UBC Publications

UBC Publications

UBC Publications

The Ubyssey Oct 20, 1972

Item Metadata

Download

Media
ubysseynews-1.0127867.pdf
Metadata
JSON: ubysseynews-1.0127867.json
JSON-LD: ubysseynews-1.0127867-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): ubysseynews-1.0127867-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: ubysseynews-1.0127867-rdf.json
Turtle: ubysseynews-1.0127867-turtle.txt
N-Triples: ubysseynews-1.0127867-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: ubysseynews-1.0127867-source.json
Full Text
ubysseynews-1.0127867-fulltext.txt
Citation
ubysseynews-1.0127867.ris

Full Text

Array Grits represent business class
OTTAWA (CUP) — Although
most voters are ordinary
working people, half of them
women, the Liberals have
nominated candidates
representing mainly the
business and professional
interests of the country. Only
10 of the 69 women in the
federal race are Liberal
candidates.
A demographic survey of the
party's candidates — outlining
age, occupation, marital
status, religious affiliation and
sex — was released last week.
Only 231 candidates were
accounted for under occupations.
Businessmen or administrators   and   lawyers
represent the largest number
of Liberal candidates — 53 and
52 respectively, while a small
number are remotely connected with ordinary occupations. Possibilities include: agriculture (farmers,
ranchers and agronomists) —
19; civil servants— 13; accountants—      seven;
clergymen — six; technicians
and skilled tradesmen —
three; merchants — three and
foremen — two.
Although five of the 13 civil
servants are from prime
minister Trudeau's office, it is
impossible to determine
exactly what social status the
other candidates listed have.
Other occupations listed are:
educators (all levels)— 21;
media (journalists, publishers,
authors)— 12; doctors —
nine; professional engineers —
eight; public relations and
advertising — six; business
and social science consultants— six; investors,
labor relations specialists and
.Vol. LIV, No. 11
Vl  .      ■■ II   l_l_I       -- -
VANCOUVER, B.C., FRIDAY, OCTOBER 20, 1972
48
228-2301
construction contractors —
three each; pharmacists —
two; there is one professional
athlete and one veternarian.
The others are self-employed
or work in industry, the press
release says.
Female candidates are
running in Alberta, two,
Saskatchewan, two, Quebec,
three, while Nova Scotia,
Ontario and Newfoundland
have one each.
From available data, 218
Liberal candidates are
married, 10 single; their
average age is 43.6.
Information on Progressive
Conservative and New
Democratic Party candidates
is not yet available.
GREAT TREK '72 wound its way through the fog from Tenth and Sasamat to main
mall where 250 students greeted the nostaligia caravan Thursday noon. Ab Richards
—kini mcdonaU photo
president of the original varsity week placed a time capsule in the cairn in front of the
math building to mark the fiftieth anniversary of the trek.
AMS backs women's study
By GARY COULL
Alma Mater Society student
council voted Wednesday night
to pay for a report on the status
of women at UBC by the
Women's Action Group.
Funding of the publication
was then turned over to the
finance committee for inclusion in the third and final
reading of the budget next
week.
Shelagh Day, spokeswoman
for the group, said she was
pleased with the motion as long
"as there are no tricks involved."
At last week's meeting the
group asked for joint-funding
from the AMS and the Alumni
Association for the $1,200
necessary to publish the
report.
Council had tabled
discussion on the subject until
after the Alumni Association
met, in hopes that the
association would fund the
report completely.
But after meeting with
association fund director
Scotty Malcolm, Day said she
was not satisfied with the
progress of the talks.
The group returned to
council this week to ask for
complete funding from the
AMS. Council reconsidered
their earlier decision to table
the discussion and the motion
was passed.
Day said her group would not
withdraw their request to the
association until they have met
with AMS treasurer David
Dick to see how the funding
will be arranged.
Dick said later it could be a
loan, which would be paid back
by selling the reports at 25
cents each, or it may be a
straight grant.
Although the motion does not
stipulate how many copies will
be printed Dick said the AMS
would guarantee production of
5,000 copies.
In other news, council approved an increase in the
original estimate for the
listening lounge renovations
from $59,400 to $68,718. The
first estimate proved incorrect
so the contract was awarded to
Frank Stanzl Construction Co.
Ltd.
Construction was scheduled
to begin Thursday. It will be
completed by the first week of
January.
The budget was not finalized
as expected during the
meeting. Due to a change in the
agenda and more am-
mendments to the budget, it
was returned to the finance
committee.
Motions to increase the
budget of the Palmer proposal
from $200 and 30 cents per
student to $200 and 40 cents per
student were tabled and sent
back to the finance committee.
An additional $1,740 is
needed to increase the Palmer
proposal. One motion calls for
the money to come from a
$1,740 cut in The Ubyssey's
budget, which would exclude
membership in the Canadian
University Press.
Dick also announced Brian
Williams   of   Swinton   and
Ed dean up for grabs
Education dean Neville Scarfe's
replacement is expected to be selected within a
month.
Scarfe is retiring from the position at the
end of this academic year. His replacement will
be hired July 1.
About 100 applications were originally
received by the education hiring committee.
"The list has been narrowed down now to 10
people and we should have it narrowed down to
a ranked list of about 2 or 3 people within a
month," said Rick Rodrigues, president of the
education students association and only student
member of the 12-man committee.
"About half of these are present members of
the faculty of education and the other half are
not," he said.
When asked by The Ubyssey if an American
was being considered for the position,
Rodrigues would only say that "we have been
asked by UBC president Walter Gage to find the
best man for the job, regardless of nationality.''
Scarfe, who is not on the committee, said
however, "I don't think it's likely that we will
get an American. Campus feeling is too much
against that sort of thing."
Company will replace Ben
Trevino as the AMS legal
counsel.
Trevino was elected to the
board of governors and cannot
continue working for the AMS.
Williams is a former AMS coordinator and was recommended by Trevino, Dick said.
The appointment was an
executive decision.
A proposal to give SUB
student employees double time
for working statutory holidays
was introduced by science
representative Ken Lassesen.
It has been tabled for further
discussion.
Council also unanimously
agreed to invite residence
association representatives to
sit on council as ex-officio
councillors.
AMS vice-president Gordon
Blankstein read a letter of
apology from Recreation UBC
chairman Ed Gautschi.
The letter said students are
not automatically required to
join if they attend UBC as was
previously thought. It also does
not apply to intramural and
extramural teams.
The letter corrected previous
information about student
involvment in the program. Page 2
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, October 20,  1972
Negative attitudes toward
female sexuality continue
By ROBIN BURGESS
Female sexuality has been depicted for
centuries as "menacing, consuming and
inherently evil", said sociologist Pepper Schwartz Tuesday evening.
Schwartz, an assistant professor at the
University of Washington in Seattle, gave the
third presentation in this year's woman's
studies program.
Almost 400 women and men came to SUB
ballroom to hear her speak on Feminist Perspectives on Female Sexuality.
"In medieval times witches were seen as
mainly women because women were
biologically able to receive the devil," Schwartz said.
This same negative attitude towards female
sexuality continues today.
In researching a textbook in female
sexuality, Schwartz told her audience she came
across similar "abominations" in modern
articles by men.
For example in a medical magazine she
found an article linking the rise of the women's
liberation movement with male impotence.
"The ineaning is obvious. If women would
be just aHittle less aggressive men could get it
up."
A woman learns to share this distaste for her
own body but not for the usually quoted
Freudian reasons, she said.
"As Germaine Greer (author of The Female
Kunuch) says, a woman begins to have
negative feelings about her body not because
she doesn't have a penis but because she is
deprived by society of her vagina."
Schwartz said women are taught to think of
their genitals as "unmentionable" and "dirty".
"There's no doubt that both men and women
both see fellatio as more reasonable than
cunnilingus."
Far from having a low sexual appetite as is
popularly supposed sex research by Dr. W. E.
Masters and Dr. Virginia Johnson shows a
woman has a potential sexual appetite "the
limits of which haven't even been discovered
yet," she said.
"We know she has a greater physical
capacity than men.
"Masters and Johnson found the more
orgasms a woman has the better they get.
Theoretically a woman can go on until she is
physically exhausted."
Schwartz dismissed debate about the
superiority of the clitoral or vaginal orgasm.
She said Masters and Johnson have shown
that there is no difference.
"An orgasm is an orgasm. The actual
mechanism is the same."
For various reasons, she said, women are
encouraged to be passive during sexual intercourse.
"Men are the status quo and women are
expected to adapt."
Therefore a woman learns to expect and
accept far less sexual satisfaction than she is
capable of receiving.
"The French say there are no frigid women,
just clumsy men. At the risk of being a hostile
bitch I must say there is some credence to
this."
The main problem, said Schwartz, is a
woman's hesitancy to communicate to her
lover "what feels good, what doesn't, what isn't
enough, what is too much."
Schwartz touched briefly on genes and
environment as factors in establishing sexual
identity.
Scientists now know both men and women
have some of the genes attributes of the other
sex, she told the audience. What we call male or
female may be just androgen-estrogen hormone balance.
The social factor is far more important in
establishing sexual identity.
Most of the components of sexual identity
are established in adolescence, a period least
suited to it, she said.
Women must overcome their respective
socializing and develop new perspectives on
their own sexuality, said Schwartz, and
suggested some ways women can go about this:
A woman has to have a healthy love of her
own body. One way, she suggested, is to learn
how to masturbate.
"Learn what turns you on."
Women must demand control over their own
bodies. For example, demand to know about
the hormones in birth control pills.
Women have to learn how to fantasize.
"The hardest thing about this," she said, "is
to learn how to lose control. Not in the sense of
losing your sense of self but to learn how to
enjoy."
A woman has to learn how to act rather than
be acted upon.
She has to learri how to take rejection.
She has to learn how to be sensual.
"Women should be allowed to be sensual and
still full-rounded human beings."
We do not describe a man as successful in
his work despite the fact that he has a wife and
three children, said Swartz.
"Women's only identity is a sexual one."
Schwartz was interrupted frequently during
her presentation by women shouting from the
back of the room.
"Why are you talking about men? Why
aren't you talking about women?
"Why don't you talk about being a woman?
Everything you've said to us tonight sounds as
if you're some kind of man."
About four protestors who identified
themselves as lesbian women took over the
microphone during the question period and
invited women who wanted to talk about
"women relating to women" to meet at the
back of the room.
A sizeable fraction of the audience took
them up on the offer.
CALYPSO
NIGHT
TONIGHT 9:00-1:30
"STEELBAND"
TOTEM PARK BALLROOM
$1.75 person $1.25 res.
FACILITIES AVAILABLE
WBMmmfflmm
Discover the World on Your
SEMESTER AT SEA
Sails each September & February
Combine accredited study with
educational stops in Africa, Australasia and the Orient. Over 5000
students from 450 campuses have
already experienced this international program. A wide, range of
financial aid is available. Write
now for free catalog:
WCA, Chapman College, Box CC40, Orange, Cal. 92666
City fliydU Tfuatre
6&S-S031 lSOS.HMfouu
FRIDAY & SATURDAY
"PUTNEY SWOPE"
(Restricted)
6:15 and 9:45 p.m.
also   "The   Rise  and   Fail of the
Third  Reich"
Midnight Movie Fri. & Sat.
"MARX BROS.
AT THE CIRCUS"
STARTS SUNDAY (One Week Only)
William Golding's
"LORD OF THE FLIES"
at 9:15 p.m.
Plus "HEAD" at 7:30 p.m.
with Frank Zappa & the Monkees
Admission only 99c
for double feature!
SIZZLING! SHOCKING! SCORCHING!
DESIRE IS KINDLED
INTO FLAMING   PASSION
BARBARA BENTON
(Miss Playboy Centrefold)
VII WRAMVILLC
6*5-3434
in COLOR
'S' FOR SEX
1:05,4:05,
7:10, 10:15'
NICE GIRL
2:30, 5:35,
8:40
WOODY ALLEN'S
"EVERYTHING YOU ALWAYS WANTED TO KNOW ABOUT SEX*
BUT WERE AFRAID TO ASK"
TONY RANDALL- LYNN REDGRAVE • BURT REYNOLDS- GENE WILDER
/    HlUlliUjfc SHOWTIMES: 12:20, 2:15, 4:05
    ^|*|g"Hp<«.—".-i'..."<- — ■•  6:00,8:00,9:50.
»51 GRANVILLE   WARNING:  Very  frank sex comedy, coarse language
' '"" and swearing. R. W. MCDONALD, B.C. Dir.	
I   til
685682J
BEST-SELLER BECOMES
MOVIE SPY-THRILLER!
Odeon
SSI  GRANVILLE
682-7468
SHOW TIMES:
12:00, 1:55
3:50, 5:45
7:40, 9:35
GENERAL
THE
SALZBURG
\*\\\>
Kurt      Vonnegut's     Jr.'s
intellectually  intriguing story.
SHOW TIMES:7:30, 9:30.
Warning:     Occasional    coarse
language and swearing.  R. W.
Mcdonald, b.c. Dir.
varsitu
224-3730«»
4375 W. 10th
WINNER 1972 CANNES FILM
FESTIVAL JURY PRIZE AWARD
SLAUGHTERHOUSE-
FIVE
NOW PLAYING
From
COLUMBIA
PICTURES
A Film by
CARL FOREMANond
RICHARD
ATTENBOROUGH
ROBERT        W        m        ANNE
SHAW m W     BANCROFT
slord Randolph Churchill ^^^H Kpk as Lady Jennie
SIMON
WARD
YOUNG WINSTON
with special appearances by
JACK HAWKINS IAN HOLM ANTHONY HOPKINS
PATRICK MAGEE   EDWARD WOODWARD
°"dJOHN MILLS
Wr.Hen (or the scee- and Produced by CARL  FOREMAN
flasedon "My Early l-le" b> Winston Chu'chi't
».,«. RICHARD ATTENBOROUGH
Mu.lccl Score by ALFRED RALSTON   A HIGHROAD/HUGH FRENCH PRESENTATION PANAVISION*
TICKETS ON SALE AT BOX OFFICE AT ODEON THEATRE
881 GRANVILLE ST. - FOR PHONE RESERVATIONS CALL 688-2308
MONDAY THROUGH SATURDAY,  11:30-7:30 - Tickets for tonights
performance available at Hyland Theatre one hour before show starts.
SCHEDULE OF PERFORMANCES AND PRICES
MATINEES:
WEDNESDAY'S 2 P.M $2.50
SATURDAY'S 1:30 P.M $2.50
SUNDAYS & HOLIDAYS 2 P.M $3.00
EVENINGS:
SUNDAYS THROUGH FRIDAYS 8 P.M $3.00
SATURDAYS 5 P.M. & 9 P.M $3.00
Be sure to enter Vancouver Calendar Magazine's
"Young  Winston"   Contest   and  win a  week  for •^^mmm^mr^mp^ am* mm^
two   in fabulous London, England via BOAC —   ^^^W%\ Ww\\m
Entry   forms   available  in  the  October   issue of ia|tp«1»^,-j1n.nfvnii
Vancouver Calendar Magazine and at the Hyland laKesjyxxiiareoiyou
Theatre.
Name	
Address	
Please send me	
seats @ $ 	
Total $	
FOR THE MATINEE ( ) EVENINGS ( )
WED. 2 P.M. ( ) 8 P.M. ( )
SAT. 1:30 P.M. ( ) SAT. 5 P.M. ( )
SUN. & HOL-. 2 P.M. ( ) SAT. 9 P.M. ( )
(day & date)	
Make    cheques   or    money    orders   payable   to    Hyland   Theatre,    1339
KINGSWAY, VANCOUVER, B.C., with stamped, self-addressed envelope.
THE HYLAND THEATRE
1339 KINGSWAY (Kings'y at Knight) 876-3045 Friday, October 20,  1972
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 3
T-Bird shop made into fire trap
By TERRY TURCHYNIAK
The Thunderbird Shop was not closed
because of a fire marshall's order, but
that could very easily have been the
case, The Ubyssey learned Thursday.
The dispute over closing the Thunderbird shop because of inadequate fire
exits has raged for the past two weeks.
"Previous reports of the shop being
closed due to a fire marshall's order
—daryl tan photo
THROWING A POT Alan Bone ed 3 uses facilities in education building. However,
non-education students interested in pottery-making can use the pottery room in SUB
251 one hour a day, seven days a week for $2 membership fee.
are erronious and ill informed," SUB
building manager Graeme Vance said
Thursday.
"The fire marshall merely informed
the Alma Mater Society if the problem
of fire exits in the Thunderbird Shop
was not cleared up shortly he would
report the matter to the provincial fire
marshall."
Regarding this possibility, AMS
lawyer Roger McAfee said "If the
provincial fire marshall regards the
premises as unsafe, the entire SUB
complex could be closed.
"Because of the uniqueness of the
structure of SUB regular fire
regulations are impossible to apply and
special ones must be drawn up."
Said Vance, "The owners of the
space have been repeatedly asked to
amend the situation and measures
have been employed for the past three
years.
"But the fire marshall has decided to
contact us, the owners of the building
and inform us that the situation must
be improved. Upon reviewing our
liability under the present circumstances with our lawyer, we
decided that this would be the best
course of action.
"We had to close the store, or the
entire building would be closed."
The origin of the problem goes back
to the early days of SUB planning. The
fire exits for the Thunderbird shop as
they exist now were in the original
plans, but the company leasing the
space, National Student Marketing,
asked that one of the fire exits be
removed from the plans.
The exit was included in the building
when it was built but NSM, in an
unauthorized move, soon removed it
and replaced it with a glass wall which
remained until a few days ago.
By this time NSM had sold the lease
of the store to a Toronto based branch
of their firm Collegiate Advertising
who has subsequently separated from
NSM.
Collegiate was soon informed the fire
door situation did not meet with AMS
approval, but the fire marshall said
that the shop could remain open pending reinstalment of the doors on the.
grounds that a small door at the back
could be used as an emergency fire
exit.
Several letters have  been sent  to
Collegiate, asking them to amend the
situation, but no action has resulted in
the past three years.
Late last summer a local firm,
Thunderbird Enterprises, started
negotiations to buy the lease and stock
of the Thunderbird shop from
Collegiate.
An agreement was made that
Thunderbird Enterprises would take
over management of the store at the
beginning of the school term, and
operate it before the title was transferred from Collegiate.
The exit the fire marshall has
referred to as the emergency fire exit
has subsequently been walled in, and
the area used as a store room.
Since this new arrangement did not
comply with the fire regulations the
fire marshall sent a letter to the AMS
on Sept. 29 informing them if the
matter of the Thunderbird shop's fire
i exit was not amended, he would
report it to the provincial fire marshall.
The store proprietress was notified
the store would be closed on Monday if
nothing was done.
She notified Thunderbird Enterprises, who not being the owner of
the store, could do nothing. So nothing
was done.
The shop was locked Tuesday
morning, Oct. 3, when the proprietress
arrived.
Subsequently, Thunderbird Enterprises notified Collegiate, and offered to have the work done and charge
it to Collegiate.
Collegiate sent a representative last
week, and in a conference with AMS
officials an agreement was reached
and reinstallation of the fire doors
started immediately and was completed on Monday. The store reopened
the next day.
While all the problems with the fire
exits was going on between the AMS
and Collegiate, Thunderbird Enterprises' contract with Collegiate
became null because the lease was
untransferable.
Presently, the AMS and Collegiate
are negotiating a lease for a larger
floor area for the Thunderbird shop
with the the expansion to the south of
the existing shop. When this lease is
completed, Collegiate can start
negotiating with Thunderbird Enterprises again for transfer.
Muck
a consumer column
By VAUGHN PALMER
An afternoon in the UBC bookstore
can be very entertaining, particularly
if you enjoy black comedy or are a
consumer columnist looking for dirt.
The bookstore has a new format
with all the books thrown even more
haphazardly on shelves stolen from a
hardware store or car parts depot.
The same old bitches remain:
outrageous prices, stupid mistakes
and unbelievable screwups.
Outrageous price of the week is
Walter Kaufman's Existentialism
from Dostoevskv to Sartre (Meridian
books). The bookstore sells this
paperback to unsuspecting philosophy 100 students for $4.70.
Duthie's books say they can get the
same edition for $3.95.
If you bother to erase the black ink
hiding the cover price you will find the
suggested price for the book is $2.25.
A 109 per cent markup is something
to make even the black market
hesitate.
If the bookstore is being victimized
by high markups on the part of
American publishers then why bother
hiding the old prices? What have they
got to hide?
The bookstore has also messed up
on the arts I book, Gunter Grass' The
Tin Drum.
This book is available in a fairly
cheap Fawcett-Crest paperback
costing $1.25. The bookstore stocks
the Vintage edition which sells for
$2.70.
They outdo this screwup by mixing
in a number of the cheaper Fawcett-
Crest editions with the Vintage one
and charging the same $2.70 price for
all of them.
I wonder if those nasty Americans
who the bookstore always blames
lor its high prices are getting any of
the $1.45 extra profit the store is
making on each Fawcett-Crest edition
of the book?
Book publishers do seem to raise
the price once they discover a book is
becoming popular on university
reading lists.
Witness new printings of John
Galbraith's New Industrial State
(Mentor, paperback, $1.95) and
James Joyce's Ulysses (Penguin,
paperback, $3.25), unchanged from
previous editions except for a $0.70
, price raise in the case of the former,
and one of $1.30 in the case of the
latter.
One of the most popular games
university professors play is 'textbook nepotism' or making your own
books required reading for your
courses.
For example students who take
political science head Walter Young's
poli sci 200 must read
Democracy and Discontent by Walter
Young.
Young has managed to keep the
price of his book (Carleton, paperback, $1.95) below the suggested price
of $2.50.
A more blatant example, is on the
reading list of Joan Reynertson's
theatre 230.
Students are asked to buy The Work
of the Film Director by, you guessed
it, Joan Reynertson. This book is a
thin paper-covered text costing the
ridiculously high price of $9.50.
In some cases a professor can
legitimately claim that his/hers is the
definitive work on the subject, but this
can hardly be the case with such well-
documented subjects as theatre and
political science.
A better course for author-
professors to take if they think their
work is that valuable to the course
would be to recommend it rather than
make it compulsory and see that
copies are available. If the work is
that good then it will be a valuable
addition to the library and
presumably will sell enough
elsewhere to keep its author in
royalties.
The Ubyssey's consumer column
has been mixed in with a pot pourri of
politics and campus events so far this
year.
Henceforth there will be two
columns. The Exposure column
dealing with politics, scandals and
events will appear in Tuesday's
Ubyssey. The consumer column, now
called Muck, will appear in Friday's
Ubyssey.
The Ubyssey welcomes all comments, scandals and tales of blatant
highway robbery which may be dealt
with in either of these columns.
Address all letters to The Ubyssey,
SUB 241K, UBC, Vancouver 8, or
phone 228-2301 Monday or Thursday. Page 4
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, October 20, 1972
Headline
Stocks slump $459 million screamed the banner
headline in Wednesday's Sun.
Terrifying, isn't it? And not because some fat cat
dividend-drawers are losing a paper bundle.
What's frightening is that a relatively small group of
people can have such an effect on the lives of us all. We
refer both to the big-time investors and the people who
wrote the headline.
A government was elected Aug. 30 to represent the
people of this province. We do not necessarily agree with
the present aims of the government.
However, we do agree that its ability to govern the
province is being seriously hampered by a sector of society
out of its control, namely the stock market.
It seems the New Democratic Party has three choices
because of the present stock market trend.
The first is to continue with its present policy. This
looks unfeasible because as long as there is a lack of capital
for investment there will be a lack of work which is
incompatible with socialism. The second is to back down
totally on their pre-election committments. We hope
this is out of the question.
The only other alternative is to pull the same midnight
expropriation trick good ol' W.A.C. pulled with the former
B.C. Electric Company, only making it about 100 times
more spectacular.
This is an oversimplification but it is the only valid
solution we can arrive at.
Expropriation of the means of production (to coin a
phrase) will enable the government to create enough jobs
to employ everyone. The extra money to pay these people
can come from the former excess profits of the giant
corporations.
Any money left over can be used as compensation for
the former owners of the companies, starting with the
small shareholders.
This of course means there will be little money left for
expansion of industries but this fits in nicely with Dave
Barrett's proclamation of a no-growth policy for the
province.
Now that we've sharpened our incisors with some
critical social commentary, let's take a few bites from the
Vancouver Sun for printing that absurd headline we
mentioned previously.
We'd like to know why that headline was run the day
after the opening of the legislature. And why was it on the
front page? Would it have been front page news if stocks
had gained in value under a right-wing government?
And why does the headline say stocks declined $459
million in value when nine paragraphs into the story we
find out there has been a general decline of shares across
North America? When this is taken into account the loss in
value is closer to $300 million.
Now look across at the other side of the Sun's front
page.
We are told steak prices in restaurants will increase
between 20 and 40 per cent by June 1974, which is when
the NDP expects to have $2.50 minimum wage in effect.
We are also told that the grease dispenser down the
street may go bankrupt by that date.
Our informant is Don Bellamy, B.C. managing director
of the Canadian Restaurant Association.
Okay, now that the restaurant owners have had their
say, why not a front page interview of a waitress detailing
how the wage increase will enable her to approach a decent
standard of living?
We doubt that such an interview will ever be
published. And this is because the Sun exists to serve a
small sector of society. The interests of this sector are not
served with an NDP government in power.
There was a very interesting statement by an unnamed
banker printed the day after the NDP victory.
The banker said: "This has been hanging over British
Columbia for 30 years. We're either going to find out we
can live with it or we're going to throw it the hell out."
The campaign to remove the NDP is running exactly
as fast as the giant presses in the basement of the Pacific
Press building.
DDT?
Re: the social standing of
first year students.
By the shining big sea
waters, by the polluted big
inlet waters, standeth the
University of British Columbia. Then standeth the senate,
then the president, and then
way, way down the list, next to
the protozoa, there dwelleth a
creature named first year
student (ignoramous
tremendious)
While I realize that first year
students are the least defensive and most offensive of the
species found at university,
and an obvious annoyance to
higher forms of life such as
ants, cockroaches and
engineers, I ask humbly on my
knees, and all other relevant
parts of my anatomy, for a
little understanding.
I too play a part in the ecosystem here, along with the
snails and bugs, it's true, but
still a part. Who else would pay
exorbitant rates at the
bookstore without crying or
support crusading engineering
presidents (re nose-picking) if
not the first year students. So,
when you step on a bug or a
first year student remember
you're shaking the entire ecosystem at UBC.
Rick Lymer
arts 1
Letters
that UBC was elitist, in that
students came from richer
than average homes.
This is most likely true, but
an accurate picture can only be
had by comparing UBC
students' parents with other
couples of the same age. To
compare students' parents
who, because of seniority,
savings from investments,
experience in their field, have
an above average income, "to
all married couples with three
dependents", many of whom
are just starting to work and
have not reached their full
earning potential, is unjustified.
Who will become concerned
with an elitist charge if the
statistics used to back up the
charge have such an obvious
flaw?
Doug Davison
grad studies 9
Firstly, the choice of
"married couples with three
dependents" for a comparison
was made by senate, not by us.
However, we feel the comparison is a reasonable one to
make. We dispute that many
married couples with three
children are just beginning to
work, as you claim.
Secondly, we fail to understand why you don't
complain about the fact that
the university is an elitist institution rather than sit around
like a one-man royal commission worrying about
possible minor variations in a
statistical survey.
Games
I would like to clear up some
confusion that has arisen
concerning the use of
recreational facilities on the
campus under Recreation
UBC. First, this new program
in no way affects the use of
recreational facilities by individuals taking part in intramurals and extramural
athletics.     Secondly,     the
Stats
Once again The Ubyssey and
Art Smolensky in attempting to
prove a point overstate their
case. From the recent senate
report on the sociological
background of UBC students,
attempts were made to show
THS UBYSSEY
OCTOBER 20, 1972
Published Tuesdays and Fridays throughout the university year by
the Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C. Editorial opinions are those of the writer and not of the AMS or the university
administration. Member, Canadian University Press. The Ubyssey
publishes Page Friday, a weekly commentary and review. The
Ubyssey's editorial offices are located in room 241K of the Student Union Building.
Editorial departments, 228-2307; Sports, 228-2305; advertising.
228-3977.
Co-editors: John Andersen, Jan O'Brien
"Dirt" said Vaughn Palmer contemplatively. "Zap" spewed Mike Sasges
as Lorri Rudland and Gary Coull Sandy Kassed out of the office. "Childish"
screamed Sandi Shreve as Lesley Krueger did a quick Kini McDonald right
into Roger MacNeill and Bruce West, Robin Burgessed into the darkroom.
Simon Truelove suggested Doug Higgins go Kent Spenser in the John'
Andersen before he mucked him. "Exposure" hinted Jan O'Brien to Ryon
Guedes as Terry Turchyniak, Brent Thompson and David Schmidt of the
seminar, 2:30 p.m.. Saturday at 4424 West Twelfth. Friday, October 20,  1972
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 5
Letters
program is entirely voluntary
for students, faculty, and staff
who wish to benefit from the
services provided by
Recreation UBC, other than
those taking part in intramural
or extramural athletics.
Recreation UBC was instituted to provide much
needed and long overdue
recreational services and
facilities, every day of the
week from 8:30 to 11 p.m.
Recreation UBC will offer
booking privileges, supervision, instruction, and use of
equipment, in addition to the
use of a variety of facilities.
For example, in the past it has
been impossible for a group of
students to obtain a volleyball,
basketball, or any other
equipment, in addition, there
was no assurance that a space
to play would be available.
Now a student will have the
privilege of booking a facility
in open times, draw equipment, and change his towel. All
areas will be supervised insuring that only UBC people
are using the particular
recreational area, a factor that
has been a problem in the past.
A brochure will be off the
press in a few days describing
the entire program.
It is hoped that if Recreation
UBC is successful that additional facilities and services
will be made available under
an expanded program.
Ed Gautschi
Co-ordinator
Recreation UBC
Idiocy— 4
In a recent letter I was quite
critical of the two major
policies of the AMS
executive— the covered pool
plan and the food services
takeover.
I maintain that these policies
are poor policies, for they
should come not before, but
after more urgent needs are
met. This incorrect assignment of priorities is a mistake
compounded by the fact that
enormous amounts of student
funds will be gobbled up by the
two plans; money that could be
far better spent, in ray
estimation.
We must judge our student
representatives by the policies
they espouse, and in my
original letter, I have so
judged.
But the two responses
printed so far — from Doug
Aldridge and Al Vince — have
done little to alter my
judgement. Aldridge chose to
correct me on two matters of
fact peripheral to the main
argument. The sarcasm and
lack of restraint of Vince's
letter would dismiss it from
serious consideration, were it
not for his valid suggestion that
I outline in detail how the AMS
could profit from the credit
union.
This I shall be delighted to
do. No such offering should be
unaccompanied by an opposite
opinion so I invite Vince to
prepare a similar article
showing in detail how the AMS
will not profit from a credit
union. Then the two pieces will
appear side by side and the
reader will judge for himself.
In the same spirit, I would
not suggest that any student be
forced to pay 25 cents a year to
support Karl Burau's experimental college.
We have already bought too
many schemes of AMS
executives, past and present,
without sufficiently examining
them beforehand. I think that
Burau's philosophy of the
university should receive some
public exposure in these
pages — perhaps an opinion
piece on the role of student
government — paired with an
article written perhaps by a
member of the current
executive. Students will then
have something tangible on
which to base a judgment.
Doug Aldridge! The AMS fee
recently rose from $24 to $29 —
a dramatic 20 per cent increase
in this most recent year. And it
has more than doubled since
1961, when it was $14 — indeed
a dramatic increase in recent
years.
Doug Aldridge: I thought
$500,000 (my personal
estimate) was a more than
generous estimate of the value
that students should be asked
to place upon the food service
takeover plan. To finance it by
extending the SUB fee for four
to five years, at $250,000 per
year, means the true cost is
$1,000,000 or more.
The covered pool will cost us
about $2 million. This
executive, then, has committed about $3 million of
student funds. We are already
paying out over $170,000 a year
in interest on previous loans.
(See the budget, "Debt
program" in the Sept. 19
Ubyssey).
If these loans had been
floated by a student-owned
credit union, to which we all
belonged, as individuals, our
credit union would have a
gross income of at least
$179,000 per year.
Therefore I am delighted to
accept publicly Aldridge's
endorsement of the credit
union as a good idea. I regret I
cannot claim credit for my
originality since the idea has
been around for a long time.
Nor, since food ideas are
public property, can I follow
the example of my
namesake — the lion — who
marks the boundaries of his
domain in an unmistakeable'
and refreshingly direct
manner.
Al Vince; Doug Aldridge; I
thank you for your replies. But
before we get on with the
debate, I think the other
members of the AMS executive
who support the covered pool
and food service takeover
plans, should publicly indicate
themselves as so committed.
Then, we will know where the
political responsibility
properly  lies.  Only  Aldridge
Forsooth!
Reply to Sandy Kass
—an instructional fable
ByJOHNDWYER
graduate studies^education
Once upon a time, in a far off kingdom, a powerful ruler
was pondering how he might have his small daughter instructed in the many ways of the world and the knowledge
thereof. His counsellors advised "him to appoint a local
philosopher to the post. However, one old counsellor, even
wiser than his many years, spake of choosing the wisest man,
from wheresoever he came. At this the king's advisors grew
most angry and slew the old man secretly — for, in truth, each
of them desired the prestigious post. Their evil counsel
prevailed upon the king and a member among them was
chosen to instruct the tiny princess. After the king's demise, he
having not begot a son, his daughter succeeded to the throne of
the land. Her knowledge of other countries was mightily
limited, though she knew every hill and shrub in her own land.
In her dealings with other princes, the princess was fooled by
the flattery and connivances of her enemies while she held'
forever suspect the good intentions of her friends. Finally,
after losing many men and much land in foolish war, the
princess decided to build a huge wall around her beloved
country in order that no foreign influence might ever infest it
again. And that once beautiful land turned in upon itself in its
narrowness, and died.
has yet come forth; and silence,
can be construed as meaning
anything at all, as the silent
majority of voters on this
campus undoubtedly know by
now.
Leo Fox
science 5
Maestro
Here's something I'd like
to share with you and your
readers.
Want to do something new
next time friends get together?
Make beautiful music
together. All you need is two
people, a four foot string, a
knife (or similarly shaped
utensil), and an oven rack.
Place the string through the
oven rack at any corner. While
holding one end of the string in
each hand, wind the ends two
or three times around your
pointer fingers. Now, lean,
forward until the oven rack is
swimging freely, away from
your body. Put your pointer
fingers in your ears and have a
friend strum the oven rack
With the knife.
Try variations. Have
someone use his fingers to hold
the oven rack in your ears, and
you strum. Get stereo with two
people sharing two strings and
two oven racks.
Les Rose
Toronto, Ont.
The Ubyssey welcomes letters
from all readers.
Though an effort is made to
print all letters received, The
Ubyssey reserves the right to edit
for clarity, legality, brevity and
taste.
•    * » •
3-Speed - $69.00
Free Light Set
With English 10-Speed
SEE US
Before you empty your wallet!
WE HAVE REALISTIC PRICES
COMPREHENSIVE STOCK -
SATISFYING SERVICE
ASK OUR CUSTOMERS
STUDENT DISCOUNT
Theft Insurance - Cables - Locks Etc.
3771 W. 10th Ave.
224-3336
FRIDAY NOON In the SUB Conversation Pit
Help End the Celebration of the Death of Progress
with
GENESIS
and their production of
LIFE SCENES
Sponsored by Speakers & Education Committee
FRIDAY NIGHT 9:00 p.m. at Lutheran Campus Centre
5885 UNIVERSITY BOULEVARD
COFFEE HOUSE
Featuring:    PHI L THOMAS with
"Songs of British Columbia"
JON BARTLETT with
"Songs of Protest, Old and New"
BIRD CALLS—
UBC'S STUDENT TELEPHONE DIRECTORY
NOW
AVAILABLE
THE UNIVERSITY OF
BRITISH COLUMBIA
UBC Bookstore and SUB
ONLY 75*
and each copy includes
40 BONUS COUPONS WORTH $75 Page 6
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, October 20,  1972
Canadian universities
lack Quebecois content
OTTAWA (CUP) — A survey
of 24 Canadian universities,
including two bilingual ones,
reveals an appalling lack of
French-Canadian content in
English-language university
French courses.
The survey, entitled French
Canadian Studies and their
place in University French
Departments: A Critique and
Model for Change in English
Canada, was released last
week by three Carleton
University professors: Sinclair
Robinson, assistant professor
of French, Donald Smith,
assistant professor of French
and Robin Matthews, associate
professor of English and
federal government researcher Joyce Wayne.
The report criticizes the
demeaning attitude most
English-language university
French departments take
towards the teaching of
French-Canadian language,
culture and literature.
"In general, French
departments seem to consider
French-Canadian literature
and civilization marginal, and
French-Canadian language an
unfortunate corruption of a
pure tongue," the report says.
Like studies of English-
Canadian language and
literature, French-Canadian
studies are not considered
worthwhile. "An attitude of
intellectual colonialism, both
conscious and unconscious, has
pervaded Canadian universities," the report says, thus
discouraging all but the hardy
from persevering to find and
understand something of the
Canadian and French-
Canadian identity.
The report also criticizes
French departments for
teaching 19th and 20th century
literature mainly, as if Canada
doesn't exist. "Such courses
perpare students, by major
ommission, to believe that
work done in Canada is not
'serious' work, especially when
French-Canadian literature is
barely offered or limited."
Courses in language and
linguistics are seriously
limited both in number and
scope, the report adds. In most
cases, French departments are
heavily oriented towards
literature; where language
courses do exist, the language
taught is "international" and
not Quebecois French. Thus
students are ill-prepared both
on the linguistic and cultural
level "for any real contact with
their French-speaking neighbors."
French departments were
also taken to task for limiting
French-Canadian literature
studies to honors and/or senior
undergraduate students,
"preventing many Canadian
students from access to
material of their own country."
The survey of courses —
French        and French-
Canadian — did not include
those offered by other
departments because most
students seldom have the
freedom to take courses in
other disciplines, and those
courses are rarely given in
French.
The highest percentage of
offerings devoted to French-
Canadian studies was 25 per
cent, the lowest four per cent
and the average was 14 per
cent; the professors' model
calls for 46 per cent.
The University of Alberta is
lauded   for   its   program   in
French-Canadian language
and literature which is
separate from French
language and literature. This
unique English-Canadian
university program allows
students to specialize in
French-Canadian literature
and language, although the
program does not treat the
studies as fully as it could, the
report says.
However, the report adds, it
is by far the best solution yet
seen in an English-Canadian
university.
Only two universities of
those surveyed "offer a
significantly different pattern
in French-Canadian studies in
French departments." They
are the University of Ottawa
and the University of
Saskatchewan, Regina
campus. The Regina campus
offers about one-third of its
French department courses in
French-Canadian materials,
the highest proportion in any
university outside Quebec.
The University of Ottawa, a .
bilingual institution, shows a
good proportion in its
"Francais" section with 17 of
57 courses listed in the 1972-73
calendar involving French-
Canadian studies. But the
French section for English-
speaking students has only
three of 23 courses offered,
thus reflecting "the
deficiencies of French-
Canadian studies prevalent in
most English-Canadian
universities."
The following is a list of the
universities and the results.
Reading courses and
qualifying years are not included, and the calendar year
is shown.
UBC — two of 27, not
counting two open
courses; 72-73
Brock — two of 14; 72-73
McMaster University —
five of 52; 72-73
University of Calgary —
one of 22, not counting one
open topic course; 72-73
Carleton University —
four of 43; 72-73
Dalhousie University —
one of 25, not counting one
open topic course; 72-73
Laurentian University
(bilingual) — French
department one of 17;
"Department de Francais" seven of 44, not
counting one open
course; 72-73
McGill University
( "College' ' and
university levels) — 21 of
88 not counting one open
topic course; 72-73
University of New
Brunswick — two of 19;
72-73
University of Saskatchewan (Saskatoon
campus) — three of 22;
72-73
University of Toronto:
Erindale campus — two
of 16, not counting two
open topic courses; 72-73.
Scarborough College —
three of 15; 71-72. St.
George campus — four of
45, not counting three
open topic courses; 71-72
Simon Fraser University — four of 35, not
counting four open topic
courses; 72-73
University of Victoria —
three of 21, not counting
four open topic courses;
71-72
The researchers' model of
course offering for English-
language university French
departments has three basic
areas of concern. In each area,
majoring students would take
a minimum of courses;
French-Canadian literary
studies, French literary
studies and studies in language
and linguistics. Students then
would be able to specialize in
one of the areas, the report
says.
The model language courses
would try to develop the
students' linguistic competence to the same level as
their French-Canadian
counterparts.
The model's French-
Canadian literary studies have
a maximum of 13 courses,
French literary studies a
maximum of 16 courses and
studies in language and
linguistics have a maximum of
16 courses, not including the
auxiliary or peripheral
courses.
The report admits "the total
number of courses offered in
each area would depend upon
the resources of individual
universities, but a ratio close to
the one presented here (46 per
cent) should be retained in
order to provide a full and open
program of offerings that is
fair to the integrity of each
area."
WHiTI I0WW Fttt* %f
& SPAGHETTI HOUSE tT»,
JSteaks-Pizza-Spaghetti-Lasagna-Ravioli-Rigatoni-Chicken Cacciatoreil
OPEN
Mon. - Thurs.
11 a.m. - 3 a.m.
Fri. - Sat.
11 a.m. - 4 a.m.
Sun.
11 a.m. -1 a.m.
TAKE OUT ORDERS
HOME DELIVERY
DINING
LOUNGE
FULL
FACILITIES
3618 W. Broadway'
(at Dunbar)
rushant
™ CAMERAS     *
4538 W.10 224-5858
NEVER UNDERSOLD!
By Popular Demand
"Curry Chicken"
Tuesday, Oct. 24, 1972
12:30
at
International House
Mm Good
RUPERT BEEBE
Your independent candidate for QUADRA
Why Independent?
No one can guess what the outcome of this election may be. Ovei
1000 candidates are seeking 264 seats and 174 candidates are independent.
The vote will therefore be split and probably split so badly that a minority
or coalition government will result The support of independent members
will then be crucial, and the independent member will be able to do much
more for Canada than a party back bencher. The independent is not tied to
party line. He can support the good and oppose the bad. He alone can give
the voter true uncompromised representation.
The Platform
People ask, "What is your platform?" I  can only reply "Common
sense." An independent cannot have a platform as such, but he is free to
support or deny, and to press for programs for the good of all.
The Issue
In the last election the Liberal and Conservative candidates for Quadra
spent over $30,000. Now, together with the N.D.P. the hard line parties are
again spending large amounts of money. The Election Act does not require
them to reveal the source of these funds, but where does the money come
from? All citizens are well aware that substantial donations, even for good
causes like the Red Feather, are very hard to get. Few people give anything
without expecting something in return. The issue then, is doubled. The
issue is not only "where does the money come from," but the important
thing is what is given, or expected to be given, in return. Possible sources of
large funds are scarce. If the election funds come from large corporations,
then it can be expected that these corporations will, behind the scenes,
dictate the policy of the party and therefore the policy of the local
candidate, and ultimately, the kind and the amount of the return. If the
election funds come from labor unions, then it can be expected that they
too will, behind the scenes, dictate the policy of the party (and the
candidate) and also the kind and the amount of the return.
It is perhaps significant that not too long ago the Conservatives had
ample opportunity to revise the Election Act, but chose not to do so. It is
perhaps even more significant that the Liberals have been reviewing the act
for three years, but were so busy jetting hither and yon that they could not
quite get the job done before the election. So now we are into yet another
election, with big slush fund spending and no explanation of fund sources
required.
Unless these parties can adequately explain both he source of these
funds and the return expected by the donors, the candidates cannot be
considered as true representatives of the people, but rather, they must be
considered as Agents, Agents that are paid, and well paid, by the people,
but Agents that nonetheless actually represent the mysterious givers of the
large contributions.
OCT. 30 VOTE BEEBE
Peter Sellers
as Albert T. Hopfnagel,
Hospital Administrator, in
Where
Does
It Hurt?
99
°n'V where i«ta»«t
HEMDALE presents A JOSEF SHAFTEL PRODUCTION, "WHERE DOES IT HURT?'
starring  PETER SELLERS • JO ANN PFLUG • RICK LENZ • HAROLD GOULD,
screenplay bv  ROD AMATEAU & BUOD ROBINSON   ». ,».. >...>„„,     music by KEITH ALLISON,
executive producer JOSEF SHAFTEL, produced by BILL SCHWARTZ & ROD AMATEAU
directed by ROD AMATEAU.   MATURE ENTERTAINMENT
Starts Today
CAPITOL   683-2634.
820 GRANVILLE ST.
12:00,   2:00,   4:00,   6:00,  8:00,   10:00 —  Last
complete show 9:30— Sunday from 2:00	 Page
Friday
QXDWN M TTWE €M
Above you see an example of Arnold Saba's illustration, on
display along with the work of French and Italian caricaturists in the
Fine Arts gallery, north library basement, to Nov. 4.
Inside: PF's election special, pages 3, 4, and 5; and some
unfinished business, page 2. SPAGHETTI HOUSE LTD.
4450 West 10th Ave.
Hot Delicious Tasty Pizzas
-22 DIFFERENT FLAVORS -
BARBECUED SPARERIBS - CHARBROI LED STEAKS
FREE DELIVERY - Right to Your Door
Phone 224-1720 - 224-6336
HOURS - MON. To THURS. 11 a.m. to 3 am.
FRI. &«SAT. 11 a.m. to 4 a.m. - SUNDAY 4 p.m. to 2 a.m.
CO
I
00
1123-1125 ROBSON STREET
20% DISCOUNT TO U.B.C. STUDENTS
ON PRESENTATION OF THIS AD
rv
00
.
to
CC
h-
LL
<
o3
(/)
(O
■
CC
Z
D
o
X
r-
2
■
s
z
Q.
LU
o>
Q_
-J
O
This Year
BIRD CALLS
The UBC Student Telephone Directory
Includes
40 Money Saving
COUPONS
BUY
YOUR
COPY
TODAY
UBC BOOKSTORE
or SUB INFORMATION
Films
Dear Clive: please
don't patronize
This is just a little message for Clive
who's been writing some movie
reviews for pf.
Dear Clive,
Down here at Women's Liberation
Central (deep in the heart of a large
metropolitan city) we've been reading your
reviews (because we read everything) and
I think it's only fair to warn you that we are
just getting the tiniest bit upset about some
of the things you've been saying.
Before a little visit becomes necessary,
perhaps you might think again about your
last two reviews, Woody Allen's
Everything You Always Wanted To Know
About Sex and Michael Ritchie's Prime
Cut. I haven't seen either movie, but that's
not the point. What matters is the ideas you
expressed in your reviews.
Even for someone like yourself, who is
obviously enamored of Hollywood com--
mercial movies, a film like Allen's ought to
be immediately suspect. When sex is dealt
with from a male point of view it usually
means that females are regarded as
something less than human. And Clive, let
me tell you it gets a bit tiresome to find out
once again, via a silly twit like Allen, that
your only function as a woman is to be
fucked (regardless of the fact that there
may be a thousand fascinating ways to
have it done to you).
From your review, which dwells with
great prep-school guffaws on things like
"gigantic tits" and "fiendish, 30-foot-high
boobs" it is obvious that this is a movie
which does nothing but exploit women and
make a .complete mockery of female
sexuality. And with great gallumping
boyish glee you gloriously approve of this
kind of attitude and recommend that
everyone rush downtown to hear Allen at
his hilarious best:
With most grievous dispatch,
I will open the latch
And get to her snatch.
You may think this "a real laugh". I
don't.
Now, to be fair, you did say in last
Friday's review of Prime Cut that you
wished the film had gone further into "the
woman-as-object theme"; and so far, three
cheers for you. But Clive, what's important
is that the film didn't explore this theme,
and quite intentionally. The cattle-pens
packed with naked women weren't supposed to make you sit back and muse upon
the exploitation of females; such shots are
just another gimmicky sexual turn-on (for
men) to ensure that the movie will sell. In
the same way, I'm sure that Playboy didn't,
recently print the stills of those bullpen shots to encourage the young men of
our nation to re-tMnk their attitudes
towards "the woman-as-object theme".
Clive, just about every movie that's ever
been made, that has a male and female in
it, could investigate the idea of woman as
object. And practically no movie ever has,
except to resolve the problem in favor of
the male.
If you were simply writing these articles
in the privacy of your own home and then
- stashing them away in a desk drawer or
even showing them only to a few "friends
and colleagues", I'd leave you alone or
maybe just take you quietly aside for a
little chat.
But you are publishing your reviews;
about 20,000 people are probably reading
them and that, Clive, distresses me.
Although the public should not be
"protected" from such attitudes, I think it
is fair to ask how responsible a critic you
are if either directly or indirectly you are
promoting ideas which insist that half the
population are no more than pieces of
meat, Prime Cuts.
I am by no means suggesting that you
should review every movie in terms of its
attitudes towards women. But if you are
going to talk about the representation of
women or male-female relationships, I
think you are going to have to look at your
own attitudes a little more closely.
I hope that it will bother you being called
a male chauvinist; perhaps it will mean
that we won't have to endure again the
glorification of a movie like Everything
You Always Wanted To Know or hear your
oh-so-hip but oh-so-patronizing comments
about something like Prime Cut.
Come on, Clive, clean up your act. If you
don't there'll be trouble. We have our
ways ...
—Anne Petrie
Clive pleads guilty
Dear Anne Petrie,
Since your nasty letter takes issue not
with the films but with my attitude in
reviewing them, I will have to point out a
few things to you.
I can now see how you could take it the
way you did. I am guilty of what you allege
from the simple fact that I am not as madly
sensitive to the disparagement and exploitation of women as you are. That is,
though I am far from blind to what
Hollywood movies do to women's dignity,
and I am (surprise!) not a sexist preppie
pig, I still don't see a raging male
chauvinist under every stone and behind
every tree. Perhaps there I am at fault.
You should look at it from a man's eyes.
If a guy merely likes women's bodies (nude
or otherwise), he is accused from all sides
of just seeing them as something to screw.
O.K., a lot of times this may be the case,
and my reviews as well as Playboy
magazine may not fight it with every word,
but believe me, it is eminently possible to
look at the Playboy foldout or to view
sexual jokes on the screen without losing
respect for women and without seeing them
as inferior beasts lacking dignity and
rights.
Contrary to what you say, it is not
necessary for a man to go through life
repeating to himself: "Women are not
objects, women are not objects, etc. . . .";
nor is it second nature to him to think of
them as such. Therefore, what you in
terpret in a newspaper or in a film as
blatant sexism may mean nothing at all
like that to a man. We aren't looking for it.
Granted, we aren't looking for your point
of view either; we're looking at the middle.
It wouldn't hurt for you to do the same. Be
careful not to protest too much.
Maybe it is the women's turn for a little
superiority, but I think it's a bit much of
you to indulge in glib weak humor at my
expense. Not that it really bothers me — I
mean I'm not afraid to have a woman
correct me or even to have her dump on
me from a great height, but it would be a
groove if she could (while assassinating
me) treat me with some of the consideration she's asking for herself.
As for this "little visit" you threaten —
fine. I am not anxious to be qualified to run
for the Gelding's Plate, but I will certainly
face any sensible criticism that doesn't
wallow in presumptions and condescending
bigotry as does your letter.
In the end, of course, you are right and I
am guilty as hell. But for you to assume
that I meant it that way is downright dense.
So I concede. Though it's not my fault
that Hollywood makes movies like it does, I
still could be doing a helluva lot more for
your cause than I'm doing.
There, you have a new ally. I was af
convert long ago but haven't been doing my
share.
I'll even be nice to girls who aren't nice to
me.
•v Clive Bird
Page Friday, 2
THE      U BYSSEY
Friday, October 20, 1972 Books
Where is equality and wisdom
A people who accepted the
challenges of building the CPR, the
Shakespeare Festival Theatre and
Expo '67 should embark on another
Knowledge Park, by Stephen
Franklin, McClelland and
Stewart, 1972, $6.95.
national venture which will constitute sublimation of the energies of
all Canadians into a moral
equivalent of war:
The proposal is quite simple. It
is that Canada should begin to
build the greatest library the
world has ever known. The
purpose is equally simple. It is
to create, in the course of time, a
centre where all the knowledge
about everything in the world
can be placed ... a community
of libraries; libraries in every
language and on every subject.
This community of libraries
would contain the collective
memory of mankind. And it
would become not only the
record room of man's
imagination, learning and
discoveries, but the active
clearing house of all knowledge
and the information centre for
the world.
That's one hell of a tall order, but
the Canadian government accepts
this proposal in the futurist novel
Knowledge Park. By Canada Day
2000 the library complex has been
established in a 5,000-square-mile
area south of James Bay,
significantly straddling the Ontario
and Quebec borders. Not only will
in this Knowledge Park?
this library unite Canada but it will
rival the great library of Alexandria
which made that city the "cultural
centre of the Mediterranean world."
Hopefully, the building of this
library complex will result in "the
creation of a saner and wiser
world."
According to Franklin, Canadians
can successfully cope with the
Knowledge Explosion by using the
new technology and will make ideal
librarians for this greatest of all
libraries because "we are temperamentally well suited to it:
cautious, uncommitted, accurate
and documentary-minded."
As for the great libraries of the
world, "almost all of them are old
and overcrowded" and "are very
vulnerable to destruction. They are
also incomplete, partial and far
from universal in scope." It is we
who must, and shall, supervise the
whole rather mind-boggling enterprise and have
War and Peace reduced from
Tolstoyan immensity to a few
small rectangles of thermoplastic film; The Pickwick
Papers squinched into
microdots.
If it's a choice between Canadians
fighting in another world war and
Canadians building this community
of libraries, I say let's build the
bloody thing. Better to serve in
Knowledge Park than reign in
Europe!
But is this the only alternative?
Certainly we need good libraries but
our major problem is not so much
that of technically coping with the
Knowledge Explosion, as bringing
wisdom to bear on all that
knowledge and data. Bringing order
out of chaos.
I strongly doubt that' 'the creation
of a saner and wiser world" would
result from building a huge "data
retrieval system" south of James
Bay. China's and Cuba's moral
equivalent to war — the pursuit of
social equality — and Canada's
present project — the building of a
'just' society-seem to me to be more
to the point. What would it profit
Politics
No help to confused voter
The Canadian Voter's Guidebook
is a compendium of information
about parties, personalities, issues
and strategy in the upcoming
federal election.
The information was compiled by
a group of students who spent 10
The Canadian Voter's Guidebook,
ed. Jim McDonald and Jack
MacDonald, Toronto, Fitzhenry &
Whiteside Ltd. $1.95.
months in Ottawa working with
members of parliament on both
sides of the house.
Most of it was available to anyone
who has been reading newspapers.
There's nothing new in the way of
information, or interesting in the
way of analysis.
This doesn't necessarily mean
that the book is worthless. If one had
no idea of what had been happening
on the political scene in Canada for
the past year, one could get most of
the raw information from this book,
and go to the polls to vote Trudeau.
The Right Honorable Pierre, in the
eyes of the authors, is almost un-
defeatable due to his charismatic
personality, which continues to
worry the opposition parties.
Anyone who has made any attempt at all to follow the campaign
knows that this simply is not true.
The first section of the book deals
with the individual political parties.
It outlines the inside action.
In talking about the Liberal party
the authors make some interesting
observations although they seem to
ignore them. The party convention
at Harrison Hot Springs 1969 is
described as "a conclave of the rich
and successful". The convention is
judged as successful in that it
stimulated discussion among those
who attended.
The chapter outlines the dissent
within the ranks of the Liberal party
culminating in the resignation of
Eric Kierans.
Discussing the Conservative
party, the authors seem to be mostly
concerned with the way Robert
Stanfield is polishing up his image.
In their view his efforts are bearing
fruit as Stanfield is being better
received this year than in the last,
federal campaign.
The NDP's main problem seems
to be the Waffle, which continues to
draw a large measure of support
especially among younger members
of the party. The authors predict
that Lewis will base his campaign on
a criticism of Trudeau's arrogance
and his mismanagement of the
economy.
Social Credit, it is predicted, will
draw most if not all of its strength
from Quebec.
Next comes a section that divides
Canada into regions and attempts to
show how the vote will go in each.
Again there is nothing new here.
The Maritimes are disillusioned
with Trudeau (whom they never
voted for in the first place) and are
expected to vote for their native son
Stanfield. Quebec will remain
Liberal — the only question is how:
many of its 56 seats the party will
retain. The main threat here, according to the authors, seems to be
the Creditistes.
The book does point out that if the
PQ decided to organize a boycott of
the election (which it is doing) the
number of ballots cast could be
significantly reduced. This, they
say, would question the credibility of
the results.
Ontario, as most people know, will
be the province which will decide the
election, or at least strongly influence the results. Here the authors
predict that the Liberals will win
since the Tory opposition is weak.
The prairies have received a lot of
attention from the Liberal government in wheat marketing policies.
According to this book that might
not be enough, especially if unemployment becomes an issue in the
election, which has happened.
Writing before Aug. 30, the
authors expected the outcome of the
provincial election to influence the
federal voting. Since the NDP won
we can expect a gain in the number
of seats the party will hold federally
in the province. (That is, if the book
is correct.)
The last section of the book deals
with the issues in the campaign.
Since we are in the midst of the
campaign there is no sense talking
about what the authors predicted the
issues would be. It will suffice to say
that they correctly predicted that
Trudeau's management of the
economy would be the major one.
The Canadian Voter's Guidebook
doesn't give wrong information, but
no attempt is made to analyze what
there is. The authors have merely
gathered information and presented
it in a well-organized and readable
fashion. They could have done much
more.
—Christine Krawczyk
Canada if in gaining every piece of
data and every film, record and
book in the whole world she lost her
own soul?
Why Stephen Franklin even attempted to build his proposal into a
novel is beyond me. Knowledge
Park is incredibly dull reading. Its
pseudo-Brave New Worldishness is
combined with fatuous attempts to
describe what Canadian life will be
like between now and 2000 A.D. All I
can say is that if it's going to be as
boring as Franklin describes I don't
think I'll stick around.
Most of the novel is as tedious as
this passage describing the delights
of the Toronto-Vancouver non-stop
flight:
The man in the next seat wanted
to talk. He was a shoe manufacturer from Kitchener who explained the problems of
women's shoe sizes in an increasingly mobile society.
There had been, it appeared, a
distinct geographic pattern for
many years. Quebec City girls
hadthe smallest feet in Canada;
Winnipeg women the largest.
And there were similar
variations within these limits.
Now people were moving so
much, he no longer knew where
to ship the size 10 triple A's so
unerringly.
Sex is treated in this novel in the
embarrassing fashion so typical of
Canadian novelists. Sanda Nu, a
young calligrapher, wants for some
incomprehensible reason to give
birth to a child with a little help from
elderly librarian Harris MacNeil.
Franklin presents us with this inspired piece of poetic dialogue:
"I can feel them wriggling inside me!"
"What's that?" said Harris.
All those thousands and
thousands of lovely little
spermatozoa of yours," said
Sanda, "swimming so hard to
meet my one lovely little ovum/
It's not a very romantic word in
English, is it — ovum?"
"No, it isn't," said Harris. "But
don't blame us. Blame the
Romans. It's Latin," he explained . . .
This thrilling exchange takes
place in a huge 'Love House' which
is part of the library complex. When
the scholars and librarians tire of
their noble enterprises they hike, or
rather, monorail, over to the 'Love
House' for a little action.
So Knowledge Park is a librarian's
fantasy in more ways than one. Its
literary merit, however, is zilch and
its subject matter only moderately
intriguing.
—Robert Perry
Friday, October 20, 1972
THE      UBYSSEY
Page Friday, 3 NEW and USED
BOOKS
• University Text Books • Quality Paper Backs
• Pocket Books • Magazines
• Largest Selection of Review Notes in Vancouver
BETTER BUY BOOKS
4393 W. 10 Ave.
224-4144 - open 11-8 p.m.
MACBETH
.   .   .   is  coming   October   25
U.B.C.   old   Auditorium
The Playhouse Theatre Company's
10th Season of Professional Theatre
ALAN BENNETT'S
DIRECTED BY PAXTON WHITEHEAD
Now thru Nov. 4
Nightly at 8:30 p.m.
Famous Artists Box Office     The Bay - Phone 681-3351
■,
YOUR PRESCRIPTION . . .
. . . For Glass**
for that smart look in glass** ...
look to
PiesctibtioH Optical
Student Discount Given
WE HAVE AN OFFICE NEAR YOU
S^cidpturecL <=Look
from 0. B. Allan
$32o
Budget Terms, of course     ^.,
%&£
OT
LIMITED
REGISTERED JEWELLER, AMERICAN GEM SOCIETY
Granville at Pender Since 1904
The y
By VAUGHN PALMER and MIKE SASGES
Ron Johnson is a 21-year-old graduate of the
British Columbia Institute of Technology's
broadcasting and communications program.
So what?
Well, it just happens that Johnson could be the
next Member of Parliament from Vancouver-Centre,
that's what.
Johnson belongs to a special club of political
cats that has been unofficially organized throughout
North America — the young candidate, the young
politician.
This year, it so happens, is the year of the
18-year-old vote.
This first become apparent in the United States
where Democrat George McGovern, Richard Nixon
and Time Magazine went out of their way to woo
the youth vote.
In the Lower Mainland-Victoria area, the three
major parties are running six university-age
candidates.
Then there's the Communist Party of Canada,
the traditionally young Communist Party of Canada
(Marxist-Leninist) and the Western Canada Party.
You may expect that young candidates only get
the nomination in ridings where the incumbent has
such a plurality that any other party can only make
a token effort.
This is not the case, although some of the
younger candidates do face tough fights but then a
lot of incumbents are fighting hard as well.
Page Friday talked with six of these candidates.
Johnson has belonged to the Young New
Democrats since he was 16 and continues to
organize the party's youth wing in this province.
Johnson says he was nominated to run against
urban affairs minister Ron Basford because of his
strong socialist principles which reflect he feelings
of the majority of the riding's organization.
He says he believes he can beat Basford because
of the high population turnover in
Vancouver-Centre.
"It's a fact by the very nature of the riding
which is highly transient, highly mobile
population," he says. "In West Vancouver the city
planning department estimates 10 per cent of the
population changes yearly."
Which means a 40 per-cent change in people
since the last election.
Like other non-Liberal candidates Johnson says
the demise of Trudeaumania will also help.
And like NDP candidates across the province,
he says he believes that the recent party victory here
will also help.
With his communication background, Johnson
says he would be interested in that area if elected.
He stresses his concern for the major issues "of
unemployment and foreign domination.
"I didn't reach my concern through intellectual
reasoning, just common sense — Why can't people
live with the wage they're earning," he says.
He is running a traditional type of campaign,
"busstopping between 7 and 9 a.m." and speaking
wherever he can.
"It's an exhausting morning to night type of
thing," says Johnson.
Greg Basham, 27, is the Liberal hopeful in the
New Westminster riding.
Basham just graduated from the urban planning
program at Simon Fraser University.
The Liberals represented New Westminster in
parliament in the previous session but the
incumbent did not run for re-nomination.
Such a seat traditionally would have gone to a
power-hungry Liberal.
But Bashman got the nomination. Why?
"You can draw whatever conclusions from this
that you want, but there were a lot of bodies at the
nomination convention that hadn't been Liberals
before — in fact Greg has only been a Liberal for
eight months," says Basham campaign manager
Terry Lenoski.
And     of    murse     Rasham    whose    nrevions
NOVAKOI
political experience
easily defeated his ■
the local Liberal assi
The good thing
has little respect for
"I am not partii
as such," he told a n
Basham said ht
offer not what his p
He accused stu
and   claimed   his
increases around SI
represents involvenu
He agreed wit
supports the NDP's
Air Defence Treat
Organization, war n
abortion and the Ek
Needless to say
been overwhelming
minister John Mi
Robert Stanbury ai
James Richardson h
The normal Lib
inflation and foreign
But   his   Prog)
Maurice Mulliagan,
bench, has been a
prison policy, espec
policy of solicitor-g(
A 21-year-old !
Tory hopeful in Fras
Trevor Armstroi
other Fraser Valley I
He had to use
the     B.C.     Progn
association to take t!
Armstrong, whc
then had a tough six
power in the partj
certain groups oppo:
Armstrong, who
Page Friday, 4
THE  UBYSSEY
Friday, October 20,  1972 ung candidate
. it's a big riding
term in the SFU senate
Donent, the president of
Basham is he's crazy and
:y line.
iterested in party policy
it SFU Tuesday.
ling on what he has to
;rs.
f never getting involved
gainst   apartment   rent
s he was on the senate
iDP accusation that he
Dn the North American
North Atlantic Treaty
the War Measures Act,
St.
Liberal support has not
riding as only health
jmmunication   minister
;es and supply minister
;d to speak.
tross of unemployment,
tion face Basham.
Convervative   opponent
r member of the federal
the Liberal's stand of
rehabilitation and leave
an-Pierre Goyer.
[timerce student is the
Y West.
e was opposed by three
imination time,
lections as president of
Conservative     student
lation.
d all his life in Langley,
>attle to consolidate his
5 just say there were
y nominatioa"
commerce 2 at the time
of nomination, had problems gathering finances and
campaign staff.
"The financial situation was helped when I
talked a bank manager into being my finance
manager," he says.
"The problem with finding campaign help is
that while Tories tend to be very loyal to the party,
they are reluctant to get out and do the actual work
of canvassing."
But he had the student Conservatives at UBC to
fall back on.
After more than a year of work, he says he
believes he has a good organization which is
succeeding in the door-to-door work necessary for
victory.
Armstrong says he believes the party can
increase the 5,000 votes from last election by
picking up the Social Credit vote and the majority
of the votes from 30,000 young people to beat NDP
incumbent Mark Rose.
But it's uphill all the way to Oct. 30.
Ken Novakowki, 28, is another NDP hopeful.
He is running in Burnaby-Richmond-Delta, the
most populous riding in western Canada.
Novakowski received his BA from the
University of Alberta some years ago and has just
completed his BEd. through part-time courses.
vote
He has taken a leave-of-absence from Langley
secondary school where he was teaching.
The riding is currently Liberal, but the NDP did
hold it up to 1968 and Trudeaumania.
Novakowski is another candidate who has come
up through the ranks, joining the Young NDP in
1965 and serving as national president from 1967 to
1969.
He says he expects to get the riding back
because of the 50-per-cent turnover in population
and because of the end of Trudeaumania.
He says he is appealing to the youth vote in his
riding by speaking on the issues of unemployment
"which is a particular youth problem" and foreign
domination.
He says he is used to the heavy work load of
campaigning because in the youth wing he often had
to go to Ottawa while holding down a full-time job.
Will he disappear into the party ranks as a
back-bencher if elected?
Novakowski says no.
"Because of my experience in the party and my
contacts across the country, I feel I could get
support in the party for any back-bench proposals,"
he says.
. Fleming   Hansen   is   a   fourth-year   political
science student at the University of Victoria.
He is the NDP nomination to beat Liberal
incumbent David Gross in the Victoria riding.
However, Hanson, 25, says he didn't know he
had been nominated for the post until he returned
from his Easter holidays last year.
But he accepted and has never looked back.
"As a matter of fact it's looking so good I've
stopped going to classes," he says.
He says canvassers report a 20-per-cent increase
over the 10,000 votes the NDP received in the 1968
election.
Hansen, who emigrated from Denmark six years
ago, says he first decided to join the scientific
pollution and environmental control society but saw
that is was mainly unpolitical.
The sixth person in this portrait is John
Cherrington, a first-year law student at UBC.
Cherrington, a long-time UBC conservative, has
JOHNSON ... the giant killer
been given the hari-kari task of beating Grace
Maclnnis in the Vancouver-Kingsway riding.
Cherrington is looking to cut his own neck
claiming:
"Grace Maclnnis is getting old. Also her
extremist views on women's lib hurt her.
He concedes women should receive equal pay
for equal work and more daycare facilities are
needed.
Nobody can be against that, especially a
politician.
He claims he is copying NDP tactics by using
young people, supposedly in the trade unions.
These six are students or recent students.
Which is good. They could be you.
It is also good that they are so candid.
How many old-time candidates would freely
admit they packed the nomination meeting to win
the nomination?
It usually takes the media or a disgruntled,
defeated candidate before such un-niceties were
discovered.   -
A
**
UBER4LMKTY
614 West Pender Street, Vancouver 2, B.C.
Old-timers don't buck the party.
Both Basham in New Westminster and
Armstrong in Fraser Valley West say they have.
There's a myth about youth power in the
relatively young North American continent.
In the U.S., magazines such as Esquire and
Time claim the youth of the '60s and '70s were
responsible for the ousting of Lyndon Johnson,
great changes in the American university system and
the election of liberal George McGovern.
In Canada, prime minister Trudeau's
administration started the Opportunities for Youth
program and the Local Initiative Program to halt
restlessness of unemployed Canadian and Quebecois
youth.
The myth or reality of youth power forced the
Canadian and American governments to lower the
age of voting to 18 from 21.
For the first time old politicos will see if the
youth really are as political as the media and the
government seems to think.
Or will it be discovered, as some surveys show,
that young people vote as their parents do?
Perhaps the NDP believes that or it wouldn't
have written off the freak-filled, student riding of
Vancouver-Quadra.
Whatever the case, six university-aged persons
are running in the Lower Mainland.
Friday,, October 20,  1972
THE  UBYSSEY
Page Friday, 5 Out, out, damned wallet
Did you ever try to memorize "Double,
double, toil and trouble" by setting it to music?
You ought to have cashed in on the idea.
Beginning Wednesday, you can see what you
might have done as UBC's musical theatre
society presents the world premiere of Macbeth: A Rock Opera, directed by Richard
Ouzounian, in the Freddy Wood Theatre. Show
time is 8:30 p.m. and tickets are $3 a throw.
If you're poorer than that, the Burnaby Art
gallery presents works by five British print-
makers Nov. 26, and an illustrated reading by
B.C. poet Pat Lane next Friday evening. Print
show is free and the poetry is 50 cents.
And if ballet is your thing, the Ballet Theatre
Contemporain of France will perform the rock
ballet Hop-op at the QE tonight at 8:30 p.m. and
Sunday at 2:30 p.m. Tickets are $3.25 to $6.50.
FROM RUSSIA WITH
LOVE
\ Tonight f& 9:30 P.M.
S.U.B. Aud. 50c
rUShANt
** CAMERAS     **
4538 W.10 224-5858
NEVER UNDERSOLD!
TUXEDO
RENTAL & SALES
+ D.B. & S.B. Tuxedos
+ D.B. & S.B. White Coats
+ D.B. & S.B. Suits
+ COLORED SHIRTS
Parking at Rear
BLACK& LEE
Formal Wear Rentals
631 Howe
688-2481
theBOOKFINDER
• COLES NOTES • SCHAUAAS
• NEW AND USED TEXTS
• POSTERS • CANADIANA
WE SELL BOOKS ON CONSIGNMENT!
4444 W.I 0th Ave.
228-8933
PACIFIC PRESENTATIONS BRINGS YOU
SAVOY BROWN
URIAH HEEP
MILLER ANDERSON
Friday, October 27, 8:00 p.m.
AGRODOME
Tickets $4.50 Advance—$5.00 Door
HOW ON SALE
CONCERT BOX OFFICES — 130 Woter Street,
Grennans Records, Richmond Square; Thunderbird Shop, UBC; A&B Sound, Woodward's
Oakridge and New Westminster. Mail Orders:
Box 8600 — Information 687-2801.
1TTM1B—fmmYmmWTmWTr1J^^" -.•■:*—
PAUfiei5PRtSfNT4Hf)N*
al
4560 W'lOtK
919 Robson St.
1032 W Hastings
670 Seymour
duthie'
BOOKS
a«
Ir^'Nil
€ i1*-
&,«»1
THE INCREDIBLE
eNGELBGRr
lUMPeRDINO
PACIFIC COLISEUM
WED., OCT. 25 AT 8:30
ONE PERFORMANCE ONLY.
$6.00-5.00-4.00-3.00
•nOaW-TMiBATBOXQeticil   Dun,,,,tUkmmJ.Wlw 1
•HOMRBtjIVATIOHSai-nSl
champ; to your iat chaum account
FAMOUS  ARTISTS   LTD.       ^AMOUS  ARTISTS   LTD.
ON OCT
30th
SHOW
YOUR
CONCERN
Why won't federal Liberals fight
to save Skagit River?
Seattle is going to flood our Canadian Skagit River to get
cheap power at our expense. Citizen groups have been fighting
tooth and nail to prevent this flooding. As counsel for these
groups I have been astounded that not a single federal Liberal
member of parliament has done anything to help.
The Skagit River can be saved.
But only if the Canadian federal government will stand up to
the Americans and refuse to allow this flooding.
The Liberal government refuses to tell the Americans that the
flooding of our valley is unacceptable — despite the fact we
have an excellent case. International law experts say the 1942
International Joint Commission order permitting the flooding
is illegal.
It is illegal because the IJC has never approved the terms of
payment. And no wonder. We agreed to give it away for
$35,000 a year. For this Seattle saves one million dollars a
year in power costs.
The Skagit is a priceless heritage.
This beautiful river flows down from Manning Park and across
the American border near Hope. Seattle wants to raise an
existing dam below the border which will inundate ten miles
of Canadian territory.
Why? To get additional water storage space for electric power
production.
This will not solve Seattle's power problems. At best it will
give relief for only a few years. Seattle must look elsewhere for
power whether our Canadian Skagit is flooded or notr
Two years ago the Liberals promised to help. They promised
to   put   the   matter   back   before   the   International   Joint
Commission for an up-to-date decision.
That promise was a sham and a delusion — because they agreed
with the Americans to terms of reference which made it
impossible for the IJC to stop the flooding — all the IJC could
do was determine the environmental consequences.
The IJC report implicitly condemned the flooding but by the
terms of reference they were forbidden to order that the
flooding be stopped.
Now the United States Federal Power Commission is the court
of last resort to decide whether a Canadian valley should be
flooded.
Its not too late.
There are strong and powerful lobbies in the United States
working with Canadians to save the Skagit River, but
they cannot fight effectively without the support of the
Canadian government.
Not even the Americans are going to flood our valley without
our consent.
I have Bob Stanfield's committment a Conservative
government will not consent to this flooding and will demand
Seattle apply again to the International Joint Commission
under terms of reference "that allows the IJC to make a new
and fair decision in keeping with today's circumstances.
The Skagit River Can Be Saved
ELECT
FRASER
PROGRESSIVE
CONSERVATIVE
VANCOUVER SOUTH
Page Friday, S
THE  UBYSSEY
Friday, October 20, 1972 Music
Of monks
and music
Takeo Yamashiro has recently been
granted landed immigrant status into
Canada as a musician. He performs on
a five-holed bamboo wind instrument
called a shakuhatchi, which he studied
for eight years in Japan before coming
to Canada.
. Ken Hall is a Canadian classical
guitarist. Together, these two
musicians have weaved their styles
and backgrounds into a successful and
beautiful artistic union.
UBC students received them well at a
concert sponsored by Special Events in
the SUB conversation pit Monday at
noon — after the difficulty of finding
two music stands was overcome.
Takeo opened the concert with two
solo pieces from his repertoire of
classical shakuhatchi music. The two
pieces, Kyo Toshi and Ajikan, were
composed by anonymous 13th century
Zen monks.
The monks didn't write their music
down, but composed it by copying the
sounds they heard in their wilderness
surroundings. The music was handed
down from teacher to student until it
was finally written down fifty years
ago. Takeo studied it in its written
form.
Ken joined Takeo for the remainder
of the program, beginning with a pi« »je
called Spring Sea, a modern composition for shakuhatchi and koto, a
Japanese stringed instrument. Ken
played the pleasing koto parts on the
guitar, reading the notes in western
signature.
This was followed by an im-
provisional piece based on a six-bar
theme composed by Takeo. It was a
dramatic point in the concert, as the
musicians traded subtle phrases, then
joined and moved back into the opening
theme. The pair concluded with
another short classical piece.
For those who missea it or want to
hear more, Takeo and Ken can be
heard on Thursday evenings at the
Classical Joint in Gastown.
—Story and photo
by Rex Weyler
Audience gasps at Indian singing
A surprisingly large number turned
out for a concert of Indian classical
music on Saturday night, considering
the amount of publicity given the event.
The 150 persons who came to the
Angus building on campus were in turn
delighted and excited by the
vocalizations of Chandrakant Kapilesh-
wari as the smiles, nods, and exclamations of approval attested.
Kapileshwari, currently on world
tour, accompanied himself on autoharp
and tampoora during the three-hour
concert. His expertise in both
vocalization and instrumentation soon
became obvious in the first part of the
show,   but   reached   levels   of   un
precedented excellence in the second
part. At times the audience exclaimed
in unison at peaks of exhilaration."
Unfortunately it had to be almost a
one-man show, as the accompaniment
by local musicians on harmonium,
tampoora, and tablas was marginally
adequate.
The local musicians somehow
•managed to look bored for the whole
concert.
Kapileshwari alone was faced with
the task of putting on the show, but
fortunately was assisted after the first
song by an outstanding local tabla
player, RaviJVIatturi. Together, they
wove patterns of voice and rhythm,
with what seemed almost one mind.
The program, consisting of a number
of Indian classics, fluctuated in interest
value. The songs, from 10 to 40 minutes
in length, were either enrapturing or
tedious. There seemed to be no middle
states several times.
Fortunately, most fell into the former category, and the concert as a
whole was fascinating.
I understand that there are plans for
i future concerts and my only hope is
] that more advertising will be done so
more people can learn to appreciate
Indian Classical music.
—Terry Turchyniak
ABRAXAS
CRAFTS
leather belts & bags 0 batik
tpottery • jewellery #) macramej
stained glass 0 candles
DISCOUNT WITH AMS CARD
& THIS AD
Mon-Sat 10:30-5:30
Fri 'til 9:00
1124 Robson St       68*3-3979
HONG KONG CHINESE FOODS
•hist One Block from Campus in the Village
WE SER VEAU THEN TIC CHINESE FOOD
A TREASONABLE PRICES
EAT IN - TAKE OUT
We have enlarged our dining room to offer you
better service at no increase in prices!
Open Every Day from 4:30 p.m. to 11 p.m.
5732 University Blvd. Phone 224-6121
rushant
** CAMERAS    *
4538 W.10 224-5858
NEVER UNDERSOLD!
SPECIALIZED
SERVICE
we repair
FIAT
—Reasonable Prices
—Quality Workmanship
—Fully Guaranteed
When a young man's fancy
lightly turns to thoughts of
'LOVE'
He should at least be clued up
on birth control. To get the
facts in plain language send for
the FREE How-Not-To booklet
by Julius Schmid, makers of
FOUREX, RAMSES and SHEIK
Quality contraceptives for men.
Sold only in drug stores.
w
JULIUS SCHMID OF CANADA LIMITED
32 Bermondsey Rd.. Toronto 16, Ont.
Please send me FREE "THE-HOW-NOT-TO-BOOK"
(Print clearly)
TO: Name_
Address.
City_
THE
HOW-NOT-TO
BOOK
Julius Schmid's guide
lo modern birth conlrol methods
_Zone_
_Prov.
l XSliULl
NOTICE
TO ALL
STUDENTS
FACULTY & STAFF
HOW DOES THIS SOUND
TO YOU ...
15% OFF
THE MAMUFACTIHtERS SU6GESTED LIST
ON ALL OUR STEREO
COMPONENTS & ACCESSORIES
Bring in your I.D. card and receive our.opportunities for
youth grant
COME IN AND SEC OUR LARGE
SELECTION OF STEREO EQUIPMENT
1VI   1   lens £■» Era   W   «■«■$
4 STORES TO SERVE YOU
1123 DAVIE ST.
683-1326
Opep 9 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. Mon. to Fri,
Saturday 9:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m,
622 COLUMBIA
524-2016
NEW
WEST
9a.i
I. to 5:30 p.m. Mon.-Sat.
Thurs. & Fri. 9 • 9
782 GRANVILLE ST.
683-1395
9:30 a.m. to 6:00 p.m.
Mon. to Sat.
Thurs. & Fri. 9-9
728 YATES ST.
388-6295
9 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.
Mon.-Sat. Fri. 9 - 9
CHARGEX • EASY TERMS • LAYAWAY
Friday, October 20, 1972
THE      UBYSSEY
Page Friday, 7 Drama
Play radiates
flower power
"Half-lives? I'll tell you what that is.
It's half a husband, a daughter with
half a mind and another who's half a
test-tube,and a women" who's half a
corpse. That's half-life."
Half-lives, fragmented and- incomplete,
are the lives Paul Zindel's characters lead
in his play The Effect of Gamma Rays on
Man-in-the-Moon Marigolds, now at the
Arts Club.
AH the action takes place withing a living
room. An atmosphere of melancholy and
despair pervades the scene. Three worn
wooden chairs and a coffee table occupy
centre stage. Two faded lounge chairs, a
desk, bookshelves and other forgotten
pieces are dilapidated and in disrepair.
The set is painted in dull browns, the
color of the characters' lives, the cramped
living space and cluttered appearance
evoke an image of trapped people in a
neglected decaying prison.
Beatrice, played by Doris Chillcott, and
her daughters Matilda (Marti Maraden)
and Ruth (Pia Shandel) are the three
central characters. Nanny (Barbara
Tremain) is a decrepit forgotten old
woman paying $15 a week for room, board
and Beatrice's cruel barbs and insensitive
condescension. Although she never says a
work, Nanny's beseeching stares and
agonized motions communicate the
tragedy of old age.
Beatrice is the focus of the play, and the
success of both is largely due to Chillcott's
superb acting. She does more than play the
character. She is the character.
Beatrice is a,paradox, a rich and complex tangle of conflicting emotions, each
one vying for supremacy. She is
forever shifting, changing into new moods
and  tempers.   At   times   garrulous   and
crude, she is also incisive and biting.
Warmth and sympathy explode into vicious
attacks of hatred and cruelty.
The two sisters lack Beatrice's depth of
character, and appear rather one-
dimensional. Ruth is an emotionally unstable epileptic, Matilda the quiet steady
scholar. Ruth is played as impulsive and
hyper-active, accentuated by her bright
clothes and overdone make-up.
Matilda's drab grey skirts and pallid
complexion convey her shy, reserved
manner, and her patient studious image
never lapses.
What is the effect of gamma rays on
man-in-the-moon-marigolds? Matilda
treated marigold seeds with cobalt 6Q,
hoping to present the mutations at the high
school science fair. She explains that too
much radiation stunts the seeds, producing .
gnarled and twisted flowers.
Too little weakens the plant, and it soon
succumbs to the environment. But if the
right dosage is given, a rare and beautiful
species results, with the necessary strength
and endurance to survive. These effects are
symbolized by the three characters,    i
Beatrice is the twisted and self-consumed
variety, eaten away from within by her
anger and frustration at a world where she
couldn't find a place. Ruth is the weak
species, retiring into her own world of half-
truths and exaggerations, and now succumbing under epileptic seizures and
terrifying nightmares. The only healthy
one is Matilda. Strong and sure, she
struggles against her environment and
flourishes.
Gamma Rays runs until Nov. 11. It starts
at 8:30 p.m. Tuesdays, Saturdays and 7:30
Sundays. Weekdays are $3.25, weekends
$3.75, and students $2 on weekends.
—Steve Morris
Films
The first was blurry,
the second was thin
Right now, new films are as scarce as
good films; yet Famous Players has
launched these two on the Vancouver
public as a double bill. This should give us
an indication of their quality.	
Confessions   of   a   Police   Captain,
starring Martin Balsam and Franco
Nero; Thumb-Tripping, starring Meg
Foster and Michael Burns. Both at the
Strand.
If the distributors won't give a movie at
least a week on its own, especially now, we
expect a real disaster. Actually, neither
film is that bad.
True, there are things blatantly wrong
with both: the photography in Confessions
is so bad — blurry focussing and washed
out color balance — that it could be your
grandmother's home movies; and Thumb-
Tripping suffers from a general
aimlessness, which is compounded by our
feeling that we've seen it all before. Who
needs another 'Youth Culture encounters
America' movie?
Nevertheless, both of these films contain
some serious attempts at good cinema, and
both have their moments. They will
probably be around the double-bill,
suburban circuit for some time.
Confessions is an Italian film. It was shot
in and around Palermo, Sicily, and except
for Martin Balsam, the cast and crew are
all Italian. We get a real sense of urban
Southern Italy from the film, and this alone
makes it interesting.
It's a police drama in which a new,
idealistic D.A. (Franco Nero) is introduced
to business and government corruption by
a cynical police captain (Martin Balsam).
After years of trying, Balsam has decided
that there is no way within the law to bring
the local crime syndicate leader to justice.
So he decides to step outside the law.
Consequently, the D.A. gets a fast
education in how powerful justice isn't. The
action moves at a good pace, and the plot is
plausible and interesting. It also has
significance. The director, Damiano
Damiani, (who also wrote the screen-play)
succeeds in making a strong condemnation
of a system where people are pawns, and
justice is meaningless.
Elio Petri's Investigation of a Citizen
Above Suspicion is a magnificent exploration of the duplicity inherent in
modern law enforcement. Confessions is,
both technically and artistically, a cruder
assault on the same hypocrisy. It does not
have Investigation's beauty, pace or style,
but it does have the same toughness.
Thumb-Tripping is an episodic road
movie. College guy (Michael Burns) meets
hippy girl (Meg Foster) and they thumb,
"taking every ride," through California.
Each ride represents a little bit of America,
and college guy gets educated at every
turn.
Maybe I'm a sucker, but I really enjoyed
parts of this film. Both the truck-driver
episode and the married-couple episode
have some great moments, and there is a
terrific incident featuring super-psycho
Bruce Dern as knife-wielding crazy.
I hasten to add that the rest is pretty thin.
Specifically, the whole relationship between the boy and girl is badly developed,
and just doesn't come off.
If you are desperate to go to the movies
and nothing really good is available, these
two are a possibility. Neither is the kind of
film you can get really involved in, but
Confessions is definitely interesting if you
can ignore its poor technical qualities, and
Tripping is good popcorn-eating divertissement.
—David MacKinlay
'A  SUB  FilmSoc  Presentation
FROM RUSSIA WITH L0VE
Tonight   7:00 and 9:30 p.m.
The Invincible DR. NO
Sal. 7:00 and 9:30 p.m.
Sun. 7:00 p.m.
SUB AUD.    50'
i
jjl>oe ffyovm
In a 12" high Rocker Sole Boot
Brown Antique Leather
Black Leather
only $45.00
Open Thursday and Friday Nites
C.O.D. orders accepted.
Credit and Chargex cards honored
VILLAGER SHOE SHOPPES LTD.
542 Granville 435 W. Hastings
Le Chateau Branch 776 Granville
Guildford Town Shopping Centre, Surrey
1324 Douglas St in Victoria
"Design and Word Trademarks In Canada of the
Villager Shoe Shoppest-td."
Page Friday, 8
THE  UBYSSEY
Friday, October 20, 1972 Friday, October 20,  1972
THE       UBYSSH
Page  15
Second term fees
may be withheld
TORONTO (CUP) — With only about half
the participating schools reporting, Ontario
students have voted overwhelmingly to
withhold their second term fee instalment if
the provincial government maintains its tuition
increases.
Seventy-six percent of students who paid
only their first instalment voted to support the
fee boycott in January if negotiations between
the government and the Ontario Federation of
Students are unsuccessful.
And 90 per cent of the students voting supported the OFS demands for a repeal of the fee
increase and a return of the loan portion of
students awards to $600 from $800.
But the OFS executive appeared to be
hedging on whether to go through with the
boycott campaign.
OFS will not consider a fee strike, secretary-
treasurer Eric Miglin said, until student
leaders bring the results to their respective
campuses. Each campus will decide on its own
whether or not to withhold fees. Student council
leaders will then meet to plan an overall
provincial action, Miglin said.
Miglin is also president of the University of
Toronto students council.
Indications are OFS lacks the determination
to go through with a serious confrontation with
the provincial government, and may be looking
for a way out. They may point to the approximately 50 per cent turnout and say this
does not indicate sufficient student support for
the action.
But compared to past campus elections,
turnout for the referendum was heavy, on most
campuses between 35 and 50 per cent.
At Queen's University where campus turnouts usually range from 30 to 40 per cent, some
60 per cent of eligible students cast their
ballots. Similar large turnouts were run up at U
of T, the University of Western Ontario and
Laurentian University in Sudbury.
Seldom is a U of T turnout more than 25 per
cent.
Disappointing turnouts of about 15 per cent
were reported at Carleton University, where
the student council is in a shambles and at the
University of Waterloo, where student council
president Terry Moore resigned because of
lack of co-operation from students in helping to
organize the referendum.
Results for almost half the participating
schools were unavailable from the OFS office in
Toronto. Even Toronto's York University failed
to report the results for its main campus to the
downtown OFS headquarters, along with those
from affiliated Atkinson College.
The most resounding majorities in favor of
the second term fees boycott were recorded at
Queen's and at York's semi-autonomous
Glendon College.
At Queen's, 3,764 students voted to withhold,
while only 607 voted against, a margin of about
6 to 1. Some 607 Glendon students said they had
already paid their fees in full.
At Glendon the vote was 190 to 33, with 163
already paying their full fees.
At U of T,.5,333~VOted to withhold, while 2,193
voted against. Some 4,070 said they had already
paid in full, reflecting the poor campaign
waged by Miglin's student council during the
summer to convince people to pay in installments.
Students at the UWO and at Carleton voted
about 5 to 1 to withhold fees.
Smaller margins were recorded at other
campuses, about 3 to 1 at Brock, 2 to 1 at
Ryerson Polytechnical Institute and 3 to 2 at
Laurentian.
The vote was 406 to 334 at Guelph and 605 to
459 at Waterloo.
Trent University in Peterborough was the
only school to vote against the fees boycott.
Some 251 voted no, as opposed to 181 voting yes,
and 259 who had paid in full.
Part-time students at the U of T, who turned
out in small numbers, also voted against the fee
boycott.
Also approved overwhelmingly in the OFS-
sponsored referendum was a call for a total
fees boycott next year, if the government increases tuition again.
The results come in the wake of a statement
by Ontario's new minister of colleges and
universities last week, that tuition fees would
not rise again this year.
Speaking at the U of T John McNie said he
also did not expect the loans portion of Ontario
student awards to rise either.
He defended this year's increase ($100 for
undergrads and up to $392.50 for graduates)
and said "Government committment over the
past 10 years has been to accessibility."
But he later admitted "I don't think there's
any question the fees increase has had an effect
on graduate and undergraduate enrolment."
Former New Democratic Party provincial
education critic Walter Pitman attacked
McNie, charging that fees increases "are
definitely a deterrent, especially to those
students of lower incomes."
Emphasis on loans "does not mean that
education will be more accessible," he said.
U of T president John Evans agreed, saying
that fees hikes and lower grant portions of
awards are "real deterrents to attendance at
post-secondary institutions. The groups affected already have the lowest rates of participation."
Ontario Liberal party colleges and
universities critic James Bullbrook appeared
to defend the fees increase. He said he couldn't
see how else the government could have found
the $23 million it saved in raising fees anywhere
else under the present taxation system.
The invincible
DR. NO
Sat. and Sun. Night
S.U.B. Aud. 50c
VARSITY GRILL
4381 W. 10th
(Beside Varsity Theatre)
CHINESE & WESTERN
FOOD
FREE QUICK DELIVER Y
Serving Students
for 16 years.
224-1822 224 3944
Notice to Graduating Students in
SCIENCE
A MEETING WILL BE HELD IN BIOLOGY 2000
MONDAY, OCTOBER 23 at 12:30 p.m.
to hear a representative from the Placement Office
(Office of Student Services)
on the subject
Graduate Employment
United Nations Day
Oct. 24, 1972
7:30 p.m.
HEAR
STANLEY BURKE
(former CBC Newsman
and World Humanitarian)
at
INTERNATIONAL
HOUSE
RESERVE OFFICER
UNIVERSITY TRAINING PLAN
. become part of Canada's active Naval Reserve
. learn seamanship, navigation & leadership skills
. one night a week during the academic year
. four months summer employment in the sea environment at
$400 a month
Interested?   ~come to HMCS discovery,
Stanley Park, Tuesday at 8 p.m.
- call Capt. Harrison at 266-4375
P+C
BILL
CLARKE
CARES ABOUT QUADRA
The Trudeau government has led the economy into a mess,
and the Stanfield team has been saying "We can do better". In
this space I shall try to explain why.
* *  *
Trudeau's policies DELIBERATELY created much of the
current unemployment. His Finance Minister said, in the
budget speech of March, 1970, "Unemployment, slightly
higher than that of 1969, might be necessary if we are really
going to beat inflation".
This Trudeau government-induced unemployment has NOT
reduced inflation. The cost of living index in September had
the biggest one-month jump in twelve years. And the current
unemployment rate in B.C. of over 8 per cent (62,000 people)
is the highest in eleven years.
This very high unemployment has meant that the federal
Unemployment Insurance Fund will have a deficit this year of
over one billion dollars, which will be made up out of the
taxpayers' pockets.
Reliance on payments from the said fund, and from various
welfare funds, has become a way of life for thousands of
Canadians who should be supporting themselves by working.
Many of them have lost "the work ethic", as they have no
incentive to get off welfare. If elected, I will work to change
this dangerous state of affairs.
The Trudeau government has encouraged this drift into the
Welfare State. It raised new tax money with a capital gains tax,
and opened the way for new provincial gift and estate taxes to
be imposed. Is it any wonder, therefore, that Canadians have
little money available to buy back the ownership of our
businesses now owned by foreigners?
* *  *
We on the Progressive Conservative team can change many of
these economic problems because we are motivated by a
different attitude towards government. We believe that there
should be LESS interference by the big federal government in
the lives of Canadians. With less interference there will be an
opportunity for more individual initiatives.
To start our reforms, we would reduce personal income taxes
so they would be 7 percent less next year than Trudeau would
have them. This is not an election bribe. Rather it is simply a
chance to let we taxpayers spend more of our own money as
we see fit. We feel the individual can spend his own money in a
better way than Trudeau's government has been spending it
for him.
Further, tax cuts will give taxpayers more money to spend
. without any higher costs accruing to their employers, costs
which would otherwise have been passed on to consumers in
the form of higher prices. When the taxpayers spend this extra
money, a higher demand will be created for goods and services
which will produce more jobs.
We, the voters of Quadra, have an opportunity on October 30
to have positive representation in Ottawa. A vote for Bill
Clarke is a vote for such change. Please think about it!
Bill Clarke is the Progressive Conservative candidate in
Vancouver Quadra. His headquarters phone for information is:
261-2292.
<C Page  16
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, October 20>  1972
Promotion, tenure worries
English teachers again
By SANDY KASS
A number of English department teachers
are worried that promotions and tenure considerations will not be given this year because
department head Robert Jordan is on leave.
But, acting head William Robbins said
Thursday, the faculty members' fears are
unfounded.
Robbins, a full professor and Victorian
literature expert, is department head from July
1,1972 to June 30,1973 during Jordan's one-year
sabbatical in Europe where he is studying
works by Medieval poet Geoffrey Chaucer.
Commenting on rumors within the
department that no P and T considerations
would be given, Robbins told The Ubyssey any
faculty member up for P and T this year would
be considered under normal procedures in the
spring.
As acting head, Robbins assumes full
authority to make P and T recommendations to
a department committee, which would then
vote on the recommendations and submit the
results of its vote to an arts faculty committee
for approval.
The faculty committee's decision is subject
to approval by an administration president's
committee, which is then subject to approval
by the board of governors.
Meanwhile, an English department instructor, who asked to remain anonymous, told
The Ubyssey Wednesday "it is an educated
assumption that Jordan is not going to have his
powers abrogated in his absence."
The instructor claims a senior member of
the department said during the summer no P
and T recommendations would be given at the
departmental level in Jordan's absence.
"There is real power and there is theoretical
power. The acting head may have the
theoretical power to make recommendations,
but there is a lot of suspicion that he won't," the
instructor said.
"Take the position of a department head —
you wouldn't want irrevocable decisions made
behind your back."
Promotions and tenure has been a contentious issue in the English department for the
past three years, during which time three
professors, whom students claimed to be excellent teachers, were denied tenure on the
grounds of inadequate scholarly research.
Tenure or permanent teaching contract
decisions are based on scholarly research,
teaching ability and university and community
involvement.
However, Robbins said, he is obligated as
acting head, to consider the cases of any
teachers up for P and T this year. A teacher has
five years from his first employment at UBC to
obtain tenure.
"These rumors are completely unfounded,"
Robbins said. He denied an allegation that he
had been told by Jordan to not make any P and
T recommendations while acting head.
He said considerations for P and T are
normally made in the spring, "and this year
will be no exception."
UWO forced to cut budget
because of low enrolment
LONDON (CUP) — An
unexpectedly low enrolment
will force the University of
Western Ontario to trim about
$2.7 million from its operating
budget this year.
Only 11,130 undergraduates
will be registered on Dec. 1, the
official count day for government grant purposes, compared to a projected enrolment
of about 12,000 undergrads
when the university budget
was prepared.
UWO president Carleton
Williams was quick to assure
there will be no faculty firings.
"It's not the faculty's fault if
students don't show up," he
said.
Faculty, who account for
about 80 per cent of the
university's $50.6 million
operating budget, are all under
contract for varying periods of
time.
The number of graduate
students is also down from
official predictions.
Williams said a freeze placed
on $1.25 million of the budget in
July will have to be translated
into cuts, and a further drop of
$700,000 in expenditures is
necessary. The original budget
had already predicted a deficit
of $734,000 and Williams said
the university wanted to break
even, producing the $2.7
million in necessary cuts.
"It's hard to think of any
item that won't be
scrutinized," Williams said.
He   hoped   the   university
wouldn't have to dig into a $2.5
million reserve fund built up
from past surpluses.
Areas affected most by the
July freeze were the council for
university theatres and art, the
instructional media centre,
libraries, computing centre,
university research council,
physical plant, information
services and university
publications, the alumni
department and the general
administration account.
Vice-president finance A. K.
Adlington said salary expenses
would be reduced through
attrition and non-appointments
with no staff being hired to fill
vacancies.
Construction plans are
proceeding for plant expansion
already in progress, Adlington
said, although actual building
may be impossible. An addition to the chemistry
department has been shelved
until the spring.
Adlington admitted the
administration would have- to
improve its method of
projecting enrolments.
He said governments will not
be any help.
"There has been so much
comment in the press about
overgrowth and the disenchantment with universities
that the more fuss we make the
better the politician likes it,"
he said.
Meanwhile enrolment at
Dalhousie University in
Halifax is reported at 6,100,
compared to an expected 6,800.
Many students who indicated
an intention to register did not.
The Dal administration
denied rumors of budget cuts,
terming,them "garbage".
Enrolment at UBC is down
by about 500 students. The
registrar's office has not indicated whether there will be
budget cuts as a result of the
drop.
STUDENTS
FACULTY S STAFF
10°/c
o
off on all
BOOKS
Just show your I.D. card
SEE OUR WIDE SELECTION
Mfr's.
Suggested List
• All the latest fiction
• Serendipity section
• Children's friezes
• Canadiana
• Dover colouring books
CHARGEX • EASY TERMS
DRIVE IN ft SAVE
• Handyman's corner
• Children's books
• Gen. book dept.
• Art supplies
• Gift books
MILLERS
1123 DAVIE ST. 683-1326
Hours 9 a.m.-9 p.m. Mon.-Fri. Sat. 9 a.m.-6 p.m.
BURSARY CHEQUES
MAY BE PICKED UP FROM THE FINANCE DEPT.
IN    THE   NEW   ADMINISTRATION    BLDG.
HOWEVER,   NOT  ALL  PROVINCIAL   BURSARY
CHEQUES ARE IN.
DON'T TOUR THE WORLD
EXPLORE!! !
PENNT0URS
75 days
57 days
38 days
MINITREK
CCT
special under-35 exploration
trips
from London to Kathmandu
from Marrakesh to Nairobi
from Lima to Rio
- Landrover expeditions or by Minibus
3 weeks Ethiopia
4 weeks Afghanistan
3 weeks Greenland
One Month Trans-Sahara
2 weeks Morocco
2 weeks Scandinavia
the popular Camping Tours of Europe
5 weeks, 6 weeks or 9 weeks,
student driver-guides to take the
bus where the majority likes to stay.
It  is not too early to make inquiries and reservations NOW! Capacities
restricted per departure because of the nature of the trips.
»B
burke*s
world wide travel
"IN THE VILLAGE"
5700 University Blvd.
Phone 224-4391 Friday, October 20,  1972
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 17
Hot flashes
Fellowships
available
Trial one-year theological
fellowships are available for
graduating students for any
accredited theological college in
either the U.S. or Canada.
The   fellowships   are  available
for students prepared to consider
.ordination in any Protestant faith
but not already committed to the
ministry.
Applicants must be under 31
and either a Canadian or
American citizen.
Applicants will be interviewed
Nov. 10. For an appointment
phone 228-2721 as soon as
possible.
Shelby Rooks, executive
director of the Sponsoring Fund
for Theological Education will be
hosting a dinner on campus Oct.
31 for interested students.
For reservations phone
228-2721 before 4 p.m., Oct. 30.
Tutors too
Tutoring services are now being
offered through Speakeasy, a
student run counselling service.
Student co-ordinator Doug
Brock said he interviews each
student to determine exactly what
course problems he is having and
iV%S.   i"yy
be in town this weekend to
answer questions of students
thinking of going there.
Deans John Saywell and
Joseph Green will be at the
Georgia Hotel today and Saturday
to answer questions about arts,
fine arts, business administration
and bilingual courses at Glendon
College.
SPEC speaks
The       B.C.       Environmental
Council is organizing trips to the,
proposed   superport   facilities   of
Nanaimo and Squamish Saturday.
In Squamish, where deep-water
facilities construction has already
begun, local residents and
Scientific Pollution and
Environmental Control Society
will give a guided boat tour of the
harbour. A similar reception is
planned for Nanaimo.
The tour begins at the 8:30
ferry to Nanimo, on which there
will be panel discussion with
fisheries experts and
environmentalists.
For information phone
277-4424.
Candidates
Another Vancouver-Quadra
all-candidates meeting will be held
Thursday, this time in the Totem
Park commons block.
to match him up with the tutor
best able to help.
"The actual cost of the tutor is
worked out between the tutor and
the student themselves but we try
to limit to $2 an hour," he said,
said.
Brock said that last year only
300   students   made   use   of the
- program but this year it hopes to
serve many more students,
students.
Those interested in obtaining a
tutor or in providing tutoring
services should see Brock at the
Speakeasy office or phone
228-4557. A fee of $1 is charged
for the interview.
And titkets
The Vancouver Little Theatre
Association will open its 52nd
season with a production of
Moliere's That Scoundrel Scapin.
Directed by Michael Ball with
William Hawk as Scapin, the play
opens Oct. 25 and runs
Wednesday, Thursday and Friday
night for three weeks at York
Theatre.
Tickets are on sale at the
Vancouver Ticket Centre. Student
rates are available.
Deans here
Representatives from York
University, Downsview, Ont., will
Tween classes
TODAY
WOMEN'S ACTION GROUP
All women faculty, staff and
students, welcome to meeting in
Grad Centre board room at noon.
SKYDIVERS
General meeting SUB 212 (clubs
lounge) noon.
SPEAKERS COMMITTEE
Genesis will perform life sciences in
SUB conversation pit at noon.
LUTHERAN CENTRE
Coffee house featuring song
collectors, Phil Thomas and John
Bartlett at 9 p.m. in the Lutheran
Centre.
UKRAINIAN VARSITY CLUB
Wine and cheese party, world
famous Kuban Cossacks will attend
8 p.m., in the Catholic centre board
room, 3150 Ash. New members
free.
WOMEN'S FILM SERIES
Short films by women film-makers
women only 8 P.m. in the Women's
Centre, 511 Carrall Street.
SOCIALIST STUDIES
General meeting noon in Buchanan
321.
ISPC
Downunder in lower lounge of
International House 4 to 7 p.m.
Facilities available.
YOUNG SOCIALIST CLUB
Politics and Philosophy by Marxist
philosopher George Novak 8 P.m.,
at 1208 Granville Street.
PRE-SOCIAL WORK CLUB
Guest speaker from Vancouver
volunteer bureau noon in SUB
105B.
SATURDAY
WOMEN'S FILM SERIES
Short films by women film-makers,
everyone welcome at 8 p.m. in the
Women's Centre, 511 Carrall Street.
ABORTION ACTION COMMITTEE
March starting from courthouse at
12 p.m. to public library. Rally
there with speakers, music and
drama at 1:30 p.m.
SUNDAY
LUTHERAN CENTRE
John Neimi from continuing ed will
speak at 9:30 a.m., worship at
10:30 a.m. Lutheran Centre.
VST & SCM
Fireside meeting Critical Decisions
in our Lives at 8 p.m. in fireside
room, 6050 Chancellor.
AQUASOC
Dive at Pourtoa Bay on Squamish
highway at 10 a.m.
NVC
Golf tournament, weather
permitting in Central Park pitch and
putt at 1 p.m.
MONDAY
ELCIRULO
Mexican counsul will speak at noon
International House 402.
SMC
Organizational meeting to build the
national SMC conference at noon in
SUB 215.
KUNG FU CLUB
Practice SUB ballroom 4:30 to 6:30
p.m.
TUESDAY
AUCM
Worship    and    soup    in    Lutheran
Centre at noon.
GERMAN CLUB
General meeting        noon in
International House 404.
WEDNESDAY
LUTHERAN CAMPUS MINISTRY
Growth  group,  still openings for a
few people,  3:30 p.m. at Lutheran
Centre.
LUTHERAN CAMPUS MINISTRY
Worship and discussion at Lutheran
Centre noon.
PRE-NATAL SOCIETY
Dr.  Jinks speaking on pedodontics
SUB 211 at noon.
NDP CLUB
Nigel      Nixon,      NDP      candidate
Vancouver   Quadra   noon   in   SUB
clubs lounge.
CROSSROADS
Information    meeting    in    Lasserre
105 at noon.
THURSDAY
KUNG FU CLUB
Practice in SUB ballroom 4:30 to
6:30 p.m.
SIMS
Introductory lecture on
transcendental meditation and the
science of creative intelligence noon
in Buchanan 207.
VOC
Used outdoor equipment sale from
9 a.m. to 5 p.m. in SUB 205. If you
have anything to sell bring it to the
VOC clubroom in SUB basement
before Thursday.
— FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE
SIX CHARACTERS IN
SEARCH OF AN AUTHOR
by Pirandello
November 1-11     8:00 p.m.
Directed by Raymond Clarke
Setting & Lighting Designed By Richard Kent Wilcox
Costumes Designed By David Lovett
CLASSIFIED
Rates: Campus — 3 lines, 1 day $1.00; additional lines, 25c;
Commercial — 3 lines, 1 day $1.50; additional lines
35c; additional days $1.25 & 30c.
Classified ads are not accepted by lelephnne and are payable in
advance. Deadline is 11 '30 am., the dav before publication.
Publications Office, Room 241 S.U.B., UBC. Van. fi. B.C
ANNOUNCEMENTS
DANCES
11
U'L ABNER IS COMING
Friday, October 27
with
CROSSTOWN BUS
COSTUME BALL! DANCE TO SUNSHYNE, tonite, 9-1 at Grad Centre.
Tickets at the door.
Greeting
12
SATURDAY SALE 100 PUR COATS,
jackets, many vintage items, $29
or less — all day Saturday. 10 a.m.
6 p.m. Pappas Bros. Furs, 459
Hamilton Street at Victory Square.
Phone 681-6840 weekdays 12-6 p.m.
Lost & Found
13
LOST: BROWN LEATHER SHOUL-
der bag. Left on Hastings bus on
October 16th. Call 263-3883 Reward.
LOST TUESDAY IN D-LOT — Woman's brown and black tote-bag.
Reward offered.  Ph. 738-2906.
LOST IN ARMOURIES 208, MAN'S
silver calendar watch on wide
leather strap. Has personal value.
Call Steve, 921-7556 after 6.
Rides & Car Pools
14
Special Notices
15
DISCOUNT STEREO. EXAMPLE:
AM-PM receiver, turntable, base,
cover, cartridge, two speakers, 2-
year guarantee, list $200, your
cost $125. Carry Akal, A.G.S.,
Zenith  TVs.  Call  732-6769.
DUST OFF YOUR INSTRUMENT!
Concert band looking for new
members. 1st rehearsal October 15.
For Information phone 224-0386' or
684-7750.
THERE ARE STILL CINEMA 16
memberships available for all
series. Monday is Swashbucklers
with Kurosawa's "Yojimbo." Sea
Hawk has been cancelled.
$75 FOR 75C
40 Bonus Coupons In This
Year's Bird Calls
AVAILABLE   NOW
BUY   YOURS   TODAY!
Bookstore and SUB
Travel Opportunities
16
Wanted—Information
17
Wanted—Miscellaneous
18
AUTOMOTIVE
Autos For Sale
21
FOR    SALE    '65   FORD   V-8
Exc. shape, new clutch, new
new shocks.  $600.  224-9900.
STD.
tires,
MUST SELL! '64 VALIANT, TIRES,
motor good condition, body banged
up.  Good buy.  $125.  434-2967.
Autos Wanted
22
Automobiles—Repairs '
24
NORTH SHORE IMPORTS
BRITISH  AND JAPANESE
CAR  SPECIALISTS
264 Pemberton Ave.
North Vancouver    988-2333
Motorcycles
25
BUSINESS SERVICES
Dance Bands
33
Duplicating & Copying
34
Photography
35
utyi Htm anb gutter"
,(j-5        Camera*
LOAD YOUR OWN!
Cut Your Film Costs In Half
Watson Bulk Loader $17.50
Lloyd Bulk Loader __ $9.95
98.5' llford FP4, HP4 $8.39
56' llford FP4, HP4 __ $4.89
3010 W. Brdwy.     736-7833
Scandals
37
MACBETH—A ROCK OPERA—BY
Richard Ouzounian and Marek
Norman, Oct. 25-Nov. 4. Student
performances Oct. 29-30, $1.00-$1.50
tickets now available UBC .Old
Auditorium Box Office,  228-3176.
Typing
40
TYPING — PAST, EFFICIENT —
Essays, Papers, Theses. 41st and
Marine Drive.  266-5053.
ESSAYS AND THESES TYPED.
Experienced typist. Mrs. Freeman,
731-8096.
EFFICIENT ELECTRIC TYPING —
my home. Essays, thesis, etc. Neat,
accurate work. Reasonable rates.
263-5317.
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted
51
INTERESTED IN  SELLING?	
Then why not be an advertising
salesman for the Ubyssey? This
part-time Job offers an opportunity
to gain experience and to earn
worthwhile commissions. Reliable
2nd or 3rd year business-minded
student who will work hard for 10
or 12 hours weekly is needed. Must
have transportation. If interested
apply to Publications Office, Room
241,  SUB,  after 2 p.m.
FEMALE SALES CLERK FOR
delicatessen, Saturdays 4-12, or
Sundays 12-8:30 p.m. Apply 848
Granville St.
GIRL AS MOTHER'S HELPER, 2
or 3 mornings perweek ex. Sunday;
one mile from gates. $1.75 per hour.
Phone Mrs. Andrade, 224-7658.
SATURDAYS, 3-4 HOURS ONLY,
part-time cleaning job for male
student. $2.25 per hour. Phone
731-2955 evenings. r
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
REGISTERED — LONG-HAIRED —
Dachshund puppies. Very affectionate, good watch dogs. Tel. 946-7473
weekend.
RENTALS & REAL ESTATE
Rooms
81
EXCELLENT — HOUSEKEEPING
room, main floor, 3886 West 18th
Ave. $55 month.  224-7580 evenings.
SLEEPING ROOM ON CAMPUS. $45
month. Call 224-7736.
FOURTH GIRL NEEDED FOR 4
bedroom house, 29th and Dunbar.
$62.50 month.  224-3166.
Room & Board
82
FOR    SALE!    '72    350-SL   HONDA.
Phone 733-2755.
CAMPUS ROOM AND BOARD, 5785
Agronomy Road. Sauna, color TV,
good food, recreational area. Phone
224-9684.
OLDER BEAUTIFULLY FURNISH-
ed one bedroom suite to share with
mature student, $55 per month in
block No. 20—203 East 6th Ave.
876-5456 evenings.
Student Ticket Price:     $1.00
BOX OFFICE • FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE
- Room 207 -
Support Your Campus Theatre
ffl»ft
Use Ubyssey Classified!
I    TO SELL - BUY - INFORM    j
The U.B.C. Campus
MARKET PLACE
lV«r   -- ..-   ... * • • • «i» ■ Page  18
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, October 20,  1972
THUNDERBIRD
FOOTBALL
U.B.C. Thunderbirds
»s
Univ. of Alberta Golden Bears
SATURDAY, OCT. 21 - 2 p.m.
THUNDERBIRD STADIUM
General Admission '1.°' — U.B.C. Students Free
Intramural talk
By SIMON TRUELOVE
Thirteen sick looking runners standing on a street
corner in the fog waiting for a
runner to appear was a
common sight Thursday at
noon as 104 runners struggled
through the Arts 20 race.
The eight man relay from
VGH was won by the Forestry
team of David Meehaw, Per
Amilie, Jack Lavis, Gary Hill,
Al Sanderson, Greg Farris,
Doug Jury and Guy Woods; in
a near record breaking time of
35:43.8.
Dekes was second at 36:12,
Engineers third at 36:59, VST
fourth at 38:49, and Alpha
Delts fifth in 38:57. The course
was over seven miles long.
A thrilling softball final
Wednesday ended in a 17-17 tie
between Dentistry and
Forestry. Dentistry won 21-17
in overtime but since the
Dentists had lost to Forestry in
league play, another final will
be played.
The final will be held at noon
Tuesday on the War Memorial
Gym field.
The intramural office
apologizes    for    the    non-
KS ®UD@©(oJ
Hoechst Research
Safety
Early perception of danger
points and easy identification of
traffic signs so that their messages can be instantly recognized, are two of the greatest
problems of road safety.
The fluorescent colours now
used to mark highways often
fade after a short time. But
Hoechst research has developed persistent fluorescent
dyestuffs which have the valuable attributes of maximum
lightfastness and striking visual
impact. The qualities of these
dyestuffs improve identification
of highway danger spots, men
working, traffic signs, railway
crossing and unlit roads. In fact
there is an almost inexhaustible
number of identification uses.
This is a major contribution by
Hoechst to future road safety.
Increases Highway
Ahead through systems
thinking
The new fluorescent dyestuffs
are the result of Hoechst
know-how and experience in
many fields. They are the
product of collaboration between physicists and technicians engaged in research into
dyestuffs and plastics.
Systems thinking is the
Hoechst strategy. Research,
development and product experience in many areas are
concentrated on the solution of
specific problems.
To keep ahead — to solve the
problems of today and tomorrow — Hoechst employs
10,300 people in research and
development with a research
investment of more than 1 50
million dollars.
Helping Build Canada
Products and ideas from
Hoechst have touched and improved the quality of people's
lives in every area around the
world, in a hundred countries
on six continents. As an affiliate
of the worldwide Hoechst organization, Canadian Hoechst
Limited has a full century of
research and achievement to
draw upon. In Canada, Hoechst
is an autonomous company
employing Canadians to serve
Canadian needs.
Hoechst in Canada concerns
itself with supplying both the
present and future needs of
Canadians. The range of products and services covers the
spectrum through industrial
chemicals, dyestuffs, plastics,
printing plates, human and
veterinary medicines, pharmaceuticals, and textile fibres.
Hoechst products and services,
Hoechst techniques and
know-how in these fields,
combined with a large international fund of experience, have
given the company a reputation
for expertise which takes constant striving to live up to.
Hoechst thinks ahead.
REG.TM HOECHST
HOECHST
Canadian Hoechst Limited
4045 Cote Vertu
Montreal 383, Quebec
40 Lesmill Road
Don Mills, Ontario
appearance of rackets Wednesday p.m. Those who missed
the session may play next
Wednesday 9-11 p.m. in Mem.
Gym.
Up-coming events are the
Cross-country cycle race, a ten
mile pedal Sunday at 1:30 p.m.
in which entries are still
permissible.
Football is played Wednesdays and hockey will start
Thursdays from 5:15-11:15
p.m. Schedules are in Mem.
Gym 308.
There will be a unit
managers meeting Tuesday at
7 p.m. in the SUB council
chamber.
Football
The football Thunderbirds
will try to play the role of
spoilers this Saturday at
Thunderbird Stadium at 2
p.m., when they take on the co-
leaders of the Western Intercollegiate Football League
— the University of Alberta
Golden Bears.
Last weekend the 'Birds were
trounced 47-0 by the University
of Manitoba Bisons to establish
a 4-1 record in league play, the
Golden Bears scored a 26-21
win over the University of
Calgary Dinosaurs, to
establish a 4-1 record also.
When UBC and Alberta met
earlier this year, the Bears
won by a score of 35-8.
Rugby
Donn Spence's rugger 'Birds
play Capilanos at Ambleside
Park this Saturday at 2:30 p.m.
Last weekend the 'Birds won
the Canada West University
Athletic Association Championship with a 43-10 win over
the University of Calgary and
16-4 win over the University of
Alberta. Their 42-18 victory
over the University of Victoria
Vikings gave the Thunderbirds
a clean sweep in their first ever
try for the Western title.
Women's Sports
The UBC Thunderette
volleyball teams started their
season in the Vancouver City
League Tuesday.
The Golds defeated the
Mouthkateers 2-0, 2-0 in games,
and split 1-1 with Sargeants'
Mess. The Blues defeated
Mouthkateers 2-0, but lost to
Sargeants' Mess.
In Division II, UBC Totems
defeated Happy Hackers 2-0
and Highballers 2-0.
Anyone interested in playing
golf for the UBC women's team
can sign up in room 208 in War
Memorial Gym.
Intramurals
A reminder to all women's
intramural unit managers of
the meeting today at 12:30 p.m.
in room 213 War Memorial
Gym. Today is the deadline for
T-shirts. They are now $2.50
and a deposit of $1 is required.
Broomball games, which got
under way this week, will be
played Mondays 4:15-5:30 p.m.
on the main rink, and Thursdays 4:15-6:15 p.m. at the
Winter Sports Centre.
Remember, defaults will cost
you $3, so make sure your
teams show up.
The winner of the badminton
tournament was Mary
Pascuzzo from Place Vanier
and second place was taken by
Brenda Wilson from Home Ec. Friday, October 20,  1972
THE      UBYSSEY
Page  19
All or nothing
SFU denied CWC membership
OT7«TT    ...;11    ~„i    U„    „11 1     l_         Hi: 1 ,i        • i        • ■ ..... ■
SFU will not be allowed to
join the Canada West Athletic
Conference unless it is
prepared to join it in every
sport, SFU administrative
vice-president George Suart
said Thursday.
"We'd like to compete in the
CWC in all men's sports except
football and swimming and in
every women's sport," he said.
SFU's bid to join the conference was blocked at the
CWC's meeting in Calgary by a
last minute constitution
change which barred any CWC
member from competing in
another collegiate athletic
organization.
Since SFU's application was
conditional on their being
allowed to remain in American
conferences in swimming and
football, where they felt the
competition offered was
superior to CWC competition,
they could not meet with the
rule change.
"We're not prepared to
compete in the CWC in
swimming      and      football
because of the lack of adequate
competition. But in all of the
other sports, we feel that we
could be very competitive and
also improve the calibre-of our
own teams," Suart said.
He said that the reason for
SFU's application for CWC
membership after years of
competing in U.S. athletic
circles comes from a policy of
increased emphasis with
Canadian universities and also
as a result of the re-alignment
of SFU's athletic department.
Under the re-alignment,
athletics has been moved to
Education. Lome Davies,
formerly SFU athletic
director, has been replaced by
Suart.
When asked if he felt that the
last minute rule change may
have been a result of present
CWC universities in B.C. not
wanting SFU in their conference, Suart declined to
comment.
UBC athletic director Bus
Phillips said that UBC did not
want SFU in the conference
unless they were prepared to
compete in all sports played by
the conference.
At present the only way that
SFU will be accepted iato the
Canada West Athletic Conference is if they buy the
CWC's terms: namely all or
none. Apparently SFU isn't
buying.
THE FOOTBALL BLUNDERERS return to Thunderbird Stadium Saturday against
the league-leading University of Alberta Golden Bears. In all likelihood the 'Birds will
run into the same type of trouble that plagued them during last week's 47-0 rout at
the hands of Manitoba. Game time is 2 p.m. — come out and see them blunder some
more.
Soccer boys back
The Thunderbirds soccer team returned to
Vancouver today after a successful six game
tour in the U.S.
The 'Birds won two of their last three games
giving them a record for the tour of three wins,
two draws and one loss.
UBC suffered a 2-1 loss to Colorado college
in the fourth game but recovered to win 3-1 over.
Colorado all-stars in the fifth game and 2-1 over
Metropolitan state college in the final game of
the series.
The final game was marred by the poor
sportsmanship of Metropolitan's Sodoman
Okiakhi who resorted to kicking Wayne Larson
of the 'Birds after Larson had been designated
to keep him in check.
Okiakhi, who was a World Cup player in the
Olympics, was eventually expelled from the
game after kicking UBC's goalkeeper, Vince
Golabek in the back when Golabek had covered
up on his goal attempt.
This was the only event that distracted from
the soccer on the tour. Thunderbird coach Joe-
Johnson was pleased with the fan interest on
the tour and said that the quality of soccer was
greatly improved since his vist to the U.S. last
year.
The 'Birds soccer 'team will begin its
schedule in the Pacific coast soccer league on
October 29, with a game against Victoria West
United in Victoria. The PSL is resuming action
this year after having several of its teams fined
and several of the players suspended for
playing in the semi-professional Premier
Soccer League.
The B.C. Soccer Association imposed a
$1,000 fine on the PSL as well as $300 fines on
individual teams in the league which used
players who had participated in Premier
soccer league games.
The UBC soccer team was not affected.
Swim meet fogged in
Torrid intramural swimmers from the Faculty of
Education easily polished off all competition in the women's
intramural swim meet held Thursday at Empire Pool.
Pat Gilmore and Cindy Grey of Education swept one-
two in the 55 yard freestyle event. Liese Marshall of Rehab,
and Jan Creig of Pharmacy were third and fourth.
After the meet competitors and spectators alike were
somewhat surprised when workmen working in the girls'
shower room gave the swimmers but five minutes to
shower, change and get out. As one girl put it: "We didn't
have time to use our dial."
Weekend Action Box
DATE
EVENT
OPPONENT
PLACE
TIME
Oct. 21
Field Hockey (A)
Jokers (A)
Spencers east
1 p.m.
Oct. 21
Field Hockey IB)
Occassional (B)
Spencers west
2:30 p.m
Oct. 21
Football
Univ. of Alberta
Stadium
2 p.m.
Oct. 22
Soccer (2)
North Delta
UBC
Oct. 21
Rugby
Capilanos
Ambleside (N)
2:30 p.m
Oct. 21
Rugby-Braves
Delta
Delta (Tsawwassen H.S.)
2:30 p.m.
Oct. 21
Rugby-Frosh
Capilanos
Ambleside (S)
1:15 p.m.
Oct. 21
Rugby-Totems
Capilanos
Kinsmen
1:15 p.m
Oct. 21
Rugby-Tomahawks
Bye
Oct. 21.
Hockey
Oct. 21
Cross Country
Seattle Pacific Col. Fort d
isey, Wash.
E MASSEY
K1URES
1972
Dr. Pierre Dansereau,
Professor of Ecology
at the Universite
du Quebec a Montreal
talks about the
present environmental
disorder- ihe difference
between ecological
harmony and disaster.
He is as concerned with
inscape-numan perception of
environment-asthe landscape and
man's impact on nature.
jfj££*Q ON CBC FM
ON CBC AM
WEDNESDAYS, 10=03 PM
MONDAYS, 10:30 PM Page 20
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, October 20,  1972
George Novack visits
Communism needs freedom of thought
By JOHN ANDERSEN
Freedom of thought is a
necessity in a true communist
society, marxist scholar
George Novack said Wednesday.
"Marxism needs free
competition in philosophy, as
well as in the arts and sciences," he told 600 students in
Hebb theatre.
Novack said he expects that
in a communist society the
communist party would
present and encourage
socialist ideas.
"However, this is certainly
different from adapting a state
philosophy," the Harvard-
educated scholar said. "This is
as bad as enforcing a state
religion, and indeed, the two
are not very far apart."
He said the theory of
marxism needs constant
challenges in order to avoid
becoming sluggish.
He said the "general
ossification" of marxist
thought in the Soviet Union was
a result of the repression of
ideas contradicting offical
theory.
"Ideas were fought not with
superior argument but with
the secret police," Novack
said.
He called the result "a
bureaucratized workers' state,
which fears dissent like the
plague."
Novack was also highly
critical of the state of
philosophy in the People's
Republic of China.
"Mao is awarded the same
monopoly in philosophy as
Stalin once had."
Novack said that many
"naive radicals" feel that the
ability to gain power
automatically makes one a
good philosopher.
"They have an almost
hypnotic admiration for the
accomplishments of a Stalin, a
Mao or a Kim II Sung (of the
Democratic Republic of
Korea)."
Novack deplored what he
termed the decline of
philosophy in our society.
"It is a sign of the
degeneration, not elevation, of
philosophy that it has become
so far removed from the bosom
of American, and for that
matter, Canadian political
life."
Novack said the prevailing
belief is that politics and
philosophy are entirely
separate entities. He said this
differs from the situation at the
time of the American
revolution when the idea of the
union of philosophy and
government was prevalent.
He said the English
philosopher John Locke had an
important influence on the
ideas of American revolutionaries  such  as  Thomas
Paine, Thomas Jefferson and
George Washington.
"The philosophy of these
rebels was inseparable from
their politics."
Novack traced the various
relationships between
philosophy and the state,
beginning with the ancient
Greeks.
He said that with their
concept of philosopher-kings
"the Greeks took for granted
the unity of philosophy and
politics.
"Plato's dream that the
heads of state should also be
philosophers hardly fits any of
the recent occupants of the
White House."
Arts I features feelies
By RYON GUEDES
Sixty arts I students recently attended a weekend symposium at
Strathcona Park lodge to make an
informal study of man's relationship
with his technology and with nature.
Section B of the department boarded
a bus Friday which took them across
the Strait of Georgia, up Vancouver
Island and finally to the lodge, which
lies 30 miles southwest of Campbell
River.
Next morning, bright and early, after
a hearty breakfast, the discussion
leaders introduced the initial activity.
This consisted of a seminar exploring
the Robinson Crusoe idea; with the
premise that a given group of people
from modern technology were
stranded in the wilderness with certain
materials, climate and terrain.
The ideas discussed, then, were the    '*"*
immediate   needs   of   the   supposed
grQup, long term problems it would
face and eventually, the formation of a
civilization.
Raised in the seminar were questions
that had not previously occurred to the
participants.
Would the eventual forming of a
religion be relevant?
How would sexual roles have to'
change with an uneven male-female
ratio?
Would the civilization retain the
culture it originally brought with them,
or would a new culture have to be
developed?
If there were any children how would
they be raised? Would the family
structure need to be altered?
How would order in the society be
enforced?
After  several  different  discussion
groups, each of which had been given
different  circumstances   and  had
developed independently, had attacked    «  ,
the  problem,   the   groups   were   in-    #*
troduced to each other.
What resulted from this confrontation was a theoretical form of
culture shock.
Activities for the rest of SAturday
were unstructured, devoted to
whimsical and leisurely pursuits; so
we strolled over to the Friends' World
University building and talked to
students and supervisors there.
The main attraction Saturday night
was a frentic get-together, that
dispersed any ice that had been left
unbroken.
The schedule for Sunday morning
offered a variety of activities:
,i«H^> ,,%..,»,
...""Wsls,,,
,-s* %:."*-
%^
Centre director Jim Boulding
supervised an introduction to survival
in the forests of B.C. including
demonstrations in fire building and
emergency shelters.
Botanist Ian Forbes gave an introduction to wild edible and inedible
plants.
Later a film on hypothermia, the
conservation of body heat, was shown
followed by a talk from Boulding.
Some slides of local fauna were
shown by Forbes. Those who weren't in
the mood for listening or watching
worked on projects of their own such as
filmmaking and writing.
The lodge, officially named the
Strathcona park outdoor education
centre, has hosted many educational
programs.
It is, in fact, primarily intended for
education outside the classroom. It is
designed for students and teachers of
all ages.
The centre's personnel is devoted to
the development of a better understanding of the environment and a
greater consciousness toward its use.
The residential programs and
recreational facilities are arranged to
the requirements of each group.
Usually students share responsibility
for housekeeping and cooking.
The centre's staff is willing to assist
in the planning of curriculum, group
dynamics, outdoor skill development
and will act as guides on field trips.
During the past year more than 25
groups have been guests of the centre.
Situated on the edge of Buttle Lake
the lodge affords a perfect opportunity
for studying a variety of eco-systems.
Many teachers' groups use the lodge,
as an education base, studying and:
discussing skills needed for their craft.
As well, the centre provides resource
material for mathematics, geology,
geography, history, conservation,
construction, arts and crafts, industrial
arts and community recreation.
Stemming from the Arts I symposium is the survival symposium
which will be held this weekend. It will
be patterned after the adult education
course, survival in the rain forest, put
on for the UBC centre for continuing
education.
The symposium will consist of
orientation, survival training and
familiarization with environment.

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
http://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.ubysseynews.1-0127867/manifest

Comment

Related Items