared his belly to
shake to the beat, sweated and
grinned, balanced — blew and
threw his harp and, flinging it into
the air amid breaths. Clutching the
microphone as if he'd never let go,
he gave the show everything he
had.
It was non-stop energy.
His talented 5-piece band kept
the 25-year blues harp veteran well-
stocked with diverse styles and
musical perfection. Guitarist Pat
Rush performed outstanding slide
guitar work in true Duane Allman
form with little visible effort. He and
guitarist Harry Hmura gave excellent guitar interplay, in precise
Written by Heather Conn
Photos by Peter Menyasz
FAGEN . . . leading solos with wild screaming wails.
synchronization and ever-changing
beats and rythyms.
Their best effort, which many
considered well worth the concert
in itself, was a 15-minute rendition
of Allman Brothers' classic "Hot
'Lanta." Few bands dare attempt to
imitate the guitar work and solo
performances of the original five-
minute song, but this version was
excellent. Saxophone player Doug
Fagen lead the solos with wild,
screaming wails on his reed instrument and prompted the two
guitarists to follow in an impressive
synchronized three-man solo
showpiece.
Individual skills and intricacies
emerged immediately in this improvised slow-paced Allman
Brothers interpretation. Drummer
Ken Johnson, an eight-year veteran
of the James Cotton band, gave a
blasting diverse drum solo, which
far surpassed most bands' token
boom-bang repititious and
monotonous drum solos.
After the show, Atlanta-born
guitarist Rush explained modestly
the band's choice of Hot 'Lanta:
"It's not hard. It's very easy to jump
right into it." Rush, who has only
been with the Cotton band for three
months, said he met James Cotton
while playing guitar with Johnny
Winter — he's never looked back.
The band's introductory one-
hour set gave the audience a small
taste of the well-honed blues hours
that were to come. Instead of an
impatient crowd tolerating a
faceless untalented back-up band
while waiting for the "real" star to
appear,   listeners   revelled   in   the
opening set as a fine performance
in itself. Then, when James Cotton
finally did appear, with his low,
throaty growly voice and harp in
hand, the icing was on the cake.
"The people in Vancouver have
been so good to us," said Cotton
after the show, as he sat shirtless
wiping sweat off his stomach with a
towel. "I thought it was a good
crowd. It was a long, beautiful set
and the people enjoyed it."
With two encores, and loud cries
for more, he had every right to be
smug.
#    *    #
The lousy no-name blues band
syndrome was alive and well and
living (barely) at the Commodore
Tuesday night.
The Thunderbirds blues band,
which played before James Cotton
and his band, was one of the worst
displays of bad blues voice and solo
work imaginable. The group's constant blast and blare and full-force
volume, without the polished, practiced ability to back it up, was
notably irritating.
It certainly wasn't worth the
three quarters-of-an-hour wait after
one band member arrived late by
plane. The lead singer had a please-
let- me-sing-blues-bu t-l-know-l-
-can't voice. His guitar work didn't
make up for serious vocal lackings
and he didn't help one band
member shine. The only faint hint
of quality playing belonged to the
keyboard player, who was drowned
out so badly by poor sound mix and
raucuous over-playing of the other
band members, he might as well
have stayed home.
APPLEWHITE . . . very easy to jump right into it.
RUSH . . . joined three months ago, never looked back.
Friday, September 14, 1979
THE    UBYSSEY
Page Friday 7 Eyes fixed on a bottle, I listen to the miauing
of a cat. I listen like that a long time, attentively.
I still see the bottle but can no longer hear
the cat's miauing: now I can hear distinctly
the bottle's misauing.
I listen then to the voice of a passer-by, a tap
running, a car.
At the same time I look at a match, then a
saucepan.
Very naturally I hear the tap snapping the
match while talking to the saucepan with the
strange voice of a car. Simultaneously,
I see the car come out of a tap with the
sound of a saucepan.
Indeed, before these curious events my
reason balks a little; but how can the
evidence be denied, even it comes close to
delirium?
Things are after all only seen by virtue of a
convention often of a utilitarian order that
serves to define the norm. Thus we live by
habits of perception that, while shared by
everyone, are none the less specious.
Is it not strange, at the outside, that a cat
miaus?
And if a cat accords itself the luxury of misu-
ing why couldn't a bottle do likewise?
The question is asked.
Anyway, the fact of hearing with the ears
alone is already astonishing in itself. Why
shouldn't I hear with my eyes, why not see
with my nose?
If I tried.
I   smell  the  perfume  of
onion, some vinegar.
I   watch   the  saucepan,
aroma of a strawberry miauing like vinegar
flowing from a tap.
I listen: I hear the smell of the vinegar in the
voice of a passer-by with a sulphur face.
I smell the onion again. It gives off liquids of
a car having struck a strawberry in the misu-
ing of a bend.
I start to lose step in myself. I stagger like a
drunk.
Abandoning my perceptual habits, I wander
without obstackle in the line of a thought
that the separation of the senses no longer
divides.
However there remains touch for me to experiment with.
With a finger I brush a cupboard, a screw, a
shirt.
I breathe in the vinegar: its breath is harsh
like a screw miauing after an onion.
I    touch    the   shirt,    I    palp    its   delicious
strawberry aroma.
Then I look at the bottle again.
Inside, I make out a rubbing of a cupboard
to the perfume of miauing.
In the interpenetration of my senses functioning like a trap, for an instant I have the
impression of seizing the meaning of the
world as a totality.
So, happy and fierce, I leave my lair.
I roar.
— By ALAIN ROUSSEL
Translation by TONY MONTAGUE
a  strawberry,   an
It   resembles   the
jrftA
PJfi
/>.
REGULAR STAFFERS AND PHOTOGRAPHERS NEEDED - ALL SUBMISSIONS
FROM POETS, ARTISTS AND WRITERS WELCOME - JOIN US ROOM 241K SUB
'<*dy
Page Friday 8
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, September 14, 1979 Brian is mistaken messiah in Python's best
By GEOF WHEELWRIGHT
Monty Python's Life Of Brian
could well have been called the
Best of Monty Python.
It is full of familiar Python
themes, jokes and parodies executed with loving care by a comedy troupe that hasn't worked
together in almost six years.
The reunion is joyful and productive, producing Python's most
cohesive work to date. It is a
celebration of British comedy at its
finest.
Monty Python's Life of Brian
Directed by Terry Jones
Starring Graham Chapman,
John Cleese, Terry Gilliam,
Eric Idle, Terry Jones
and Michael Palin
At the Capital 6
The film is about a young Judean
named Brian (Graham Chapman),
who is born across the street from
the nativity, and almost receives all
the gold, frankincense and myrhh
intended for Christ. But Brian isn't
the son of God, although many
people find it convenient to continue thinking he is.
The unwitting messiah soon
becomes the martyred hero of the
People's Front of Judea, led by the
infamous terrorist Reg (John
Cleese), but falls out of favor with
the PFJ when they find out he has
the audacity to survive a suicide
mission to kidnap Pilate's wife.
He is befriended by female PFJ
member Judith (Sue Jones-Davis),
who harbors him in her bed — only
to be discovered by Brian's throng
of followers and Brian's mother
(Terry Jones) when they wake up.
Brian finally addresses his
"disciples" from the balcony of
Judith's bedroom and tells them "I
am not the messiah" to which they
say, "Only the real messiah would
deny it." He tells them to believe in
themselves because they are all individuals. They bleat back "we are
all individuals" in unison.
Brian's mother then appears to
drag him away telling the assembled masses "he's not the bloody
savior, he's just a naughty boy and
he's going home."
Brian eventually ends up being
arrested by Pilate for his involvement with the PFJ and is sentenced
to crucifixion. While waiting'for'his
CANADIAN ODEON Theatres
FOR THEATRE INFORMATION PHONE 687-1515
l^rjPTwr^^ni
SHOWTIMES: 1:10 3:15 5:20 7:25 9:35
SUNDAY 3:15 5:20 7:25 9:35
Varning: Some graphic scenes of burns
& injuries — B.C. DIR.	
voquc
918  GRANVILLE
6855434
■■£)   SHOWTIMES: 1:00 2:40 4:15 6:05 8:00 10:00
■/ SUNDAY 2:40 4:15 6:08 8:00 10:00
OQEON
Mls Warning:    some '   „„
^ swearing ft coarse      88' .c"*"™"
nguage-B.C. Dir.
682-7468
L&VEand
.BULLETS
SHOW TIMES:  1:45 3:45 j
5:50 7:50 10:00
SUNDAY   3:45  5:50  7:50
10:00
CORONET  I
THE
"Warning:    some       "5'   GRANVILLE
riolence. 685-6828
; SHOW TIMES: 1:30 3:30 5:30
7:30 9:30
SUNDAY 3:30 5:30 7:30 9:30
CORONET 2
Warning      some    gory    violence    &       85'   GRANVILLE
* -o4£.k^L. ,   frightening scenes. B.C. DIR
685-6828
Warning: some frightening
scenes, occasional violence
& nudity. B.C. DIR.
Showtimes:
7:30 9:30
duisbAR
DUNBAR  at  30th
224-7252
THE ROCK N ROLL MOVIE! 9   'hmmm
DARK
SHOWTIMES: 7:30 9:30      gor555?isK]   CAM8,E „ ,8ts
^ 876-2 74 7
/I2IIB/1
WITH ALL THE REALISM OF
A    LIVE   CONCERT
PRESENTED IN FULL FOUR-
TRACK    STEREOPHONIC
SURROUND SOUND.
224-3730
^375  W. 10th
time to come, Brian is stuck in a cell
with a prisoner (Michael Palin) who
tells him he's lucky to be crucified
and gets jealous when a centurion
spits in Brian's face.
"Look at that favoritism, he
never spits in my face," yells the
prisoner.
The prisoner's joke and most of
the others in the film have already
been used successfully in previous
Python films, but re-made in this
particular fashion they make a comprehensive collection of their best
material.
Palin's joke comes from the
famous "Four Yorkshiremen"
sketch in which four Yorkshiremen
argue proudly over who's had a
worse life.
But to a real Python fan the jokes
are like a fine wine, they improve
with each repetition, and those
who aren't Pythonites won't have
heard them anyway.
If you've never had the pleasure
of seeing a Python film, then this
is the one to see, if you have, and
liked it, then you won't miss this
one for anything.
PS«T.'B«IAN!PQ«N6
AMVTHms Afree the
CRUC-IFixio (47
J
For only a
few dollars
a month, you
can afford
TO LAUGH
AT BAD
MARX.
Almbsf any student can afford fhe
luxury of laughing at bad Marx.
Or jeering Edward the King.
Perhaps even learning the art of fast
food with the Galloping Gourmet.
Granada has made it all possible
with great, low, colour TV rental rates.
Whafs more, all service, all parts, even a
colour loaner if shop repairs are
needed, are yours at no extra charge!
Ifs a great deal you won't have To
study to understand.
So let Granada help you take a
break from the rigours of academic life.
Call us now.
With our fast installation, we could
have you laughing at Marx in less than
an hour.
All Granada locations are open daily from 9 AM to
9 PM, and Saturday till 6.
Give us a call soon. We're listed in the Yellow Pages.
GRANADA ^h^
Worry-Free Colour TV Forever.
995 Granville Street. Vancouver
669-1221
1009 Kingsway, Vancouver, 873-6311
4800 No 3 Road, Richmond, 278-3337
10596 King George Highway, Surrey, in the Dell Shopping Centre
584-2323
1314 Broad Street, Victoria, 386-8826
Friday, September 14,1979
THE    UBYSSEY
Page Friday 9 O DOCTOR
The sky is a strip of gauze
Stabbed by the sun's red blades,
The mountain is a giant purple bruise
And the smokestack is a grim spike
To fall upon
0 Doctor
People   with   faces   the   color   of
chloroform
Seamless and dreamlessly
Brandishing bottles full of
Poppy-colored death
Pursue me, accrue me, redo me,
O Doctor
There are guns
As shiny and bright as forceps
There are snake coils of rope
Dangling from cabinets full of sleep
Fully as aenesthetic
There are sterile bathtubs
And deadly oceans brimming
With liquid more precious than blood
Urging me on
Urging me off
To that seamless dreamless
Totally antiseptic table
0 Doctor
To that last final spurt of being
To that last final spurt
To that last
To that
0 Enemy
1 bleed
As you genuflect before whatever
White and sterile Gods
Operate on the lineoleum tiles
Of your sterile skull,
With your civilized worship
Of clot and bandage
You transfuse and abuse
With such misplaced passion
0 Enemy
Is it truly a religious revival
As you pump and thump
And curse and nurse
Every stiffened eyelid a personal affront
Each bloodless wrist an insult
To   your   sadistic   supposed    omnipotence
0 in this grim corridor
God wears a white coat
And rubber soled shoes
0 God
A   stethoscope   growing   like   twin
horns
Out of your disinfected ears
What fear I feel in you
As you anxiously pursue
The idiot pulse
0 Doctor
1 flicker like a light
And   you   are   nowhere   near   the
switch
You are nowhere near
You are nowhere
You are
Helpless.
The Residents
— susan ward
From PF 2
rich. An' they wouldn't like it
you didn't give me another
cup of milk."
Nick's eyes* bulged like
goggles before he right hand
reached out open palm to
slap me across the face. My
left hand reflexly caught
Nick's wrist, pressing fingers
into the pudge looking for a
nerve to pinch. My body
stood up towering, still holding on to the bad hand.
"Now, Nick, what is this
about the Hoover family?"
Goggle-eyed response.
Like dead fish eyes being
squeezed out of socket.
"They're rich. An' they's
religious. An' they tol' me t'
punish you."
Lumber out of here fat
sleek  bear before  my  right
hand slaps your face, I
thought. Punish yourself
with your gorging and fattening and letting runny
yellow egg yoke slime your
beard. When you go to the
can unload the stuff you are
full of T.V. eyed gogglebrain-
ed nuisance fixated on
foodstuff instead of
womanstuff. I let go of his
wrist without a word, containing my furious thoughts.
I wanted to slap him with a
thousand breaker waves with
my fury, slap the face joined
to the arm which fed and
overfed him. I was to be
punished by an hallucination,
a second party slap. I let go
of Nick's wrist. He inched
backward out of the office,
eyes now downcast, properly minnow-sized again.
PL^Ks
From PF 2
raucous    madness    of   the
Subhumans.
After lead vocalist Wimpy
verbally abused the crowd
the Subhumans launched into an uncompromising set
that became even more effective as the volume of the
guitar got louder, inducing
that wonderful brain damage
effect so beloved of all truly
crude music.
Death to the Sickoids and
Slave to My Dick were standouts, both reflecting the
band's utter contempt for
everything that exists.
But the best was saved for
last as DOA took to the
stage. The notorious
noisemakers from north Burnaby made up for any repetition in their music by using
sheer power and provocation
to force the audience to
become involved. Unlike
other bands, the members of
DOA move like possessed
devils on stage, jumping and
writhing to their music. They
rank with the best rock
bands because they get people ■ moving to the point
where the blind walk and the
lame see.
Despite the rain, the
unpleasant antics of the inevitable biker contingent and
the fact that less people attended than had been anticipated, the event was called a success by DOA's
manager Ken Lester. "Under
the circumstances, we're
really happy. A lot of people
were introduced to some
new music, and it shows
dedication to music and
social awareness by Vancouver people."
We Cut Corners
When cutting the pieces to make a pair
of pants, straight lines are easier than
curves. They also use less fabric. Some
larger firms cut pants that way. With tens
of millions of pairs a year, those savings
add up.
But they don't add up to Howick. Our
pants fit better because of all the slow,
gentle curves in our patterns.
Howick's not a clothing giant, so you won't find our
pants on every corner.
But then,you won't find those corners on our pants.
W^W 1
\ !
i     j
si
v
V
1/       71
m HOWICK
The fitting choice in jeans and cords
Page Friday 10
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, September 14, 1979 \j§ *** 	
SBffiSJ?
■CLIP THIS COUPONn
NEC
$749
AUTHENTIC SERIES
AUA 5000 AMPLIFIER, 50
watts of pure power.
AUS      5000      SPEAKER
SYSTEM,  2  way   passive
radiator, with stands.
AUP    5000   TURNTABLE,
low-noise/rumble    belt
drive.
AUT 5000 TUNER, am/fm,
twin meters, fm muting.
AUDIO RACK, convenient,
attractive.
OFFER VALID ONLY
UPON PRESENTATION
OF COUPON
SAVE 10%
LLOYDS V916
MICRO MINI RECORDER
• only 2 5/8" x 5 3/8", 1"deep
• complete    with     batteries,    case
earphone, cassette, and AC adapter.
■ CLIP THIS COUPON
P49
VANCOUVER:
807 GRANVILLE MALL
Corner of Granville & Robson
684-6351
RICHMOND:
LANSDOWNE SHOPPING CENTRE
Use East Entrance
278-4685
ELECTRONICS LTD.
COUPON "MUST" BE PRESENTED
TO TAKE ADVANTAGE OF
THESE LOW, LOW PRICES.
CLIP THIS COUPON
SAVE $$
LLOYDS E619 SUPER
SCIENTIFIC CALCULATOR
• 8 digit mantissa, 2 digit
sign. 2   digit exponent.
• performs trigonometric
and hyperbolic functions, plus many more
complex calculations.
• complete with
case and
batteries.
VANCOUVER:
901 GRANVILLE MALL
Corner of Granville & Smythe
685-8637
NEW WESTMINSTER
WESTMINSTER MALL
524-6631
BURNABY:
BRENTWOOD MALL
Lougheed & Willingdon
294-8551 Film critics create
commercial success
By LARRY GREEN
When critics band together and
extoll the virtues of a film like
Breaking Away, they can
sometimes create enough interest
to turn a picture into an audience
favorite.
During the past summer, Breaking Away was a small-scale film, a
high-spirited, comedy that found
many admirers.
Breaking Away
Starring Dennis Christopher
and Paul Dooley
Directed by Peter Yates
At the Vancouver Centre
Quite simply, Breaking Away is a
film that works as it should. The
preconceived notions you may have
about its content: adolescent
dreaming, cycle hysteria, lower-
class discontent, cutesy humor —
are neither obtrusive nor even
noticeable.
It's not a heavy experience in
cinema, but it manages to get pretty close to the bone of middle-class
American life. For once this is a
movie that doesn't cheat itself, let
alone the audience and it emerges
as a worthwhile hundred minutes of
film.
The story centres on the post-
high school malaise of four friends
who seem bound together by their
indecision and their hatred of the
college kids whose existence is the
raison d'etre of Bloomington, Indiana, a town of fast-food stands
and lower-middle class housing,
much like many American college
towns.
The friends are Dennis Quaid as
the  funny,   goofy  fellow,   Jackie
the failed athlete, Michael Stern as
Earle Hailey as the short, peppery
character and Dennis Christopher
as the dreamer and thinker, Dave
who takes over the film.
It's too early to tell if Christopher
will spend many more film roles
playing male ingenues, but he's so
perfect and fresh in Breaking Away
that it's hard to imagine him as
anything else. Paul Dooley and Barbara Barrie, as his parents, cook up
some daydreams of their own. Both
familiar faces from television, they
add a funny zest to Dave's progression from drifting and absently
singing Italian opera, to his
development of a sense of self-
worth through his climactic victory
in a cycling championship.
Breaking Away is at its best in its
depiction of two contrasting
elements that make up Bloomington. There is the affluence of the
students from out of town and the
townspeople who probably
couldn't afford the tuition for their
own kids to attend their own
university. It's a persistent struggle
that occasionally comes to a head.
At one point a fight breaks out and
the coeds get the blame and the
boys feel as worthless as ever.
Dave foolishly courts a beautiful
student, Robyn Douglass and the
romance is amusing and doomed at
the same time. It becomes part of
an incisive look at college towns in
America.
The next best thing in the film is
the bike racing, which Peter Yates
directs and cuts with a skill he has
demonstrated before in Bullit and
which complements a continuously
inventive script by Steve Tesich.
Thursday - Sunday
COMING HOME woody ah™-.
with Jane Fonda and Jon Voight | NTE R I O RS
7:30 Box Office Opens 7:00
16th & ARBUTUS, VANCOUVER        738-6311
CLUB'S DAY
ALL DAY
Thursday, Sept. 20
Friday, Sept. 21
Both floors of SUB
THE GREATEST SKI TRAVELOGUE OF ALL TIME
DICK BARRYMORE'S
VAGABOND
SKIERS
Monday, Oct. 1/79, Tuesday, Oct. 2/79
8:00 p.m.. Queen Elizabeth Theatre
Tickets Available At:
Vancouver Ticket Centre, All Eatons Stores
and Information Centres
Presented by Can-Ski Sportshop
WOMEN'S ATHLETICS
ARE INTERESTED IN YOU
Welcome back! On September 18, we are having a
social for all coaches, managers and interested
players. It will be an excellent opportunity for
everyone to meet the newcomers as well as to chat
with old friends. This function will be held from 7:00
p.m. to 10:00 p.m. in SUB Room 212. Refreshments
will be served.
DAL GRAUER
MEMORIAL LECTURES
AMORY LOVINS
By training a physicist, by practice a conservationist, Amory Lovins is a full-time
British representative of Friends of the Earth, Inc., an American-based non-profit
conservation lobbying group. Concentrating on energy and resource strategy,
Mr. Lovins has been a consultant to several United Nations agencies, the
Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development, the Science Council
of Canada, Petro-Canada, the U.S. Department of Energy and many other
organizations in several countries. He is author of several books, including Soft
Energy Paths: Toward a Durable Peace.
SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 15, 8:15 p.m.
Woodward Instructional Resources Centre, 2
(Vancouver Institute Lecture)
'Soft Energy Paths'
FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 21, 12:30 p.m.
Buchanan 106
'Energy Policy: How to Enjoy the Inevitable'
WOMEN'S ATHLETICS
STARTING
DATES:
TEAM TRYOUTS
WOMEN'S ATHLETICS
1979-80
Badminton
Tues., Sept. 18 6:30-9:30 p.m.
Gym A
Basketball
Mon., Sept. 17 4:30-6:30 p.m.
Memorial Gym
Cross Country
Tues., Sept. 174:30 p.m.
Meet in Memorial Gym
Curling
Thurs., Oct. 11 5:00-7:00 p.m.
Winter Sports Centre
Fencing
Mon., Oct. 1 7:00-10:00 p.m.
Gym E
Field Hockey
Mon., Sept. 17 to Fri., Sept. 21
4:30-6:30 p.m.
McGregor Field
Golf
T.B.A. Check at Athletic Office.
Gymnastics
Mon., Sept. 17 4:00 p.m.
Gym G
Ice Hockey
Tues., Sept. 18 5:00-6:15 p.m.
Winter Sports Centre
Rowing
Sat., Sept. 15 9:00 a.m.-12:00 noon
Meet at the Memorial Gym
Vancouver Rowing Club
Sailing
Mid-Sept., first meeting of UBC Sailing
Club                             T.B.A.
Skiing
Tues., Sept. 18 4:30 p.m.
Gym A
Soccer
Tues., Sept. 18 12:00 noon
P.E. Centre Field
Squash
Tues., Sept. 18 5:00-6:30 p.m.
Winter Sports Centre
Swimming
and Diving
Thurs., Sept. 13 12:30 noon
Aquatic Centre Classroom
Tennis
Mon., Wed., Thurs. to Sept. 27
4:30-6:30 p.m.
Thunderbird Park
Tennis Courts
Track & Field
Tues., Sept. 18 4:30 p.m.
Meet in Memorial Gym
Volleyball
Mon., Sept. 17 7:30-10:30 p.m.
Memorial Gym
Cheerleaders
Noonhours                                        Meet
in Memorial Gym, Room 208
Page Friday 12
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, September 14, 19 BLUE NORTHERN . . . at SUB on
Wednesday.
"Jitters," a new comedy by
David French, will open the Vancouver Playhouse Mainstage series
Saturday, September 15, and will
play nightly except Sundays at 8
p.m. In the light comedy style of
Neil Simon, "Jitters" takes a comic
perspective on the backstage
preparations for a production in a
small Toronto theatre. Tickets at
the Vancouver Ticket Center.
Kurt Vonnegut Jr.'s anti-war
comedy, "Happy Birthday, Wanda
June," is being staged nightly except Sundays by Rhapsody Productions at the Y.H. Lui Theatre, until
Sept. 22. All shows at 8:30 p.m.;
tickets at the Vancouver Ticket
Center.
Ida Haendel will be guest violinist
with the Vancouver Symphony in a
program of Mozart, Sibelius and
Brahms. A performance on Sunday, Sept. T6 at 2:30 will open the
orchestra's Diamond Jubilee
season, and the program will be
repeated at 8:30 the following Monday and 7:30 Tuesday. Tickets at
the Vancouver Ticket Center.
The newly regrouped Purcell String Quartet will play Beethoven,
Haydn, and Milhaud in their first
concert together in their new incarnation. You can hear them at the
SFU Theatre on Friday, Sept. 14 at
8:30 p.m. Tickets at the Vancouver
Ticket Center.
Sneezy Waters and his Excellent
Band will give two concerts at SFU
Theatre. At 12:30 on Thursday,
Sept. 20, there will be a free concert, and at 8 p.m. the same-day a
full-scale concert you have to pay
for. Tickets at the SFU Ticket Office. (Whew!)
Blue Northern will appear in the
SUB Auditorium on Wednesday,
Sept. 19 at 12:30 noon. Proceeds
for the concert go to the FM 99
Children's Hospital Fund. Tickets at
the AMS Ticket Office.
Sub Ballroom will be the site of
Bram Tchaikovsky's concert at 8
p.m. on Friday, Sept. 14. Tickets at
the AMS business office. <
Pumps Gallery, 40 E. Cordova,
will be holding an exhibition of new
sculpture by John Mitchell, beginning Friday, Sept. 14 at 9 p.m.
Sea Scent Circus Night on Cable
TV (10) will be a video compendium
of six local writers presenting an
hour of poetry and music, Saturday, Sept. 15 at 3:30 p.m.
"Side by Side by Sondheim" will
be revived for a limited engagement
to open the new Arts Club Theater
on Granville Island. Performances
are 8:30 Monday through Friday,
and 7 and 10 p.m. Saturday, and
tickets are available at the Vancouver Ticket center. "Sondheim
will be playing until September 22.
Michael Strutt will be playing
classical guitar at the Robson
Square Theater at 8:30 on Friday,
Sept. 14. Tickets at the Vancouver
Ticket Center.
UBC's own Freddy Wood
Theatre will present Tom
Stoppard's comedy, "Resencrantz
and Guildenstern are Dead."
Showtimes are 8 p.m., and the production will run from Sept. 19 to
29. Tickets from the Theater Dept.
BLACK & LEE
TUX SHOP
NOW AT
M IG Seymo'-r St.
688-?431
Decorate With Prints
the
Srin. ,
bin
THE Poster & Print
PLACE in B.C.
738-2311
3209 W. Broadway, Van.
Decorate With Posters
^oveKtlfa.^eand
FOR NEW * USED
BOOKS
THOUSANDS Of
• TEXTBOOKS
• PAPRBACXS
• REVIEW NOTES
* MONARCH NOTES
* SCHAUMS OUTLINES
* COLES NOTES
* LARGEST SELECTION OF
REVIEW NOTES IN B.C.
• WE mux USED
P0CKETB00KS
-* 7000 SCIENCE FICTION
BOOKS ALWAYS IN STOCK
CASH PAID FOR TEXTS, ETC.
BETTER BUY BOOKS
4393 W. 10th A»e.
INTERNATIONAL
MEN'S
VOLLEYBALL
Canada vs. Japan
Wednesday, Sept. 19
8:00 p.m.
UBC War Memorial Gym
Tickets available at all
Vancouver Ticket Outlets
and at the door
All Seats Reserved
Prices:
$3 and $4
$1 off for students
BRAiyi TCHAIKOVSKY... mora new wave from the Brits
HAIRWORLD
2620 SASAMAT (W Oh AVE. & SASAMAT
224-4912 224-1862
Ohrummti
RED LEAF
RESTAURANT
Luncheon Smorgasbord
Authentic Chinese Cuisine
228-9114
from 4:30 p.m.
2142 Western Parkway
U.E.L. Vancouver. B.C.
BJ#tt*;&*
■J»V
- WELCOME -
COME & EN JO Y A WONDERFULL Y
l>05<ID>ON
A UTHENTIC GREEK DINNER
DINNER FOR TWO $17.00
DELICIOUS!
Village Salad                                   Soup
Souvlaki                                     Dessert
(Fully Licensed)
7 days A week     THE POSEIDON RESTAURANT
11:30 - 2:30                        <B5 E. Broadway (res. please)
5:00"                                    874-0622
HONG KONG
CHINESE FOOD
(Self Serve
Restaurant)
^UNIVERSITY BLVD.^>
tfC Eat In and Take Out j£
f* OPEN EVERY DAY ^
4:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m.   ?*>
PHONE: 224-6121 A
aBisMiisliaialndBimiaasmnsiigrgrsiqi
l PACHEENA
FRASER ARMS
14b0 S.W. Marine Dr
SPECIALIZING IN
GREEK CUISINE
& PIZZA
FREE FAST DELIVERY.
228-9513
4510 W. 10th Ave. 5
'^Fli^FJEJiTaMs^r^nr)Nr='f='i='iffi^'iCTii
CALIFORNIA STYLE
MEXICAN COOKING
2.904 W.4W AVE.    793-3713
'An eating experience not to be under
estimated as one ol the best mexlcan restaurants north of California.' Thats what
it is all about!
OPEN TUES.-SUN.
TAKE OUT ORDERS WELCOME!
 LICENSED
^•••••••••••••••••at
Another I inch's
SPECIAL
Fl 1.1. COl RSE MEALS
From S3.95
CI RRIEI) SHRIMPS t ASSEROLE
BRAISEI) SHORT RIBS
ROAST PORK & APPLESAUCE
BAVARIAN KNACK VURST
BREAKFAST SPECIAL
BACON, HAM OR SAUSAGES
AM) EGGS
HASH BROWNS. TOAST
COFFEE
$1.95
8:00 AM - 11:00 AM
££mc(u's
(jS
3211 V\. BROADWAY
738-2010 YOUR ONE-STOP
RECORD & TAPE CENTRES
4240 LOW BUDGET —
KINKS
9504 EVE —
ALAN PARSONS PROJECT
SERAPHIM CLASSICS — 2.99 perd.sc
titlf;artist
LP
TAPE
TITLE/ARTIST
LP
TAPE
GET THE KNACK
THE KNACK
4.29
4.79
I ROBOT
ALAN PARSONS PROJECT
4.49
4.99
FIRST UNDER THE WIRE
LITTLE RIVER BAND
4.29
4.79
TIME PASSAGES
AL STEWART
4.49
4.99
WHITE ALBUM
THE BEATLES (2 L.P. SET)
7.99
8.99
WAVE
PATTI SMITH GROUP
4.49
4.99
SGT   PEPPERS
THE BEATLES
4.49
4.99
LION HEART
KATE BUSH
4.49
4.99
1962-1966
THE BEATLES (2 L.P. SET)
7.99
8.99
THE KICK INSIDE
KATE BUSH
4.49
4.99
1967-1970
THE BEATLES (2 L.P. SET)
7.99
8.99
BALDRY'S OUT
LONG JOHN BALDRY
4.49
4.99
GREATEST HITS
APRIL WINE
4.49
4.99
DARK SIDE OF THE MOON
PINK FLOYD
4.49
4.99
NIGHT OWL
GERRY RAFFERTV
4.49
4.99
STRANGER IN TOWN
BOB SEQER
4.49
4.99
WE SHOULD BE TOGETHER
CRYSTAL GAYLE (NEW)
4.49
4.99
PLEASURE & PAIN
DR. HOOK
4.49
4.99
A MILLION VACATIONS
MAX WEBSTER
4.29
4.49
THREE HEARTS
BOB WELCH
4.49
4.99
PARALLEL LINES
BLONDIE
4.29
4.49
ENDLESS SUMMER
BEACH BOYS (2 LP. SET)
4.99
5.49
PYRAMID
ALAN PARSONS PROJECT
4.49
4.99
TOUCH THE SKY
CAROLE KING (NEW)
4.79
4.99
TOP 20 RECORDS & TAPES AT 0&6sound
TITLBARTIST
LP
TAPE
TITLE/ARTIST
LP
TAPE
1
IN THROUGH THE OUT DOOR
LED ZEPPELIN
4.99
5.49
11
RICKIE LEE JONES
RICKIE LEE JONES
4.29
4.99
2
THE CARS
THE CARS
4.29
4.99
12
ARMAGEDDON
PRISM
4.29
4.99
3
BREAKFAST IN AMERICA
SUPERTRAMP
4.79
4.99
13
MINGUS
JONI MITCHELL
4.79
4.99
4
CANDY-O
THE CARS
4.49
4.79
14
13
CHICAGO
4.79
4.99
5
GET THE KNACK
THE KNACK
4.29
4.79
15
LOW BUDGET
KINKS
4.29
4.79
6
SLOW TRAIN COMING
BOB DYLAN
4.79
4.99
16
BORN TO BE ALIVE
PATRICK HERNANDEZ
4.49
4.79
7
RUST NEVER SLEEPS
NEIL YOUNG
4.79
4.99
17
REALITY .  .  .WHAT A
CONCEPT
ROBIN WILLIAMS
4.79
4.99
8
FIRST UNDER THE WIRE
LITTLE RIVER BAND
4.29
4.79
18
BAD GIRLS
DONNA SUMMER
7.49
8.99
9
AT BUDOKAN
CHEAP TRICK
4.49
4.99
19
52nd STREET
BILLY JOEL
3.99
4.49
10
VOULEZ-VOUZ
ABBA
4.49
4.79
20
BALDRY'S OUT
LONG JOHN BALDRY
4.49
4.99
SPEAKERS
The EPl 100 has become the industry standard for bookshelf loudspeaKers. Leading consumer and
audiophile publications have consistently given the EPl 100 their top ratings. It does everything you
want a loudspeaker to do, and it does it all in a compact cabinet!
The EPl 100 offers EPI's celebrated Linear Sound: a pure, uncoloured, natural sound from top to
bottom. With no artificial boosting of the bass to impress the innocent. And all the nuances at the
treble end that, on most speakers, just fade away.
The Model 100 doesn't just deliver the Linear Sound of EPl straight ahead, either. In fact, up to
15,000 Hz, the speaker's off-axis dispersion is down an average of only 3dt.
And, unlike nearly every other speaker, you can listen for hours to the EPl 100 without suffering
listening fatigue. The reason is EPI's "minimum distortion" — both harmonic and intermodulation.
With its excellent dispersion and EPI's Linear Sound, we'd say the EPl 100 is clearly the finest
speaker you can get for the money.
GUARANTEE YOU'LL
LOVE THIS SYSTEM!
tlMlMMUlWXl
$699
95
ea.
So much for so little at the heart of this fine system is the powerful Marantz 1530 AM/FM stereo
receiver. With 30 watts RMS per channel and super low distortion of only .08% the 1530 will give
you accurate, trouble free performance from all sources. The Marantz 6025 is an easy to operate
belt driven turntable with a newly designed tonearm that reduces tracking distortion by 30%. The
6025 has automatic return and shutoff and is complete with a Shure M70B magnetic cartridge. Accuracy and unparalleled sound quality have made the EPl 100's the most highly reviewed and rated
loudspeaker in the industry. The 8" woofer reproduces full tight bass with low distortion and the 1"
air spring tweeter reproduces exhilarating highs with excellent dispersion. Come into A&B Sound
and hear how much $699.95 will buy.

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
http://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.ubysseynews.1-0127869/manifest

Comment

Related Items